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A special publication from the Denton Record-Chronicle • September 16, 2015 ·--~ .

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

David Minton/DRC

A photo from the 1950s shows a view of cars parked along Avenue B right in the heart of the North Texas State College campus just north of the Administration Building. Now, trees and sidewalks fill the space where the street once ran, creating a pedestrian mall between the Hurley Administration Building and the General Academic Building. MORE PHOTOS FROM NOW AND THEN: 15, 31, 39, 58, 68, 80, 83, 92

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HISTORY From one small upstairs room on the Square to a sprawling campus, a look back at the university’s past 125 years. By Lucinda Breeding

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EDUCATION There’s one constant in UNT’s history: instruction of current and future educators. By Britney Tabor

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ATHLETICS Athletes who wear the green and white have found achievement on and off the field. By Randy Cummings

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

Editor’s letter W

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COLLEGE OF MUSIC Music education has been a part of the university since the start. By Stanton Brasher

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TIER ONE For years, UNT has worked toward becoming a top-tier research university. By Jenna Duncan

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TOWN AND GOWN Denton and UNT have grown together as a singular organism. By Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe

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UNIVERSITY UNION The new $128 million University Union is set to open this fall. By Caitlyn Jones

President’s message: Page 7 Presidents: Page 17 Campus in 1953: Pages 22-23 Student newspaper: Page 53 Discovery Park: Page 60 College of Business: Page 63 Innovation Greenhouse: Page 72 UNT Health Science Center: Page 76 UNT Dallas: Page 85 UNT Dallas College of Law: Page 88 2015 Homecoming events: Page 91 Profiles: Pages 24, 25, 32, 38, 54, 57, 61, 62, 64, 65, 69, 77, 79, 81, 86

UNT: 125 Years | 1890-2015 A special publication from the Denton Record-Chronicle September 16, 2015 Publisher Bill Patterson Managing Editor Scott K. Parks Section Editor Lucinda Breeding Content Coordinator Larry McBride Cover Design Jason Lee Page Design Mariel Tam-Ray

Advertising Director Sandra Hammond Retail Advertising Manager Shawn Reneau Retail Advertising Representatives Becci Hendrix, Linda Horne, Tami Phillips, Joanne Horst, Fred Lofland, Stephanie Cravotta, Shelly Vannatta

Denton Record-Chronicle | DentonRC.com 314 E. Hickory St., Denton, TX 76201 Phone: 940-387-3811 | Fax: 940-566-6888 Email: drc@dentonrc.com The contents of this free publication are copyrighted by Denton Publishing Company, 2015, a subsidiary of A. H. Belo Corporation (www.ahbelo.com, NYSE symbol: AHC), with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited.

e hope this magazine takes its place among the keepsakes that commemorate the 125th anniversary of the University of North Texas. We see it as the Denton Record-Chronicle’s birthday present to UNT. For me, the opportunity to work on this magazine was really special because my blood runs green. My mother, father, stepfather, two of my three sons and two aunts graduated from UNT. I earned a bachelor’s degree with a double-major in journalism and political science in 1973. I closed out my college career as editor of the North Texas Daily’s editorial page. Finding reasons to celebrate UNT’s excellence in higher education is easy. Deciding what to leave out of the magazine was harder. So, please forgive us if every one of UNT’s excellent academic programs is not mentioned in these pages. The best stories are about people, not programs. We scoured the United States from coast to coast to find prominent UNT alumni willing to talk about their college years. Whether they attended 65 years ago or graduated last year, they recall UNT with fondness and appreciation. Lifelong friendships, marriages and careers began at college. We want to thank everyone who gave us their time and attention. Without them, these stories would not have come to life. Professor Gary Ghioto and his students at the Mayborn School of Journalism deserve credit for gathering and assembling the alumni profiles. Most of all, however, we must thank the late Dr. James L. Rogers, who wrote The Story of North Texas (University of North Texas Press, 2002). His insights and reportage contributed mightily to our understanding of UNT’s 125-year history. “With a population of 2,558 [in 1890], Denton had eight saloons, no sidewalks, no bridges, but lots of shanties, mud and sand,” Rogers wrote. “Yet to come were a waterworks, electric lights, telephones, streetcars, a new courthouse, a chatauqua and an opera house.” Now, 125 years later, UNT continues to grow, evolve and find new ways to serve the hunger for higher education. As we prepare to print this magazine, university officials are preparing to open a Frisco campus. Collin County needs a UNT presence to spread the Mean Green tradition ever further during the next 125 years. We hope you enjoy the magazine. Scott K. Parks, Managing Editor, Denton Record-Chronicle


Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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FROM THE PRESIDENT n Sept. 16, 1890, 70 students met in a rented classroom above a hardware store in downtown Denton. There were men, women and, by the year’s end, Creek Indians. They were studying to be teachers. But Joshua C. Chilton, founder of the Texas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute, harbored a bigger vision for the school and indirectly for Denton, then population 2,558. “It will be our aim to become leaders in the education of the young men and women of Texas, fitting them to creditably fill the most important positions in business and professional circles,” Chilton said in his opening-day speech. Born of the North Texas prairie, the University of North Texas — as we are known today — is a thriving public research university with 36,000 students and more than 200 degree programs, encompassing education, engineering, business, the arts and everything in between. As UNT celebrates its 125th anniversary this year, we do so knowing we haven’t succeeded on our own. Our roots are Denton sown, Denton grown. The people of Denton always have been a part of our progress, beginning with The Syndicate, a group of businessmen who saw the importance and economic benefits of making Denton a center of learning. They donated 10 acres of land that became our campus, and the city paid for the first building. That shared vision made UNT and Denton what we are today. UNT is the intellectual, creative heartbeat of a city known for its independence and economic vitality. Today, UNT is the nation’s 25th largest university while Denton, now with a population of about 123,000, is one of the nation’s fastest-growing cities. We have a shared history of originality, prosperity and impact, all of which will continue to define our futures. UNT’s future — like our past — is one of adaptation. As education has changed, as needs have shifted, so has UNT. We’re a modern university where knowledge and creativity power big dreams, bold ideas and new innovations. We remain

O

Neal Smatresk PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS focused on producing a workforce of bright, entrepreneurial college graduates for Denton, the North Texas region, Texas and the world. Why? Because there is nothing more life-changing than a college education. It changes students and their families and friends as they see how a college degree makes success that much easier to attain. That’s why we’re transforming an increasing number of first-generation college students into tomorrow’s leaders. More practically, having a collegeeducated workforce means graduates have more earning power, businesses have more staying power and cities have more economic power. We’re meeting this goal by focusing on becoming a nationally prominent research institution offering the best education in Texas — with an independent streak. From the start, we’ve been a place where “students become independent thinkers and investigators,” as noted in our first course catalog. Our milestones symbolize how we’ve always taken the road less traveled. We admitted women from the beginning and were one of the first universities in Texas to desegregate in the 1950s. We established the nation’s first jazz studies program, which helped plant the seeds for our renown in music. We’re also known today for the caliber of our arts programs, and education is still part of our legacy of excellence. Beginning with pioneering water quality research in the 1930s, our passion for the environment began early, and today UNT is a hub for bio-based research. Our research enterprise includes plant science, materials science and engineering, computational chemistry, logistics, social sciences and more. Our faculty are conducting cuttingedge research and finding solutions to world problems while our graduates are leading the way to change. Together,

Photo by David Minton/DRC

we’re creating the world of tomorrow. UNT also is the cultural and intellectual fountainhead of our vibrant community. We bring the best in the arts, entertainment and lectures, and we partner with the city in economic development and public service efforts. Since 1890, UNT has been a place of opportunity. Our legacy is alive in the hundreds of thousands of graduates who

change the world in their own unique ways. Our future is full of promise as we continue our journey to the top — while remaining firmly rooted in Denton. This is UNT at 125. Neal Smatresk is president of the University of North Texas, the nation’s 25th largest university. ●


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

UNT on the SQUARE Now in its seventh year, UNT on the Square is part of the eclectic blend of arts, educational and entertainment opportunities that affords downtown Denton its special character and growing national prominence as a city where town and gown collaborate and engage freely. UNTSQ serves as a conduit for UNT to share the talents and production of our creative faculty, students and alumni with a broader audience and to inform the community, as well as visitors and prospective students, about the opportunities and achievements that reside on our campus. UNT on the Square is also a public portal to UNT. Annually, thousands of visitors from Denton and the region view exhibitions, hear concerts, enjoy receptions, or attend lectures, seminars and panel discussions on topics covering the arts, literature, sustainability, social and political issues, and more.

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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MEMBERS OF THE GEEZLES FRATERNITY FUNDED THE BRONZE EAGLE BUST AT APOGEE STADIUM. ITS NAME IS SPIRIKI, A OLD FRAT GREETING THOUGHT TO BE A MASHUP OF THE WORDS SPIRIT AND “KEE,” AN EAGLE’S ATTACK CRY.

History

UNT Libraries Special Collections

Soon-to-be schoolteachers: A photo shows North Texas Normal College’s graduating class of 1899.

From one room to sprawling campus By Lucinda Breeding Staff Writer

It started in a small room on the downtown Denton Square. The city was at the tail end of the 19th century, and the goal was to turn out smart teachers who could groom the state’s children to claim a livelihood in a world that was getting smaller and an economy that was getting faster.

God and family were meat-and-potatoes ideals to the people who called Denton home. But the locomotive had crisscrossed the country for two generations. American cities were Chilton rising out of the soil. The men and women of Denton were still clambering in and out of horse-drawn buggies. The population was halfway to 3,000 souls in a town with no sidewalks or

bridges (but eight saloons, the late historian and journalism professor James L. Rogers said). People were still trying to coax crops out of the ground and nurture small shops and churches, but citizens of Denton still turned their eyes to the future. The University of North Texas started as a humble school in a dusty and droughtwhipped town. “It will be our aim to become leaders in the education of the young men and women of Texas, fitting them to creditably fill the most important positions in business


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

ROCKER AND ENVIRONMENTALIST DON HENLEY, BEST KNOWN FOR HIS WORK WITH THE EAGLES, STUDIED ENGLISH IN THE LATE ’60S AT NTSU, WHERE HE READ HENRY DAVID THOREAU AND RALPH WALDO EMERSON AT HIS

on campus then.

and professional circles,” said Joshua Crittenden Chilton, the first president of Texas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute. Chilton made it clear that his mission was to push Texas ahead in intellectual and economic progress. Even as the university made steady gains and growth, the crucial years for the school were also crucial moments in American history.

A postwar campus bustles

The early years Once city officials determined they would build a teachers college, the stage was set. In the first 30 years, the teaching program grew from three years to four years. The school began its ongoing campaign for funds to support a growing student body, a burgeoning campus and a growing region. Salaries were under the microscope. Dean H.D. Campbell, chairman of the Texas Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, visited Denton in 1924 to prepare a report on accreditation for North Texas State Teachers College. He told William Bruce, the college president, not to apply for accreditation because the salaries of professors were too low. “The salaries paid for nine months to heads of departments, $2,900 — $500.00

UNT Libraries Special Collections

Texas Normal College granted this diploma in 1894. below our standard — are too low to secure or retain the best training,” Campbell wrote. The school faced funding struggles and put itself again to the task of recruiting

good faculty and making them even better. By 1934, despite the grinding poverty of the Great Depression, the university had debuted its master’s-level education program. An estimated 1,800 students were

Leroy Whitaker, who is 85, attended North Texas from 1948 to 1952. It was an important time for the university. Weston J. McConnell was wrapping up 17 years as college president. It had been a highgrowth time with World War II and Korean War veterans streaming onto camWhitaker pus, supported by tuition grants from the G.I. Bill of Rights. During McConnell’s tenure, 1934 to 1951, the student population grew from 1,800 to 5,000 and 26 new buildings sprang up on campus. Whitaker grew up in Paris, a small town in northeast Texas. When he graduated from high school, he knew he wanted to study chemistry. “My high school chemistry teacher got me a scholarship to Paris Junior College,” said Whitaker, one of three UNT graduates who will receive a Distinguished Alumni Award this fall. During his second year at junior college, his chemistry teacher introduced Whitaker to all five of the chemistry

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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PROFESSORS’ SUGGESTION. “TRANSCENDENTAL THOUGHT, AS EXPRESSED BY THESE TWO GREAT AMERICAN WRITERS, INFLUENCED MY LIFE IN A VERY FUNDAMENTAL WAY,” HE TOLD PRESERVATION MAGAZINE.

Courtesy photos/UNT Archives

Joe Atkins (above and left) was the first African-American to apply to North Texas State College in 1955. Atkins, who died in July at the age of 79, eventually enrolled in 1963.

