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INSIDE iQ

COV ER STORY Great architecture is peppered throughout the city’s neighborhoods. In this issue, Local iQ peeks over the fence.

PUBLISHER

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Francine Maher Hopper fran@local-iQ. com SENIOR EDITOR/ART DIRECTOR

Kevin Hopper kevin@local-iQ.com EDITOR

Mike English mike@local-iQ.com VP OF SALES & NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Colt Brown colt@local-iQ.com FASHION EDITOR

Lisa VanDyke fabu@local-iQ.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Chela Gurnee 505.264.6350, chela@local-iQ.com

FOOD

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Lindsay Gillenwater 505.550.3362 lindsay@local-iQ.com

Modest prices, atmosphere counterbalance the exquisite offerings at UNM-area eatery, Guava Tree Cafe.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

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Derek Hanley 505.709.0364 derek@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Elisabeth Zahl 505.480.4445, elisabeth@local-iQ.com AD PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jessica Hicks jessica@local-iQ.com AD DESIGNER

Rachel Baker rachelb@local-iQ.com EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT/CALENDAR COORDINATOR

Amanda Stang amanda@local-iQ.com

M US I C

DESIGN ASSISTANT

Hannah Reiter hannah@local-iQ.com PHOTOGRAPHER

Wes Naman wes@local-iQ.com PHOTO ASSISTANT

Joy Godfrey

Red Light Cameras’ rapid rise to local prominence built on band chemistry and catchy sound.

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Placitas Artists Series has brought fine music and art to a village setting for the past 25 years.

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COPY EDITOR

Nancy Harbert EDITORIAL INTERNS

Jessica Depies, Jessey Cherne

ON THE COVER

A R TS

High architectural style in High Desert.

CONTRIBUTORS

FI LM Santa Fe Film Festival and Santa Fe Independent Film Festival offer more than 100 screenings over five days.

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CALENDARS Arts Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Community Happenings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Live Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Book Signings/Talks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

EDITORIAL

DISTRIBUTION

Abinash Ackrekar Nellie Bauer Jeff Berg Joanne Camp Max Cannon Jessey Cherne Charlie Crago Justin de la Rosa Jessica Depies Eric Francis Logan Greely Jennifer Houston Jeff Kerby Jim and Linda Maher Kyle Mullin Cristina Olds Susan Reaber Tish Resnik Ronnie Reynolds Steven J. Westman Ben Williams

Miguel Apodaca Jessey Cherne Kristina De Santiago Sean Duran Jesse Gurnee Jessica Hicks David Leeder Ronnie Reynolds Distributech Stephanie James Andy Otterstrom

Local iQ COLUMNS Fabü. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Key Ingredient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Stir It Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Good Doctor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Paw Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Backyard Plot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Built . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Earth Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 FEATURES Places To Be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Marquee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Crossword/Horoscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Red Meat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

P.O. Box 7490, ABQ., N.M. 87194 OFFICE 505.247.1343, FAX 888.520.9711 • local-iQ.com SUBSCRIPTIONS are $10 for 6 bi-weekly issues within the Continental U.S. Please send a local check or money order payable to Local iQ, attention “Subscriptions” to the address above. You may also use the number above to place a credit card order. DISTRIBUTION: Find Local iQ at more than 600 locations in Albuquerque, Santa Fe and surrounding areas. If you can’t find a copy, want to suggest a new location, or want to help deliver Local iQ, please call 505.247.1343.

PUBLISHED BY

SAKURA, INC. ALL CONTENTS ©2011 LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY ALLISON AND FISHER AND NATALIE BRUCE ESQ.


PLACES TO BE

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21

OCT

FRI

15

OCT

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where to go and what to do: October 13 to 26

CONCERT SPORTS

Merle Haggard 8p, Fri., Oct. 21

Jackson’s MMA Series VI: Matt Leyva vs. Federico Lopez, Chuck Parmalee vs. Joey Villasenor 7p, Sat., Oct. 22

Legends Theatre at Route 66 Casino 14500 Central SW, 505.352.7866

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Albuquerque 11000 Broadway SE, 505.724.3964

$30-$55

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Albuquerque 11000 Broadway SE, 505.724.3964

startickets.com/event. php?event=2579

FREE hardrockcasinoabq.com

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SUN

FUNDRAISER Day of the Tread 6:30a, Sun., Oct. 16 Embassy Suites Hotel & Spa 1000 Woodward NE, 505.245.7500

$12-$85 dayofthetread.com

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ycling, walking and running don’t always have to be ghastly. This fifth annual fundraiser for Carrie Tingley Hospital and Casa Esperanza puts a spirited spin on what would be a typical event for runners/walkers and bikers. Providing enough events to satisfy those of all ages and skill levels, from a marathon and half marathon and bike rides from 12 to 100 miles, Day of the Tread goes the extra mile in another respect. The whole event is Halloweenthemed, and participants are encouraged to dress up in their preferred ghoulish attire for a day of live entertainment, pumpkin trails, costume prizes and more. —JD

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$25-$125 Tickets: holdmyticket.com hardrockcasinoabq.com

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OCT

here is nothing quite like an old country song that tells a story so vivid you cannot only hear, but see and feel what the voice on the radio is trying to portray. Country Music Hall of Fame superstar Merle Haggard has been painting those pictures for years, and he will perform songs from his vast repertoire of 40 number-one hits in this show. Haggard was recently awarded with a Kennedy Center honor for his lifetime contribution to American culture in the performing arts. The American country singer’s well-known songs include “I’m a Lonesome Fugitive,” “The Legend of Bonnie and Clyde,” “Carolyn,” “Cherokee Maiden,” “Big City” and “That’s the Way Love Goes.” —JC

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otorcycle riders and nonrider enthusiasts unite one day a year to promote awareness for infant mortality, birth defects and premature births, while having a great time doing what they love — riding motorcycles. Welcome to the First Annual Rock-n-Ride motorcycle rally, with all proceeds benefitting the March of Dimes Bikers for Babies foundation. There will be live entertainment from Chris Raven, Coyote Blue, Poster Child, Rapid Fire, Burning Bridges and other New Mexican bands. A custom-bike auction will be held, featuring the coveted El Lobo Chopper. Local restaurants will dish up the food. —JC

CONFERENCE Burque Bioneers 9a-4p, Fri.-Sat., Oct. 21-22 National Hispanic Cultural Center 1701 4th SW, 505.246.2261

$25/both days, $15/one-day pass bbabq.wordpress.com nhcc.org

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f you recently came off the inspirational high of the local TEDxABQ day of big ideas, check out the Albuquerque live feed screening of the Bioneers national conference, featuring keynote addresses by legendary activist Gloria Steinem and renewable energy thinker Amory Lovins. The non-profit Bioneers aim to restore people and the environment through social and scientific innovation. During this two-day sustainability conference, local speakers, panel discussions, workshops and special events will aim to energize and educate. Kenny Ausubel and Nina Simon, co-founders of the Bioneers, are a Santa Fe husband and wife team who also produce a radio show, newsletter and youth program. —CO

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

he long awaited fight between Matt Leyva and Federico Lopez, as well as a battle between Chuck Parmalee and Joey Villasenor, are the highlights of this event, which will also include an amateur card. Albuquerque’s Greg Jackson has taught some of the world’s greatest Mixed Martial Arts champions at his local business, Jackson’s gym. Jackson’s passion for combat fighting has translated into the Southwest’s premiere Mixed Martial Arts series, presenting fighters of various levels and techniques to fans and fighters. —JC

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First Annual Rock-n-Ride 10a-8p, Sat., Oct. 15

SUN

RALLY

SPORTS Duke City Marathon 7a, Sun., Oct. 23 Civic Plaza, 505.880.1414

$67 dukecitymarathon.com

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f Oprah and P. Diddy can do it, certainly you can, right? A marathon — 26 miles and 385 yards — is the dream of many people who put on the jogging shoes. But dreaming it and doing it are two different matters. As a qualifying event for the Boston Marathon, thousands of runners from all over the state, country and world descend on the Duke City to test their mettle on a course that starts at Civic Plaza, runs along the Rio Grande and up Paseo del Norte, before turning around and ending where it began. For the less ambitious, a half marathon, 10k and 5k are also options. This year is the 28th running of Albuquerque’s signature running event, with proceeds going to the New Mexico Cancer Center Foundation. —ME


MARQUEE

Urban growth Alvarado Urban Farm opens in Downtown Albuquerque, with big dreams for the future BY JESSICA DEPIES t first glance, the term “urban farm” may seem like an oxymoron. However, just because the Alvarado Urban Farm doesn’t have a red barn, livestock or the typical location, that doesn’t make it any less of a farm. In fact, that may be what will make it successful. Downtown Albuquerque is a commercial district home to various shops, restaurants and other businesses. With recent apartment developments and the filling up of lofts and condos Downtown, a problem has arisen: Despite various efforts, no grocery stores have been built. The solution? Alvarado Urban Market. In a recent interview with Local iQ, Alvarado co-creator Chris Goblet explained this problem by saying that Downtown “doesn’t have the formula that most grocery stores are looking for.” The ideal formula would be an area where, instead of businesses and shops, there would be a multitude of homes and families. But without a grocery store, families are more reluctant to move to the area. And there won’t be access to grocery PHOTO BY WES NAMAN stores until there are more homes and The Alvarado Urban Farm, located in the heart of downtown, consists of 4,000 square feet of growing area divvied up into 70 irrigated raised beds. Food raised at the site will be sold during regular market days, and also utlilized by Downtown restaurants. Future plans call for a covfamilies. ered market area and performance space. This circular challenge inspired Alvarado Urban Farm co-founders Goblet and Rick Local involvement has already begun to take Rennie, who, as involved members of the place: Albuquerque’s Convention Center Downtown community, feel they have found has invested in four of the growing beds at the perfect solution. Why not build an urban Alvarado, and can use any of the food from farm — a place where community members could grow and buy fresh food in the heart of those beds for its events, creating a mutually beneficial partnership. Downtown? Over the next two years, the market will The plan is simple: 70 irrigated raised beds, be constantly growing — both figuratively each 12 feet by four feet, make and literally. The market will up approximately 4,000 feet start off selling its goods each of growing area on Silver Ave, CELEBRATION Tuesday, and Goblet hopes that right off of First and Second. eventually it will expand into Alvarado This part of the plan, Goblet’s selling two days a week, or “Phase One,” has already been Urban even five. completed. Farm PreAdditionally, schools of Next comes the building all levels will ideally begin of a covered market area Halloween working with the farm, from and a performance space Celebration elementary schools in the where workshops, live music area to high schools such 4-7p, Tue., Oct. 18 and more will take place. as Downtown’s Amy Biehl Construction on this phase is Silver SW, between 1st High. The UNM School of and 2nd set to be finished by the end of FREE Sustainability will also be in 2011. alvaradourbanfarm.com cooperation with the farm, While Goblet says that he making Alvarado Urban Farm, and the rest of the team are in Goblet’s words, a true still “piecing together the “learning space.” infrastructure,” they are well on their way to The grand opening of Alvarado has already a revolutionary addition to Downtown. They taken place, but those who haven’t seen the have given themselves two years to “prove the concept,” during which time they hope to farm will have the perfect opportunity at a pre-Halloween event with various baked build a client base, involve local restaurants goods straight from the farm for sale a and businesses, and, ideally, convince a pumpkin carving contest — one of the grocery store to look at the successes of the first ways in which the community will be market and expand into Downtown. involved in Alvarado’s progress. In the words of Goblet, “We’re talking about a production farm. Not a hobby, but a serious In Goblet’s words, “We have a project with magnetism.” business. It’s not a garden; it’s a farm.”

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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LIFESTYLE

Fabulous fitness need not cost an arm and a booty

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his issue, I’m writing about something that might shock you: fitness. Take a moment to steady yourself. Sip some water. Take slow, deep, breaths. You OK? Good. Let’s continue. I reiterate: I, fabulicious, have been workin’ on my fitness. No joke. They’re ice skating in Hades, dahling. Considering the fact that 40 was rapidly approaching, I decided it was time to ditch my precious ciggies, lighten up on the vodka (and champagne … and tequila … oh, how the list goes on), finally make friends with vegetables and — gasp! — develop a fitness regime. My plan lingered in the development stage for a few months. This was due to three reasons: 1) Sloth and I are dear, old friends, 2) I heart sugarladen treats, and, 3) I’m not a fan of most gyms and gym people. There, I said it: Gym culture freaks me out. I don’t want to buy the gear and show up to the group sessions and chat with all the gymmies about gymness. I’m not saying it’s wrong; I’m just saying it’s not my thing. Enter personal trainer Jonathan Rockwell, founder of The Machine Training Systems (505.573.5753). I’d heard about him from a trusted friend who shares the same slacker values and gym phobia as I. Even so, I still worried. I’d tried several gyms and several personal trainers over the years. No bueno. However, 40 was breathing down my neck, so I took the plunge one more time. “Expect to achieve your goals,” he declared at our first meeting. “Let’s begin.”

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That was it? Yes. No frills; no fancy promises; no intimidation. I quickly learned that Rockwell is a man of few words, but those that he does share are meaningful, encouraging, kind and inspiring. “You can totally do this,” he said as he kindlyyet-firmly pushed me to higher levels with each meeting. Each week, I noticed improvement. I will never forget the moment I realized my posterior was changing. “Check it out!” I screeched to my fiancé as I rushed into the house, grabbing my own booty. “It’s tighter! Grab it!” He happily obliged. Now, five months later, I’m in better shape than ever and my diet is a shadow of its former self. I’m not ripped (I requested the toned-not-ripped look, but if ripped is your thing, Rockwell’s your man, too), but I’m definitely not soft. My fitness, nutrition and supplement knowledge has dramatically increased. I’m exactly where I hoped to be. I am 40, fit and fabulous, thanks to this incredible trainer. Though he can train clients anywhere, Rockwell primarily trains at Planet Fitness (planetfitness. com). You’ve likely seen these gyms popping up all over town. Membership rates range from $10

to $20 per month. That’s it. And they’re open 24 hours most days of the week. Too good to be true? I have such good news: No. If you’re seeking a superaffordable, clean, easily accessible gym without the slightest meat market vibe, this is the spot for you. If you want a fitness center where you can take squash lessons or sip wheatgrass smoothies at the juice bar whilst socializing with other members; however, you’ll be happier elsewhere. Planet Fitness is where average people show up, work out and go home; no more, no less. Rockwell might look fierce, but he’s all heart. He is such a bona fide nice guy that you simply do what he asks — even the homework. The man is so cool that you hate to let him down. You actually look forward to showing up, proudly informing him that you did your homework, then launching into your session and reaching higher levels. “The single-most important reason I chose this profession is because I love to help people achieve their dreams,” he said. Before I close, I’ll leave you with even more good news: Rockwell charges $40 per session. If you’re not well-versed in personal training rates, that’s incredibly good. Considering the ridiculously inexpensive Planet Fitness membership rate, this means that now anyone can join a gym and secure a personal trainer. I’d like to raise a protein shake to the winning combination of Jonathan Rockwell and Planet Fitness. No overinflated egos, no goofy classes, no uncomfortable conversations and — perhaps best of all — no spandex. Cheers! Speaking of toasts, happy hour is calling — gotta run! No, I didn’t say I cut out the vodka; I said I cut back on the vodka. Yours truly plus no

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Proving personal trainers aren’t just for the wealthy and/or spandex-obsessed, Jonathan Rockwell offers expert fitness guidance, affordable rates and fab abs.

vodka? That, dahling, would cause a recordsetting freeze in the underworld, so much so that it would be too cold to skate. Thus, since my fitness level has already made things quite frigid down there, I’ll just go ahead and imbibe so that sinners may skate. Salud! Do you sell/make a product or offer a service that you think is fabulous? Don’t be shy. Local iQ readers eat this stuff up with their purse strings. E-mail all the necessary details to (fabu@local-iQ.com) and she may just grant her Fabü seal of approval.


STU FF WE LIKE BY JESSEY CHERNE

THERE IS SOMETHING INSTANTLY RECOGNIZABLE

$26 FIND IT AT:

Tokyo Hardcore Pop Culture Shoppe 109 Carlisle SE, Suite A, 505.255.4430

tokyohardcorelove.com

about the pure white face, black whiskers and red bow that screams trendy and cute. Hello Kitty is invading the western world as we speak, and at Tokyo Hardcore Pop Culture Shoppe you can fulfill your meowing desires for a laptop bag that is chic, sophisticated and fun. The Hello Kitty laptop bag is designed to fit a 13-inch-or-smaller laptop. You’ll want to caress the plush faux leather design and intricate details, including zippers with the purr-fect logo.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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FOOD

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

All menu items at Guava Tree Cafe get a Latin touch — South American, Central American or Caribbean. The Arepa Machilla (left) is a tasty corncake sandwich filled with beans and veggies. Guava Pinto, center, is a satisfying dish of beans and rice seasoned with Colombian-style salsa and topped with avocados. The El Guava Pollito sandwich (right) is a chicken delight.

Latin cool Modest prices and atmosphere counterbalance the exquisite, exotic offerings at UNM-area eatery, Guava Tree Cafe BY MIKE ENGLISH n an age when concept eateries seem to play an oversized role in the restaurant business — Asian fusion, nouveau American, et al, with carefully orchestrated menus and detailed interior decors designed to enhance the dining experience — it can be refreshing to wander into a modest restaurant, order at a counter and get delivered to your table a plastic basket filled with standout food. Welcome to Guava Tree Cafe, a Latin American lunch eatery open for about a year that sits on Yale Boulevard, near Outpost Performance Space and not far from the University of New Mexico campus. Guava Tree resides in an old one-story house, wrapped with a big front porch for outside dining and filled with a hodgepodge of tables and chairs in a brightly colored dining room inside (orange, yellow, red and light blue walls). Orders are taken at the counter by the owner Diego Barbosa, who bustles from cash register to kitchen to tables, blends fruit smoothies, serves coffee and just generally keeps things running smoothly. Maricarmen Pijem, his wife, runs the kitchen. To say Guava Tree Cafe serves Latin American food means the wide range of flavors of Central and South America, as well as Caribbean countries like Cuba and Puerto Rico. In New Mexico, our palates are adjusted to Mexican cuisine as

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the south-of-the-border staple, but Guava Tree roams much farther. So be ready for a Colombian-style salsa called hogao, for example, or a side of roasted and grilled sweet plantains. You will be eating black beans, not pinto, and your tamale will come Costa Rican style, wrapped in a banana leaf, not a corn husk. The absolute standout on the menu at Guava Tree Cafe, to my mind, are the arepas. This is a heavenly fresh-baked cornmeal patty that originated with the indigenous people of northern South America, and remains a staple in that region today. Arepas are crispy on the outside, creamy inside. At Guava Tree they make arepas from scratch, slice them open while hot and fill them with delicious ingredients. REVIEW

Guava Tree Cafe 11a-5p, Mon.-Fri., Noon-5p, Sat. 216 Yale SE, 505.990.2599 guavatreecafe.com

The standard arepas are the Arepa Pabellon (shredded beef, black beans, sweet plantain and “fresco” cheese, a crumbled white cheese in the Latin American style) and the vegetarian Arepa Machilla (same ingredients, minus the beef). They come wrapped in paper — a tidy little corncake sandwich — and served with a side of hogao. I tried the veggie version, and the added ingredient of carmelized onions pushed it to an exquisite eating experience. The crispy exterior, sweetness of the warm corn cake and the savory filling made it perhaps the best $4.75 (yes, it’s that inexpensive) I’ve ever spent. The arepas can make a meal if you’re not too hungry, but I was, so I also ordered the Guava Pinto plate. This is a simple dish of white rice and black beans seasoned with hagoa, topped with avocado slices and served with a side of sweet plantains and salad. At $6.25, it’s a satisfying dish.

