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Issue 23, November 2012

Harmony in your design. How to make it work. Feature: Track lighting and it’s benefits Look of the month


Note from the editor …………………………………………………………………………… 1 Inside this issue …………………………………………………………………………………… 2 Line ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 Texture ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8 Light ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………13 Color ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………18 Space ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………23 Shape ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28 Form …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 33 Balance …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 38 Harmony …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 43 Rhythm ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 48 Emphasis ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 53 Massing …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 56 Proportion …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 59 Scale ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 62

 


Dear Readers, This issue of looking up is Completely dedicated to the principles and elements of design. Pretty interesting concept right? I mean they are in every Single issue we put out, But how often do we Mention them by name? That’s one reason we here at Looking Up love them so much! They are near and dear to our hearts, because they are as often overlooked as the facades we focus on each issue. So this issue my team and I came up with the idea of putting these little tools that make our designs as Interior Designers, architects, or even just stay at home parents work. As ever we are focusing on the upper part of rooms and buildings. People always notice things at eye level, but some of the most interesting detail means tilting your head upwards and glancing at ceilings, roofs, moldings, or embellishments. So enjoy seeing how these little details come out with the principles and elements of design. Because we love them, we really hope you will too! Love

N L 1  


Nicole Lobell is an Interior Design student at East Carolina University. She is a freshman this year, and intends to stick with her major. After graduation in 2016 Ms. Lobell has plans to either study abroad in Europe or Asia for a year, or attain a career in one of the may fields of interior design. Ms. Lobell started out loving furniture from a young age, a large part due to growing up around IKEA stores. Her mother, Patricia Lobell, has worked at IKEA since before Nicole was born, is now the Sales Manager for IKEA USA, and the first woman to hold such title and responsibility. The constant furniture and design influence contributed largely to Nicole’s love of interior design. Ms. Lobell has always loved to observe interiors as well as exteriors of buildings, but has found that the most interesting and intriguing part of buildings is not at eye level, but above. She became editor of this magazine because of her love of, well, looking up! We are happy to have her as our editor in chief! 2  


A real or implied point in motion. Created by continuous adjacent points.

Straight Horizontal 3  

Curved Flowing

Straight Vertical

Curved Tightly


While line is a collection of points on a plane and not more specific than that, types of lines convey different feelings and serve different purpose's. Horizontal lines are relaxed. We picture a human lying down, they are calming and show stagnancy.

Rawl Building East Carolina University Greenville NC

Horizontal Line 4  


Speight Building East Carolina University Greenville NC

Vertical lines are more static than horizontal ones. These lines show more movement, but not nearly as much as diagonal lines. Vertical lines give a sense of strength, as is conveyed in this building.

Vertical Lines 5  


C u r v e d f l o w i n g l i n e s u n l i k e horizontal lines, are filled with movement. These lines are used to contrast with the v e r y a n g u l a r lines of the windows o n t h e building. Croatan Dinning Room East Carolina University Greenville NC

Curved Flowing Lines 6  


Tightly curved lines provide movement in the same way that flowing curved lines do, but they are not n e a r l y a s loose. These lines provide more tension, and feel more like a spring than flowing curve. The s e n s e o f movement they provide is more intense.

Building East Carolina University, Greenville NC

7  


Surface quality of a shape or a volume. Real or implied.

Tactile

Implied

Non-Reflective

Reflective

8  


Non-reflective texture is real o r i m p l i e d texture that has a non reflective s u r f a c e . Unfinished wood, and stone often h a v e t h e s e properties. This stone castle structure is an example of how stone is a non r e f l e c t i v e texture, and is well displayed with both direct sunlight and shadow. Stone Castle, Central Park. New York NY

Non-reflective Texture 9  


Morristown Museum, Morristown NJ Tactile texture is texture that is actually represented and that if touched would have a feeling other than smooth. These carvings in the moldings are tactile texture, as all the carvings are not painted on, but are real.

Tactile Texture 10  


Top: Backdoor Skate Shop Greenville, NC Bottom: Berlin Wall, Berlin, Germany

This glass panel shows implied texture well. While the panel looks like it would feel rough because of the paint on it. Implied texture is also very common in frescos in old buildings, and murals in general. This section of the Berlin Wall also displays implied texture with the painting.

11  

Implied texture


R e f l e c t i v e texture is typically very similar, and very often found in the same place, as smooth texture. These tiles are a f a n t a s t i c example. The smooth texture of the tile allows light to bounce off the surface and reflect. This can often cause a mirrored i m a g e . I n interior spaces it can make rooms seem larger.

Reflective Texture 12  


A source that makes things visible and illuminates colors in a spectrum.

13  

Track

Task

Art

Soffit


Joyner Library, East Carolina University Greenville, NC

S o f f i t lighting, also known a s w a l l washers, are a type of lighting that allow the beams to graze the wall. This can p r o v i d e lighting to s h o w a piece of artwork, or, in this case, light a hallway at night w i t h o u t h a r s h overheads b e a m i n g directly down on the p e o p l e walking by.

14  


Track lighting is a highly versatile type of lighting because of the ability it has to change. The track itself can be suspended or attacked to the ceiling, but the lamps attached to the track can be changed out for different types, as well as moves to adjust to movement in the room.

track  

West End Dining Hall, East Carolina University, Greenville NC

15  

Track Lighting


Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville NC

colored  

Colored lighting can often set a mood or create atmosphere within a space. The light can also be used simply as an artistic element, or to contrast with other lighting colors in the space. In this case the hallway in the library is made more visually interesting because of the blue colored lighting.

Colored Lighting 16  


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