Students practice their skills in a 1942 typewriter studies class. UNT Libraries Special Collections

faculty at UNT. “He got me on as a lab assistant. It paid $36 a month,” Whitaker said. “Strangely enough, room and board at North Texas at that time cost $36 a month.” Whitaker recalled a modest campus that had everything a young man could want. He remembers Saturday night stage shows by the forerunner to the UNT jazz laboratory bands, the Aces of Collegeland. And on Fridays, Whitaker said, the college closed Avenue A, and brought out a disc jockey to play music. There was dancing in the street. In summer 1948, Whitaker started studying and experimenting with new organic compounds. Professor Price Truitt was doing grant-funded research to synthesize new compounds that could be used in medicine. Whitaker assisted Truitt in the mission, and the experience narrowed Whitaker’s focus to the subject that would always be part of his life’s work — organic chemistry. Whitaker got his bachelor’s degree in 1950. He stayed on at the university, earned his master’s degree in 1952 and then got a doctorate in organic chemistry under Roger Adams (“the guru of organic chemistry at the time,” Whitaker says) at the University of Illinois. He went on to work in the petrochemical industry — with Shell and Jefferson companies — and finally landed at pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly. Whitaker went back to school once more to pursue a law degree. He spent the rest of his career as a patent attorney, establishing and protecting intellectual proper-

ty of medical innovators. The road to his work as a patent attorney was paved in Truitt’s lab at North Texas State College, Whitaker said. “I think one of the main things is that they [the faculty] had a personal interest in the students,” he said. “I was close to all of them, but most of all to Price Truitt. I never really felt frustrated there. Things went really smoothly. We knew what our work was, and we were able to do it. I feel like I got a very sound education at North Texas.” “I don’t think I achieved that much as a scientist,” said Whitaker, who lives in Dallas with his wife. “The Ph.D. was an achievement. The highlight of my career came as a patent attorney. With Lilly, I had worldwide responsibility of their intellectual property. … Lilly spends 20 percent of its budget on research. I think all of us felt like we were helping the world through medicine.”

Desegregation: changing faces at college In 1954, a high school principal named Alfred Tennyson Miller became the first black student to enroll at North Texas in 1954. He took doctoral level courses. But integration didn’t really happen in earnest until Joe Atkins filed a lawsuit in August 1955. Atkins showed up at the North Texas registrar’s office in June 1955. College officials denied his application to be a student. He believed the denial was based on his race. After a federal court order, North Tex-

ONE SCHOOL, MANY NAMES As Joshua C. Chilton’s school for teachers grew and evolved, its name went through changes, too: 1890 Texas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute 1894 North Texas Normal College 1901 North Texas State Normal College 1923 North Texas State Teachers College 1949 North Texas State College 1961 North Texas State University 1988 University of North Texas

as opened to black students in spring 1956. By then, however, Atkins was enrolled at Texas Western University (now the University of Texas at El Paso) because an El Paso judge had already ordered it to desegregate. While Atkins was studying at Texas Western, Irma E.L. Cephas became the first black undergraduate student to enroll at North Texas on Feb. 3, 1956. The first black athletes, Leon King and Abner Haynes, integrated the North Texas football team. Atkins returned to Denton and North Texas in 1963. In an oral history, he recounted the painfully methodical integration process. “The first year, they wouldn’t permit blacks to live on campus,” Atkins told his interviewer, professor Ronald Marcello. “The second year, while I was there, ... they

recruited a basketball player, and they opened up the dormitories.” Atkins said the university had a reputation for fair leadership, and that was part of his reason for wanting to attend. “I understand it was difficult for Dr. James Matthews,” the president of North Texas during desegregation, Atkins said in the oral history. “He was expected to make recommendations to his board and so forth. I’m sure he wanted to obey the law, but at the same time he was taking in the political considerations, also, at that time. … I know El Paso, Austin, San Antonio and many of the school districts in the western part of the state opened up in 1955. The governor was telling them, ‘Take your time! Make sure you’re right!’ He was saying those kind of things, and they [university presidents] wanted to obey the law.”

Anti-war sentiment on campus Another turning point for the university came in 1968. The sexual revolution had arrived, Vietnam War protests were raging and a new women’s rights movement was blossoming. For many older Americans, the changes were dizzying. When John Kamerick took over the presidency of North Texas in 1968, U.S. Marines had been in South Vietnam for three years. Many college students were vocally opposed to war. Prior to his appointment at North Texas, Kamerick had been vice president and provost at Kent State in Ohio. He had


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

Congratulations UNT on Your 125 Year Anniversary We Are Proud Alumni

Jason Helal Class of 1990

Jeff Richard Class of 1979

Mark Roden Class of 1989

Ryan Marchand Class of 1990

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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TWO WOMEN WHO WERE ONCE COEDS AT NORTH TEXAS HAVE WORN THE MISS AMERICA CROWN: SHIRLEY COTHRAN (1975) AND PHYLLIS GEORGE (1971). BOTH WERE BORN AND RAISED IN DENTON.

A graduation cap bearing a peace symbol stands out from the crowd of students at a 1971 commencement ceremony. UNT Libraries Special Collections

already been energized by the changing times. “In Ohio, John was known as a political liberal,” said Elaine Kamerick, his widow. “Being liberal one place is different than being liberal in another place. But what we brought to Texas was what we had and did in Ohio — the work he did there.” Kamerick left Denton in 1970, but Kamerick Elaine Kamerick said her husband moved the university culture forward in bounds. Under John Kamerick’s leadership, North Texas formed a faculty senate, and more students than ever before were given a voice in the university’s governance. Kamerick also paved the way for a National Association for the Advancement of Colored People chapter on campus. When Kamerick died in April at age 95, his passion for a more democratic campus was mentioned in several obituaries. “John always believed in faculty governance,” Elaine Kamerick said. “He never let

go of that idea. It was something he took with him to all the other schools he went to. He believed in academic freedom, and that professors needed freedom to research and teach.” Kamerick was near the end of his tenure at North Texas when anti-war protests erupted at Kent State in May 1970 and turned into a riot. The Ohio governor dispatched the National Guard. Several soldiers fired into the crowd of students. Four were killed and nine were wounded. “What I remember was that he was distressed about it as was everyone,” Elaine Kamerick said. “At the time, I had four college-age kids, and what happened at Kent State was terrible for me, for all of us. That disturbed all the colleges, and there was a lot of worry at the time that violence would break out on other campuses.” John Kamerick chose to march with protesting students at North Texas, his widow said. Some people praised him for leading students in protest without violence. Kamerick also built on the foundations built during the civil rights era in the 1960s. Though students integrated North Texas in the 1950s, Kamerick hired T.R. Lee Jr. as

associate dean of students. Thus, Lee became the first black administrator at North Texas. Kamerick pushed searches for black faculty and authorized courses in black history and culture. Kamerick also lifted a campus ban on political speakers. He brought boxer Muhammad Ali, Southern Poverty Law Center founder Julian Bond and civil rights activist James Farmer to campus, in spite of objections from the Board of Regents. Elaine Kamerick said her husband supported academic freedom because he wanted students to leave school with critical minds and boundless curiosity. But also because he loved to teach. “After he retired, he went back to the classroom. He taught seminars as long as he could,” she said. “He had the hardest time getting the young men to take off their caps.”

Green light to greatness During the 1970s, the college moved forward in every way: size of the student body, diversity of faculty and students, and a wide variety of academic programs. New programs and fields of study were grafted onto the original taproot of teacher

education: Students began studying community service, medicine, CPA preparation and petroleum accounting. The world-renowned One O’clock Lab Band, which focused on big-band jazz, won its first Grammy nomination with the recording Lab 75. So began the tradition of busy and bright College of Music alumni (and faculty) picking up Grammy nominations in jazz, classical, polka and gospel music. There were rough patches, too. President C.C. “Jitter” Nolen resigned in 1979 when The Dallas Morning News sniffed out a State Auditor’s Office investigation of the separation of the North Texas State University Educational Foundation from the university itself. Investigators alleged procedural problems and financial misconduct. A Denton County grand jury cleared Nolen of criminal allegations. The audit didn’t result in any criminal indictments against any North Texas State University official. The 1980s were fruitful for the university. President Alfred Hurley took the reins in 1982 and held the position until 2000. And even when his presidency ended, he became the school’s first full-time chancellor before retiring in 2002. He shepherded


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

ELIZABETH “BETTY ANN” DUKE, AN ENGLISH GRAD STUDENT, BECAME A LEADING CAMPUS RADICAL N THE LATE 1960S. SHE’S ON THE FBI’S MOST WANTED LIST FOR DOMESTIC TERRORISM AND HAS BEEN IN HIDING SINCE 1985.

the university through enormous changes. Enrollment nearly doubled during his tenure, and he headed the first capital campaign in the university’s history and oversaw the second. The two campaigns raised $200 million for the university. The ’80s saw a move to merge Texas Woman’s University and North Texas because of an economic downturn and the desire of some politicians to slash state spending on higher education. North Texas got its seventh name — the University of North Texas — in 1988. That same year, the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science formed to offer clever high school students a chance to study college-level math and science for two years. The 1990s saw UNT expanding its programs to compete with a globe that moves as fast as technology will allow. The Center for Logistics Education & Research was formed. It’s a long name, but think of it as the art and science behind Amazon Prime and the promise of getting that book, houseware item or yodeling pickle delivered by drone. The College of Visual Arts & Design was created in 1992 and quickly attracted students seeking degrees in art and design programs. Before his retirement in 2014, Dean Robert Milnes said one in 15 UNT students was seeking a degree from one of

and a raft of students and professional journalists interested in developing literary nonfiction techniques. Since 2000, UNT has answered the clarion call of modernity: Think creatively, get digital and innovate. Students have studied robotics, nanotechnology, Spanish language media and documentary film. Art and technology intersect in the school’s interdisciplinary programs. Research is a high priority for students and faculty. University President Neal Smatresk writes that the UNT of today is educating critical thinkers who are versatile and flexible. In his welcome address to the student body of 2015-16, Smatresk stressed imagination. “What is creativity?” he writes. “It seems like a simple question, but for the UNT community, there are no simple answers. Only endless possibilities. … That’s what a UNT education is all about: Exploring possibilities. Pushing the boundaries of thought and imagination. Unleashing your creativity and intellect.”

125 DRC file photo

Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science senior Aaron Scheinberg directs the TAMS Symphony Orchestra during practice in 2005 at UNT’s McConnell Hall. TAMS, a two-year program for gifted high school students, started in 1988. the art school’s programs. The College of Music built its state-ofthe-art hall, the Murchison Performing Arts Center, in 1999. Ever since, both of the center’s performance spaces, Winspear Hall and the Lyric Theater, have been packed with small ensembles, student opera com-

panies, the UNT Symphony Orchestra and musical luminaries who perform as guests. The same year, the university’s journalism program was renamed the Frank W. and Sue Mayborn School of Journalism. The school spun off an annual summer conference that attracts famous writers

Several sources contributed to this article: “The Story of North Texas: From Texas Normal College, 1890, to the University of North Texas System, 2001,” by James L. Rogers; UNT Special Collections and the UNT Libraries. ●

Years & Counting

Wishing the University of North Texas a Happy Anniversary & many more. We’re thrilled to be growing and serving the community of Denton, while cheering on the Mean Green! see what’s new

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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PAT BOONE STUDIED AT NTSC IN 1954 AND 1955 BEFORE FINDING FAME AS AN ENTERTAINER. HE RECALLED HE AND HIS NEWLYWED WIFE, SHIRLEY, LIVED IN STUDENT HOUSING ON AVENUE D AND “WERE JUST HAPPY AS CLAMS.”

NOW AND THEN:

1914 & 2015 Curry Hall: In a photo from 1912, student-athletes and spectators gather for an outdoor basketball game between North Texas State Normal College and a visiting team outside the Historical Building. The building, now called Curry Hall, was built in 1912 and is the oldest building on the UNT campus, having been home to a gymnasium, the campus radio station, the campus library and a small museum over the last 103 years. David Minton/DRC


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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THE NORMAL BUILDING, THE FIRST CAMPUS BUILDING, WAS BUILT IN 1891. THE FUTURE SPIRIT BELL WAS BROUGHT TO DENTON AS A CURFEW BELL. ■ THE INSTITUTION’S NAME CHANGED TO NORTH TEXAS NORMAL COLLEGE IN

University presidents through the years Joshua Crittenden Chilton

John Jackson Crumley

Menter B. Terrill

1890-1893

1893-1894

1894-1901

J.S. Kendall 1901-1906

The founding president, Chilton opened the private Texas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute on the second floor of a hardware store on the Denton Square with 70 students and nine full courses. Under his leadership, the school erected its first building on its 10acre campus west of town in 1891. Chilton supported opening the doors of higher education to women. He was a principal in Indiana before coming to Denton.

Crumley rescued the Texas Normal College from financial distress by convincing the Legislature to allow it to confer state teaching certificates. Because the school’s name was altered on the bill to North Texas Normal College, Crumley acquired a new charter under that name. He first joined the faculty to teach ancient languages and literature after serving as a principal at Pilot Point Institute.