Guava Tree Cafe serves a full menu of 8-inch sandwiches ($4.75-$6.50), from El Cuban (a traditional Cubano sandwhich) to El Guava Pollito (shredded chicken breast, smoked provolone, carmelized onions, roasted mushrooms, tomatoes and a garlic sauce). Like all menu items, the sandwiches get a Latin touch, with such ingredients as slow-roasted Caribbean-style pork and rubbed, Puerto Rican-style roasted turkey. Let’s now take a moment to speak of the “juices” served at Guava Tree. I ordered the Mango and Orange with Milk (a variety of fruit combos are offered). This was an afterthought for me — a little refreshment, I thought — and I was not prepared to have my world rocked by maybe the most delicious fresh, sweet, cool smoothie I’ve ever tasted. I’m already plotting my next visit to Guava Tree Cafe. It will be soon and it will include arepas and a smoothie, and it will cost less than $10. May this little restaurant thrive and prosper.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011


FOOD

Have a savory, sweet fall fling with winter squash

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n recent years, the old-fashioned supermarket pumpkin bin has given way to varied displays of winter squash — named, priced and heaped near the entry of every grocery store in America. The expectation is that you will buy an assortment of these squash, strew them decoratively about your house, and let them collect dust until midJanuary. Not so fast, you fancy harvest-mongers. Winter squash are delicious culinary gems, both savory and sweet, and deserve their rightful places on our plates, not just in our centerpieces. When shopping for a winter squash in all their shapes and sizes, look for hard skins — soft skin means it was picked too young and will be lacking in flavor. It’s okay if your squash has a flat, lighter-colored spot. That’s where the heavy bugger was resting on the ground. As long as there is no visible mold, punctures or blemishes, you are good to go. Once you get your squash home, it will keep for months if it is kept cool, dry and well-ventilated. Have a basement? Wine cellar? Garage? Store it there (not in the refrigerator). To cook squash, start by washing the outside thoroughly. Then there are two easy ways to approach the cooking process, depending on your objective: Remember that tough, inedible rind? You can A) use it to your advantage, or B) try to conquer it. If you are planning on mushing the squash flesh into something smooth and non-cubic, go with method “A” and use that outer rind to protect the gentle flesh of the squash. Cut the squash in half through the stem and opposite end. Scoop out the seeds and stringy membrane (ice cream scoops work great for this, as do large metal serving

soup) to Kuri (good for pies and baking). For the following recipe, I’ve chosen Banana squash. Banana squash look like bananas on steroids. They are pink-tinged and grow upwards of two feet in length and eight inches in diameter. They can be cut in half through the equator and tackled in parts. Wrap the exposed flesh end in plastic when you aren’t ready to deal with a whole one. spoons). Lightly oil the exposed flesh, season with salt and place flesh-side down on a baking sheet. Roast in a 350 degree F oven until you can puncture through the skin of the squash to the flesh with a fork. Let the squash cool until you can handle it comfortably, and, using that same big metal serving spoon, scoop out the flesh. The squash is now ready for freezing, pureeing, mashing and souping. With method “B” your goal is chunks of squash, perhaps to fold into risotto or a chunky soup or a hearty salad. In this case, you have to peel the inedible rind off the squash. Pick squash with smooth skin. Butternut, Banana and Delicata are your superior choices. Start by washing and drying the exterior of the squash. Lay the squash on its side. Use one hand to firmly hold the squash while you cut the non-stem end off the squash. Then, turn the squash upright, so it has a flat base, and, starting from the stem area, “shave” the rind off the squash with a big, sharp knife. From here you can cut the squash in half, scoop out the seeds and stringy stuff, and cut it into whatever size pieces you choose. The chunks can be placed in a pot, barely covered with cold water, and par-cooked until fork tender or, you can intensify the flavor by lightly tossing the chunks with a little oil (just to gloss them up) and salt, then roast them on a sheet pan until fork tender. As noted, winter squash come in almost endless sizes and shapes, from Butternut (good for

Roasted Banana Squash Salad with Pepitas and Feta Ingredients: Juice of one Lime 1 tsp. Local honey 2 Tbsp. Olive oil Pinch of Kosher salt Pinch of freshly ground black pepper or ground cayenne One half pound sturdy greens, like arugula Roasted pieces of pink banana squash, warm 1/4 cup Toasted and salted pumpkin seeds 1/4 lb. Feta cheese, crumbled Method: In a small bowl, whisk together lime juice, honey, olive oil, salt and pepper (or cayenne). In a larger bowl, toss the greens with the dressing to coat evenly. Add the pumpkin seeds. Toss. Add the roasted squash and toss gently. Top with crumbled feta. Nelle Bauer is co-chef/co-owner of Jennifer James 101. She loves clean, food-related jokes. Q: How do you change a pumpkin into another vegetable? A: You throw it up in the air and it comes down squash.

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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DRINK

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aybe it’s just me, but it seems that everyone I know is far too busy. Life in the city (even our little city) can be overwhelmingly fast-paced at times, leaving little opportunity for observation and reflection. Several times a week I find myself reciting (or should I say butchering) Mos Def’s lyrics, “life is treated with short worth ... full of short attention spans, short tempers and short skirts.” I would have to agree that attention spans seem to be getting shorter, my own included. One of the great things about the crafting of cocktails is that one is forced to focus on the subtleties of ingredients, flavors and aromas to create something interesting. The Edamame Fizz is a slow-sipping refresher course in subtlety.

Edamame Fizz 1.5 oz. Cucumber infused vodka* .25 oz. Lemon juice 1 tsp. Powdered sugar 3 dashes Celery bitters 8-10 Raw edamame beans (removed from the pod) PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

For the cucumber vodka: In a large sealable container, pour one 750 ml bottle of vodka over one large, peeled, seeded and chopped cucumber. Seal container and store in a cool, dark place for three days, agitating daily. Strain off cucumber chunks and keep in a fridge or freezer. For cocktail: Combine edamame, bitters, powdered sugar and lemon juice in a pint glass

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

and muddle until all beans are mashed. Add ice and vodka and shake lightly. Double strain into a collins glass and top with ice and a splash of club soda. Stir and garnish with a basil leaf. Ben tends bar at Scalo Northern Italian Grill in Nob Hill and teaches beer brewing classes at Victor’s Grape Arbor. He is also a member of ska/reggae band CrazyFool.


FOOD

F O O D W E LIKE BY LOGAN GREELY

NOODLES ARE FILLING, BUT AT DOWNTOWN DIM SUM HAVEN AmerAsia,

noodles are served in small, single-serve cups rather than endlessly deep, family-style bowls the size of Charlie Brown’s skull. What’s more, this particular sweat-inducing preparation is a lot like a bowl of your favorite hot salsa — you have to keep eating it to (however illogically) quell the heat. This special small treat is laced with a just a touch of beef, the flavor of which is soaked up by fat, soft noodles that vanish all too soon.

$3.50 FIND IT AT:

AmerAsia 800 3rd NW, 505.246.1615 PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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SANTA FE

SANTA FE SCENE PHOTOGRAPHY

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ill Eppridge is a renowned photojournalist who worked prolifically in the mid- to late 20th century and who has accomplished more than any photographer could dream. His work has been featured in museums all over the world and in major publications such as National Geographic, Life and Sports Illustrated, and in this year he was named recipient of the Lucie Award for Achievement Bill Eppridge in Photojournalism. THROUGH NOV. 20 The Monroe Gallery Monroe Gallery presents some of 112 Don Gaspar, Eppridge’s most 505.922.0800 important photo essays FREE together for the first

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

Chocolate is more than just an ingredient at Santa Fe’s Kakawa Chocolate House, it is also a New World history lesson. Inspired by 17th century Mayan and Aztec recipes, Kakawa’s Linda Miner, Ariana Rossi and Peter Wolf (pictured left to right) offer delectable chocolate treats such as Kakawa chocolate turtles topped with walnuts (above left) and a variety of hot cacao-flavored drinks.

monroegallery.com/ time in one place. showcase The images presented include his most wellknown series on the influential Kennedy family, with a focus on Robert Kennedy during his presidential run in 1968 and pictures from the day Kennedy was assassinated — including the iconic image of busboy Juan Romero trying to comfort Kennedy after he had been shot. The other photo essays displayed include a compilation of images of the Beatles on their first visit to America, Woodstock, natural disasters and rarely seen candid images of various celebrities such as Barbara Streisand and Casey Stengel. —JC

ART

Ancient flavors Santa Fe chocolate shop serves up delectable, historical sweets BY CRISTINA OLDS ow hot is it?” I asked Peter Wolf, owner of Kakawa Chocolate House in Santa Fe on a recent visit. “Try it!” He dove into the tiered glass case loaded with dark chocolate delights and handed me a sample of Chile d’Arbol. Recently featured on Food Network’s Heat Seekers, the caramel- and chocolate-dipped Mexican arbol chile made the hosts cry. My first tentative nibble was mild and sweet, so I downed the rest of the succulent treat with confidence. Then, a fiery sensation creeped up the back of my throat and into my sinuses. The intense spiciness flashed through my skull and seemingly exited my head via my ears with what had to be a puff of smoke. PROFILE Wolf founded the cozy, artisanal Kakawa Kakawa Chocolate House in 2005, just as the widespread appreciation for authentic dark Chocolate chocolate, and all its health benefits, became House popular in the U.S. “There are literally 1050 Paseo de Peralta, hundreds of chemicals (in the cacao) all Santa Fe, 866.982.0388 working together doing cool things to the HOURS: body,” Wolf said, “like aiding digestion, 10a-6p, Mon.-Thu.; not to mention good stuff like iron and 10a-8p, Fri.-Sat.; magnesium.” Noon-6p, Sun. Wolf subsequently passed me a sample

“H

kakawachocolates.com of Kakawa’s traditional Mexican drinking chocolate, which has a base of almond milk and is sweetened with agave nectar. During my visit, I also happily sampled a number of Kakawa’s truffles, including mescal, pomegranate and cardamom, and slowly savored sips of warm beverages exuding tastes of blue corn meal, chipotle pepper, cinnamon water and a wide variety of herbs and spices. Raised in Santa Fe, Wolf had been a successful contractor before jumping at the opportunity to start a chocolate cafe. Wolf cited the historic El Camino Real trading route that once ran from Mexico City to Santa Fe, as well as recent findings in Chaco Canyon, as solid reasons why Santa Fe is an appropriate location for such a venture. Kakawa’s skilled chocolatiers attempt to accurately represent historical

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drinking chocolate from 1000 BC Mesoamerican and European recipes of the 1600s, as well as colonial American and Mexican liquid concoctions. Ingredients true to the periods are imported from South and Central America and Mexico to re-create the tastes the Mayans and Aztecs used in elixirs medicinally and ceremonially. Kakawa chocolatier Ariana Rossi learned about making enticing and delicious desserts from her mother, who was a chef. She wears her passion for the business on her skin, where she sports chocolate and vanilla molecule tattoos. “My mother got (the chocolate one) for me as a birthday present one year,” she explained, noting it’s an image of the chemical compound theobromine, “What makes chocolate chocolate.” Rossi is originally from New England, but “nobody had anything bad to say about New Mexico, so here I am.” After learning about the history of chocolate, Kakawa was an obvious creative outlet. “Peter and the others would leave me alone for hours with all these cool ingredients,” Rossi said. “They never seemed to care if they came back to find pink hibiscus passionflower cakes or 10 different kinds of aphrodisiac truffles.” Rossi credits both her mom and Kakawa’s employees for coming up with the best ideas for new products. She also cited a French sales representative from one of Kakawa’s supply companies as an inspiration. “He will bring in really cool stuff like chestnut paste or white peach puree and make me try it,” Rossi explained. “The funny and yummy ingredients are actually the greatest inspiration, however silly that might sound.” Kakawa’s menu varies according the availability of seasonal ingredients from local farmer’s market and what’s grown in a small garden beside the cafe. As much as possible, Wolf emphasized, local ingredients are used in the making of all of his shop’s menu items. The buzz felt in Kakawa products isn’t from caffeine, but rather from the stimulizing effects of theobromine. Nor is the rush derived from sugar, since the chocolatiers at Kakawa use only agave nectar or local honey as a sweetener. Maybe the noticeable high I felt after sampling from the chocolate house’s menu, is derived from the chile. In my opinion, it is a result of the friendly staff at Kakawa, whose passion for chocolate is palpably addictive. Whatever it is, it flows freely at Kakawa, and you’ll want to sample it time and again.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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Gail Rieke: he shape, style Through the and aesthetics of the kimono are a Lens of the signature of Japanese Kimono culture. This style of OPENING PRESENTATION dress and the historical 5:30p, Fri., Oct. 14 significance behind its New Mexico creation are often seen Museum of Art as something foreign to 107 West Palace, the citizens of the Land 505.476.5072 of the Enchantment. FREE Gail Rieke would nmartmuseum.org like to enlighten her friends and neighbors of New Mexico about the art of the kimono through her presentation at The New Mexico Museum of Art. Rieke is a Santa Fe artist who is internationally acclaimed in collage, assemblage and installation work. Rieke has traveled to Japan several times, which has inspired her latest work of photography highlighting the textures, colors, textiles and rhythms of Japanese life. Rieke’s exhibition, Kimono: Karen LaMonte and Prints of the Floating World, is running at the New Mexico Museum of Art until Nov. 6. —JC


HEALTH

No magic bullets in cure for common hangover

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y head hurts. My stomach aches. I am dehydrated and weak. You would think that I have the flu or a tummy bug, but once again I find myself tending to a completely avoidable illness: The all-consuming, gut-wrenching hangover. I spent last weekend in Palm Springs, Calif., at my best friend’s bachelor party, where the hot wind was bone dry, sun worshipers have welltanned leather hides and drinking is a contact sport. Surely, I am not the only one in the Duke City in this sorry state; I am sure there were more than a few of you nursing your hangovers after the recent New Mexico Brew Fest. We have all heard of sure-thing elixirs, Internet myths or your buddy’s swear-by cure to the hangover. Is there any truth or medical evidence to prevent or cure the hangover? Like any awful disease, the key is prevention, prevention, prevention. Abstinence or drinking in moderation is sound advice if trying to prevent a hangover — although I am sure stating, “Two is my limit; if I drink more I don’t sleep well,” would have gone over really well at the bachelor party. I am 37 years old; am I a binge drinker? Most studies quantify “binge drinking” as consuming

No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover. —BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL IN 2005

more than five drinks in a night — or more than three drinks in one to two hours. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, one in five adults have consumed more than five drinks in a day during the previous year. Clearly the amount of alcohol consumed correlates with the degree of hangover. However, other factors such as a person’s size, gender and genetics make some more susceptible to hangovers. Women and people of Asian decent, for instance, generally have lower levels of alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme that breaks down alcohol, and thus notoriously have worse hangovers. The medical literature on hangovers is scant. Doctors are not even sure what a hangover is, let alone how to treat it. “No compelling

evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover,” concluded researchers in the British Medical Journal in 2005. I can tell you from personal experience and my medical perspective the symptoms of a hangover are well documented: dehydration, headache, weakness and stomach ache. Alcohol blocks a hormone in your kidneys that normally retains water. With each drink, you effectively lose more water and electrolytes than you take in. This leads to headaches and weakness. I recommend drinking a glass of water with each cocktail you consume. This will prevent dehydration and may make you drink less. Too much alcohol also irritates your gastrointestinal tract. (Imagine pouring tequila on an open wound). Eating just about anything while you drink eases the pain because the food coats

the lining of your intestines. Also, consider an antacid like Tums to ease your pain. Pain relievers such as aspirin and ibuprofen can stave off hangover headaches. But, be cautious of acetaminophen found in Tylenol, which can cause liver damage if taken in excess with alcohol. So in conclusion, drink in moderation and stay hydrated and well fed. Before bed take a few Tums and some ibuprofen. When you awake, hopefully after sleeping at least eight hours, enjoy one Bloody Mary at your favorite brunch spot. Hopefully, I will remember my own advice before the next full-contact drinking bachelor party. Dr. Abinash Achrekar (Dr. Ash) is an Assistant Professor of Cardiology, Internal Medicine, and Public Health at the University of New Mexico. Send any comments or questions to Dr. Ash to abinash@localiQ.com.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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PETS

Dog’s weight depends on you

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e shouldn’t be surprised that the problems we see in our dogs mimic the issues that challenge us. The key one is exercise and weight. Every day we hear of some new magic solution for our struggles with our weight. Just when we think that there is finally that magic pill, we are reminded that it all comes down to diet and exercise. This is just as true for our canine companions. If we’re sedentary, this usually results in our dog also not getting enough exercise. Meeting our dog’s energetic needs is usually a challenge, except for those owners who run every day or who actually work their dogs in herding, agility or in the activities they were bred for. So what can the average couch potato do to help meet their dog’s requirement for high activity? First of all, if you are looking at adopting a dog, be honest with how much activity you are able to give your dog. Do you really jog every morning? At Animal Humane New Mexico all of our dogs go through a “Meet your Match” test to determine, among other things, their energy level. So while you may choose a dog by their looks, being aware of their requirements for activity can be even more important to not only to keep their waistline slim, but to have a successful, long, happy life together. If you are not a long distance runner and

want to keep your dog healthy and meet his needs for exercise, here’s a suggestion: Dogs explore and interact with their world by using their mouths, and there are a variety of toys that can help not only feed them but help burn off some energy. A Buster Cube, Kibble Nibble or Kong toys are good examples. Instead of feeding your dog out of a bowl you can take his allotment of food and put it into one of these toys. Your dog has to bat around the toy to get the kibble to randomly fall out. So instead of your dog gobbling down his meal in 15 seconds, it may take him 20 minutes or more while he chases it around working to get the food. Stuff the Kong with his kibble that has been soaked in water, then freeze the whole thing, and it can take him even longer to work out his meal — not only using his mouth but also his brain. One of my favorite games you can play with your dog will not only increase his level of exercise but also help to solidify his “come-here” exercise. With two or more people, call your dog back and forth

through the house. Reward him with tiny treats, praise and pats. Your dog will be running from person to person up and down the stairs through the house and even out to the backyard. Teaching your dog to come to you is one of the most important things you can teach him, and this game can do double duty training him while burning calories. If after your run or walk, your dog is just barely warming up, try enlisting the services of a professional dog walker. You can arrange for them to come to your home daily, weekly or whatever schedule will work for you. If you have friends with social dogs, take turns leaving your canine companions at each other’s house while you are at work. Nothing helps give your dog a work out like a day of playing with a friend. You can also take your dog to one of the variety of doggie day care facilities located in Albuquerque. Your dog can spend the day romping with a group of friends in a supervised environment. So do not despair if your veterinarian mentions that your dog is getting a bit wide in the waist. Make these suggestions a part of your daily routine to help keep your pup healthy and happy. Now, as for your waistline, I wish I had the secret pill for weight loss, but until then take your dog on a long walk that will benefit both of you.