Under Terrill, North Texas Normal College had its greatest financial success as a private college. He made faculty income dependent on tuition and, to boost enrollment, offered preparatory classes for a large number of students below the college level. He was president until the school became funded by the state in 1901. He previously taught at Terrill College, a school in Tennessee founded by his father.

Kendall was the first person to hold the office of president after the school became a state institution — North Texas State Normal College. When he arrived, the college had an enrollment of about 500 students. He raised teacher preparation standards, and the Main Building was erected during his presidency. He was the state superintendent of public instruction for Texas before coming to Denton.

Celebratingg 125 Years of Excellence in Higher g Education

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

1894, WHEN THE WORD “NORTH” WAS INTRODUCED BY A CLERICAL ERROR IN STATE LEGISLATION. ■ THE SCHOOL’S FIRST YEARBOOK, THE COTTONTAIL, WAS PRINTED IN 1906. IT WAS RENAMED THE YUCCA THE NEXT YEAR.

William Herschel Bruce

John L. Carter

1906-1923

1970-1971, 1979-1980

Eight major buildings were constructed during the time of “Dr. Bruce’s Normal,” including the Library Building (now Curry Hall), the Science Building and the Education Building. Previously a math professor at the school, he raised the standards for instruction and the qualifications for faculty. It was at his suggestion that the Legislature renamed the state normal colleges “teachers colleges.” The name changed to North Texas State Teachers College in 1923. Bruce also had served as president of Tarleton College.

Robert L. Marquis 1923-1934

A former faculty member at the college, Marquis led the institution through the Depression years. New structures during his tenure included the gazebo designed by O’Neil Ford. He developed plans for the first dormitory, which was named Marquis Hall in his memory when it opened in 1936. The college was admitted to the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools in 1925. Marquis previously served as president of Sul Ross State Normal College.

Weston Joseph McConnell 1934-1951

During McConnell’s presidency, the college grew from 1,800 to 5,000 students and added 26 major buildings. Graduate work was first offered in 1935, and the college was admitted to the Association of American Universities five years later. The name changed to North Texas State College in 1949. McConnell was an alumnus who had served as a faculty member since 1916 and later served as dean.

James Carl Matthews 1951-1968

As president, Matthews guided the college through its desegregation, beginning with the admission of the first AfricanAmerican graduate student in 1954 and undergraduate students in 1956. The college awarded its first doctorate in 1953 and became North Texas State University in 1961. Almost 15,000 students were enrolled when Matthews retired. An alumnus, he was the college’s first education dean and had served as director of the teacher demonstration school.

John Kamerick 1968-1970

The Faculty Senate was formed while Kamerick was president, and he also increased student participation in university governance. He changed the regulations for housing, expanding dorm hours and allowing women 22 and older to live off campus. He was previously vice president and provost at Kent State University.

Carter was called upon twice to serve as acting president of the university. He was a longtime vice president for fiscal affairs who also had served as chief accountant and comptroller. He was known across the state for his financial integrity.

Calvin Cleve “Jitter” Nolen 1971-1979

During Nolen’s time as president, major construction projects included Wooten Hall, the Art Building, the General Academic Building and the expanded Union. The Coliseum opened in time for the 1973-74 basketball season. The Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Worth was placed under Nolen’s direction in 1975. He previously served as vice chancellor for development at Texas Christian University.

Frank E. Vandiver 1980-1981

Vandiver was appointed the first chancellor of North Texas State University and the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in addition to serving as the university president. He was a nationally known military historian and award-winning author who had served as vice president, provost and acting president at Rice University.

Howard Wellington Smith Jr. 1981-1982

Smith served as ad interim chancellor and president after serving as associate vice president and vice president for academic affairs. He led the College of Education twice, as acting dean and as interim dean, and was the college’s first associate dean from 1969 to 1976. He was nationally recognized for his work in the improvement of teacher education and higher education.

Alfred Francis Hurley 1982-2000

Hurley served as chancellor and president, celebrating the name change to the University of North Texas in 1988 and the Centennial in 1990, which ushered in the first capital campaign. During his tenure, the Murchison Performing Arts Center was built, the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science was established, the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine became the UNT Health Science Center at Fort Worth, and UNT Dallas got its start. Hurley was the UNT System’s first full-time chancellor from 2000 to 2002. A retired U.S. Air Force brigadier general and noted military historian, he taught at the Air Force Academy before joining UNT.

Norval Pohl 2000-2006

As president, Pohl focused on UNT’s role as a public research university and oversaw the creation of Discovery Park and the College of Engineering. The Chemistry Building and new athletic facilities and residence halls were built during his tenure. He also helped build the recreation center that now bears his name. He joined UNT in 1999 as executive vice president and provost after serving as vice president for finance and administration at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.

Gretchen M. Bataille 2006-2010

The first woman to be president of UNT, Bataille founded the Emerald Eagle Scholars student success program and initiated the construction of what would become the Life Sciences Complex, Apogee Stadium and the Business Leadership Building. She helped move the university closer to its goal of becoming a national research university. Prior to joining UNT, she was the senior vice president for academic affairs for the University of North Carolina System and interim chancellor at the North Carolina School of the Arts.

Philip C. Diebel 2010

Diebel served the university for 26 years, working as controller, vice president for finance and business affairs and UNT System vice chancellor for finance. He came out of retirement to serve as interim president. He was recognized for his expertise in the state’s complex system of higher education funding.

V. Lane Rawlins 2010-2014

A three-time university president, Rawlins helped UNT grow as a public research university focused on offering the state’s best undergraduate educational experience and moving closer to the top tier. In his time as president and throughout his career, he focused on maintaining strong connections between world-class research and top-quality undergraduate education. Rawlins served as president of the University of Memphis and Washington State University before leading UNT.

Neal J. Smatresk 2014-present

Smatresk became UNT’s 16th president in 2014, marking his second university presidency. Smatresk is helping to steer UNT to national prominence by providing high-quality education, expanding research and innovation, and building strong partnerships with communities and industry. Before joining UNT, Smatresk led the University of Nevada at Las Vegas as president for more than four years and as provost for two years.


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At UNT, we combine creativity and culture to broaden your horizons. Easy to Love: A Celebration of Love Songs from Broadway In its annual gala, the College of Music features famous love songs from classic Broadway musicals. David Itkin conducts the UNT Symphony Orchestra and solo student vocalists in songs from South Pacific, Cinderella, The King and I, and many more. Presented by the College of Music.

4 p.m. Oct. 4 Murchison Performing Arts Center — Winspear Hall Tickets: thempac.com/tickets

RJ Mitte Famous for his portrayal of Walter Jr. on Breaking Bad, Mitte was born with mild cerebral palsy and faced school bullying. He speaks on overcoming adversity and has become a vocal role model for those who have turned a disadvantage into an asset. Presented by the Fine Arts Series.

8 p.m. Oct. 29 Murchison Performing Arts Center — Winspear Hall Tickets: studentaffairs.unt.edu/fine-arts-series

The Philadelphia Story Philip Barry’s witty comedy follows Tracy Lord during her 1930s Philadelphia wedding. Guest directed by Robin Armstrong, the show examines the social hierarchy of the time period while maintaining quick humor and hilarious hijinks. Presented by the UNT Department of Dance and Theatre.

7:30 p.m. Nov. 5-7 and 2 p.m. Nov. 8 Radio, Television, Film and Performing Arts Building Tickets: danceandtheatre.unt.edu/productions-ticket-purchasing

Permanence/Impermanence Professional artists challenge the ideals of stability and transience in this UNT Art Gallery exhibition. The exhibit explores expectations relating to climate change and how the notions of steadfastness or transitory influence our observations of the world around us. Curated by the College of Visual Arts and Design photography program.

Sept. 10 - Nov. 17 UNT Art Gallery Information: gallery.unt.edu/exhibitions

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

WHAT’S A NORMAL SCHOOL? THE NAME IS BASED ON THE FRENCH ÉCOLE NORMALE. COLLEGES THAT TRAINED TEACHERS WERE CALLED NORMAL SCHOOLS BECAUSE THEY SET A NORM — THAT IS, THEY SERVED AS A MODEL.

College of Education

Legacy of teaching reaches across state By Britney Tabor Staff Writer

Education is the University of North Texas’ foundation. Joshua C. Chilton founded the school as Texas Normal College and Teacher Training Institute in 1890. The following year, the school was designated an institution of education. Teachers taught prospective teachers how to be educators. Within three years of the teachers’ college opening, it had authorization to issue state teaching certificates. The university has gone by seven different names since its inception. It’s broadened its scope of instruction to other disciplines. But in its 125-year history, one thing has stayed constant — instruction of current and future educators. Today, UNT’s College of Education certifies 1,000 teachers annually, arguably more than any other university in the state, according to school officials. Nearly a quarter of the university’s doctoral degrees are conferred through the college. The College of Education has more than 43,000 living alumni and is viewed among many as one of the top training grounds for school educators and administrators. “We’ve been producing teachers and principals and superintendents for a long time,” said Dean Jerry R. Thomas. “There wouldn’t be anybody in the state, I don’t think, that would be doing it any longer than us, and very few nationwide.” Taking a hands-on approach has been a part of the school’s instructional method since its early days. In 1913, the school received authorization to develop a demonstration school. Known to many as the Lab School, student teachers educated young children under the supervision of certified educators. Dr. Kenneth Matthews enrolled in the Lab School at age 5. His father, Carl Matthews, was the principal and a teacher at the Lab School. Carl Matthews would go on to lead the university as its president in the 1950s. Kenneth Matthews recalls the Lab

David Minton/DRC

Jerry Thomas, dean of the College of Education at UNT, stands in front of a display case honoring J.C. Matthews, a 1925 alumnus who became the first dean of the College of Education and later president of the university. School as being a unique group. A great number of the students were children of the college faculty. Class sizes were limited, Matthews recalled. There was one class for first- through third-grade students. In each classroom were three to four student teachers and a master teacher. The classes were small, he said, and students received a lot of personal attention. At the junior high school level, there were 20 to 25 students per class. In sixth grade, he recalls one of his teachers opening a “post office” so that all the children from kindergarten to junior high school could write Valentine’s cards.

The cards were delivered by sixth-graders, who took the national post office exam to learn the postal rules and regulations. They had to pass the test to deliver, Matthews said. The student with the highest score was deemed postmaster, he recalled. “It was an interesting entry to government,” he said. Matthews attended the Lab School through junior high. He later returned to attend college at what is now UNT. “By the time I got to junior high, the high school portion had dropped by the wayside,” he said. “I think I got a private school education. Very privileged.

“I got a good education from prekindergarten to college, and I was blessed to go there.” Matthews said his father had highly qualified faculty members, many of whom had their doctorate degrees and were involved in research work. “The school of education grew and maintained a credibility throughout the state of Texas, and even nationally, that teachers could come out of there and be prepared to teach at any level,” Matthews said. “They prepared people to be excellent teachers throughout Texas.” One could say education was in


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ACCORDING TO THE MORRIS DICTIONARY OF WORD AND PHRASE ORIGINS, THE FIRST NORMAL SCHOOL IN AMERICA WAS FOUNDED IN 1823 IN VERMONT; THE NAME FELL OUT OF FAVOR IN THE LATE 1920S.

NOTABLE ALUMNI The UNT College of Education has produced a number of school system leaders in the region, as well as other notables:

UNT Libraries Special Collections

Students in the North Texas State Normal College training school get lessons in woodworking in 1921. Matthews’ blood and that of his two older siblings, now deceased. Matthews, now 72, is a pediatrician in College Station. Since leaving his residency in 1973, he said he’s always had some role as a teacher. Matthews has a medical student who works alongside him four days a week, and he gives classroom lectures and demonstrations at Texas A&M University. His brother was a professor, and his sister taught elementary school in Denton ISD. Matthews’ son is now a Denton high school teacher. The College of Education continues a modernized version of hands-on teaching today in schools across North Texas and abroad. In Matthews Hall, the college runs its Childhood Development Laboratory, a preschool for children ages 3 to 5. The program serves as a training grounds and research center for students in early childhood education, child development and play therapy. It’s supervised by degreeholding early childhood and child development specialists. Thomas said the college plans to renovate a downstairs room to look like a modern elementary school classroom. The College of Education places student teachers in 27 local school districts and in more than 200 schools in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Teacher education faculty members are each required to supervise at least one student teacher a year.

UNT Digital Library

Lab school students Susan Marquis, Robert Dane, Dick Selby, Alan Widmann, Betty Sue McAlister and Carolyn Bogan fill Red Cross boxes for children overseas in a photo from the 1959 Lions Roar, the yearbook of the Laboratory School at North Texas State College. This gets them back into the schools to see what’s going on there, Thomas said. It also helps those in the schools to see who is training future educators, he said. Faculty members are sent out to one of the schools after the school day is over, and student teachers take methods courses there at the school, rather than travel back to Denton. Student teachers also gain experience in using iPhones and other electronic devices in ways applicable to today’s classrooms.