ADOPTIONS

For info about these pets and many others, visit AnimalHumaneNM.org or call 505.255.5523 Find us: facebook. com/animal humanenm

SHAINA #23502

Shaina is a 14-year-old spayed female, Heeler Cross. This girl is ready to share unconditional love with a new family. Shaina is trained, quiet and very gentle. She’s social and loves to take long walks. Come spend some time with this intelligent sweetheart. LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE AND MANY OTHER GREAT PETS AT WWW. ANIMALHUMANENM.ORG FIND US: FACEBOOK.COM/ ANIMALHUMANENM

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011


HOUSE/HOME

four houses A STRAW BALE RETROFIT OF A 1940S HOUSE in the Nob Hill area, an energy-efficient home in Corrales that blurs distinction between indoors and out, a modern house that frames a dramatic view of the adjacent Sandia Mountains and a cast-concrete residence that cantilevers over a hillside in Spruce Park. Innovative architecture and unique style are peppered throughout the neighborhoods of Albuquerque, and in this issue of Local iQ we peek over the fence at some of the city’s most interesting homes.

WRITTEN BY MIKE ENGLISH

Mesa Vista de Corrales

CORRALES

BILL REYNOLDS KNOWS A THING OR TWO ABOUT GREEN CONSTRUCTION.

The owner of New Haven Homes, a Corrales custom home building firm, he helped put together Build Green New Mexico in 1998. It was a coalition of like-minded contractors who believed in developing and implementing green approaches to construction. “We all saw this is where it was headed,” he said. Mesa Vista de Corrales, a 4,674-square-foot home Reynolds built and lives in, is a testament to his ongoing commitment to green building. The home features photovoltaic power, solar water heating, efficient radiant floor heating, low-flow water fixtures, extensive insulation (including spray foam insulation

under the roof deck for a fully insulated building envelope) and American Clay plaster on the walls, the latter a natural product manufactured in Albuquerque. Perhaps most important, Reynolds’ home is beautiful, with all the amenities of an upscale residence. Most striking is what Reynolds describes as a “transparent distinction between indoors and outdoors” — exterior floorto-ceiling windows in the living area literally fold away to create a seamless transition from the kitchen and living room to the backyard pool patio. It is elegance in an energy-efficient package, and it gives green construction a good name.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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HOUSE/HOME

Villa Marquette

SPRUCE PARK

ALBUQUERQUE’S SPRUCE PARK NEIGHBORHOOD, immediately west of the University of New Mexico campus, took shape from the 1920s to the middle of that century. Historic pueblo and mission-style homes dominate the small neighborhood, with the notable exception of a project that was completed in 2006. Villa Marquette, as it is called, is a home designed by architect Mark Rohde, who lives there. The street approach to the home is deceiving, with a landscape of grasses and boulders and small oak trees that suggest a home growing out of a mountainside. But behind this facade is a two-story rectangle of cast-concrete walls and steel that is truly one of the city’s most unique homes. Villa Marquette features an open top-story floor plan and high wood ceilings atop exposed steel beams, with solid banks of windows forming the south and north walls, with views that stretch across I-25 toward the volcanoes west of the city. The home’s public spaces are on the upper story, with kitchen and living areas mingling, and outdoor wood decks just outside both front and back offer a blend of indoor and outdoor living. Smaller bedrooms and utility rooms occupy the lower floor. The construction of Villa Marquette was an orchestration of concrete and engineering, with the walls poured into forms in place, and the home itself nestled into a seemingly precarious hillside that seemed a less-than-ideal building site. The project is a testament to developing a vision of what can be, and building it.

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011


“A lot of times, modern homes can be cold, but this is warm. We love living here,” says Doug Turner of his completely revamped Albuquerque Country Club area home, which he owns with wife, Mala Htun. The couple recruited Modulus Design to help with the renovation.

Modern Country Club redo

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irtually all homeowners, whether their abode is brand new or decades old, harbor some dreams about how to improve it. If only the kitchen opened to the family room. If only the master bedroom had a walk-in closet. If only the family room featured French doors to the back patio. Doug Turner and Mala Htun developed exactly those kind of dreams during their time living in a 1948 home in Albuquerque’s Country Club neighborhood. They knew they loved their house’s location. “It’s a residential, childfriendly neighborhood,” Turner said, which is an important consideration for parents of two young children. But the 1,350-square-foot, one-story layout was chopped into multiple rooms — not good for keeping an eye on children — and there were other shortcomings typical to a residence built 60 years ago: cramped kitchen, dated bathrooms, low ceilings and limited natural light. Turner (owner of Albuquerque public relations firm DW Turner, former campaign manager for New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson and a one-time candidate for governor himself) and Htun (a scholar and author with a doctorate in political science) have both traveled the world. During the course of their relationship they’ve lived together in a New York City loft. They knew what they liked in a home, and their Country Club residence didn’t have it. So they decided to remodel. Now, there are remodels, and there are big remodels. Turner and Htun knew they wanted open, loft-style living spaces and a second story, all on the home’s original slab foundation. Not too big a deal, right? Wrong. “The magnitude of the project was not clear to us when we started,” said Turner. That magnitude evolved in consultation with Modulus Design, an Albuquerque design/build firm that helped Turner and Htun give shape to their dreams. Modulus owner Christian Harper and project manager Walt Gill met with the couple to start the process. Albuquerque architect Trevor Elliott also worked on the project along the way. They began with the couple’s desire for an open floor plan, communication between indoors and out, maximum natural light and a contemporary, clean design. Those elements helped guide Gill as he conceptualized initial floor plans. Openness, in some respects, was the easiest

issue to address. Three smaller rooms on the west side of the home were maintained, and the fireplace left in its original location. Other than that, the house was gutted and ceilings were lifted to nine feet. This created what Gill called “vast open public zones” — living, dining and kitchen areas all flowing together, which is a theme continued upstairs, where a master suite claims the majority of space. Gill planned for an abundance of natural light both upstairs and down primarily with a solid two-story bank of windows that surrounds a large, open corner stairwell and climbs from the ground floor to the second-floor ceiling — over 20 feet of uninterrupted vertical glazing in all. To further create a sense of space, the garage, attached to the house in the 1940s floor plan, was torn down and built as a separate structure at the back of the property line. That way the dramatic bank of windows provide a picture frame for the green backyard, including a mature cottonwood tree. Those are the big interior brushstrokes. But fine custom cabinetry, built by Gary Smith of Second Generation Construction (who worked exclusively on the home during the year of construction), is an example of the craftsmanship found everywhere. Bold bathroom tile schemes, white oak floors, warmly colored teak paneling and a wood and metal front door are examples of the attention to detail paid by Htun and Turner, who selected every finish detail. And R-60 ceilings and R-28 walls, zoned heating and cooling and two on-demand water heaters are just some of the energyefficient features of the home. That’s the inside. Perhaps even more impressive is the house’s exterior appearance, an alternating mix of stained tongue-andgroove cedar siding and stucco. The result is contemporary but warm, cubist but at home in the neighborhood. “A lot of times, modern homes can be cold,” Turner said. “But this is warm. We love living here.”

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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HOUSE/HOME

High Desert House NORTHEAST HEIGHTS THE POWERFUL PRESENCE OF THE SANDIA MOUNTAINS inspired a retired couple to

purchase a lot and settle in the foothills of the High Desert subdivision. The goals for the design of the house, undertaken by Albuquerque architect Jon Anderson, were to exploit the intimacy and views of the mountain, display the couple’s extensive and varied art collections and support their lifestyle of entertaining their friends and family, all while meeting the strict design guidelines of the development. The outcome, as viewed from the street, is a modest and discreet stucco/masonry house extruded gently from the native landscape. A low canopy announces the entry and compresses space as people enter, in anticipation of the dramatic celebration of the majestic mountain caused by the living room’s high sloping ceiling with floor to ceiling glass oriented directly toward Sandia Peak. Galleries throughout the house and niches in the masonry display the art. The 3,400-square-foot house is bright and open, with the butterfly roof clerestory providing dynamic light, changing with the passing of each day and each season.

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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HOUSE/HOME

Anderson Home

NOB HILL

IT MUST HAVE BEEN A LITTLE BIT SURPRISING FOR

Joanne Calkins’ neighbors to see her wood-framed stucco house, originally built in 1948 in a style typical to Albuquerque, suddenly wrapped with a solid bank of straw bales earlier this year. But it made perfect sense to Calkins. She had been startled by how drafty her home was when she moved into it, and how hot it was in the summer. She decided to change that, and at the same time pursue a lifelong dream of living in a “green” home. The first part of the plan was straw bale construction. The insulating capacity of straw bales is well established, with some of the highest R values attainable. Calkins had her entire house covered in straw, including a new second-story addition. “It’s like putting a quilt on your house,” she said. The bales were covered with rigid foam, and the entire house was

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restuccoed. The roof was also super insulated. Since then, Calkins has hardly used her furnace or swamp cooler. Next came the home-based power, which comes from a bank of solar panels atop her roof. Calkins is not paying for electricity at all. In fact, PNM is paying her $100 a month for the power she generates. At that rate, she estimates it will be only six years until the solar system is paid for — and after that, pure profit. Finally, Calkins installed two 500-gallon and one 300-gallon rainwater catchment barrels. This year, even with meager rainfall, Calkins said she collected 3,500 gallons of rainwater, which she used to water her yard. “I care that we not fight over natural resources like oil,” said Calkins, 70, a former school teacher. “I hope this house would be an example to other people that you can do this.”

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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ENVIRONMENT

Freight truck emissions pose pollution challenge Q: Freight companies like FedEx, UPS and all those 18 wheelers on the highways probably generate a lot of pollution and global warming. Is anything being done to address this? — Michael Brown, Washington, DC Freight shipments are responsible for about a quarter of all transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions. Heavy duty trucks are the biggest villains, accounting for 77.8 percent of freight transportation’s total.

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A: Freight companies operating in the U.S. and beyond do generate significant amounts of pollution. While transportation technologies and fuels have gotten more efficient in recent years, freight demands have grown considerably over the past two decades. Today, in the U.S. alone, for example, freight is responsible for about a quarter of all transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions. Most freight trucks, locomotives and ships run on diesel engines, which are major sources of emissions of nitrogen oxides, particulate matter and carbon dioxide (CO2). Repeated exposure to nitrogen oxide-based smog and particulate matter has been linked to a wide range of human health problems, and we all know what CO2 emissions are doing to the planet’s atmosphere and ecosystems in terms of global warming. According to a 2005 analysis by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration, heavy-duty trucks are the biggest villains, accounting for 77.8 percent of total U.S. freight greenhouse gas emissions. Boat, train and airplane freight contribute 10.8, 8.7 and 2.8 percent respectively. Besides filling up loads completely and keeping equipment well tuned, shippers can reduce emissions via smarter operations and procedures. Software developed by UPS’s Roadnet helps logistics managers re-engineer their fleet routing, preventing tons of emissions and saving

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

millions of dollars in the process. Newer Environmental Protection Agency emissions standards aim to reduce nitrogen oxide and particulate matter pollution from freight operators upwards of 60 percent by 2020. They are a step in the right direction, but the failure of Congress to pass substantive federal legislation limiting CO2 emissions means that a growing freight sector will continue to pump out more and more greenhouse gases. A recently released report by the tri-lateral North American Free Trade Agreement’s Commission for Environmental Cooperation lays out a vision for how to make freight — the second largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in North America after the generation of electricity — more efficient and less polluting across Mexico, the U.S. and Canada. The report identifies some scary trends. For example, emissions from freight-related vehicles grew 74 percent between 1990 and 2008 — some 40 percent more than emissions growth from passenger vehicles over the same time span. Also, while emissions by light-duty vehicles are expected to drop 12 percent by 2030, freight truck emissions are expected to grow by 20 percent. To start turning the freight sector around, the report recommends that the three countries party to NAFTA start shifting to lower-carbon fuels, putting a price on carbon emissions and replacing crumbling infrastructure. These fixes won’t be cheap, but the report’s authors claim such changes will save money in the long run and are necessary steps to clean up North American freight. Send your environmental questions to EarthTalk, c/o E Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; submit it at emagazine.com/earthtalk/thisweek/ or e-mail it to earthtalk@emagazine.com


GARDEN

Time to tuck in the home garden for winter ahead

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ne cool October day, I had an opportunity to stand under an aspen tree the trunk of which was so large I could not wrap my arms around it. As I gazed up at what seemed like the granddaddy of all aspen trees, taking in its majestic golden and glistening canopy, my perception of New Mexico’s enchanting landscape widened, only to be heightened by the smell of moist leaves and the low, warm sun on my back. As we welcome the transitional fall equinox, which is accompanied by glorious autumnal reds and yellows, we wind down our gardening days with some reluctance. Gardeners know the advantages of preparing their landscapes for a winter’s nap. With cooler gardening weather at hand, the following guidelines will insure a cleaner, healthier garden, along with the added advantage of a jump start in the spring.

Cleaning Rake all leaves and dead annual and vegetable plant debris from gardens to keep insect eggs and plant diseases from wintering over. Weed all beds to prevent cool weather weeds from plaguing the garden. Weeds encourage insects to hide and lay eggs. If left to go to seed, the weeding task becomes all the more tedious next season. Leave ornamental grasses for winter interest and movement in the garden. Cleaning these should be done before their spring growth begins. After cleaning the garden, add a thick layer of compost to provide some protection from harsh

Winter grants the gardener time to plan for spring, make lists of new plants and dream of endless possibilities

weather and to improve soil structure. Mulching will add even more frost protection when spread on top of compost. This will also help reduce the alternate freezing and thawing of the ground, protecting newly planted and shallow rooted plants. After the first frost, perennials will die back, leaving their stems and seed heads. When cleaning, leave a couple of inches on the stems of perennials until early spring. This will protect them from winter weather. The perennial seed heads can be left, providing birds with winter food. Move houseplants indoors, checking for insects under leaves and in the pots. Remove dead leaves and stems.

Watering Plants need water in the winter, especially in times of drought, although the amount and frequency will be much less than is required when they are actively growing. Water all trees, shrubs and perennials once a month through the winter, and remember,

evergreen needles lose moisture in the winter and need a good drink to maintain their health. Water only when temperatures are 40 degrees or above and in the middle of the day, allowing excess water to evaporate by sundown. If the ground is frozen, do not water. It is best to wait until the ground thaws to water in the winter. Cactus beds, to include all succulents and agaves, should not be watered after the first of October. Survival of these plants is dependent on their being dehydrated in the winter time. The cactus and agaves may look shriveled but they are happy.

Ponds and Water Features

As the diminishing daylight brings gardening to its season finale, ambivalent feelings settle in. Winter grants the gardener time to plan for spring, make lists of new plants and dream of endless possibilities. Conversely, as cabin fever peaks and the garden sleeps, and you wish for the jonquils to make their debut, remember: recharge, take respite and resign to the fact that spring is like a baby — it will come when it is good and ready! Tish Resnik is the owner of Great Outdoors Nursery. A native New Mexican, she specializes in plant and garden knowledge that adds to home value.

Many pump manufacturers recommend removing pumps from pondless water features to protect them from freezing. Do not shut the feature off for the winter and leave a pump in the feature, as that may ruin the pump. In the Albuquerque area, hard freezes last only a few days, and as long as the water feature can be turned on, the pump can stay in the water basin. Remember to fill the basin as needed. Ponds should be cleaned before the first freeze. Remove all dead leaves from pond plants and any other debris that has fallen into the pond to prevent methane gas build-up.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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MUSIC

L I V E MU S I C

SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Oct. 21 for the Oct. 27 issue. Please send calendar entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711 a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 USE THIS FORMAT:

Venue Band GENRE Time, Cost List events any time for free at local-iQ.com *Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Less than a year after forming, Albuquerque four-piece rock outfit Red Light Cameras, which includes (left to right) Kirsten Lopez, Barney Lopez, Amanda Machon and Chris Walsh, quickly rose to prominence in the local music scene. The group will release its debut studio recording on Saturday, October 15 at Launchpad in Downtown Albuquerque.

Breaking the speed limit Red Light Cameras’ rapid rise to local prominence built on band chemistry and catchy sound BY CHARLIE CRAGO t’s becoming more and more clear that when speaking of Albuquerque’s Red Light Cameras, it is not the Big-Brotheresque, government-sanctioned, pole-mounted video recorders paving the way for an Orwellian state we should be concerned with, but rather, the stomping-rock outfit currently taking the city by storm. Comprised of husbands, wives, thespians and old friends, Red Light Cameras has garnered a massive local following in an incredibly short period of time. Still, it isn’t too hard to find them, as the band is booked somewhere in Albuquerque almost every weekend — a fact emphasized by drummer Kirsten Lopez in a recent interview with Local iQ. “Wherever we can go, however we can make it, we’ll play,” she said. There couldn’t be a more appropriate location to talk with a band than a dark corner of a dark bar on a dark street lit by little more than a neon sign. I asked the members of Red Light Cameras over beers at Burt’s Tiki Lounge how they felt about the rapid success of the band, and as they completed each other’s sentences, it became clear that Red Light Cameras is a band united by a strong sense of loyalty. Husband-and-wife duo Barney and Kirsten Lopez handle drum and bass duties, respectively, with Chris Walsh’s guitar leading the troupe.