“We try to mimic in our preparation what’s working well in the public schools,” Thomas said. “So, we pay attention to what principals say and what superintendents say and what the teachers say, and it’s one of the reasons I like all of our faculty to do some supervision of student teachers so they can see what’s actually happening in the school situations.” Additionally, the college partners with the University of Seville in Spain for a fourweek exchange program. Students from Spain come to Denton to get experience

SUPERINTENDENTS ■ Telena Wright, Argyle ISD (Doctor of Education) ■ Bobby Burns, Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD (doctorate) ■ Mike Waldrip, Coppell ISD (doctorate) ■ Jamie Wilson, Denton ISD (bachelor’s and master’s; recently earned doctorate) ■ Robin Ryan, Grapevine-Colleyville ISD (doctorate) ■ Kevin Rogers, Lewisville ISD (doctorate) ■ Rick McDaniel, McKinney ISD (doctorate) ■ David Vroonland, Mesquite ISD (doctorate) ■ Robert Bostic, Stafford Municipal School District (doctorate and superintendent certification) ■ Michael Novotny, Salado ISD ■ Mike Waldrip, Coppell ISD ■ Kent Crutsinger, Sanger ISD ■ Cathy Bryce, retired superintendent from Highland Park and Weatherford ■ Victor Rodriguez, first Hispanic school superintendent in San Antonio ■ Fernando Medina, assistant superintendent of human resources, Richardson ISD ■ Ken Helvey, retired superintendent, Allen ISD ■ Stephen Waddell, retired Lewisville ISD superintendent ■ Ray Braswell, retired Denton ISD superintendent SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS AND LEADERS ■ Erum Shahzad, assistant principal, Lewisville ISD ■ Deidre Parish, assistant director of professional development, Frisco ISD ■ Shannon Orsborn, elementary principal, Greenville ISD ■ Suzanne Newell, director of humanities, Grapevine-Colleyville ISD ■ Tami Smalskas, director of career and technical education and special projects, McKinney ISD ■ Cynthia Bauter, assistant principal, Decatur ISD ■ Emily Klements, dean of North Central Texas College’s Bowie and Graham campuses ■ Andra Penny, elementary principal, Coppell ISD OTHER NOTABLES ■ Jane Nelson: Texas state senator, R-Flower Mound, from 1993 to present. She earned a bachelor’s degree in education and taught sixth grade in Arlington ISD before going into politics. ■ Mackie Spradley: Earned her doctorate from the UNT College of Education and is the new director of enrichment education and programs for the Texas Education Agency. She will provide leadership for enrichment curriculum and statewide programs. ■ Sandra Palmer: Professional golfer, LPGA Player of the Year in 1975. Earned a degree in health education from UNT’s College of Education in 1963 and turned pro the following year. She has 26 professional wins and participated in the LPGA Tour from 1964 to 1997.


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

COACH FRED COBB LED THE MEN’S GOLF TEAM TO ITS FOURTH CONSECUTIVE NCAA CHAMPIONSHIP IN 1952. FROM ART STRICKLIN’S “LINKS, LORE, & LEGENDS: THE STORY OF TEXAS GOLF”: “COBB, WHO ALWAYS HAD BINOCULARS

teaching in an American class, and students from UNT travel to Spain to do the same. The College of Education’s kinesiology program also has an exchange program with East China Normal University in Shanghai. The college hopes to expand its exchange programs to Costa Rica, Mexico and Scotland. UNT is known for launching the education careers of many teachers and educators in the North Texas area. According to College of Education officials, 72 percent of the school’s teaching graduates are still teaching in Texas after five years on the job, the most in the state. This year, 14 local alumni were recognized as teacher, principal or superintendent of the year. “One of the things we’ve done very well, I think, is the teachers that we produce are retained effectively in the public schools,” Thomas said. Kevin Rogers is superintendent at Lewisville ISD, the largest school district in Denton County. He’s also a College of Education alumnus. He earned un-

dergraduate and doctorate degrees from the college, and he’s been an adjunct professor for the past four years. The college has played a big role in his career, from the mentors it provided to opportunities to connect with other educational leaders in the area, he said. “I’m proud of UNT,” Rogers said. “UNT allowed me to attend a school close to my community as I was a teacher and a coach. It allowed me to interface with a lot of professors that not only knew what they were talking about but were [also] good mentors to me.” In every school district large or small in this area, it’s not uncommon to find many educators who call themselves UNT graduates, Rogers said. There’s no way of measuring the “immense impact” the college has had on schools. “UNT in general provides us with a great number of teachers for our district and area teachers,” Rogers said. And, he added, he’s proud of them. ●

Midcentury view An aerial photo of the North Texas campus in 1953: 1 Administration Building (later Auditorium) 2 Science Building 3 Presidents House 4 Historical Building (later Curry Hall) 5 Industrial Arts 6 Metal Shop 7 Power Plant 8 Drawing Building 9 Manual Arts Building 10 Marquis Hall 11 Terrill Hall 12 Bruce Hall 13 Masters Hall 14 Library 15 Business Administration Building 16 Kendall Hall (first to be named for President J.S. Kendall) 17 Hospital 18 Education Annex 19 Union Building

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

Harriss Gym Men’s Gym Music Hall Orchestra Hall Chilton Hall Quadrangle Men’s Gym (new) Fouts Field Golf Course and Club House Education Building (later Lab School) Old Athletic Field Women’s Gym Journalism Building (later Scoular Hall) Union Slab Swimming Pool Home Management House Service Center (later Physical Plant) Leggitt Hall Men’s Building Mary Arden Lodge

CONGRATULATES UNT for

Congratulations on 125 Years of Excellence from Ebby’s Denton Office and the more than 100 UNT Alumni Ebby Associates and Employees

125 YEARS of

CONTINUING EDUCATION

940-891-3229 3201 Teasley Lane, Suite 601 Denton, TX 76210

400 N. Loop 288, Suite 100 Denton, TX 76208 940-898-1144 IP

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AROUND HIS NECK, A WALKING STICK IN HIS HAND, AND A CIGARETTE IN HIS MOUTH, MOLDED HIS NORTH TEXAS TEAM INTO A NATIONAL POWERHOUSE IN A SPORT ONCE THE EXCLUSIVE DOMAIN OF EAST COAST IVY LEAGUE SCHOOLS.”

UNT Libraries Special Collections

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

T H E E A R L I E S T R E F E R E N C E T O A N A L U M N I A S S O C I A T I O N A P P E A R E D I N T H E N O R T H T E X A S S T A T E N O R M A L J O U R N A L I N 19 0 3 . ■ T H E F I R S T L I B R A R Y B U I L D I N G O P E N E D I N 19 0 3 . I T ’ S N O W K N O W N A S C U R R Y H A L L , A N D I S

Degree: Ed.D. in educational administration, 1991 City: Argyle Occupation/career path: Retired in 2009 after a 34-year career as an educator in public schools; superintendent of Highland Park ISD from 2001 to 2009. Currently an investment banker, specializing in Texas public finance with BOSC Inc., an affiliate of Bank of Texas. Owner of educational consulting business Cathy Bryce Consulting LLC. What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? My fondest memo-

ries about my time at UNT are the relationships that I built with my professors and fellow classmates. They have influenced me, both professionally and personally, throughout my career. Their influence in my life continues today. I treasure the knowledge, skills and depth of understanding that I learned from engaging in rigorous and stimulating dialogue about the coursework and discussing our beliefs about the many facets of public education. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT did a great

job of preparing me for my career as a public school administrator. Through the coursework, I gained both knowledge and valuable insight regarding the various roles of administrators in public education. The professors provided knowledge gained through real-world experiences. Through interaction with my classmates, I also gained valuable knowledge about how other school districts operated. Graduate school provided many opportunities for in-depth exploration of the work of school administrators.

Emily Klement

James D. Laney

Marc P. Valerin

Jamie Wilson

Degree: B.S. in education, 1992; M.Ed., 2012; Ed.D., 2014 City: Muenster Occupation: Community college administrator What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I attended a Saturday football game with Joe Greene on the field during my senior year in high school; then and there, I decided to move to Denton. I have great memories of making many friends at Clark Hall, eating coffeecake with Pop Noah and President Kamerick at the Union, attending an anti-war peace rally on Oak Street, walking to downtown movies at the Campus Theatre, attending basketball games in the Pit (Joe Hamilton, of course!). I later worked at the Physical Education Department, where Dr. Cearley, Ira DeFoor, Bill Brashier, Ken Bahnsen, Odus Mitchell, Pop Noah and so many others influenced and encouraged me. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT has always been a premier university for education majors, so I earned all three degrees within the College of Education. I credit my professors in every level for their brilliance and knowledge, but most of all, because they mentored and prepared me for the profession. The Bill J. Priest Center for Community College Education program, staff and faculty helped me become the community college administrator I always wanted to be.

Degrees: B.S. in education, 1979; Ed.D. in elementary education, 1982 City: Denton Occupation: Professor and department chair, Department of Teacher Education and Administration, UNT What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? My favorite undergraduate memories include attending football and basketball games, ringing the Talon spirit bell, and riding cars/ floats in the homecoming parades. I also have fond memories of my North Texas education instructors and student teaching experiences in the Denton public schools. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT’s College of Education is top-notch in the preparation of teachers for Texas public schools. At UNT, I received a firm grounding in both subject matter content and pedagogy that has served me well as an in-service teacher in the Denton public schools and in my later career as a teacher in higher education. In short, I learned both the art and science of teaching at UNT.

Degree: Ph.D. in higher education, 2011 City: Dallas Occupation: University administrator What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? My fondest memory at UNT was the end-of-year banquet that the Program in Higher Education and the Bill J. Priest Center hosted each spring to recognize graduating students and those receiving special awards. They always invited a distinguished speaker in the field of higher education and gave those in attendance an opportunity to meet and network with the individual. It was always such a fun time to celebrate with our fellow classmates and alumni who returned. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? I cannot adequately express the deep gratitude and appreciation I have for those higher ed faculty members (e.g., Drs. J. Anthony, J. Baier, B. Bowers, V.B. Bush, J.P. Eddy, P. Lane, R. Newsom and K. Whitson) who not only taught me the subject matter in their respective courses but showed me how these concepts applied to the educational enterprise that is called a university. Almost weekly, I was able to take something I learned in class and use it in my workplace. By earning my doctorate at UNT, I was able to demonstrate my commitment to the profession as well as adding value to my institution of higher education.

Degrees: B.S. in education, 1991; Master of Education, 1999; Ed.D. in educational administration, 2012 City: Denton Occupation: Teacher, superintendent of schools for Denton ISD What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? In the fall semester of 1988, we were enrolled in Dr. Lott’s anatomy class. At the time, I was thinking of majoring in kinesiology, and all kinesiology majors were required to take Dr. Lott’s anatomy class. Dr. Lott was an incredible teacher, and he was difficult. His expectations were for us to learn what we needed to learn so we could be what we wanted to become. He was very influential and motivating. I quickly changed my major to biology. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT and the Denton community have always been a part of my life — from day one. My parents were both young students at UNT (then North Texas State University) when I was born at Flow Hospital. Both of them were educators. My mom, who passed away in 2002, was a special education teacher whose gift was to find the good in every person she met. My dad, who is still with us, is an inspiration to me. He was a real difference-maker for his students, and hearing from them share how he impacted their lives made quite an impression on me. I believe for a teacher, there is no greater compliment.

Cathy Bryce


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T H E O L D E S T B U I L D I N G S T I L L O N C A M P U S . â&#x2013; T H E U N I V E R S I T Y F L A G I S T H E L O N E S T A R F L A G I N G R E E N A N D W H I T E . I T W A S D E S I G N E D I N 19 8 6 , T H E Y E A R T E X A S C E L E B R A T E D I T S S T A T E S E S Q U I C E N T E N N I A L .

Stephen F. Waddell

Valerie Gotcher

Rick Herold

Degrees: B.A. in history, 1975; Ed.D. in education administration, 1995 City: Flower Mound Occupation: Public school educator, superintendent of schools, education consultant What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I loved being on a university campus and the enlightened, intellectually charged atmosphere. I enjoyed the discussions and interactions with fellow students and professors, the liberal arts freedom of the college, the exposure to ideas and creativity. I became friends with students from other schools, especially the Lab Band. My doctoral degree created great relationships with fellow students, and my professors provided me with a great education and foundation for a wonderful career. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? As a history/philosophy major, I was given a great liberal arts foundation. I was taught how to think critically, to evaluate ideas, to see a broader picture. My graduate degree in education administration and public administration gave me tremendous preparation to lead public institutions.