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Vocalist Amanda Machon described the band’s success: “It’s pretty exciting. It’s all happened very fast; we haven’t even been Red Light Cameras for a year. We have great chemistry as a band, and musically we get each other,“ she said.

RELEASE

Red Light Cameras WITH RAWRR!, TECHTONIC MOVEMENT, THE GREAT DEPRESSION AND SHOULDER VOICES

7p, Sat., Oct. 15 Launchpad 618 Central SW, 505.435.9912

With vocal $5 arrangements Tickets: holdmyticket. com ranging from the launchpadrocks.com hardest line to the most bittersweet, the spectrum of musical instrumentation covered by the rhythm and lead sections of the band spans the gauntlet of melodic inspiration. You will be hard-pressed to leave a Red Light Cameras live show and not find yourself humming their tunes in the morning. “I’ve heard it about our band, which I like, that it’s so catchy you can’t help but like it,” said guitarist Walsh. “I think that’s our one goal — to be as catchy as possible. I want to be stuck in your head.” Recorded mostly piece-by-piece at the

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

Que Studios in Albuquerque, Red Light Cameras’ self-titled debut album represents a gold standard in local recording and sound engineering. If you have the means, listen to Red Light Cameras on headphones — notice the fine use of throw-back stereo recording on tracks like “Hot Mess.” “We’d go in once or twice a week and do long sessions,” Barney Lopez said, describing the recording process. “As it went on we’d do more short sessions, so we took our time doing it over the summer.” Comparisons are thrown around with reckless abandon in the music industry today, so I reasoned it would be best to ask the band how they felt about being compared to other rock ‘n’ roll bands, and where they might fall on that comparison scale. “Comparisons are fine, we like them. They help in defining genres,” said vocalist Machon. “We’ve had a hard time, though. We don’t know what genre we are. Usually when we have to describe it we say, ‘Pop, rock, 80s, garage, a little blues inspiration — we play country.’” In reality, the question is, how do you pigeonhole such a simultaneously fresh and brash band? The fact is: you should not. Rather, go see Red Light Cameras for the release of their debut record, and while you’re at it, you can catch a virtual who’s who of local talent. Enjoy yourself.

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Blackbird Buvette Cosmic Dancing with Brendangerous and Nicaolatron DANCE 10p, FREE Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder DJ Quico DANCE/JAMS 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Universal - Original Weekly Dance Party w/CLKCLKBNG & Guests DANCE/ ELECTRO/INDIE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Corrales Bistro Brewery RJ Perez Trio BLUES 6:30p, FREE Imbibe College Night with DJ Flo Fader HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL 9p, FREE

Launchpad Gypsyhawk, SuperGiant, Sandia and Skulldron 9p, $5 Low Spirits WhiteWater Ramble and Lost Lingo 9p, $8

Lotus Nightclub & VIP Ultralounge Temptation Thursday with DJ’s AI & J-Roc Spin HIP HOP/DANCE 10p, $10 for 18+/ Free of 21+

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s We Can Duet 1:30-5p, Jam Night: Jimmy Jones 5:30-9:30p, FREE O’Niell’s Pub (Heights) Los Radiators ACOUSTIC/FOLK/BLUES/CELTIC 8-10p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Latin Tinge Thursdays featuring Latin Tinge Crew SALSA 5-8p, FREE Outpost Performance Space Eric Vloeimans Quartet JAZZ 7:30p, $15$20

Scalo II Bar Le Chat Lunatique DIRTY JAZZ/SWING 8:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery Felix y los Gatos AMERICANA/BLUES/FUNK 6p, FREE


MUSIC

LIV E M USIC Sunshine Theater Hatebreed, Former Thieves, Dead Hours, Epiphany 7:30p, $15 The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Rob-A-Lou ROCKABILLY 8p, FREE Zinc Ryan McGarvey Band BLUES/ROCK 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

FRI 14 Annapurna World Vegetarian Cafe DeBoSa with Debo and Sabino BOSS NOVA 7-9p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette RJ Perez Trio LATIN FUNK 7p, FREE Planet Rock Funky Dance Party 10p, FREE

Colorado-based bluegrass hybrid act, WhiteWater Ramble, will perform at Low Spirits Bar & Stage (2823 2nd NW, lowspiritslive.com) on Thu., Oct. 13 with openers Lost Lingo. Show at 9p. $8 cover.

Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder Blue Rhythm Boys BLUES/ROCK/ AMERICANA 9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Skulldron Night Terrain, Lord Hanus, Flatcar METAL/DOOM/ROCK 8:30p-2a, FREE

Cheenah Lounge at Santa Ana Casino Juntos Unidos SPANISH CUMBIA/

Sandia Resort & Casino: Bien Shur Rooftop Lounge Sweetlife COVER BAND 9p-1a, FREE Scalo II Bar Todd and the Fox ROOTS/FOLK 8:30p, FREE

CoolWater Fusion Jenne Sluder SOUL/POP/ROCK 6-8p,

Sol Santa Fe Tribal Seeds, La Junta and E.N. Young 7:30p, $10 St. Clair Winery Tony and the Bandits ROCK 6:30p,

FREE

FREE

Cooperage Blue-Zilla ROCK/BLUES 8:30p, $5 Corrales Bistro Brewery Erik Knudson BLUEGRASS 6:30p,

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill John Heart Jackie MODERN FOLK

RANCHERIA/COUNTRY 9p-1a, FREE

FREE

Effing Bar & Grill DJ Jarra R&B/TOP 40 9p, FREE El Rey The Meditations REGGAE/ROOTS 6p, $12-$15

Imbibe DJ Rotation DANCE 10p, FREE Launchpad Yelawolf, DJ Craze and Ritz 9p, $20 Low Spirits C4C presents the Enzo Sisneros’ Benefit Show featuring Mondo Vibrations, RJ Perez Trio, and Element 37 8p-12:30a, $5 Lotus Nightclub & VIP Ultralounge Lost in a Trance 2 featuring Entheogen vs. Jimmy James, Limit, Cameron Simmons, Kevin Kirkland and Lotus resident DJ XES HOUSE/

6-7:30p, FREE

The Go Round FOLK/POP 8p, $5 Vernon’s Hidden Valley Steakhouse Le Chat Lunatique FILTHY GYPSY JAZZ

Imbibe DJ Akata DANCE 10p, FREE Immanuel Presbyterian Church Quintessence presents: Carol Barnett’s “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” AMERICANA 5p, $5-$15

Launchpad Red Light Cameras CD Release Party featuring Techtonic Movement, The Great Depression, Rawrr and Shoulder Voices 9p, $5 Lotus Nightclub & VIP Ultralounge DJ J-Roc & DJ G HIP HOP/DANCE 10p, $10 for 18+/FREE for 21+

Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriguez Duo 6:30-9:30p,

8:30p, FREE

FREE

Zinc Felonious Groove Foundation

Mine Shaft Tavern The Jakes CLASSIC ROCK 7-11p, FREE Molly’s Bailout 1:30-5p, Memphis P-Tails

SOUL/FUNK 9:30p-12:30a, FREE

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Anasazi Fields Winery The Watermelon Mountain Jug Band CD Release Party BLUEGRASS 3-6p, $5

Blackbird Buvette Hyperland INDIE/INDIE POP/ ELECTRONICA 10p, FREE

Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder Blue Rhythm Boys BLUES/ROCK/

BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station Baracutanga LATIN 9p, FREE One Up Elevated Lounge DJ Cut, Huggie, Big Worm HIP HOP/ OLD SCHOOL/R&B 9p-2a, $2-$5

Outpost Performance Space Kim RIchey AMERICANA 8p, $15-$20 Rio Grande Lounge at Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa Combo Special JAZZ 8:30-11:30p,

TOP 40/DANCE $10 for 18+/FREE

AMERICANA 9p, FREE

FREE

for 21+

Burt’s Tiki Lounge De Bruddah Project DUB/JAM BAND/

Sandia Resort & Casino: Bien Shur Rooftop Lounge Sweetlife COVERS 9p-1a, FREE Scalo II Bar Inside Out JAZZ 8:30p, FREE St. Clair Winery Entourage Jazz Band JAZZ 6:30p,

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo 6:30-9:30p,

REGGAE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Molly’s Gene Corbin AMERICANA 1:30-5p, Rudy Boy Experiment BLUES 5:30-

Cheenah Lounge at Santa Ana Star Casino DJ Dance Night DANCE 9p-1a, FREE Cooperage Cafe Mocha SALSA 9:30p, $7 CoolWater Fusion Shane Wallin SOUL/POP/ROCK 6-8p,

9:30p, FREE

FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station Felix y los Gatos BLUES/ZYDECO 9p,

Corrales Bistro Brewery Frank and Greg OLDIES/70S 6:30p,

FREE

FREE

Ned’s on the Rio Grande The Electric Edric Project ROCK 9p-

Cosmo Tapas Saudade BOSSA NOVA/JAZZ/SAMBA

FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Open Mic Night hosted by Shelly ALL KINDS 8p-12a, FREE

1a, FREE

7-9:30p, FREE

One Up Elevated Lounge Happy Hour with Todd Tijerina BLUES 5-8p, FREE DJ 12 Tribe and B-Tre HIP HOP/R&B/REGGAE/TOP 40

Effing Bar & Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE Hard Rock Hotel & Casino The Electric Edric Project ROCK

9p-2a, $2-$5

4-5p, FREE

FREE

St. John’s United Methodist Church Quintessence: Choral Artists of the Southwest: Americana AMERICANA 5p, $15/$10 (Sen.)/$5 (Stu.)

Sunshine Theater Andrew Nikatina with special guest Hopsin 8p, $25 The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Russell Sharf’s Jazz Explosion JAZZ 2p, FREE Cristen Grey & The Moving Dunes ROCK/ADULT CONTEMPORARY 8p, $5

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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MUSIC

LIVE M U SI C

Launchpad Blue Scholars, Bambu, Grynch 7:30p, $12

Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriguez 6:30-9:30, FREE Molly’s Dangerous Curvz 60s-90s COVERS 5:30-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

The Kosmos The Go Round FOLK/POP 8p, $12 Warehouse 508 508 Open Mic Night (ABQs ONLY Under 21 Open Mic Night) 6p, FREE Zinc Blue Hornets REGGAE/ROCK STEADY/SKA

9:30p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Cali Shaw Acoustic Showcase with Nick Pena LA JUNTA 8:30p, FREE Taylor Ranch Library Dana & Sue Robinson BLUEGRASS 6p,

9:30p-12:30a, FREE

FREE

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill The Tone Daddies CLASSIC ROCK/

SUN 16

SOUTHWESTERN 8P, FREE

UNM Hospital’s Barbara and Bill Richardson Pavilion Cafe The Deadbeets w/Kate Horsely ECLECTIC

Blackbird Buvette Camino Del Soul with Mello and Tahnee SOUL 7p, FREE Corrales Bistro Brewery Mike Chavez CONTEMPORARY 6:30p,

FOLK/REGGAE/ROCK 12-1p, FREE

THU

FREE

Hotel Andaluz Sunday JazzBrunch featuring Jazz Brasileiro BRAZILIAN JAZZ 11a-2p, FREE Club Beethoven featuring works by Kaija Saariaho, played by Jesse Tatum, Douglas Cardwell, David Felberg, Megan Julyan, Kim Fredenburgh and James Holland

Blackbird Buvette KGB Klub DANCE 10p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Universal - Original Weekly Dance Party w/CLKCLKBNG & Guests DANCE/ ELECTRO/INDIE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Corrales Bistro Brewery 505 Blues Band BLUES 6:30p, FREE Imbibe College Night with DJ Flo Fader HIP

CLASSICAL/MODERN 4:30p, $5-$15

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery The Watermelon Jug Band BLUEGRASS 3-6p, FREE Launchpad 40 Oz to Freedom and Dub Cartel 8p, $10 Leo’s The Electric Edric Project ROCK 4-8p, FREE Mine Shaft Tavern Gene Corbin AMERICANA 3-7p, FREE O’Niell’s Pub Holy Water & Whiskey FOLK/BLUEGRASS 4-7P, FREE Placitas Prebyterian Church Kaplan and Weiss Duo featuring works by Shcubert, Ravel, and Beethoven CLASSICAL/PIANO/VIOLIN 3p, $20

St. Clair Winery The Blues Tapes JAZZ 6p, FREE St. John Episcopal Church October Concert featuring works by Bach, Mendelssohn, Finzi, Parry, Pietro A. Yon CLASSICAL 4p, $15-$30 St. John’s United Methodist Church Quintessence presents Carol Barnett’s “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” AMERICANA 3p, $5-$15 Sunshine Theater Panic At The Disco, Patrick Stump, Foxy Shazam 8p, $25 Teatro Paraguas Mindaugas Briedis and Ausrine Garsonaite KEYBOARD/VIOLIN 7p, FREE The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Cowgirl Brunch with Boris McCutcheon featuring the music of Townes Van Zandt AMERICANA 12-3p, FREE Kyle Martin and Doug Muchmore WESTERN 8p, FREE

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Blackbird Buvette Blackbird Karaoke with DJ Kammo 9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Two Wheel Mondays featuring Goldenboy INDIE Merican Slang ALTERNATIVE/INDIE/ROCK 8:30p-2a, FREE

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HOP/R&B/SOUL 9p, FREE

Juan Tabo Library Dana & Sue Robinson BLUEGRASS 12p, FREE

PHOTO BY JOY GODFREY

On Thu., Oct. 13, Downtown Albuquerque “microclub,” Blackbird Buvette, will host Cosmic Dancing, featuring local DJs Brendangerous (pictured) and Nicaolatron. Music starts at 10p. No cover.

Launchpad St. Petersburg and Story Ark 9p, FREE Low Spirits Thrift Store Cowboys and The Driftwood Singers 9p, $5 Lotus Nightclub & VIP Ultralounge Temptation Thursday with DJ’s AI & J-Roc Spin HIP HOP/DANCE 10p, $10 for 18+/Free of 21+

Launchpad Grieves and Budo, Prof, The MC Type, and Solar One 8p, $13 Loma Colorado Main Library The Buckarettes COUNTRY/SWING 6:30-

Launchpad Embelisk, Destroy to Recreate, Die As You Fall, and Halcyon 9p, $4 Low Spirits Coffin Hunter, The Cheatin Hearts 9p,

7:45p, FREE

FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Cowgirl Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig 9p, FREE

Molly’s Southwest Wind COUNTRY/FOLK 5:309:30p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Jazz Jam with Michael Glynn JAZZ 8:30p, FREE

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Blackbird Buvette Geeks Who Drink 7p, FREE 2.0 Tuesday featuring NerdCord Hip Hop with DJ Nonsense HIP HOP 9p, FREE

Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder Karaoke 8p, FREE Corrales Bistro Brewery David McCulloch BLUES/INSTRUMENTAL 6:30p, FREE

Esther Bone Memorial Library The Enchanters MIXED CHORAL 6:30p, FREE

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Kenny Skywolf CONTEMPORARY BLUES/ ROCK/SOUL/FUNK/REGGAE 8p, FREE

BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Outpost Performance Space Rene Marie JAZZ 7:30p, $20-$25 Scalo II Bar Felix y Los Gatos BLUES/CAJUN 8p, FREE Sol Santa Fe Radio Moscow, The Flying Eyes, As In We 8p, $7 St. Clair Winery Soul Sanctuary ALTERNATIVE/ EXPERIMENTAL/METAL 6p, FREE

Taylor Ranch Library Dana & Sue Robinson BLUEGRASS 6p, FREE

WED 19 Applebee’s (Montgomery) Abby Maxwell Duo ACOUSTIC/JAZZ/BLUES 8-11p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette Wasteland Inkorporated PUNK/ PSYCHEDELIC/HIP HOP/ROCK 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Vinyl & Verses with UHF B-Boy Crew UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8p-2a, FREE

Hard Rock Pavilion Chris Brown feat. T-Pain and Tyga 7pm,

Cooperage NM Jazz presents: Jazz Stories JAZZ 7p,

$75.75-$125.75

$10/$8/(Stu.)