Degrees: B.S. in child development, 1998; M.S. in speechlanguage pathology, 2004 City: Prosper Occupation: Executive director of BIND: Brain Injury Network of Dallas and an outpatient speech language-pathologist What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? During graduate coursework, I spent a tremendous amount of time at the Speech and Hearing Center. My employment as a graduate student assistant for Kathy Thomas was a remarkable experience, and she became my mentor in preparing for work in brain injury rehabilitation. I also took great pleasure in my tenure as an officer with the student organization for future speech-language pathologists and audiologists, NSSLHA. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? I was fortunate to have logged more than 500 hours of clinical practicum experience while in the graduate program and enjoyed treating a variety of populations, ages and diagnoses. Without the experience I was provided, I feel strongly that I would not have found the path meant for me in brain injury rehabilitation.

Degrees: B.S. in recreation and leisure studies, 1994; M.S. in recreation and leisure studies, 1996 City: Grand Prairie Occupation: Director of Parks, Arts and Recreation for the city of Grand Prairie What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? In graduate school, we were a tight-knit bunch of students and virtually everyone went on to a distinguished career in parks and recreation. We stayed close and always showcased our green and white pride. In fact, we dominated the Dallas-Fort Worth parks and recreation scene! How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? I owe my entire career to my years at UNT. The university ignited the creative spark in me and helped launch my passion for the parks and recreation profession. I could never give back enough to the university that I love so much. Caring professors, a diverse student population and a hometown atmosphere in Denton: UNT is the place!

Ben E. Keith Company would like to congratulate The University of North Texas for their 125 outstanding years of higher education. Ben E. Keith is very proud of our partnership with the University over the last 40 years. We look forward to many wonderful years to come. Go Mean Green!

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

THE SCHOOL’S FOOTBALL PROGRAM OFFICIALLY LAUNCHED IN 1913, THE SAME YEAR ENROLLMENT SURPASSED 1,000. ■ FRANCIS STROUP, A 1929 GRADUATE, WROTE THE SCHOOL’S FIGHT SONG, “FIGHT, NORTH TEXAS,” IN 1939.

Athletics

Eagles find ways to soar By Randy Cummings For the Denton Record-Chronicle

Whether it’s been the “Eagles” or “Mean Green” splashed across the uniform, the century-old history of University of North Texas intercollegiate athletics tells the story of a journey from meager beginnings to a program that can boast of achievements both on and off the field of competition. Most certainly, UNT athletics has had to overcome numerous hardships along the way. But thanks to the dedicated athletes who have worn the green and white, coupled with the visionary leadership of their coaches and administrators, intercollegiate athletics at North Texas are not without their champions and championships. Ever since the school organized its first football team in 1913 — and played a onegame “season” that fall — UNT has continued to grow its athletic program over the years. Football has remained the constant, but men’s basketball started up three years after the football team was established, and within a decade men’s track and baseball had been added to the list of the school’s teams. Women’s intercollegiate competition at the university attained varsity status in the mid-1970s and has since written its own history of winners. Today, of course, the Mean Green compete with Division I status in six men’s programs (football, basketball, golf, cross country and indoor-outdoor track and field) and 10 women’s sports (basketball, soccer, golf, softball, tennis, cross country, swimming and diving, volleyball and indoor-outdoor track and field). Although many people don’t know it, UNT’s history includes national championship teams, world record holders, AllAmericans, conference title teams, bowl victories in football, 20-win seasons in basketball and a multitude of all-conference performers in every sport. In many ways, the new millennium has been as productive as any era in the history of UNT intercollegiate athletics. Since 2000, the football team has played in five postseason bowl games. NCAA postseason appearances — as a team or as individuals — have been made in basketball, golf, cross country and track on the men’s side and soccer, golf, tennis, cross country, track and swimming and diving in women’s

ABOVE: North Texas State University football player Charles Edward “Joe” Greene appears in a 1967 publicity photograph at Fouts Field.

LEFT: North Texas State College fullback Abner Haynes, 28, runs the ball in a 1958 game. In 1956 Haynes helped the North Texas team integrate college football in Texas. Starting in 1960, he played professionally for the AFL’s Dallas Texans, later the Kansas City Chiefs. UNT Libraries Special Collections

sports. What’s more, today’s athletic teams are beneficiaries of arguably the best collection of facilities the school has ever offered. Football’s five-year-old, 30,000-seat Apogee Stadium, with its distinctive wingshaped end zone seating and prime location in view of Interstate 35E, replaced 59year-old Fouts Field and is now the centerpiece attraction on campus. And since 2005, the athletic department has occupied a spacious 45,000-square-foot Athletic Center, unveiled new home arenas for soccer, tennis and volleyball in 2006, and debuted a new softball stadium in 2007. Collectively, today’s facilities comprise

what is known simply as the Mean Green Village. But for athletic director Rick Villarreal, who has guided the department’s growth since 2001, the status quo is not enough to satisfy his Villarreal vision of Mean Green athletics. “I think it’s great that we are [competitive in Conference USA] and that we’re winning conference championships — that’s awesome,” Villarreal said. “But I want to be a national program. And there’s nothing that’s keeping us from doing that.

We have great facilities. We have great academic opportunities. We have great coaches. “My vision is we’ve got to take the next step,” he added. “You’ve got to move forward.”

A hard climb upward Football’s long history boasts NFL Hall of Famer Joe Greene as the undeniable face of the program. His four years (196568) in uniform helped North Texas claim two Missouri Valley Conference titles and earn national recognition as the school’s only consensus All-American. He was also part of the defensive unit that inspired the


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UNDER COACH ODUS MITCHELL, THE FOOTBALL TEAM PLAYED ITS FIRST BOWL GAME IN 1946. THE EAGLES BEAT THE COLLEGE OF THE PACIFIC 14-13 IN THE OPTIMIST BOWL THANKS TO A PASS IN THE FINAL 9 SECONDS.

creation of one of collegiate athletics’ most unique team nicknames. (The moniker “Mean Joe” — cemented in the famous 1979 Coca Cola advertisement — didn’t surface until Greene was pushing ’em and holding ’em as a Pittsburgh Steeler.) “You don’t see many defensive linemen that could do what Joe did,” said Bill Mercer, the school’s longtime radio play-byplay voice from 1959 to 1993. “He was so quick and so strong. He could get in the backfield before you could blink. You knew he was going to be an amazing player.” A decade before Greene, however, North Texas football had quietly carved a historic spot in intercollegiate sports in Texas — and, for that matter, in the South — by becoming the region’s first predominately white college to integrate its football program. Dallas native Abner Haynes and high school teammate Leon King joined the program as “walk-ons” in 1956, and Haynes ultimately emerged as an AllAmerican running back after helping lead the Eagles to a spot in the 1959 Sun Bowl. Many factors contributed to the university’s remarkably smooth transition to an integrated football program — the conscientious leadership of head coach Odus Mitchell, the friendly personality of Haynes himself and the initial acceptance that many players extended to their black

Golfers Don January and Billy Maxwell were on the North Texas golf team that won four consecutive NCAA national championships from 1949 to 1952. Both eventually played on the PGA Tour, with January winning the 1967 PGA Championship.

DMN file photo

Coach Hayden Fry applied the “Mean Green” nickname to his football team in the mid-’70s. teammates. One of football’s most captivating eras came in the mid-1970s with the arrival of head coach Hayden Fry a year after being fired by Southern Methodist University. A master at promotion, he rode into town firing off changes like bullets from a sixshooter, utilizing the “Mean Green” nickname for the entire football team for the first time in school history, changing the team’s color scheme to include an eyecatching lime green, and eventually pulling team from the Missouri Valley Conference, its home the previous 18 years. Fry’s dream of an invitation to the

UNT Libraries Special Collections

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

IN 1952, THE UNIVERSITY OPENED FOUTS FIELD, THE HOME OF ITS FOOTBALL PROGRAM FOR NEARLY 60 YEARS. ITS CAPACITY WAS 20,000, LATER EXPANDED TO 30,500. THE LARGEST CROWD: 29,437 AGAINST BAYLOR ON

Southwest Conference never materialized, however, and independent status was never a good fit for North Texas. Fry departed in1978 and football entered one of its most challenging periods. The program was relegated to non-major Division I-AA status in 1982, beginning a 13-year stretch in which athletics battled to stay relevant while operating under strict budgetary limitations. Somehow, though, football managed to win two Southland Conference titles and make four trips to the division’s NCAA national playoffs.

Other sports prosper Historic achievements in men’s and women’s basketball were also reached during the 1980s when the teams — the women in 1986 and men in 1988 — made first trips to the NCAA postseason. The Mean Green men have subsequently earned two additional berths in “The Big Dance,” in 2007 and 2010. The women’s program made two trips to the Women’s National Invitational Tournament (WNIT) in 2001 and 2002. On a national stage, UNT’s biggest success has come in men’s golf. The golf program started in 1939 and the Eagles became NCAA national champions a mere decade later, earning the first of four con-

UNT soccer coach John Hedlund leads his team in conditioning drills during practice in 2005. DRC file photo

secutive national crowns in 1949. The four-year run of national titles highlights the team’s glorious history: 34 berths in the NCAA tournament and 30 conference championships — including a Conference USA crown earlier this year.

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times. The team’s first and only coach, John Hedlund, accepted the challenge of starting the team from scratch in 1995 with just six scholarships and no experience as a head coach or women’s coach. “It was an opportunity that I didn’t

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UNT’s most consistent winner in the past two decades has been the Mean Green women’s soccer program. With a 20-year history under its belt, the team has won eight conference championships and qualified for NCAA postseason play three

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SEPT. 6, 2003. ■ THE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM ADVANCED TO THE NCAA TOURNAMENT IN 1986. IN 1988, THE NORTH TEXAS MEN’S TEAM MADE ITS FIRST TRIP TO THE BIG DANCE.

want to pass up,” said Hedlund, who was an assistant for the UNT men’s team before that program folded in 1993. “I wanted to stay here and I wanted to be a head coach. I found out that first year that you can’t really coach girls the way you coach boys. It was a learning process for me because for those first couple of years, even though we had winning seasons, I found I needed to change. I wasn’t going to last and I wasn’t going to get the most out of the kids.” The team has bounced around to call six different locations its home field, ranging from the school’s band practice field to, for a brief time, a field next to the Peterbilt truck factory in southwest Denton. Now playing in their own 1,000-seat lighted stadium, the Mean Green continue to flourish under the guidance of Hedlund and have never had a losing season while boasting an impressive 280-111-25 record. In a way, soccer’s successful rise from its humble beginnings reflects the story of UNT athletics. For more than a decade now, dedicated athletes under the guidance of hard-working coaches and administrators have brought — as the title of the school song says — glory to the green. “The great thing about my time at North Texas,” said deputy athletic director

UNT ATHLETIC TEAMS CURRENT Football Basketball (men and women) Softball Soccer (women) Tennis (women) Swimming and diving (women) Golf (men and women) Track and field (men and women; indoor and outdoor) Cross country (men and women) Volleyball (women) PAST Soccer (men) Tennis (men) Baseball Boxing Gymnastics (men) Wrestling

Hank Dickenson, a 20-year department veteran, “is the institution and the city of Denton have grown at the same time. The opportunities and the ability to keep getting better have never been squelched.” It hasn’t mattered whether the teams have been called the Eagles or Mean Green — North Texas athletics has always found a way to overcome its challenges and prosper. ●

Nickname origins

How green got mean By Bj Lewis Staff Writer

and Randy Cummings For the Denton Record-Chronicle

The birth and evolution of UNT’s distinctive athletic nickname — Mean Green — is about as unique as the name itself. Many people believe the nickname sprang from All-American defensive tackle Joe Greene in the mid-1960s — who later earned the nickname “Mean” Joe Greene. After college, he became an NFL Hall of Famer with the Pittsburgh Steelers. In fact, UNT’s one-of-a-kind moniker was born in the grandstands of Fouts Field, when it was the home of UNT football. Sidney Graham, the wife of the school’s first sports information director, Fred Graham, deserves most of the credit for initiating the tag that today is carried by all of UNT’s athletic teams and spoken proudly by the legion of alumni and fans supporting the Mean Green over the years. When Greene joined the varsity squad as a sophomore in 1966 (freshmen were

UNT Libraries Special Collections

Dick Dimanno holds Scrappy, the North Texas State College mascot, in 1950. The live eagle mascot Scrappy was kept at the Fort Worth Zoo. ineligible in those days), his impact was immediate. And Sidney Graham, watching the team’s games with her friends and coaches’ wives from the stands, began cheering for the team’s outstanding defensive unit by encouraging it to “get mean, green!” “We’d yell things like ‘That’s the way to

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

THE COLLEGE’S FIRST COSTUMED EAGLE MASCOT APPEARED IN 1963. HIS NAME WAS MR. EAGLE.

Denton & UNT Right for Each Other and for North Texans

for 125 Years UNT Libraries Special Collections

Scrappy motors around on the sidelines of a football game at Fouts Field in 1979. go mean green,’” Graham said. “I told Fred and he put it in a [press] release and it caught on. We had a good offense at the time, but suddenly we had a good defense. When I suggested it to Fred, he thought it was corny. But he put it in there and it caught on.” The “Mean Green” nickname for the defensive unit quickly became popular and the next year the band announced itself as the Mean Green Marching Machine during its halftime performances. When Hayden Fry arrived as head football coach in 1973, he liked the name so much that he adopted it as the entire football team’s official nickname. That move coincided with an attention-getting change in the athletic department’s shade of green and athletic logo. When current athletic director Rick Villarreal took over the department in 2001, he noted that many teams were called Eagles — still the school’s official mascot — but that there was only one Mean Green. Consequently, he announced that all of UNT’s athletic programs would henceforth be called the Mean Green. But the official UNT mascot is still Scrappy, the eagle. The eagle was chosen by the student body in 1922 for its keen eye, strength, independence and loyalty. In 1950, students named the first live bird mascot “Scrappy,” which later became the name of the costumed mascot portrayed by a human. The Eagle was known by other names through the years, including “Eppy” in the 1980s. But in 1995, the modern-day Scrappy returned to the nest. And while officials insist Scrappy is the UNT mascot, the Mean Green nickname has become more ingrained in the UNT sports culture with each passing year.

“Scrappy is still at our games, and Scrappy and eagle images are on materials promoting athletic events, and the eagle image remains on the football helmets as a way to meld both our mascot and the nickname,” said Margarita Venegas, a UNT spokeswoman. “It’s similar to the way Alabama uses the nickname Crimson Tide, even though their mascot is an elephant.” Manolo Muñoz, president of Talon, UNT’s spirit and service organization, calls his school’s teams the Mean Green Eagles. “Mean Green — it’s a name the school and student body recognize,” he said. “I hope the eagle stays around. I don’t think it will ever go away because of the history. We have the eagle statue on campus that has always been there, and I hope it always will be. When I think of UNT, I think Mean Green Eagles, I can’t think of anything else there.”

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School colors UNT is never short on spirit. Fans show up at events sporting green and white. Green and white? Who chose those colors? Students who attended North Texas early in the 20th century recalled the belief that Mother Nature would be kind to those using her green color, according to Margarita Venegas, the UNT spokeswoman. But the earliest reference that can be found to UNT using the official colors of green and white is in a line of the 1907 Yucca yearbook. Over the past century, the shade of green has ranged from dark green to light green and everything in between. “Unfortunately, it’s not attributed to anyone specifically, so it’s hard to say what the process was for finalizing those colors,” Venegas said. ●

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015 THE PORTAL TO TEXAS HISTORY, AN ONLINE TREASURE TROVE OF HISTORICAL TEXAS PHOTOS, MAPS, DOCUMENTS AND MORE, IS RUN BY THE UNT LIBRARIESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; DIGITAL PROJECTS UNIT.

NOW AND THEN:

1960 & 2015 Fouts Field: In a photo from 1960, North Texas State College quarterback Robert Duty (wearing the No. 15 jersey) looks over to the sideline before the snap during the Homecoming game against Hardin-Simmons University. The action on the field in the 1960 photo is set against the east grandstands of Fouts Field, which were demolished in August 2013. David Minton/DRC

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

NORTH TEXAS’ HIGHLY STYLIZED EAGLE LOGO FROM THE 1970S IS AFFECTIONATELY KNOWN AS THE “FLYING WORM.” IT’S BASICALLY A SQUIGGLE WITH THREE SQUIGGLES FOR WINGS.

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Degree: B.F.A. in dance, 2012 City: Brooklyn, N.Y. Occupation: Doug Varone and Dancers company member What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? It’s a collection of memories and experiences shared of taking class, rehearsing and performing with my fellow dancers. Stovall Hall became a second home to us. We were able to be vulnerable, take risks, research and discover more about dance as individuals and within a community of movers. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The knowledge and wisdom of my professors helped prepare me for a career as a contemporary modern dancer. I learned about my stamp of authenticity as a mover and gained new insight about the mind and body. We also had the opportunity to work with guest artists. This exposed me to choreographers and dancers outside of the university setting. With the support of UNT and my parents, I was able to study at different dance intensives and meet and dance with people from around the world.

Degree: B.A. in international studies (concentration in international development) and Spanish, 2006 City: Berkeley, California Occupation: Project manager, Inveneo; formerly program officer for the USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance in South Sudan What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? It still makes me smile to think about all of the deep (and sometimes intense!) conversations about life, politics, relationships, religion and more with my friends and colleagues over meals, on weekends and during latenight walks to and from the library. I also enjoyed getting to know my professors and appreciated their accessibility and willingness to help students grow and succeed. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? I am very grateful for the time and effort UNT’s first-rate faculty invested in helping my colleagues and me prepare for our careers. My international studies major paved the way for me to work for non-governmental organizations. Moreover, my Spanish major prepared me to work and communicate effectively in Latin America.

Degrees: B.S. in education with a major in speech and drama, 1965; M.S. in theater arts, 1967 City: Dallas Occupation: Fine art business, owning and operating galleries and fine art auctions; formerly advertising and promotion specialist in the motion picture industry What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Meeting my late wife, Linda, at a drugstore across from the Historical Building. I was waiting tables and she came in and I took her order. When I delivered her food, I said to her, “I’m looking for a girl who is at least 21, has a car and her father’s in oil.” Her response without any change in expression was, “I’m afraid I don’t qualify.” We got married the following June. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? My major was theater and that means more than learning how to act — there is design, construction, lighting, sound, publicity, advertising and a lot of other moving parts. In this team effort, you have to be on time and “hit your mark” as there a lot of people depending on you. I used this discipline in building a career.

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THE ROCK BOTTOM LOUNGE OPENED IN THE UNION IN 1976 AS A RESTAURANT AND NIGHTCLUB FOR STUDENTS, WHO ENJOYED DRINKS, A FULL DINNER MENU AND MUSIC FROM LOCAL ACTS, INCLUDING JAZZ STUDENTS.

College of Music

John Murphy, chairman of UNT’s jazz studies division, stands in the chart library. In the early years of the jazz program at North Texas, jazz had something of an unsavory reputation. “They had to use expressions like ‘dance band,’” Murphy says. Al Key/DRC

North Texas sounds famed the world round By Stanton Brasher

For the Denton Record-Chronicle

Imagine strapping yourself into a time machine and journeying back to a small horse-and-buggy town on the North Texas prairie in 1890. People react with shock and disbelief when you tell them that Denton is destined to become home to one of the most important and respected colleges of music in the United States. A lot has happened since the 19th century evolved into the 20th. Grammy Awards have been dangled. Competitions

have been won. Professionals forged in the fire of the violin string and the unique sound of the oboe blow have emerged from the North Texas program. When the school was founded as Texas Normal College in 1890 under the leadership of Joshua C. Chilton, music education was one of the original areas of study. Chilton was passionate about the people he employed. He wanted only “welltrained” teachers to teach in their dedicated specialty. He was also very progressive in his views on women.

“So from our educational horizons are the cobwebs of superstition being swept, and this institution joins in the advance guard by admitting ladies to all its classes on equal terms with the other sex,” Chilton said in his opening-day speech. This attitude paved the way for the first music administrator at North Texas Normal College, Eliza Jane McKissack, who founded the department and served as its head for two years. Chilton died three years after the college opened, but he left a lasting influence

on its culture and curriculum. He was not only an educational administrator, but also an avid music fan — teaching classes in music history and theory, while offering private lessons in voice and piano. After Chilton’s death, the college established a “conservatory of music” as its only art component. During the early years of the 20th century, music culture thrived at the college. The Glee Club was one of the first extracurricular organizations to form at the fledgling school. Nine prior music organizations


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

MAUDELL GENTRY BAKER WAS ONE OF THE ONLY WOMEN IN MUSIC CLASSES WHEN SHE ATTENDED. IT WAS THE MIDDLE OF THE DEPRESSION, BUT BAKER RECEIVED THE FIRST BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE AT NORTH TEXAS.

North Texas State Normal College Band members sit with their instruments in a photo from around 1901. Music was a part of the school from its start in 1890. UNT Libraries Special Collections

had preceded it. While music remained popular in the culture of the school, critics deemed it unworthy of respect compared with other academic subjects. That all changed in 1918 when the faculty voted to strike a stipulation that gave music courses less credit. After this decision, music culture exploded at the school. A few years later, professor Floyd Graham, also known as “’Fessor Graham,” brought his zeal for music to North Texas students. A graduate of the school, Graham was familiar with the territory when he joined the faculty in 1923. That same year, the junior college elevated its status to

a four-year-university and Graham created a radio show that would reach audiences within a 200-mile radius. His show featured performances by students and, in turn, cultivated awareness for the North Texas program. In 1925, ’Fessor Graham started playing silent pictures in the main auditorium with live accompaniment from the Aces of Collegeland, a band that once featured superstar singer Pat Boone. By the time the 1930s rolled around and “talkies” started dominating the film market, Graham started producing entire live performances that occurred before the movie. These events were so popular, they would attract

UNT

Much-loved music professor Floyd Graham, right, known as “’Fessor Graham,” sings with Pat Boone, left, in 1956.

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“BUT OF ALL THE ACHIEVEMENTS IN MY LIFE, THE ONE I'M MOST PROUD OF IS TEACHING 3-YEAR-OLDS,” BAKER SAID IN 2013, WHEN SHE CELEBRATED HER 100TH BIRTHDAY. SHE WAS STILL TEACHING PIANO LESSONS.

as many as 2,000 people per week. While the school had achieved some notoriety, enrollment was still less than administrators hoped for — that is, until the arrival of Wilfred Bain and, later on, jazz music. Bain became the chairman of the music program in 1938, later becoming dean. He ripped a page out of Graham’s playbook and produced a radio show that featured his own creation, the A Capella Choir, which he also put on tour with the Dallas and Houston symphony orchestras. This increased awareness for the school, and Bain doubled down by switching the program from a Bachelor of Science to a Bachelor of Music degree. This strategy allowed for lower tuition costs, and enrollment increased from 25 to more than 400 students. Gene Hall was one of them.

All that jazz While the music school was still trying to establish itself, a cultural and musical movement was taking over the country. The sounds of Tin Pan Alley, which would later evolve into jazz music, were traveling out of the black communities in New York to audiences of various colors and walks of life — including college students and professors alike. During Hall’s time as a student, he worked his way up to an arranger in ’Fessor Graham’s band. As an alto saxophonist, he got his thrills from doing stage work and had a healthy obsession with jazz. When he graduated, Bain offered him an internship position with the department. “I come back to North Texas, and [Dean Wilfred] Bain gives me a graduate assistantship. I have three chores. One of them seems ridiculous now. One of the things I had to do was patrol the practice room area at certain times to be sure no one was practicing or playing jazz or popular music,” Hall said in a piece written by Maristella Feustle for UNT’s music library. While this might serve to paint Bain in an anti-jazz light, Hall felt that to be contrary to the truth. In fact, Hall also points out that when he approached Bain about his thesis, Bain already had one picked out, to “write a method book for teaching jazz on the college level.” As it turned out, Hall did not have much choice in the matter. “Gene really wasn’t trying to be some artistic rebel,” said David Joyner, director of jazz studies at Pacific Lutheran University and a former UNT jazz professor. “He was just saying, if we are here to learn music, let’s learn music that we can make a living playing.” Bain was thinking about the future, and it paid off for Hall as he was hired to lead the still-forming jazz studies department at North Texas State Teachers College in

Al Key/DRC

Jazz was “always, culturally, an outcast,” says Richard DeRosa, an associate professor of jazz studies at UNT. 1947. The program was the first of its kind. The desire to create a jazz department was not palatable to the entire community, or other teachers, because jazz was associated with minorities and “deviant” communities. “It did emanate primarily from the black community,” said Richard DeRosa, an associate professor of jazz studies at UNT. “You go back a hundred years, 70 years. Go back to 1960 and you see the plight of the black American and how they couldn’t live equally, and the music was in tandem with that. “So, where did the music flourish? The seedy parts of town and in the brothels and all of that. So, it was always, culturally, an outcast.” John Murphy, a professor of jazz history at UNT, blames the early fear of jazz on the media’s tendencies to sensationalize drug arrests of famous jazz musicians. He points out that plenty of doctors, lawyers, actors and professional athletes have engaged in illegal drug use, but their arrests were often not as publicized. He theorizes that the public image of jazz caused people to believe that the players were demonstrating their “allegiance to a lifestyle with unsavory characteristics.”

This opposition did not stop the music from being heard. Jazz eventually won over the community, but it had to do so in small increments and find ways around its public image. “They had to use expressions like ‘dance band,’” Murphy said. “To say that an ensemble is a ‘laboratory band,’ with the implication of the application of what they’re doing in arranging class.” From its official beginnings at North Texas State, Hall had a heavy hand in the jazz program. By the late 1950s, he left to found a similar jazz program at Michigan State University. He was succeeded by a teacher who took UNT from a little school that everyone talks about to the jazz program everyone wants to join.