Imbibe College Night with DJ Automatic & Drummer Camilo Quinones 9p, FREE

Corrales Bistro Brewery Danny Clayburn BLUES/OLDIES 6:30p,

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson 6:30-9:30p, FREE Molly’s Tracy Troy Turpin 1:30-5p, Bad Katz

FREE

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Tony B, Andy Kingston, Justin Bransford JAZZ/BLUES/LIGHT R&B 8p, FREE

FRI

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Blackbird Buvette The MashUp Test with Kent 10p, FREE Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder CalQl8trz 80s 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Billie Oshun PROGRESSIVE/PSYCHEDELIC Moon FOLK/EXPERIMENTAL Roo 8:30p2a, FREE CONTINUED ON PAGE 28


smart MUSIC The Avett Brothers 7:30p, Thu., Oct. 20

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t is always nice to be able to relate to a lyric or two in a band’s song. With a Popejoy Hall, UNM group like The Avett Brothers, there’s an campus, 505.925.5858 entire discography that doesn’t just contain $30 relatable lyrics, but is packed with soulbaring stories from your life. Tickets: unmtickets. com “Something has me acting like someone I theavettbrothers.com know isn’t me — ill with want and poisoned by this ugly greed,” goes the song “Ill With Want” from 2009’s I and Love and You, proving to listeners that Seth and Scott Avett are insightful, honest songwriters. The North Carolinians are best known for their blend of folk, rock and bluegrass that is rough around the edges yet simultaneously polished. Produced by Rick Rubin, I and Love and You was the band’s first majorlabel release, which showed listeners the Avetts could step toward the mainstream without losing their signature Southern twang. The Avett Brothers have been quite successful since, releasing a live album and performing alongside Bob Dylan and Mumford & Sons at the 2011 Grammy Awards. The Avett Brothers will be bringing a taste of the South in the form of gleaming harmonies and sweet strings for what is sure to be an intimate and inspiring performance. —Justin de la Rosa

T

he pop culture phrase “foshizzle ma’ nizzle” was once considered nonsense. Now, it’s a phrase more common than the household name behind it. And the stately gangsta who fathered such vernacular used to scare the fashizzle out of us with his gun-toting rhymes and rivalries that enveloped the nation’s coasts. Now he coaches the youth football teams his son plays on. Yes, Snoop Dogg has indeed come a long way — from infamy in the East Coast/West Coast beef that resulted in the slaying of peers Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G., to playing endearing characters like mob boss Huggie Bear in the practically PG film Starsky and Hutch. Snoop Dogg’s latest CD, The Doggumentary, is meant to be a retrospective on his edgier era albums like Doggystyle. But the new effort has more rhymes in autotune than rhymes about automatic weapons. Now he’s into music’s pop sensibilities, not poppin’ Glocks. The Dogfather has grown older and a bit wiser, and those of us who’ve grown with him can catch his upcoming gig at the Sunshine. — Kyle Mullin

Snoop Dogg 8p, Sat., Oct. 22 Sunshine Theater 120 Central SW, 505.764.0249 $37.50

Tickets: zanytickets.com, holdmyticket.com snoopdogg.com sunshinetheaterlive.com

Anthrax WITH TESTAMENT AND DEATH ANGEL

8p, Wed., Oct. 26 Sunshine Theater 120 Central SW, 505.764.0249 $33-$138

Tickets: holdmyticket.com anthrax.com testamentlegions.com sunshinetheaterlive.com

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had this girlfriend one time who had Borderline Personality Disorder — she seemed to make a tangible decision about anything, while simultaneously sabotaging herself at every turn. In other words, she was EXACTLY like the vocalist situation Anthrax has had over the years, only less musical and more depressing. Since breaking onto the scene in 1985, this seminal thrash band from New York City has had three different singers at the helm. Although both John Bush and Dan Nelson each had certain strengths as front men, fans never seemed to fully embrace either. Luckily for its fans, Anthrax recently reunited with original vocalist Joey Belladonna of Among The Living fame, and released a new record, Worship Music. When asked in a recent Local iQ interview about what it’s like to tour in support of new music 30 years after the origination of the group, Anthrax drummer Charlie Benante said, “It freaks me out that that much time has gone by. In my mind I still feel like the same person from back then, but if we were to do this 10 years ago, I would be more concerned about staying relevant and this time I could care less about staying relevant. It’s about doing what I think our fans enjoy.” New music aside, the group is certain to draw heavily from Anthrax’s halcyon era at its Duke City show on October 26, which includes such tracks as “I’m The Man,” “Antisocial” and “Caught in a Mosh.” Any selfrespecting metalhead who once wore board shorts, hi-top Cons and a painter’s cap, should find reason to rejoice. —Jeff Kerby

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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MUSIC

LI VE M USI C

Scalo II Bar Michael Anthony Trio JAZZ 8:30p, FREE

Lotus Nightclub & VIP Ultralounge Lost in a Trance 2 featuring Entheogen vs. Jimmy James, Limit, Cameron Simmons, Kevin Kirkland, and Lotus resident DJ XES HOUSE/TOP 40/DANCE $10 for

South Broadway Cultural Center KG and the Ranger YODELING/

18+/FREE for 21+

6:30p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo 6:30-9:30p,

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill The Sean Healen Band ROCK/FOLK/

FREE

POP/BLUES 8p, $5

Cooperage Larry Conga Show ROCK/BLUES

Mine Shaft Tavern Open Mic Night hosted by Shelly

The Cube Restaurant Los Radiators FOLK/BLUES

8:30p, $5

VARIETY 8p-12a, FREE

6:30-9:30p, FREE

Corrales Bistro Brewery Karl Z PIANO/JAZZ/BLUES 6:30p,

Molly’s Skip Batchelor CLASSIC ROCK 1:305p, Badfish CLASSIC ROCK 5:30-

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

Cheenah Lounge at Santa Ana Star Casino Equal Cut JAZZ/LATIN/BLUES/ROCK/ R&B/OLD SCHOOL FUNK 9p-1a, FREE

CLUB 49 - Inn of the Mountain Gods The Electric Edric Project ROCK 8p1a, FREE

FREE

Effing Bar & Grill DJ Big G ALL KINDS 9p, FREE Imbibe DJ Rotation DANCE 10p, FREE Launchpad Monster Paws, The Fertile Crescent, Bulletproof Tiger and DJ Dirtgirl 9p, $7 Low Spirits The Squash Blossom Boys, Imperial Rooster, Todd and the Fox

9:30p, FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station Soul Kitchen BLUES/SOUL 9p, FREE Outpost Performance Space Roust the House Performance Night LOCAL TEEN BANDS 7:30p, $3 Sandia Resort & Casino: Bien Shur Rooftop Lounge Kari Simmons Group JAZZ/FUNK 9p-1a, FREE

COWBOY SONGS 7p, $15

St. Clair Winery St. Clair Jazz Festival presents Combo Special JAZZ

The Kosmos Alan George Ledergerber EXPERIMENTAL Daniel Francis Doyle AVANT ROCK Zack Freeman VOCAL/HIP HOP 8:30p, $7

Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Fire Season ROCK Suicide Lanes ROCK/COWPUNK/POP 8:30p2a, FREE

CLUB 49 - Inn of the Mountain Gods The Electric Edric Project 8p-1a, FREE

Cooperage Nosotros SALSA 9:30p, $7 Corrales Bistro Brewery Ancient Bones BLUES/JAZZ 6:30P, FREE

Effing Bar & Grill Karaoke 9p, FREE GiG (Santa Fe) Gohar Vardanyan CLASSICAL GUITAR

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Blackbird Buvette Speed’s Birthday Bash 10p, FREE Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder CalQl8trz 80S 9p, FREE

9p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette Geeks Who Drink 7p, FREE Low Life with DJ Caterwaul 9p,

FREE

FREE

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery Squash Blossom Boys BLUEGRASS

Blue Tower Lounge at Buffalo Thunder Karaoke 8p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Asteroid Shop ALTERNATIVE/ AMBIENT The Ghost Wolves BLUES/

3-6p, FREE

Launchpad Da Bruddah Project, Jah Branch, Con Razon, and Ill Conscious 8p, FREE

Leo’s The Electric Edric Project ROCK

Imbibe DJ Akata DANCE 10p, FREE Jazzbah Le Chat Lunatique FILTHY GYPSY JAZZ

7p, FREE

Launchpad Until Chaos, Howitzer, Requiem Mass, Burst Into Flames, Sleep Tastes Pretty,and Burn Alive 7p,

Low Spirits Knife City, Jonathan Warren & Billy Goats, and Blue Rose Ramblers Mine Shaft Tavern The Ruebarbs SOULFUL BLUES 3-7p, FREE

Low Spirits An Evening with Ryan McGarvey

O’Neill’s Pub Rivet Gang BLUEGRASS 4-7p, FREE Outpost Performance Space Iva Bittova and Vladimir Vaclavek

8p, $8

CZECH OLD WORLD

Lotus Nightclub & VIP Ultralounge DJ J-Roc & DJ G HIP HOP/DANCE

7:30p, $15-$20

$10

Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriguez Duo 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Desert Southwest Blues Band BLUES 7-11p, FREE

Molly’s Leap of Faith CLASSIC ROCK 1:30-5p, Rock Bottom BLUES 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station The Memphis P-Tails BLUES 9p, FREE

NHCC Ballroom Saudade BOSSA NOVA/JAZZ/SAMBA 5p, $10/FREE (Co-op Members)

Sandia Resort & Casino: Bien Shur Rooftop Lounge Kari Simmons Group JAZZ/FUNK 9p-1a, FREE

Scalo II Bar Soul Kitchen R&B/SOUL 8:30p, FREE

Sol Santa Fe Santa Fe Oktoberfest Noon-8pm, $10/$15 (advance)/$20 (day of show)

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Corrales Bistro Brewery Skip Batchelor BLUES/OLDIES 1p,

4-8p, FREE

10p, $10 for 18+/FREE for 21+

White hot alt-pop quartet Panic At The Disco, along with openers Patrick Stump and Foxy Shazam, will command the Sunshine Theater stage (Central SW, 505.764.0249, sunshinetheaterlive.com) on Sun., Oct. 16. Show at 8p. Tickets: $25, available at holdmyticket.com.

TUE

8p, $15

8:30p, FREE

SAT

SUN 23

St. Clair Winery St. Clair Jazz Festival presents Patty Littlefield JAZZ 6:30p, FREE Sunshine Theater Snoop Dogg 8p, $37.50 The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Bluegrass Jam Hosted by Cathy Faber BLUEGRASS 1-4p, FREE Chango COVERS 8p, $5

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

St. Clair Winery St. Clair Jazz Festival presents The Peacemakers ACOUSTIC/

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ROCK 8:30p-2a, FREE

Corrales Bistro Brewery Paul Karamov BLUES/ CONTEMPORARY 6:30p, FREE

Imbibe College Night with DJ Automatic & Drummer Camilo Quinones 9p, FREE

Low Spirits Melissa Ferrick and Vandaveer 9p, FREE

Molly’s Kyle Martin COUNTRY 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Jazz Jam with Michael Glynn JAZZ 8p, FREE

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Brent Berry and Josh Martin AFRO COASTAL/AMERICANA 8p, FREE

26

AMERICANA 6p, FREE

WED

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Boris McCutcheon The Townes Van Zandt Brunch AMERICANA

Applebee’s (San Mateo) The Electric Edric Project ROCK

12-3p, FREE

8-11p, FREE

MON 24

Blackbird Buvette Body Language with Justin O’Brien and Rev Mitton 9p, FREE Burt’s Tiki Lounge Vinyl & Verses with UHF B-Boy Crew UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8p-

Blackbird Buvette Blackbird Karaoke with DJ Kammo

Cooperage NM Jazz presents: Jazz Stories

9p, FREE

JAZZ 7p, $10/door $8/students

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Two Wheel Mondays featuring The Jealousy Mountain Duo

Corrales Bistro Brewery Mother Jones Music BLUES/JAZZ

INDIE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Larry Friedman BLUES 6:30-9:30p,

Big Jim Adam and John Stilwagn, Tasty Blues Soup BLUES 8p, FREE

Launchpad Domestic Violence, Who Killed Carla, Big City Bombers, Spin Dry Kittens 9p, $4 Low Spirits The Real Matt Woods, Carlos the Tall, The Lengthy 9p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Sunshine Theater Robert Randolph & The Family Band ROCK 8p, $20 The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Cowgirl Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig 9p, FREE

2a, FREE

6:30p, FREE

FREE

Molly’s Triple X ROCK 5:30-9:30p, FREE Scalo II Bar Cali Shaw Acoustic Showcase with Leah Black 8:30p, FREE Sunshine Theater Anthrax, Testament, Death Angel 8p, $33-$138

The Cowgirl Bar & Grill Arielle Nichole SINGER/SONGWRITER/ ACOUSTIC 8p, FREE

UNM Hospital Pavilion Cafe Duke City Sound BARBERSHOP QUARTET 12-1p, FREE


PAID ADVERTISMENT

SOU N D ADVICE BY RONNIE REYNOLDS

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and names have accrued an interesting and developing series of patterns since the early days of rock ’n’ roll. In the 1960s, having the word “The” as the first word seemed to be the pattern: The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. In the 1970s it seemed to be a one-word band name, like Kiss, America or Bread. The 1980s brought the world the one-name artist: Prince, Madonna and Cher. The second decade of the 21st century has

begun to develop its own pattern for band names — namely, animals. In the last few years we’ve seen plenty: Deerhunter, Danger Mouse, Band Of Horses, Fleet Foxes, Fruit Bats, Gorillaz, Grizzly Bear, Seabear and Bears, to name just a few. The following artists are definite standouts in the animal-band-name category, as their recent releases attest.

Justin Ginn, co-founder of Audioair uses their flagship product to listen to the game while VP Chip Lile looks on. Audioair will be featured at their Product Premiere at the Uptown Sports Bar from 2-7 pm this Saturday.

I BREAK HORSES

SEAPONY

PANDA BEAR

Hearts

Go With Me

Tomboy

Cooperative Music, 2011

Hardly Art 2011

Paw Tracks 2011

This Stockholm, Sweden, duo’s debut album is a 40-minute electronic, pop, psychedelic, shoe-gazey parade of sound. I’m positive, as kids, this is what we imagined music would sound like in 2011. With the development of technology in music, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to determine if a sound is electronic or analog, and I Break Horses is a master of disguise.

Is there a new Seattle sound? Seapony’s music is stark, dark and nicely monotone. The quick songs conjure images of rain-spotted windows and vast, gray bodies of water. The band’s songs are tinged with a country twang, but not backwoods country; more like in-the-middle-of-nowhere country with fuzzy guitars, massively reverbed vocals and overtly simple electronic drum beats. It’s Elliott Smithinspired, Pacific Northwest lo-fi with female vocals clearly intent on lulling the listener into a dark, musty sleep.

Now that Noah Lennox of Animal Collective fame has teamed with Pete “Sonic Boom” Kember of Spacemen 3/Spectrum, his music has become more strangely focused, incorporating actual song structure. Instead of the extreme Pet Sounds weirdness of his first three albums, Lennox and Kember have managed to bridge the gap slightly from experimental to commercial, much like Spacemen 3 in the 1990s.

Audioair™ prepares to ‘Unmute your world’ It all began with a problem, then an idea. Justin Ginn recalls the moment when the thought came to him a couple of years ago. “I’d gotten off work and was sitting at a local sports bar, trying to watch my favorite team play. The ref had just made a bad call and as usual, the sound was muted. I remember thinking to myself, ‘Why can’t I hear this game? And why hasn’t someone invented a way to listen to it on a Smartphone?’ That’s when I realized there might be an opportunity to solve this problem for me and for everybody else.“ He sat on the concept for a while, but the idea would not rest in his mind. “It just kept coming back to me so I took that as a sign to keep going,” Ginn recalls. He shared his concept with his general manager at Old Tymer’s Café in Durango, Colorado, Ryan Danford, who liked the idea so much that he agreed to finance the initial development of the concept. Assembling a team of developers, engineers and seasoned managers with a track record in wireless communications and network technologies, startup company Airborne Media Group was born, and now just one year later they are rolling out their first and flagship product, audioair™ - a Smartphone-meets-advanced IT networking technology that delivers a unique and personalized listening solution. Albuquerque is the market Airborne Media Group has chosen for their product launch. “We liked Albuquerque because it’s a friendly place, plus it’s right in our back yard,” Ginn states. So get ready folks– because this is a product that will

be taken worldwide, and you’re getting it here first. Imagine yourself sitting at your favorite establishment with a few friends. The game is on, but you can’t hear it. No problem – you pull out your Smartphone, click on the audioair™ app you’ve downloaded and select the channel you want to listen to from the channel list on your screen. Voila! The sound is available right through your Smartphone speaker, or you can plug into your earbud headset for private listening. The bar must subscribe to the audioair™ network for the user to connect, so ask for it at your favorite establishment. The genius of this technology is its simplicity, yet it also offers some additional features to expand the user’s entertainment experience. “We wanted this to be not only a useful app, but also fun and exciting. That’s where the social and gaming features come in,” Ginn explains. Not only can you chat with your Facebook friends and others on the audioair™ network, one will also find interactive entertainment on the 2.0 version such as sports trivia and sports pools. Audioair™ will make its debut at their Product Premiere on September 17th from 2-7 pm at the Uptown Sports Bar. It’s free to the public, and along with free food, music and prizes, all will have the opportunity to try out the audioair™ product. Welcome to Albuquerque, audioair™ - we look forward to hearing what we’ve been missing.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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ARTS

OPENI NGS

SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Oct. 21 for the Oct. 27 issue. Send entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 505.243.8173, a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 Name of Exhibit/Event Description of exhibit/event VENUE/GALLERY ADDRESS website List events any time @ local-iQ.com

Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

THU

13

THROUGH NOV. 26 (SANTA FE) EXHIBITION PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Dianna Shomaker is board president for the Placitas Artists Series, which has been showcasing some of the nation’s finest classical musicians in the village of Placitas since 1986. The concert series also features the work of local artists, and is held in Las Placitas Presbyterian Church.

Community orchestration Placitas Artists Series has brought fine music and art to a village setting for the past 25 years BY JENNIFER HOUSTON he Placitas Artists Series, which celebrates its silver anniversary this year, has quietly showcased some of the finest musicians from across the nation in a series of nine classical concerts year after year. Tucked away in the quaint village of Placitas and graciovvusly hosted at Las Placitas Presbyterian Church, the series began in 1986 when a group CONCERT of musicians met at a dinner party and decided Placitas to call themselves the Artists Series Helios Quartet. They MARK KAPLAN AND played for friends and YAEL WEISS locals, and after hearing 2p, Sun., Oct. 16 the group, audiences Las Placitas Presbyterian wanted more. The Church following year, the 7 Paseo de San Antonio, Placitas Artists Series Placitas, 505.867.8080 (PAS) was founded, $20 said Dianna Shomaker, placitasartistsseries.org PAS board president, in a recent interview with Local iQ. Dubbed in an early review “as one of the best bargains for quality music in the area,” a cornerstone of the PAS concerts is Willy Sucre, who was lead violist for the nowdefunct New Mexico Symphony Orchestra and is the creator of the PAS. Sucre has kept the bar high for the series from the beginning.

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The first concert of this season, for example, was held Sep. 18 and featured La Cantina Quartet, currently the faculty quartet-in-residence at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. La Cantina performed the works of Argentinian composer Alberto Ginastera’s String Quartet No. 1, and Mexican composer Silvestre Revuelta’s Musical de Feria (which goes along with Sucre’s stated mission to promote Mexican and Latin music). The quartet was given a standing ovation by the packed house of 150, seated in the traditional wooden church pews. The rest of the performances in this year’s series will be an array of classical to contemporary music, and each performance is preceded by an art exhibition and reception featuring art in a range of media and styles — from watercolor, photography, mixed media to jewelry. Shomaker said she finds it astonishing that throughout PAS’s 25 years, all the musicians have been paid solely through donations from individuals and local businesses and ticket sales. Shomaker believes that PAS is a vital part of Sandoval County because it supports a sense of community through music and art. “One has only to step through the oak doors of the church and feel that community at work,” Las Placitas Presbyterian Pastor Drew Henry remarked in passing while Shomaker was being interviewed. Las Placitas Presbyterian Church was built in 1896, but it wasn’t until the 1980s, when major construction to the church was done to expand the sanctuary to seat more churchgoers, that it was realized the sanctuary was balanced acoustically and could be used for fine musical performances. What began as a local benefit 25 years ago has now flourished into an event that hosts internationally known musicians. It goes to show that classical music is still appreciated and desired by the public, and funded by donations and sponsorships, including by individuals not living in Placitas, Shomaker related. If you are a music lover, this series is an event to attend. Placitas residents have a tremendous sense of pride in their village and the musical treat they offer the public, and they welcome Albuquerque residents and others. The next series performance will feature the chamber music of Mark Kaplan and Yael Weiss. Kaplan is a graduate of the Julliard School and has performed with nearly every major American orchestra. Weiss has also performed across the United States, as well as in Europe.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

Autumn Gold, New Mexico: Paintings of the Season, 19201970 The luminous golden tones of New Mexico’s fall palette inspires this collection of seasonal paintings by prominent artists, including Jozef Bakos, Gustave Bauman, Emil Bisttram, Fremont Ellis, Eric Gibberd, William Lumpkins, Ila McAfee, Alfred Morang, Lloyd Moylan, Helmuth Naumer, Sheldon Parsons, Carl Redin, Albert Schmidt, Ben Turner and Stuart Walker 9:30a-5:30p, Mon.Sat, FREE WILLIAM R. TALBOT FINE ART, ANTIQUE MAPS & PRINTS 129 W. SAN FRANCISCO, 505.982.1559

williamtalbot.com THROUGH OCT. 28

The 6th Annual ‘A View With Room’ Art Exhibition & Sale Open Space Visitor Center has hosted the annual ‘A View With Room’ art show for five years. All paintings will be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going to support Open Space Alliance 1-4p, FREE OPEN SPACE VISITOR CENTER 6500 COORS BLVD. NW, 505.897.8831

cabq.gov/openspace/viewwithroom. html THROUGH OCT. 21

Zane Bennett Contemporary Art Reception and Exhibition Zane Bennett Contemporary Art presents this exhibition of prints celebrating the 20th century’s greatest contemporary master artists, including George Condo, Richard Diebenkorn, Roy Lichtenstein, and Edward Ruscha among others Mon Sat. 10a-5p, Sun. 12-4p, FREE ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART 435 S. GUADALUPE ST, 505.982.8111

zanebennettgallery.com


ARTS

O P E NI N G S/ PER F O R M A NC E S THROUGH OCT. 20 EXHIBITION

THROUGH OCT. 29 EXHIBITION

Jon Garcia: Wood-turned sculptures A display of Garcia’s entire set of exploded model renderings for his “Wormhole Vessel.” 10a-6p, Mon.-

Ife Fidudusola Exhibition An exhibition of works by Ife Fidudusola, comprised of batiks, pen and ink drawings, wood collages, fiber art works and bead mosaics, on display during most of October. 10a-8p, Mon.-Thu.; 10a-

Sat.; 10a-8p, First Fri. of each month, FREE PALETTE CONTEMPORARY ART 7400 MONTGOMERY NE-SUITE 22, 505.855.7777

palettecontemporary.com THROUGH OCT. 15

Cuatro Hermanos This exhibition presents the art of the Simpson family, aka Cuatro Hermanos, a family guild of artists. 9a-1:30p, FREE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH 3701 CARLISLE NE, 505.884.1801

THROUGH DEC. 18

Sinners & Saints: 15th-19th Century Paintings A visual feast of religious painting from the 15th-century Renaissance through the 19th-century neoclassical period in Europe and the New World. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

unm.edu/-artmuse THROUGH DEC. 18

An Inquisitive Eye, Seeing Into Prints This show provides visitors a chance to view significant prints and printed books from the museum’s permanent collection, which spans the history of printmaking from 1493 to the present. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

unm.edu/-artmuse THROUGH DEC. 18

Re-Imagining American Identities This photography show seeks to provoke discussion about how we individually and collectively define ourselves as Americans. Drawn from the museum’s extensive collection of photographs, these portraits brings us face to face with the diversity of American life. 10a4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

unm.edu/-artmuse THROUGH NOV. 14 OPENING RECEPTION

The Albuquerque Rail Yards Exhibit This unique exhibit features images that capture the empty Albuquerque Rail Yard. 6-8p, Thurs., FREE THE KIMO THEATRE ART GALLERY 423 CENTRAL NW, 505.891.5101

abqrailyards.blogspot.com THROUGH OCT. 31 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Landscapes of the Southwest Paintings by Cecilia Kirby Binkley and Linda Petersen. Photographs by Woody Galloway and Steven A. Jackson. 5-7p, FREE NEW CONCEPT GALLERY 610 CANYON, 505.795.7570

newconceptgallery.com

5p, Sat, FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY AUDITORIUM 744 LOMA COLORADO NE, 505.891.5013 EXT 3033

THROUGH JAN. 6 EXHIBITION

Young Brides, Old Shirts: Macedonian Embroidered Dress This exhibition will show 27 mannequins dressed in multiple layers, highlighting the cultural activity of making and wearing clothes. 10a-5p, Tue.-Sun., $9-$20 THE MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MUSEUM HILL, CAMINO LEJO OFF OLD SANTA FE TRAIL, 505.476.1200

internationalfolkart.org THROUGH JAN. 7 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Superheroes: Icons of Good, Evil & Everything In Between Superheroes is a multi-media, group exhibition about heroes, villains and other less-definable examples of human possibility. It explores the way we absorb these archetypes, and for good or ill, use them to inspire, author and rationalize our behavior. 6-8p, Sat., Oct. 1; 12-5p, Tue.-Sat., FREE 516 ARTS 516 CENTRAL SW, 505.242.1445

516arts.org THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITIONS

October Exhibits This month’s exhibits at this Madrid gallery include Ford Robbins’ photography and the textile dyes of Marcia Petty. 3-5p, FREE THE JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 STATE HWY 14, 505.471.1054

turquoisetrail.org THROUGH OCT 29 EXHIBITION

The Art of Lisa Chernoff, Ming Franz, Jo Schuman, and Natalie Searl Ceramic, watercolor and photography. FREE PLACITAS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 6 MILES EAST OF I-5 ON NM 165, 505.867.8080

placitasarts.org THROUGH OCT. 29 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Victory Over Violence Victory Over Violence is a movement to help inspire young people to identify and root out the violence in their daily lives and in their community. Opening reception with guest speakers, including City Councilor Rey Garduño, Dr. William Pratt and Dr. Michael Johnstone. 1:30-3:30p, Sun.; 9a-5p, Mon.-Fri., FREE ALBUQUERQUE CENTER FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE 202 HARVARD SE, 505.268.9557

THROUGH OCT. 23 PERFORMANCE

THROUGH OCT. 16 WORKSHOP/CLASS

and they do it through improv teamwork. 8p, $6

THROUGH NOV. 6 PERFORMANCE

Dead End Killington Drive: The Jack O-Lantern Murders This musical mystery by Richard Atkins features a copycat murderer killing people who reside on the dead-end street, Killington Drive.

Non-toxic Photogravure/ Solarplate Etching This four-day workshop provides an exciting opportunity to create beautiful limited edition prints using two distinctly different methods. The first results in rich and detailed photographic images, the second is a great alternative to lithography for artists who love to draw. 9a-5p, $285 (includes

THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112 B, 505.404.1578

Home This Tony Award-winning dark comedy, in the tradition of 1960s absurdist drama, follows the rambling and often hilarious chatter of four eccentric mismatched characters — two pretentious British “gentlemen” and two vulgar working-class “ladies” — that becomes a not-sosubtle commentary on a nation in decline.

6:30p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$35 EAST MOUNTAIN CENTER FOR THEATRE, VISTA GRANDE COMMUNITY CENTER 15 LA MADERA, 505.286.1950

emct.org

2 small plates and all printing materials)

THROUGH OCT. 27 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Harwood’s 2nd LGBTQ Exhibit: Asking & Telling Join artists from New Mexico, Illinois, California and New York as they use visual and written works of art to explore the myriad experiences of coming out of the closet. 10a-4p, FREE HARWOOD ART CENTER, ESCUELA DEL SOL MONTESSORI 1114 7TH NW, 505.242.6327

NEW GROUNDS 3812 CENTRAL SE SUITE 100 A & B, 505.268.8952

FILM SERIES

Spanish Cinema: “En la Ciudad sin Limites” The Spanish Film Series presents a provocative tour of Spanish cinema’s history through a series of movies that weaves together the country’s cinematography. 7p,

harwoodartcenter.org

FREE

THROUGH NOV. 25 EXHIBITION

NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER BANK OF AMERICA THEATER 1701 4TH ST SW, 505.724.4777

This is This: Largely Small Paintings Michael Hudock’s first paintings were backgrounds for his photographs. In This is This Hudock layers paint onto pages from dictionaries, old maps, photographs, digital prints and bits of trash, then scratches away at the paint to reveal what lies beneath. Mon.-Fri., 2-5:30p, FREE INPOST ARTSPACE AT THE OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE 210 YALE SE, 505.268.0044

outpostspace.org

albuquerque.cervantes.es

FRI 14 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

PAINTKIT by Jane Abrams and Aaron Karp This show of work features two of Albuquerque’s best-known and longtime members of the local arts community.They have both been recipients of the prestigious Pollock-Krasner foundation award. 5-8p, FREE

THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITION/RECEPTION

EXHIBIT/208 208 BROADWAY, 505.450.6884

Angel Dust Surreal Southwest painter Sam Esmoer again enlightens us with his fish eye impression of taverns, taco stands and street life. Esmoer creates myopic architecture and vignettes that tell a very mysterious story. 5-8p, FREE MARIPOSA GALLERY 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.6828

mariposa-gallery.com

artoon@swcp.com FRIDAYS THROUGH OCT. 28 PERFORMANCE

The One Night Stanleys The One Night Stanleys were voted Best of Burque’s Best Comedy Troupe three years running. The four members of the The One Night Stanleys win their laughs,

theboxabq.com THROUGH OCT. 28 PERFORMANCE

The Show Composed of eight talented performers from Albuquerque and Santa Fe, The Show is a whipsmart short form improv group, created and directed by Cody Dove. 9p & 10:15p, Fri.; 9p, Sat., $8

7:30p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10$15

THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112 B, 505.404.1578

THE VORTEX THEATRE 2004 1/2 CENTRAL SE, 505.247.8600

theboxabq.com

THROUGH NOV. 6 PERFORMANCE

PERFORMANCE

Vampires, Zombies, and Shakespeare, OH MY! and We Rehearsed for Four Weeks and All We Got Was This Lousy Play Written by Jason Witter and directed by Kelsey Montoya, a group of actors are locked inside The Box Performance Space, and the only way they can get out is by performing this play. Will this throng of thespians come up with a worthy show in time, or will they be trapped inside The Box forever? 6p, $10 THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112B, 505.400.1848

theboxabq.com THROUGH OCT. 30 PERFORMANCE

Satan’s School for Girls: The Reunion Presented by The Dolls and Aux Dog Theatre. They were the most popular girls at Satan’s School for Girls, Class of 1959. It’s 18 years later and they are having their reunion, only to discover one of them is the mother of the antichrist. Armageddon, here we come. 8p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $15 AUX DOG THEATRE 3011 MONTE VISTA NE, 505.254.7716

auxdog.com

vortexabq.org

Cabaret Take your seat at the Kit Kat Klub, the “perfectly marvelous” cabaret where singer Sally Bowles meets writer Cliff Bradshaw. As the two pursue a life of pleasure in Weimar Berlin, the world outside the Klub begins to splinter. 8p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun, 8p, Thu. Oct. 27, $18-$24 ADOBE THEATRE 9813 4TH NW, 505.898.2222

adobetheater.org FRIDAYS THROUGH OCT. 28 EXHIBITION

Fluid States — Yoon Cho Fluid States captures the moments of continuously creating our reinvented persona in response to our surroundings and relationships with others. The exhibition explores the state of progress and transformation rather than the end result that is static and unchangeable. 5-8p, FREE SCA CONTEMPORARY ART AND ARTLAB STUDIOS 1 BLOCK SOUTH OF I-40 BETWEEN 5TH AND 6TH, 505.228.3749

scacontemporary.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITION/RECEPTION

Day of the Dead This annual invitational Day of the Dead show is always a roster of talented artists. Two- and threedimensional artworks, as well as jewelry will be exhibited in this exhibition. 5-8p, FREE MARIPOSA GALLERY 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.6828

mariposa-gallery.com THROUGH OCT. 31 EXHIBITION/RECEPTION

Interactions - Art In Use New porcelain work by Kathryne Cyman, who is a part-time faculty member in the Fine Art Department at UNM. Cyman was nominated and selected as a Local Treasure. She has had many solo shows and museum shows. 5-8:30p, Fri. Oct. 7; 10:30a-5:30p, Tue.-Fri.; 11a-5:30p, Sat., By appt. only, Mon., FREE WEYRICH GALLERY/THE RARE VISION ART GALERIE 2935 D LOUSIANA NE

weyrichgallery.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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smart ARTS

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William Betts: Terminal hotography, at its most basic, is a process of capturing an image Oct. 14-Nov. 23 in its natural essence. But for GALLERY HOURS: many photographers, that’s just the 11a-4p, Tue.-Sat. Richard Levy Gallery start. William Betts’ newest exhibition, 514 Central SW, 505.766.9888 Terminal, features Betts’ unusual technique for adding pixelated, painterly FREE touches to his photographed images — levygallery.com with striking results. Betts traveled to airports all over North America to compile his images for this show, which focus on the beauty and simplicity of an airplane taking flight. The construction process of his photo/paintings starts with digital photos, which are morphed into something much more complex through image transfer onto slick plexiglass. Betts drills the plexiglass with thousands of tiny holes, which are then filled with acrylic paint to create an abstract, majestic finished image — shifting from every angle, varying from the crystal-clear far-away view to up-close pixelated pigments of viewings at close range. —Jessey Cherne

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alloween: the only time of year when chicks can dress sleazy and not be deemed easy. Speaking of saucy dames, it’s time once again for the annual Halloween antics of Albuquerque’s premier drag theater ensemble, The Dolls. This year’s play, Satan’s School for Girls: The Reunion, promises to be among their best Halloween performances yet. Gibby, Muffy, Ashley and Gidget were the most popular girls at Satan’s School for Girls, class of 1959. Now, 18 years postgrad, they’re invited to an unexpected reunion, where they discover that one of them is the Antichrist’s mother. Armageddon, here we come! Nobody does camp stage shows better than The Dolls. Naturally, this year’s Halloween show audiences can gleefully expect parodies of classic ‘70s horror flicks that taught the world to be frightened of devilish insemination, washed-out bridges and the barrel curl. —Lisa VanDyke

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

Satan’s School for Girls: The Reunion Oct. 14-30 SHOW TIMES:

8p, Fri.-Sat.; 2p, Sun.; Aux Dog Theatre 3011 Monte Vista NE, 505.254.7716

$15 auxdog.com

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he intricate, yet ordinary, lives of two strangers who meet and strike up a friendship might sound like thin fare for a night of theater, but Home will move audience members in a way they never expected. David Storey’s Tony Award-winning dark comedy has been said to be a biting commentary on British life. The story follows two gentlemen in the 1960s who have never met but share similarities that are revealed through their ramblings about life, love and the weather. The pair further reveal themselves as they interact with two working class “ladies” that flirt shamelessly throughout the play. The ending of the piece is not what one would assume. Since the play’s premiere in London in 1970, Home has received critical acclaim from audiences and critics everywhere, with both Broadway and offBroadway productions. The play is locally directed by Brian Hansen. —Jessey Cherne

Home 7:30p, Fri.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., Oct. 14-Nov. 6 Vortex Theatre 2004-1/2 Central SE, 505.247.8600 $15 vortexabq.org


LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

33


ARTS

OP E N I N G S/ P E R F O R M A N C E S CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

THROUGH OCT. 16 FESTIVAL/MARKET

SAT 15

Tijeras Arts Market Come for the art, stay for the music. Live music and entertainment with a juried arts and crafts fair in a lovely, shady setting. 10a-5p, FREE

PERFORMANCE

Hansel and Gretel and the Kingdom-Wide Sugar Ban This humorous retelling of the classic folktale “Hansel and Gretel.” 2p, $10 THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112B, 505.400.1848

theboxabq.com PERFORMANCE

Vampire Hamburger A group of middle school kids enter an abandoned burger joint called Monster Burger. 6p, $10 THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE 100 GOLD SW STE. 112B, 505.400.1848

theboxabq.com THROUGH OCT. 16 EXHIBITION/TOUR

24th Annual Galisteo Studio Tour More than 30 artists open their home studios one weekend a year in this historic adobe village. Included are painters, printmakers, potters, weavers, photographers, woodworkers, jewelers and sculptors. 10a-5p, FREE GALISTEO 20 MILES SOUTH OF SANTA FE, 505.466.2121

galisteostudiotour.org

488 E. HIGHWAY 333 (ROUTE 66) IN TIJERAS, 505.281.9611

tijerasartsmarket.com WORKSHOP/CLASS

Family Program: Drawing Basic Portraits After viewing portraits in the current exhibition From New York to Corrymore: Robert Henri and Ireland, students will learn to create their own portraits. Using a variety of provided materials, different techniques will be demonstrated to foster an understanding of portrait drawing. Led by Meriom Feder, artist, educator, therapist. 9:30-11:30a,

Johann Sebastian Bach. Also on the program will be Taloa’Hiloah (Thunder song) for solo Timpani. Composed by Jerod Tate and performed by Douglas Cardwell, this performance is part of the Celebration of Native American Composers series. 10:30a, $5-$15

WED 19

CHURCH OF BEETHOVEN 1715 5TH NW, 505.234.4611

TALKING FOUNTAIN GALLERY 4207 LEAD SE, 505.369.4369

churchofbeethoven.org

TUE

18

PERFORMANCE

Global DanceFest presents: Faustin Linyekula/Studios Kabako Three dancers twist and rage to the seething poems of Antoine Vumilia Muhindo and the driving rhythms of Congolese pop and Sex Machine funk star Flamme Kapaya with his five-member on-stage band in a fierce celebration of hope in the face of despair. 8p, $15-$50 N4TH THEATER 2904 4TH NW, 505.344.4542

vsartsnm.org

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 JOHNSON, 505.946.1039

SPECIAL EVENT

SUN

16

PERFORMANCE

Double Tongue Week 3 Amy Beeder will be reading her new poetry work inspired by Sonata No 2 in A Minor by

Figural Fountain Figure drawing night at this gallery. Bring your creativity. A live model will be featured. 7:30-9:30p, $5

AUDITION

FREE

okmuseum.org

CLASS/WORKSHOP

Reader’s Club: The Art Spirit Examine Robert Henri’s beliefs and theories as presented in his classic book, The Art Spirit, which continues to be a mustread for artists and lovers of art. Discussions led by Elaine Trzebiatowski. 6-7:30p, FREE MUSEUM EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, 505.946.1039

okmuseum.org

A Star Trek Thanksgiving The Box is looking for young actors/actresses from ages 8-17 years old. It will consist of a cold reading, and short-form improv games. To audition, contact Kristin Berg. 6:30-8:30p, FREE THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112B, 505.404.1578

theboxabq.com

THU 20 FILM SERIES

Spanish Cinema: “Un Franco 14 Pesetas” The Spanish Film Series presents a provocative tour of Spanish cinema’s history through a series of movies that weave together the country’s cinematography. 7p, FREE NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER BANK OF AMERICA THEATER 1701 4TH ST SW, 505.724.4777

albuquerque.cervantes.es THROUGH OCT. 29 PERFORMANCE

The Glass Menagerie The Albuquerque High School Drama Department presents this classic family drama as part of the 2011 Albuquerque Theatre Guild Tennessee Williams Festival. 7p, Thu.-Sat., Prices TBA ALBUQUERQUE HIGH SCHOOL 800 ODELIA NE, 505.843.6400