Leon Breeden and Stan Kenton A professor and a friend of Gene Hall, Leon Breeden was elevated to the head of jazz studies in 1959. During this time, the jazz and big band heyday was winding down. Rock ’n’ roll was dominating popular music. Breeden enlisted the help of professional pianist Stan Kenton, his friend, for help. “Stan was the one who was proactive with it and said, ‘You know what? This mu-

ENSEMBLES CHOIRS: A Cappella Choir, Concert Choir, Women’s Chorus, Men’s Chorus, Collegium Singers, University Singers (formerly Chamber Choir and Canticum novum), Recital Choir BANDS: Wind Symphony, Symphonic Band, Concert Band, Brass Band, Green Brigade Marching Band, Basketball Band JAZZ: One O’clock, Two O’clock, Three O’clock, Four O’clock, Five O’clock, Six O’clock, Seven O’clock, Eight O’clock, Nine O’clock, Latin Jazz lab bands; L-5 Jazz Guitar Ensemble (blues, rock, electric, avant garde), 335 Jazz Guitar Ensemble (rock, bebop), Super 400 Jazz Guitar Ensemble (mainstream bebop); Jazz Repertory Ensemble; Zebras; Jazz Singers, Jazz Singers II, Jazz Singers III PERCUSSION: Classical, Advanced Classical, Drumline Battery, Drumline Pit, Contemporary/Pop, Steel Band, Advanced Steel, Brazilian, South Indian Cross-Cultural, Advanced South Indian Cross-Cultural, African, Advanced African, Afro-Cuban, Advanced Afro-Cuban, Bwana Kumala Gamelan ORCHESTRAS: Symphony, Concert, Baroque COMPOSITION: CEMI, NOVA, SPECTRUM ENSEMBLES: Horn Choir, Trombone Choir, Tuba/Euphonium Choir, U-Tubes (jazz trombone), Classical Guitar Ensemble, Cello Choir, Mariachi Águilas, Flute Choir, Harp Ensemble, UNT Opera


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ON HALLOWEEN 1969, KNTU WENT “ON AIR” FOR THE FIRST TIME — WITH MUSIC PLAYING AT THE WRONG SPEED. “THE VERY FIRST WORD UTTERED ON THE AIR WAS A CURSE WORD,” GENERAL MANAGER BILL MERCER SAID IN 2003.

sic isn’t going to survive unless it goes into the schools,’” DeRosa said. Kenton took his band off the road in the summer months and had it establish residency at the school. This allowed him to teach clinics — something rare for jazz studies in those days. “Because of his status, that put North Texas in the limelight for jazz,” DeRosa said. With the new prestige that came from having a respected jazz performer teach in his department, Breeden found himself in an advantageous position. From there, he managed to turn the university’s program into one of the leading jazz programs in the world. While Breeden worked as the director, North Texas State University lab bands and musicians received more than 50 national awards, toured internationally, performed with Duke Ellington and Stan Getz at the White House, and were featured regularly in festivals around the world.

The EMC was a place for students to experiment with the latest technologies to find new and experimental ways to make music. The program thrived throughout the 1960s and ’70s. By the time the ’80s hit, electronic music had become a part of mainstream music. By 1983, students were incorporating dancers and other styles of visual art, and the facility changed its name to the Center for Experimental Music and Intermedia.

Looking ahead

Future sounds While jazz was finding a path to resurgence through academia, electronic dance music was just a glimmer in its grandpa’s young eye. In 1963, faculty composer Merrill Ellis founded the Electronic Music Center.

Congratulations

UNT Libraries Special Collections

UNT’s school of music remains a respected outlet for aspiring musicians of all kinds. DeRosa and Murphy say the school hosts a top-level program because it attracts the best teachers and the best students. With that philosophy in mind, UNT spokeswoman Margarita Venegas said, the university is dedicated to finding “new ways to engage with and transform the musical and intellectual life of the broader community.” That means the College of Music plans to keep offering students and faculty the latest advancements in technology and teaching to grow the school’s relationship with students and the surrounding community. ●

Leon Breeden, right, works with the One O’clock Lab Band in 1961. Breeden directed the ensemble from 1959 to 1981.

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

RENOWNED GRANITE SCULPTOR JESUS MOROLES, A UNT ALUMNUS, DIED JUNE 15 IN A CAR ACCIDENT. “EACH OF MY PIECES HAS ABOUT 50 PERCENT OF ITS SURFACES UNTOUCHED AND RAW — THOSE ARE PARTS OF THE STONE

Nicolas Rost

June Mandeville Barnebey

Robert Earley

Name: M.S. in political science, 2005 City: New York Occupation: Central Emergency Response Fund What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I met my wife at UNT! Other than that, I always appreciated how accessible the professors at UNT’s Political Science Department were, and how much they engaged with students. In class, we had thought-provoking discussions about real-life issues. You could always talk to professors outside of class and ask for their advice. I ended up publishing several research papers that I co-wrote with UNT professors. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The Political Science Department had, and still has, some of the greatest scholars of human rights, humanitarian issues and conflict resolution. So I learned a lot about the issues on which I’ve worked with the U.N. in Central Africa, Somalia and Palestine. I also learned a lot of about statistics, analysis and writing at UNT, since we worked on our own research projects and were encouraged to present them at international conferences.

Name: B.A. in economics, 1948; M.A. in economics, 1952 City: Plano What is your fondest memory of your days at UNT? I have wonderful memories of the six years I spent at UNT. They include the fun of dormitory life, four years on the debate squad, with all the competition, camaraderie and travel to tournaments, then serving as debate coach and teacher while a graduate student; being on the organizing committee that formed the UNT student government that exists today, campaigning for and eventually marrying Dick Barnebey, its first president. How did UNT prepare you for the career you chose? My UNT education helped prepare me for the unknown. I fully expected to become a social studies teacher. Never would I have guessed what I would do instead. I had acquired a husband. Soon he took the U.S. State Department Foreign Service exam. By age 24 we were in Washington for orientation/training. Within three months we were off to Vienna, Austria, to begin a 35-year diplomatic career that took us also to Bolivia (twice), Peru, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Belize.

Degree: B.S. in political science, 1983 City: Aledo Occupation: President and CEO of Tarrant County’s publicly supported health care system; former state representative What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Let’s face it, at 18 we all get homesick. UNT met me on day one with open arms. The feel of that university was so welcoming and the Denton community as a whole was an accepting environment for a kid from South Texas. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? As student body president, I learned much from being in a leadership position, but many experiences went beyond the classes needed for my degree. I was introduced to all kinds of music; I learned about the great religions and cultures of the world in a philosophy course. I often speak with my former professors today and they still inspire me. The student population taught me to respect differences and prepared me to deal with the diverse population at JPS, which I so appreciate to this day.

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

39

THAT WERE TORN,” MOROLES SAID IN AN INTERVIEW. “THE REST OF THE WORK IS SMOOTHED AND POLISHED. THE EFFECT, WHICH I WANT PEOPLE TO NOT ONLY LOOK AT BUT TOUCH, IS A HARMONIOUS COEXISTENCE OF THE TWO.”

NOW & THEN:

1942 & 2015 Music Hall: A 1942 photograph shows the entrance to the Eagle Park football field on Chestnut Street with the Music Hall behind. The Music Hall, a three-story brick building, stood at the corner of Avenue C and Chestnut from 1917 until 1954; the Eagle Park field was replaced by Fouts Field in 1952. The driveway entrance between the football field’s gates still serves as a driveway for service vehicles going to the Music Building and Willis Library, which stands on the former site of Eagle Park. David Minton/DRC


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

FOR THE UNIVERSITY’S CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION IN 1990, THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING DESIGNED AND BUILT A SOLAR CAR — NAMED CENTENNIAL — FOR AN 11-DAY RACE OF SOLAR CARS SPONSORED BY GENERAL MOTORS.

Town and gown

Denton, UNT inextricably linked By Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe Staff Writer

If the University of North Texas had never existed, Mayor Chris Watts’ wonderful life would likely have turned out far differently. As a high school student, he didn’t think much about going to college. “I didn’t apply anywhere,” Watts said. “My grades weren’t great.” Moreover, his family was poor. He started to see he had to do something to break the cycle. He was working hard at the Sonic Drive-In, where he started as a car hop and would eventually become assistant manager. He considered joining the armed forces. Since UNT was

in his backyard, he applied. “I wouldn’t have had the stamina, or the money, to go somewhere else,” Watts said. He didn’t fully understand the impact when he got accepted, he said. Finishing college wasn’t a goal as much as it was something he decided to take one step at a time. He kept working at Sonic and lived in town. The first year of college was rough. Much of the experience was too new, he said. But he still remembers the day he was walking down the hall in the computer science building and had an epiphany. “I saw I needed to be smart,” Watts said. After that, he turned things around. He got good grades and earned his degree in

computer science. He returned to UNT for a graduate degree in counseling and eventually earned a law degree. He is a prime example of how Denton and UNT have woven themselves together to form a singular organism during the last 125 years.

Dallas Morning News file photo

Creative thinking “has really driven a lot of how the culture evolved in Denton,” says Kim Phillips, with the Denton Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Intellectual capital Watts doubts he’s the only kid who grew up in Denton and saw his family life transformed after college. “It’s great for a community to have this opportunity for kids who may not have thought they could go,” Watts said. Watts isn’t the first mayor of Denton with ties to UNT, or even the first UNT graduate to serve in the office. Denton and

UNT grew up together, he said. Many professors have served local governance in myriad ways, from elected and appointed office to the provisions of the city charter. A North Texas political science professor, the late H.W. “Wib” Kamp, was among the 15 people who helped Denton rewrite its charter in 1958. Local government under the city’s first charter was fail-

LEADING THE WAY Mean Green spirit runs deep at CBRE, the leading provider of commercial leasing services, investment sales and property management. We congratulate the University of North Texas on its milestone anniversary and applaud David Glasscock for his leadership contributions. DAVID GLASSCOCK UNT Foundation Director CBRE Senior Vice President david.glasscock@cbre.com +1 214 979 6321

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

PETER WELLER, THE STAR OF ROBOCOP, ROBOCOP 2 AND CULT CLASSIC THE ADVENTURES OF BUCKAROO BANZAI ACROSS THE 8TH DIMENSION, WAS A TRUMPET PLAYER AT UNT WHO EARNED A THEATER DEGREE IN 1970.

As a youth growing up in Denton, Mayor Chris Watts realized the transformative power of education because UNT was in his backyard. “It’s great for a community to have this opportunity for kids who may not have thought they could go,” he says. Kristen Watson/DRC

ing to the degree that the city couldn’t make payroll. Gary Henderson, CEO of United Way of Denton County, said he can’t imagine where Denton would be without the inHenderson tellectual capital and vitality that comes from the university. First, there are all the degree programs that graduate professionals in social work, health studies and family studies, as well as teachers. They flow out of school and into the workforce ready to tackle problems, he said. Without UNT in Denton, internship programs that benefit both students and the nonprofit agencies they work for would “completely evaporate,” Henderson said. Those internship programs help United Way address community problems in health care, education and income. In addition, professors and professional staff often serve on local nonprofit boards. They lend their research expertise to many community problems and determine how best to solve them, Henderson said. “Then there are the intangibles — what millennials bring in their energy and vitality to a community,” Henderson said.