AUDITION

Into The Woods Jr. We are looking for actors/actresses from ages 8-17 years old. it will consist of a cold reading, and one song performed a capella prepared by the auditionee. If you have any other questions please feel free to email us at info@theboxabq.com. 6:30-8:30p, FREE THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112B, 505.404.1578

theboxabq.com

FRI 21 PERFORMANCE

Vampires, Zombies, and Shakespeare, OH MY! & We Rehearsed for Four Weeks and All We Got Was This Lousy Play A group of actors are locked inside The Box Performance Space, and the only way they can get out is by performing this play. Will these thespians deliver a worthy show, or be trapped inside The Box forever? 6p, $10 THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112 B, 505.400.1848

theboxabq.com

34

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

THROUGH NOV. 23 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Ian Campbell: Emergence Campell’s paintings are meant to be viewed as melodic studies in an attempt to find the freedom and responsive range which is the natural province of music: a conversation between structure and interpretation. 5-8p, FREE PALETTE CONTEMPORARY ART & CRAFT 7400 MONTGOMERY NE SUITE 22, 505.855.7777

palettecontemporary.com RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

Hung Liu: Pressed Memory Liu, a highly respected and widely collected American artist, addresses issues of marginality and displacement in her prints and paintings. This exhibit debuts five new Tamarind lithographs, alongside prints by Hung Liu from other workshops. 6-7:30p, FREE TAMARIND INSTITUTE 2500 CENTRAL SE, 505.277.3901

tamarind.unm.edu THROUGH NOV. 13 PERFORMANCE

Vanities Written by Jack Heifner and Directed by Robin Lane, this play has had a long history on stage and TV. It won the Drama Desk Award as Oustanding New Play when it opened on Broadway in 1976, and has been a favorite in regional and community theaters ever since. 8p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $15 ADOBE THEATRE 9813 4TH SW, 505.989.9222

adobetheater.com THROUGH OCT. 23 PERFORMANCE

Defending the Caveman Broadway’s longest-running solo play will open for a three-day run at the historic KiMo Theatre. The wildly popular comedy was written by Rob Becker over a threeyear period in which he made an informal study of psychology, prehistory, anthropology, sociology and mythology to learn all about the many elements that create the “caveman” of today. 2p, $25-$35 KIMO THEATRE 423 CENTRAL NW, 505.768.3522

cabq.gov/kimo THROUGH OCT. 30 PERFORMANCE

Doctor Faustus Dr. John Faustus has an unrivaled lust for knowledge. He consumes and masters every academic field of study he can, until only one kind of knowledge remains unknown — magic. What follows is a dark tale of ambition, temptation and despair as the forces of Heaven and Hell do battle for the soul of one man. 7:30p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $8-$12 THE EXPERIMENTAL THEATER UNM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 505.277.4332

theatre.unm.edu

SPECIAL EVENT

Artsee ArtSee is a collaboration of arts and cultural organizations committed to the sustainability of the arts in Santa Fe by providing access and engagement opportunities to a younger demographic. 5-7p, FREE GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 JOHNSON, 505.946.1037

facebook.com/pages/ ArtSee/189026791134048

SAT

22

PERFORMANCE

Hansel and Gretel and the Kingdom-Wide Sugar Ban This humorous retelling of the classic folktale features a healthcrazed wizard who longs to turn every sweet in the kingdom into something healthy, a wicked king, a vain princess, and a super-hip woodcutter in plaid. 2p, $10 THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW SUITE 112B, 505.400.1848

theboxabq.com FESTIVAL/FAIR

Placitas Flea Market and Arts & Crafts Fair Great variety and bargains on fine art, crafts, furniture, antiques, collectibles, Hummels, gold/silver/ Native jewelry, watches/clocks and more. Vendors welcome’ stalls start at $10 and proceeds benefit Placitas Community Library. 7a-4p, FREE PLACITAS COMMUNITY LIBRARY 453 HIGHWAY 165

placitaslibrary.com SPECIAL EVENT

MATANZA! The Spanish Colonial Arts Society is presenting a traditional pig roast with side dishes at the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art. The cooking show by Steven Otero and crew will begin around 8a and lunch will be served from 11a-2p, rain or shine. Lowrider cars will be on display all day. 8a-2p, $12-$30 MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 CAMINO LEJO ON MUSEUM HILL, 505.982.2226

spanishcolonial.org

SUN

23

PERFORMANCE

Double Tongue Week 4 Gary Brower will read a poem inspired by John’s Book of Alleged Dances for String Quartet and sampled percussion sounds by John Adams. Musicians will be David Felberg and Gabriel Gordon, violins, Justin Pollack, viola, and Dana Winograd, cello. 10:30a, $5-$15 CHURCH OF BEETHOVEN 1715 5TH NW, 505.234.4611

churchofbeethoven.org


THEATER

Albuquerque theater scene benefits from one organizer’s efforts

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here is a theatrical stereotype of the egotistic prima donna who always speaks in rounded tones and demands to be the center of attention. In contrast, the serious theater person is often mild and self-effacing, with a deep desire to just be a part of the collaboration. Every successful theater venture has at least one of these tireless idealists. In this respect, I have always looked to my “go-to-person” for theater in Albuquerque: Linda López McAlister. In just my second week in Albuquerque, Linda led me on a personal tour through the National Hispanic Cultural Center (NHCC), where she’s both a staff member and a docent. It was a thrilling introduction to the deep sense of art and culture that exists in our new home town. She answered all of our questions about the NHCC and Albuquerque theater with pride and enthusiasm. Later, Linda assisted my husband, Shep, on his first directing assignment, introducing him to actors and production personnel. Linda has provided us both with theatrical employment, guidance in the local theater community and many exciting discussions of theater. She loves theater and has an open

generosity of heart for all who pursue it. She has never said to me, “Enough already — don’t you retain anything I say to you?” In acting, we are taught that the answer should always be, “YES!” and with Linda, it always is. In addition to being the founding artistic director of Camino Real Productions, Linda is vice president of the Albuquerque Theatre Guild (ATG) and the chair of their “Buzz Committee,” where she collects all ATG theater information, including season announcements, dates and times. Linda began her love for theater as a teenager in Los Angeles, working with a teacher from the prestigious Actors’ Lab. She became a member of Actors Equity Association (AEA).

Eager to experience theater and New York City, Linda attended Barnard College and spent every spare moment at the theater or in the theater department. Through a series of events — failing a final exam at Barnard in order to get to a summer stock gig in Michigan; making up that class by taking philosophy courses at UCLA while pursuing her acting career; and then experiencing a few years of the struggling actor’s life — Linda went back to school again, earned a Ph.D. in philosophy at Cornell, and became a philosophy professor with the intention of pursuing theater in the summers. When this proved to be impossible, she spent the next 30 years as a philosophy professor and dean, doing almost no theater. Upon retirement in 2000, Linda moved to Santa Fe to join Santa Fe Stages, an AEA theater company that operated from 1994-2004. A broken ankle prevented a fourth year in this position, so Santa Fe Stages hired Linda to serve as dramaturge for their production of Copenhagen, when the director requested a researcher. When Linda moved to Albuquerque in 2004, she was cast as Francisca, a nun, in Measure for Measure. She discovered that Albuquerque theaters

select their seasons from proposals submitted by potential directors. Armed with Copenhagen research and rehearsal experience, Linda submitted a proposal and became the director of a very successful production of the play in Albuquerque. The female lead in Copenhagen lived in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, and after the production closed here, the cast traveled to San Miguel to perform the show. In 2006, this dual-city approach became the impetus for Linda’s founding of her own theatre company, Camino Real Productions. In collaboration with the NHCC, Camino Real produces one stage production per season. In addition to Rancho Pancho, this year they collaborated with NHCC, Teatro Nuevo México and KUNM to produce the Official New Mexico Centennial Project, Night Over Taos. Linda López McAlister became involved with the founding and ongoing health of the Albuquerque Theatre Guild because she has found the Albuquerque theater community “so easy to become a part of, easy to get in a play, easy to direct — warm and welcoming. That was my experience and I want to help make it that way for others.” And indeed she is.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

35


COMMUNITY

C OM M U N I T Y E V E NT S THU

13

THROUGH OCT. 31

Rio Grande Community Farm 14th Annual Maize Maze A seven-acre dinosaur-shaped maze and game, plus a children’s activity area, farm stand, food vendors, petting zoo and pumpkin patch. 9a-3p, Mon-Thu., 9a-9p, Fri-Sat., 9a-6p, Sun, $7/age 12 & up) $5/age 3-11) FREE/Under 3 1701 MONTANO NW, 505.345.4580

riograndefarm.org FUNDRAISER/BENEFIT

Peace Begins in Me A benefit for international peacethrough-education programs at the Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. Silent auction, raffle, balloon glow and more. 6p, $25 ALBUQUERQUE INTERNATIONAL BALLOON MUSEUM 9201 BALLOON MUSEUM NE, 505.255.2042

brownpapertickets.com SPECIAL EVENT

Stephen Hunt presents The Best Live Comedy Hunt has tickled funny bones at LA’s Comedy Store, The Improv Comedy Club in Hollywood and even on Disney’s cruise ships. His nickname is the “Southwest Borscht Belt Comic” because he performs “Take my wife Por Favor” kind of jokes. 7:15-9:15p, $10-$15 SILVA LANES/PUNKY’S PLACE 3010 EUBANK NE, 505.340.4654

thebestlivecomedy.com laughandbericher.com

FRI 14 LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Living Soil is Where It’s At Dr. Elaine Ingham, Rodale Institute, discusses healthy soil biology, fertility and high production yield. 7-9p, $10 SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, WEST WING LECTURE HALL, ROOM 216 6401 RICHARDS, 818.913.2877

carboneconomyseries.com

SAT

15

LECTURE/DEMO

Foundations: Steps to Better Health Dr. Daniel Prince will discuss the importance of the feet and their role in the “kinetic chain” of events. Dr. Prince will also tell you how to treat foot problems, buy the right shoe and how to heal from devastating foot injuries and avoid future ones. 10a, FREE

36

LECTURE/DEMO

17th Annual Dia del Rio Event Participate in a variety of conservation projects that nurture and protect the bosque and river, including trail work, re-vegetation and trash clean up. 8:30a-1p, FREE

Science of Sound at the Library! Learn how sound is produced. Test your abilities with real instruments from around the world. 4-5:30p,

BERNALILLO COUNTY DURAND OPEN SPACE 4812 ISLETA SW, 505.247.1191

LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Imam Shafi Lecture Imam Shafi will talk about how we are related, the teachings of the Koran and will debunk some misconceptions about Islam. 3p,

WED

19

LECTURE/DISCUSSION

DISCUSSION/LECTURE

Drawing from Experience: Free Evening of Exploration Explore how learning can lead to personal transformation and the expression of our innate gifts and longings. RSVP: programs@ aloveoflearning.org. 6:30-9p, FREE

Introduction to Soil Foodweb Dr. Elaine Ingham explains how soil becomes food for plants.

loveoflearning.org

FREE UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST WESTSIDE CONGREGATION 1650 ABRAZO

9:30a-4:30p, $175-$300 SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, TRADES AND ADAVANCED TECHNOLOGY CENTER 6401 RICHARDS, 818.913.2877

carboneconomyseries.com SPECIAL EVENT

From Field to Feast: A Native American Community Celebration This community festival celebrates the traditional Indo-Hispano histories of planting, harvesting, cooking and eating. 9a-4p, FREE THE INDIAN PUEBLO CULTURAL CENTER 2401 12TH NW, 505.843.7270

tmccullah@indianpueblo.com

SUN 16 WORKSHOP

Cha-Cha Dance Workshop Part 2 with Tony & Hayley 2-4p,

ACADEMY FOR THE LOVE OF LEARNING 133 SETON VILLAGE RD, 505.995.1860

LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Post-September in Israel/ Palestine: Where Are We Headed? Prof. Jeff Halper, an Israeli anthropologist and the head of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions will discuss the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict. 7-9p, FREE CONGREGATION NAHALAT SHALOM 3606 RIO GRANDE, 505.343.8227

SPECIAL EVENT

Let’s Get Cooking with Federico’s Mexican Food Federico Cardenas and Jacob Boker demonstrate how to prepare quesadillas with pico de gallo and guacamole. 6:30-7:30p, FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY AUDITORIUM 755 LOMA COLORADO, 505.891.5013 EXT 3033

20

$35-$40

THU

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET 550-B ST. MICHAELS SUITE #1, 505.204.2988

LECTURE/DISCUSSION

mambofe.com DISCUSSION/LECTURE

Soil Foodweb and Compost Tea Technology Heal soil and plants by altering the biology of the soil instead of adding expensive chemical additives. 9:30a-4:30p, $175-$300 SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, TRADES AND ADAVANCED TECHNOLOGY CENTER 6401 RICHARDS, 818.913.2877

carboneconomyseries.com

MON 17 SPECIAL EVENT

ANIMAL HUMANE NEW MEXICO 615 VIRGINIA, 505.265.3087

LA CUMBRE BREWING CO. 3313 GIRARD NE, 505.265.6470

petlosscounselor@aol.com

animalhumanenm.org

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY 755 LOMA COLORADO NE, 505.891.5013 x3082

rei.com/albuquerque

Pet Loss Group A group supporting those who have lost or anticipate the loss of an animal companion. 10-11a, $20

SUPPORT GROUP

18

SPECIAL EVENT

Tail Date Doggie Dash PreParty A club where dog lovers can meet and socialize. Tail Date members support Animal Humane through social outings and advocating for homeless pets, all while having a great time. 5p, FREE

ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE RD. SE, 505.891.5012

TUE

The Manhattan Project in New Mexico Georgia Strickfaden presents the story of how the world’s greatest minds came together at Los Alamos to develop the atomic bomb during World War II. 7p, FREE OLD SAN YSIDRO CHURCH 966 OLD CHURCH RD, 505.890.5583

LECTURE/DEMO

Warming Up a Cool Planet Explore how rising temperatures will affect New Mexico’s future landscape. 6-8p, FREE MUSEUM EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, 505.946.1039

okmuseum.org

FRI

21

SPECIAL EVENT

Late Night at the Library An evening of scary stories, games and fun for children in grades 3 through 5. 7-9p FREE ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012


FILM

FILM SHORTS BY JEFF BERG

W

hen I was in high school, I mostly read history books, Western fiction (Louis L’Amour, Will Henry, et al) and baseball magazines. That was until my senior year, when I was introduced to Graham Greene. I loved his work, Brighton Rock and read a lot of it. DIRECTED BY ROWAN This film version JOFFE of Greene’s book Oct. 21-25 3:15, 5:30, Brighton Rock is 7:45p very disappointing. Guild Cinema Essentially it is the 3405 Central NE, story of a young 505.255.1848 man with a streak brightonrockmovie.com of violence who guildcinema.com may be on the way to doing something good. The movie takes the story into the 1960s, instead of the late 1930s when Greene wrote it. A mistake, I feel, as it makes the main character impenetrable and is too dark for its own good. Disappointing and dreary.

Martin Sheen stars in The Way, a new film directed by and co-starring his son, Emilio Estevez. Sheen and Estevez were in Santa Fe recently for a screening to help promote the Santa Fe Film Festival, scheduled for Oct. 20-23. The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival screens Oct. 19-23.

Film bonanza Santa Fe Film Festival and Santa Fe Independent Film Festival offer more than 100 screenings over five days

T

Octubre his short and emotionally resonant DIRECTED BY DIEGO AND VEGA VIDAL Peruvian film tells the Opens Oct. 14 story of Clemente, a CALL FOR harsh money lender SHOWTIMES whose life changes The Screen when he is thrust Santa Fe College into fatherhood — a of Arts and Design byproduct of his Campus only interest outside 1600 St. Michael’s, making money, which 505.473.6494 is frequenting cocottes. thescreensf.com The mother of the baby is nowhere to be found, but a woman he hires to help him soon has aspirations of family and husband. Clemente, unable to connect emotionally, is not likable, but she firmly believes in miracles. Dark and absorbing.

G

uild Cinema in Halloween Nob Hill will Season screen a flurry of retro Screenings Halloween-season flicks Oct. 15-22 over the next two weeks, Guild Cinema including a couple of 3405 Central, NE free-admission Vincent 505.255.1848 Price classics, House of guildcinema.com Usher (Oct. 15, 12:30p) and The Pit and the Pendulum (Oct. 22, 12:30p). Everyone’s favorite toast throwing movie, Rocky Horror Picture Show, will show Oct. 21-22 at 10p and midnight each night, and by far the best of all — the hysterical new release Tucker and Dale vs. Evil shows Oct. 14 and 15. Normally I can’t stand horror films, but Tucker and Dale is now a guilty pleasure.

BY JEFF BERG ne is growing, and the other is on the comeback trail. Between Oct. 19 and Oct. 23, Santa Fe will be hosting two film festivals — the Santa Fe Film Festival (SFFF) and the upstart Santa Fe Independent Film Festival (SFIFF). In terms of how long the festivals have been around, SFFF is the leader, with this being its 12th edition. SFFF continues rebounding from 10 great years of presenting numerous films all FESTIVAL across city, before financial problems Santa Fe forced it to become more of a unique boutique affair in 2010. Last year the Film Festival festival covered a long weekend and 10 Thu.-Sun., Oct. 20-23 films, as opposed to past years, which Various venues featured well over 100 offerings. santafefilmfestival.com The move went well and was actually slightly profitable, allowing for a bit Santa Fe more leeway in programming this year, under the auspices of Diane Schneier Independent Perrin, a Santa Fe-based filmmaker. Film Festival The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival, Wed.-Sun., Oct. 19-23 on the other hand, began in 2009 Various venues to directly compete with SFFF, since santafeindependentfilmthe people behind SFIFF felt that the festival.com then-handlers of SFFF were not being responsive enough to New Mexico filmmakers. Working from a new office in the Lensic Theatre building in downtown Santa Fe, thanks to the generosity of Greer Enterprises, SFIFF retains its New Mexico flavor this year by honoring three local filmmakers and opening with a screening of the 1951 classic made-in-New Mexico film, Billy Wilder’s Ace in the Hole. Shot in the Gallup area, the film retains its timeliness, as it focuses on the rescue operation of a man caught in a cave while stealing ruins. A disgraced reporter, played by Kirk Douglas, happens upon the scene and helps turn it into a media carnival and an attempt to revive his own career, done in by braggadocio and booze.

O

In five venues over 48 hours of on-screen time, SFIFF will showcase over 100 films, many of them shorts, and host a number of guests and filmmakers, including documentarian Kirby Dick, whose interesting and eyebrow-raising documentary about the Motion Picture Association of America, This Film Has Not Yet Been Rated, will screen at the Lensic. Also screening will be the two very interesting non-New Mexico films, including If a Tree Falls, another very informative documentary about the Earth Liberation Front and how the government viewed them as domestic terrorists. For something very, very fun, check out the comedy White Knight, which stars Ted Sizemore as a former KKK bigwig who gets tossed in jail, only to find out that his new cellmate is a Mexican national. Stacy Keach costars in this comedy with a message, which won’t open nationally until 2012. Among the most interesting and fun short films is Low Rider, directed by Las Cruces-based filmmaker and actor Mark Steffen. It is a new look at a cultural icon. Meanwhile, SFFF will be expanding a bit this year, and will include a set of short films by local filmmakers and other New Mexican touches. SFFF has already had several special promotional screenings, including a sold-out show of The Way, a new film directed by and co-starring Emilio Estevez and his father Martin Sheen. Both made an appearance at the slightly impromptu Santa Fe screening, which sold out just hours after it was announced. SFFF has also made the best possible choice in its selection of a new film programmer by enlisting the help of former Santa Fe resident Brent Kliewer. Kliewer, whose career includes time as a film curator, critic, venue developer, instructor and programmer, and he will be making all the final selections for the films that will be seen as SFFF. Kliewer currently is the film programmer for The Screen, a Santa Fe venue which he helped design and fund. Complete schedules for both festivals were not available at deadline, but are now posted online at each festival’s respective websites. In spite of the best efforts of state government, New Mexico remains a leader in film production and film based revenue. Your financial support of these festivals helps to prove that for those who are paying attention.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

37


BOOKS

TA L K S/SIG NINGS THU 13 CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Children’s Pre-K Story Hour Children five and under are read to from a selection of classic books. 10a PLACITAS COMMUNITY LIBRARY 453 HIGHWAY 165, PLACITAS, 505.867.3355

placitaslibrary.com

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

New Mexico Historical Biographies Don Bullis presents New Mexico Historical Biographies, a collection of biographical sketches from the 16th to the early 21st century. The book focuses on providing information about New Mexico’s history and the people that have shaped the Land of Enchantment. 3p

FRI 14

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Friday Night Story Time Share great stories, crafts and fun with your child. 7p BARNES AND NOBLE 3701 A ELLISON NW, 505.792.4234

SAT

15

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Tales of Joy Reading Dogs Readers of any age may read to one of the reading dogs. 11a ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 EXT. 3128

SUN 16 BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Dark Beauty: Photographs of New Mexico Celebrated American photographer Jack Parson’s photographs have been compiled into a book that presents his love for New Mexican landscape. The book features Parson’s most rarely printed images over the past 35 years of his career. 3p

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

bkwrks.com

After the Tsunami Annam Manthiram, the awardwinning short story writer and novelist, will sign and read from her book about the struggles of a young boy who is physically and emotionally abused. 1p ALAMOSA BOOKS 8810 HOLLY NE STE. D, 505.797.7101

alamosabooks.com BOOK TALK/SIGNING

In the Shadow of Everest Rio Rancho author Robert Ove will sign his newest book about his adventures in Nepal with his wife, Pat. 1p HASTINGS 1630 RIO RANCHO, 505.892.3837

gohastings.com BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Wildflowers of the Sandia and Manzano Mountains of Central New Mexico Local field-guide authors Larry J. Littlefield and Pearl M. Burns will sign and talk about this book, which focuses on the wildflowers and shrubs of Central New Mexico and contains more than 700 color photographs and descriptions of southwestern plants. 2p PAGE ONE BOOKSTORE 11018 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.294.2026

page1book.com

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

POETRY

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

I, Judas Author James Reich has extensively researched and compiled this book about the controversy surrounding Judas Iscariot. Reich questions why Judas committed suicide, Judas’ relationship with Jesus Christ and how this compares to famous suicides in history. 7p

Poetry Slam A dramatic reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s classic narrative poem, “The Raven,” will be held by performance poet and poetry teacher Carlos Contreras and English teacher, poet and sponsor of Cleveland High School Poetry Community, Katrina Guarascio. 6p

In the Shadow of Everest Local Rio Rancho author Robert Ove will sign his newest book about his adventures in Nepal with his wife, Pat. Ove will share his newfound passion for mission trips and the religious influence that brought him closer to God. 1p

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X3128

bkwrks.com

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

TUE 18

FRI 21

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Toddler Time Story time for children ages 2 to 3 years old, including songs and activities to the tune of a pink plastic guitar. 10:30a

Conversations for Paco Dr. James Lenhart will sign his debut novel, a cliff hanger about love, greed and medicine. The book is inspired by Lenhart’s experience as a family practician for 30 years. 11:30a

ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X. 3128

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us/index. aspx?NID=126 BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Cowboys Don’t Cry Cherri Berry will speak on behalf of her late husband, Charles Berry, who wrote Cowboys Don’t Cry. Cherri will discuss Charles Berry’s writing process. 7p BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Bedouin Weaving Talk/Demo Joy Hilden, author of Bedouin Weaving of Saudi Arabia and its Neighbors, will discuss her book and give a demonstration of how to do Bedouin weaving. Bedouin weaving comes from the Bedouin women who provide for their people by making textiles to create rugs, saddlebags, tents and other equipment. 5:30p

UNM MEDICAL/LEGAL BOOKSTORE 1001 STANFORD NE, 505.277.0408

WED 19 CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Good Morning Story Time Share great stories, crafts and fun with your child. 10:30a BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

Late Night at the Library An evening of scary stories, fun and games will be held for children third grade through fifth grade. Registration is limited to 40 children. 7p

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Searching for Beauty: The Life of Millicent Rogers Cherie Burns will read and sign her book about Millicent Rogers, who was born into the life of luxury. The book discusses her rebellious lifestyle of choices, her romantic endeavors and how she was propelled into the fashion world. Rogers eventually became the muse of designer Charles James and a Southwestern style icon. 2p

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

The Unobservable Universe: A Paradox-Free Framework for Understanding the Universe Scott M. Tyson, local physicist and engineer, will discuss his nonfiction exploration of the world around us. Tyson will address key misunderstandings in modern science and support his controversial theories with hard facts. 2p

ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X 3128

PAGE ONE BOOKSTORE 11018 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.294.2026

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

page1book.com

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

BOOK CLUB

Princes, Popes and Pirates Sandra K. Toro’s novel depicts the life of the Duke of Naxos, Joseph Nasi in the late 16th century. Princes, Popes and Pirates is the sequel to Toro’s By Fire Possessed: Doña Gracia Nasi.

Mercy Dvorah Simon’s book of poetry about pain and blessing is sure to move audiences and create an empathetic atmosphere. 7p

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

7p

bkwrks.com

Story Time with Story Lady and Song Lady Children ages three to six will enjoy stories, songs and fun. 1p

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X. 3128

THU

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

MON 17

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us BOOK CLUB

Stephanie Meyer Book Club Discuss the importance of being on Team Edward of Team Jacob with other Twilight fanatics. 5:30p BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

bkwrks.com

20

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

Friday Night Story Time Share great stories, crafts and fun with your child. 7p BARNES AND NOBLE 3701 A ELLISON NW, 505.792.4234

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Toddler Time Story time for children ages two to three years old, including songs and activities to the tune of a pink plastic guitar. 10:30a ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X. 3128

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

SAT

22

BOOK FAIR

A. Montoya Elementary Bookfair Support the children of this elementary school and take part in their bookfair. 9a

Saturday Story Time Explore the world of books with Miss Ana and discover your child’s joy of reading with them. 3:30p BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

Stephanie Meyer Book Club Discuss the importance of being on Team Edward of Team Jacob with other Twilight fanatics. 5:30p BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

TUE

25

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Toddler Time Story time for children ages two to three years old, including songs and activities to the tune of a pink plastic guitar. 10:30a ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X. 3128

ci.rio-rancho.nm.us/index. aspx?NID=126 BOOK TALK/SIGNING

René Blum & the Ballets Russes: In Search of a Lost Life Judith Chazin-Bennahum will sign her biography about the talented writer and producer, René Blum. Chazin-Bennahum has a passion for ballet that shines through in her depiction of Blum’s role in dance history. 3p UNM BOOKSTORE 2301 CENTRAL NE, 505.277.7473

bookstore.unm.edu

WED

26

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

Good Morning Story Time Share great stories, crafts and fun with your child. 10:30p BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

BOOK CLUB

SUN 23 BOOK FAIR

A. Montoya Elementary Bookfair Support the children of this elementary school and take part in their bookfair. 10a BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505-883-8200

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

B&N Shakespeare Join the monthly B&N Shakespeare Book Group in the cafe. 6p BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

POETRY READING

New Mexico Poetry Alliance Upstairs in the Atrium The featured reader is Albuquerque resident Constance Hester, whose poems have been published in several journals and anthologies. Her most recent book of poetry is entitled Call Me Myriad. 7p

Fragments of Peace in a World at War Poet and photographer Jock Cobb presents work reflecting time spent behind the front lines of World War II in the Middle East, North Africa and Italy.

By the Way ... A Guide to New Mexico’s 25 Scenic Byways Laurie Evans Frantz, Lesley S. King and Marti Niman have compiled the most up-to-date guide for anyone with the urge to discover New Mexico’s hidden destinations. The trio provide driving directions and interesting facts and things to do once you get the specific area. Colorful photos and a regional map accompany the roadside attraction depictions.

10:30a

3p

7p

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

bkwrks.com

bkwrks.com

BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

38

BOOK CLUB

alamosabooks.com

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

ESTHER BONE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 950 PINETREE SE, 505.891.5012 X. 3128

gohastings.com

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

gohastings.com

Story Time with Story Lady and Song Lady Children ages three to six will enjoy stories, songs and fun. 1p ci.rio-rancho.nm.us

ALAMOSA BOOKS 8810 HOLLY NE STE. D, 505.797.7101

HASTINGS 4315 WYOMING, 505.299.7750

CHILDREN’S BOOK TALK

HASTINGS 1251 CANDELARIA NE, 505.332.8855

bookstore.unm.edu

In the Shadow of Everest Rio Rancho author Robert Ove will sign his newest book about his adventures in Nepal with his wife, Pat. 1p

MON 24

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

BARNES AND NOBLE 6600 MENAUL NE, 505.883.8200

store-locator.barnesandnoble.com BOOK TALK/SIGNING

In the Shadow of Everest Local Rio Rancho author Robert Ove will sign his newest book about his adventures in Nepal with his wife, Pat. Ove will share his newfound passion for mission trips and the religious influence that brought him closer to God.


PLANET WAVES ARIES (MAR. 20-APR. 19) Beware of subtle tensions that could be brewing under the surface of your professional or social contacts. Things you barely notice have the potential to trigger reactions from you or from others. The first person to monitor is yourself; in particular, any sense of pressure that has the feeling, “If I don’t deal with this, I might explode.” The real subject matter may be masked by more obvious dramas or conflicts that are in truth, meaningless. Carefully look past any drama for the actual subject matter, which will relate to circumstances that you have not been able to change no matter how hard you try, or qualities in yourself that seem intractable. Don’t wait for any kind of straw to break the camel’s back, or the fire to start that runs out of control. There’s a long-established pattern pointing back to what you are trying to work through here. Be patient and connect the dots. TAURUS (APR. 19-MAY 20) How often, do you see the world from the viewpoint of others? It would seem that you have little choice, though to do so means indulging in some complexity and sorting out what may be a mixed message or some exaggerated point of view. The real information you’re seeking will come more in the form of a whisper. When you notice something about another person, your confirmation will be that it tells you something about yourself. The sensation will be one of closeness rather than alienation; of common ground rather than a polarity, and your own desire to grow and evolve. There is plenty you can point to that is different about someone, and the helpless sensation of a deadlock is always available. Go below the surface and tap into something creative, a feeling or observation that draws you toward contact and empathy. GEMINI (MAY 20-JUN. 21) Most people choose to remain ignorant because they think that exposure to new information will not only threaten their viewpoint, it will threaten their identity. Let go of any such irrational fear. Be most willing to embrace anything that contradicts or challenges your point of view. Make a conscious effort to see all sides of any situation without being judgmental or dismissive. Pay attention to your environment, and notice the agendas of anyone involved. Someone seems determined to create a conflict where there otherwise would be none, but they are leaving clues along the way and you may have had a run-in with them recently. Listen carefully and keep your sixth sense on. You have the ability not only to defuse this situation, but to make sure that it’s turned into a positive gain for everyone. CANCER (JUN. 21-JUL. 22) The feelings of others may be compelling right now, but don’t lose your center. You could easily have your emotions drowned in an issue that someone is claiming is important but is really just an over-reaction. The key will be to listen without getting caught up in the current. You may have a tendency to forget yourself, or to forget what’s important to you. If you keep your focus and maintain a sense of perspective, there is an opportunity brewing that is likely to appear quickly and disappear just as fast if you don’t take notice. The opportunity relates to a financial situation that you recently determined was top priority. It’s not just about money; you have a lavish creative

By Eric Francis • planetwaves. net opportunity that’s on the verge of opening up. Remember your potential and how many times you have promised yourself to do something about it. LEO (JUL. 22-AUG. 23) Confront something that you don’t understand, no matter how confounding it seems. You will benefit from doing so, even if you have to encounter confusion along the way. You may think you have to sort everything out, but what you’re trying to do is get yourself out of a corner. Your sense of being overwhelmed has more to do with your viewpoint than it does with your environment. The more flexible you become, the clearer you’ll feel. You may have to feel really, stuck before that happens, but it won’t last long; and as you get to the breakthrough point, you’re likely to recognize that you can make similar adjustments to your thought patterns. You’re seeing the difference between thinking clearly and not thinking at all. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEP. 22) Something has been bothering you and you are about to discover what it is. Imagine you got a shard of metal embedded in your skin as a child, then forgot about it. Over the years, your body has pushed the shard up toward the surface. Then one day it breaks the skin, and you can grab it with a tweezers and pull it out. The little injury that you get from the skin breaking is nothing compared to the sense of relief of the thing coming out. An odd tension you barely noticed will release itself, giving you new flexibility. What is this thing? It’s something old, and it’s directly related to the self-critical” thing that so many astrologers, and Virgo natives, have noticed about your sign. Working out the unfinished business of the distant past has been a theme of recent years of your life, and this is one tangible result. LIBRA (SEP. 22-OCT. 23) Certain individuals in your life can stand a lot more chaos, uncertainty and instability than you. The more you hunker down and cling to stability, the more you notice how much instability annoys you. One way to look at the situation is that everyone is just being who they are. Another is that you and the people around you are influencing one another, as living things coexisting in one environment will always do. There are things you can learn about how to integrate change into your life. For you, this is more about working with variables than it is about embracing chaos. There are patterns that make perfect sense, and which point to viable options, as long as you look at the world with an open mind. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 22) You seem to be considering something you never would contemplate otherwise. I get the feeling that you like the sensation of doing this, and you seem poised to make a spontaneous decision that might leave everyone wondering what got into you. From the look of your solar chart, this involves your career, you finally figured out that you could not be boxed into an old idea or goal, and the desire to grow took on a life of its own. Even if you make a significant change now, you will be able to find the roots of that thought process going back years; you’re reaching the critical mass point now. Carrying through on a decision is sometimes more challenging than making the decision in the first place, so make sure you take one step at a time and keep going until you get where you want to be. Let your passion guide you. That will be a lot easier now that you know

UNIVERSAL CROSSWORD

in which direction to head. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 22) You can indulge your fantasies, no matter how lurid, “inappropriate” or hormonedrenched. If I had to guess, these won’t feel like your usual erotic daydreams but rather like some form of actual, living contact, though on a different plane of existence. I’ve noticed that the more vivid and easy a fantasy feels, the more likely it is to happen. It’s like you think a thought and then it thinks you back just as fast. The contact between you and the focus of your desire is so palpable, it’s vivid and alive. How does it feel to be so turned on? Do you feel drawn in, a little panicky, or both? A touch of fear would be normal given the placement of the planets, but it’s something you can brush aside to claim the pleasure that’s directly on the other side. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 20) Someone may be getting on your nerves. Since you can handle really, really annoying people, this is saying a lot. Translated into Goat Speak, someone who has been irritating you for a while is on the verge of becoming such a significant pain in the ass you might have to whack them with your head once or twice. The planets suggest one fact clearly — this person is more of a hazard to themselves than they are to you. Keep your distance and let the situation unfold. You’ll get one of those “lessons of leadership,” which amounts to: sometimes you don’t need to do anything. Therefore, keep your agenda moving forward; focus on what you want to create rather than fixing anything that’s bothering you. Many other forces are working in your favor; your friends love you and want to help you. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 19) Consider how if you believe something that is wrong, it can have the full force and effect of being true. You may have just discovered something like that in your life. This is why it’s healthy to challenge your beliefs before they get around to challenging you. This one had something to do with whether you feel confident enough to assert your authority. That in turn may have involved the confidence of whether you will be liked or loved. This is the thing you sometimes have to chance when you assert yourself. It could be that you’ll be liked more for being authentic, but in any event, the real issue is integrity. And this you have demonstrated, and you’ve learned something in the process of doing so: as in, don’t always believe your beliefs. Take them out for a spin and see if they actually roll. PISCES (FEB. 19-MAR. 20) When sexy planets show up in Scorpio, I like to remind you that sex is your religion. By this I mean that your notion of what is spiritual is what most people think of as erotic, or at least it starts there. You can leave it to others to proclaim that “God is love” or “God is everything,” and then you get to experiment with living as if that’s actually true. Keep that in mind over the next few weeks, especially the part about this all being an experiment. That would include having faith in passion and exploring the ways in which beauty is nourishing. I would offer you one last idea: when most religious leaders use the word “sin” they mean sexual sin. What if this were absolutely not true? What if there were no such thing? There may not be one answer to that question, but rather a doorway to a world of possibilities.

SOLUTION ON PAGE 40 LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

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LOCAL iQ

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011


Issue142—Oct. 13-26