Creative mindset Tracy Bays-Boothe, executive director of the Greater Denton Arts Council, said that vitality pulled her and her husband, both UNT alumni, back to Denton. They met through the Good/Bad Art Collective, a spinoff of UNT’s College of Visual Arts that it- Bays-Boothe self spun off more renowned artists and put Denton’s creative community on the national map in new ways. The UNT College of Music and its jazz program put a pin on Denton and international maps years ago. That creative mindset does more than foster great art and music in seemingly every nook and cranny of the city, BaysBoothe said. “It’s ingrained in the students to be innovative,” Bays-Boothe said. When people see different interpretations and perspectives as valuable, it gets out into the community, she said. “I think Denton is intelligent and insightful,” she said. “We love it here.” Not to mention that creative spirit just makes Denton cool. The Denton Convention and Visitors

Bureau has capitalized on that perception in recent years, according to its director, Kim Phillips. “Ever since the university began … I think that [creative thinking] has really driven a lot of Phillips how the culture evolved in Denton,” Phillips said. The bureau uses the image of Denton as “independent” and “original” in its branding and marketing of the city to visitors. “We are one of the best college towns in Texas,” Phillips said. She suspects that reputation helps attract new students — and professors, for that matter — to Denton. “We are cool. That’s a fact,” Phillips said. These days, as Denton’s mayor, Watts sees a bit more of that “town and gown” relationship than he did as a student. Because the university is a state-supported institution, conflicts emerge from time to time. “The downside is that it is a more powerful entity,” Watts said. State entities don’t have to conform to the city’s rules for development. Yet, they still do, Watts said. And, because of the people involved,

most of the conflicts have been handled pretty well over the years, he said. He rejects the criticism that UNT drains city resources because it doesn’t pay property taxes. Once, he put pencil to paper to try to figure out how much UNT property might be worth on the tax rolls, and he estimated about $12 million annually for city coffers. “Now that’s a lot of money,” Watts conceded. But, he said, that’s assuming that in the university’s place Denton would be able to attract the headquarters of major corporations with all the thousands of good-paying jobs and sales tax spinoff that would bring. That’s where Watts, and many others living in Denton, see UNT as a major economic driver in the city, too. Watts agrees that Denton and UNT have grown up together. As colleges and universities nationwide begin to compete for students, he also sees the city as a potential recruiting tool — even as Denton gets bigger and attracts other businesses. “Denton can be an asset,” Watts said. “Fry Street is still a hot spot. And then there’s the Square. Denton is a great town with so much to choose from — and you won’t get lost.” ●


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In every community, there are people who inspire others to work for positive change. True leaders know that a small difference accomplished today can create a lasting legacy of success. Little by little we can do a lot. Small is HugesM

We proudly celebrate the 125th Anniversary of the University of North Texas and are proud to be a part of the campus card program since 2003. Denton UNT (on campus) • 940-384-6500 Denton Crossing 1727 S. Loop 288 • 940-380-2450 Denton Downtown 101 S. Locust St. • 940-382-5421 Denton North 601 W. University Dr. 940-387-9264 Denton South 1001 S. Interstate 35 E. 940-384-0368 Hickory Creek & Teasley 5009 Teasley Lane • 940-891-6480 o

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For 125 years and counting, the University of North Texas has fulfilled its mission to create leaders and visionaries. Our students and alumni embody creativity. curiosity and something else that distinguishes them and makes them successful - grit. These qualities are in UNT's DNA. bome of an independent spirit that sets us apart. From admitting women on our opening day to pioneering water quality research for the region. establishing the nation's first jazz studies program and becoming one of the first universities in Texas to desegregate. UNT always takes the road less traveled on our path to excellence.

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

53

AS AN ENGLISH MAJOR IN T H E L A T E 19 5 0 S, PUL IT ZER PRIZE WINNER LAR R Y M CM U R TR Y LISTED HIS G O ALS IN A LITER AR Y M AG AZINE AS TEACHI NG, “WITH PERHAPS A LITTLE WRITING ON THE SIDE.”

Campus Chat/North Texas Daily

Pages chronicle campus life By Keith Shelton For the Denton Record-Chronicle

The Campus Chat, the student newspaper of what is now the University of North Texas, reported on a student poll taken in 1941. The headline said, “AmericanJapanese War Is Due, But U.S. Should Win.” The paper quoted a coed: “I believe we will be fighting Japan in a few days.” The issue was published on Dec. 5, 1941, two days before the attack on Pearl Harbor. Such stories have chronicled life on campus and in Denton since the Chat began publishing in 1916. By 1970, it had become the North Texas Daily. During those almost 100 years, the university’s student newspaper has won national awards and produced staff members who went on to win five Pulitzer Prizes. Bill Moyers, who studied journalism at North Texas but graduated from the University of Texas, distinguished himself as press secretary to President Lyndon Johnson and by producing prize-winning shows on PBS and CBS. Moyers attended North Texas from 1952 to 1954. (He and his wife, Judith, met in the reporting lab at North Texas.) Several times the Daily has won the Pacemaker Award, given by the Associated Collegiate Press, a national organization for student newspapers. The Pacemaker is given annually to the five best student newspapers in the nation. In the mid-1980s, the Daily won the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Excellence in Journalism. Unbeknownst to faculty adviser Dick Wells, student journalists spent days dressed like, and living with, homeless people in Dallas. They wrote about what it was like in a poignant series about life on the street. Editor Carol Rust and Wells accepted the award in Washington “standing alongside some heavy-duty professional journalists who had also won,” Wells recalls.

A few highlights A 1917 story on a room shortage at the school said: “Not only are many students without rooms, but a number of teachers as well have none in which to meet their classes. Students are compelled to sit on the windows. Some two at a desk.” One of the reasons the student curfew was changed from 7 p.m. to 7:45 in 1917 was so Chat staff members could attend staff meetings at night.

Campus Chat staff members examine pages of the newspaper in 1942. UNT Libraries Special Collections

In 1918, a Chat lead story covered a parade from the library to the home of Annie Webb Blanton of the English faculty. She had just been elected state superintendent of public instruction, the first woman ever elected to statewide office in Texas. In 1919, the Chat sent a sports writer to cover an out-of-city game for the first time ever, to Simmons College in Abilene. In 1920, a Chat editorial suggested that everyone discontinue speaking of “The Normal.” The college had been named North Texas Normal, meaning a teachers’ prep school. “It is a college in every sense of the word and let’s call it that,” the paper said. (Many years later the Homecoming theme was “We Haven’t Been Normal in Years.”) In 1937-38, the Chat won a first-class award from the ACP, the first of many national awards for the paper. C.E. Shuford and J.D. Hall Jr. were co-sponsors. Shuford was considered the founder of the modern journalism program in the post-World War II years, and Hall was head of the Printing Department for many years. The editor was Alonzo Jamison, who left journalism and became a state representative from Denton for many years. In 1940, the paper won its first AllAmerican award from the National Scholastic Press Association

In 1956, President J.C. Matthews was trying to hold down discord over integration. He asked the Chat not to write any editorials “in praise of the success of integration.” The Chat reported on “demands” by the African-American Student Union. An editorial said the AASU should have “requested” things. In a letter to the editor, the AASU said the demands were in “the only language the white system understands — power.” In 1968, a Chat editorial criticized the Young Democrats for offering to sponsor a concert to raise money for people charged with marijuana possession. The freedom of the journalism students to print what they wanted, and to make the inevitable mistakes, has drawn criticism through the newspaper’s history. In 1968, the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors recommended giving greater control of the newspaper to students universitywide. Under the recommendation, one edition a week would be done by journalism students; the others by a separate staff. One page would be done by journalism students, the other pages by the other staff. It was opposed by C.E. Shuford, the journalism chairman, and the entire Chat staff.

The Students for a Democratic Society, an anti-Vietnam War group, circulated a petitioned demanding that the editorial page be turned over to anyone who wanted to present an opinion. SDS attacked Chat adviser Martin L. Gibson for “stifling student opinion.” (The Ex-Marines were an opposing group that backed the war and hated “Hippies.” A newspaper editorial said the university should “keep and eye on the Ex-Marines because they were potentially violent.” After the editorial ran, several Ex-Marines came to the Daily office and “threatened to beat the [expletive]” out of the editor, thus proving his point.) In 1969, I joined the faculty and became faculty adviser to The Campus Chat. In 1970, we changed to four editions a week, making it a daily by ACP standards. The Daily “became more involved than ever in coverage of student issues,” according to James Rogers, who wrote The Story of North Texas, a definitive history of the university published in 2002. Previously, the student newspaper had not been allowed to cover the administration. As Daily adviser at the time, my choice for the new name was the North Texas Eagle, after the athletic mascot. The Wichita (Kan.) Eagle and the Brooklyn (N.Y.) Eagle were prominent papers in those days. However, the students favored North Texas Daily and the publications committee agreed. In recent years, the emphasis has changed and the format changed from broadsheet to tabloid size — and, just this fall, back to broadsheet, now printed once weekly. The Daily has now gone digitalfirst, in keeping with the new electronic age, on NTDaily.com. NTDaily TV is available on Denton Community Television. Since fall 2014, NTDailyRadio.com has been on the Net. And On the Record is a summer magazine that carries news features. Dick Wells summed up the feeling of being an adviser to The Daily. “Highlights of my tenure were just the joys of watching and working with the staff members and seeing them go hard after stories in the best traditions of journalism,” he said. EDITOR’S NOTE: Thanks to Dr. James Rogers, a longtime North Texas administrator and faculty member, for many of the anecdotes in this article. ●


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

IN 1971, WOMEN WORKING AT NTSU WERE FINALLY ALLOWED TO WEAR PANTS INSTEAD OF SKIRTS OR DRESSES.

Degree: B.A. in journalism, 2001 City: Minneapolis Occupation: Vice president of communications at Target What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I am so proud of the work we did to secure funding and support for a rec center on campus. Although I never benefited personally, I felt like UNT had an opportunity to create

more of a community by dedicating spaces to its students that extended beyond the classroom. I will never forget the pure joy I felt the day the vote passed and coming back as an alumna to attend the groundbreaking. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? As a student government leader, I had a chance to be part of a very impactful experience — one that turned a difficult, negative moment into a true learning opportunity. A fraternity was involved in an event involving discrimination against fellow students. Rather than turning into the anger brewing amongst members of the student population, the Student Government Association organized a unity rally to bring university officials, students and faculty together — encouraging dialogue and action around creating a more tolerant, diverse campus. It changed to conversation and helped move us forward.

Cynthia Izaguirre

Kim Phillips

Degree: B.S. in broadcast journalism, 1997 City: Grapevine Occupation: Co-anchor for 5 and 10 p.m. newscasts at WFAA-TV (Channel 8) What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? My fondest memory was one afternoon my senior year when I was walking across campus after my “final” final exams. I’ll never forget that feeling of satisfaction and joy. I literally stopped in the middle of campus just to soak in the moment, the buildings, the people. With a big smile on my face, I remember saying out loud, “Thank you, God,” for the opportunity to have a college education, especially from UNT. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT taught me the skills and responsibilities I needed to learn in journalism. My professors were previously broadcast and print journalists, so they knew exactly what they had to teach us. UNT required I do at least two internships as part of my curriculum, which was brilliant. Working with professionals in the field reinforced what I wanted to do in life. I made contacts in those TV internships that helped me get my first job in the business.

Degrees: BAAS in community service, 2004; master’s in journalism, 2010 City: Lewisville Occupation: Destination marketing executive in Denton at the Chamber of Commerce What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I always loved the “feeling” of campus, the culture that permeates life at UNT. My favorite memory was discovering that the culture extends well beyond the UNT campus borders. Discovering Denton was like coming home to stay. I have built my life here and I love it. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? My entire UNT experience was as a nontraditional student. I was already well-established in my career when I began. While I love my career, I was frustrated from time to time with a feeling that I was wasting my writing passion. My time at UNT helped me gain a new perspective for integrating my work with my writing in meaningful ways that I now apply daily in my professional and personal life.

Dustee Tucker Jenkins

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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Imagine the Next 125 Years!

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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THE SCHOOL LITERARY MA GA ZIN E A V EST A WA S FIRST PUBL ISHED IN 1917. IT TO O K A HIATU S DU R ING W O R LD W AR I, THEN R ESU M ED P U BLICATI ON F ROM 1924 TO 1965.

Kristi Nelson

Coralee Trigger

Tina Young

Degree: B.A. in journalism, 1994 City: Dallas Occupation: Anchor/reporter at NBC 5 News (KXASTV, Channel 5) What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I was forced to give up my single room at Bruce Hall, and the woman who moved in with me is still one of my closest friends. And I loved being an RA for two years at Kerr Hall. I met so many interesting people, and really learned to be a compassionate professional. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? I always knew I wanted to be a journalist. As a kid, I would create my own newspapers and sell them to family. I needed a strong program with a good track record and I found that at UNT. I learned the foundation of the craft — seeking the truth and writing it well — and I’ve always been proud to say I learned everything at UNT. I still brag about winning the Shuford Sophomore Reporter award!

Degree: B.A. in converged broadcast media, 2013 City: Los Angeles Occupation: Emmy-winning producer and social media consultant What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I loved making dinner with my roommates, nights out on Fry (most of which I remember), eating at Mr. Chopsticks, hanging out at the Square, and of course all the adventures with ntTV friends: producing shows, traveling for field shoots, and end-of-season potlucks and karaoke. Playing in the flute choir with Terri Sanchez was always a welcome break from the RTVF building, too! How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? Three words: North Texas Television. There was something so magical about being surrounded by equally passionate students who knew only enough to know they wanted to do something, but had the energy and desire to figure the rest out.

Degree: B.S. in journalism, 1991 City: Plano Occupation: Entrepreneur/CEO of Marketwave What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Like all journalism students, I was a reporter for the North Texas Daily, and it taught me how to gather information, connect with people to get the story, and how to meet the challenge of writing on deadline. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The combination of majoring in journalism and minoring in business prepared me well for my career path. My professors had high expectations of me and they challenged me to give my best and to persevere, whether the next hurdle was having my writing published, or developing a marketing plan that would fuel a 20 percent increase in sales for a mock client. The realworld scenarios, internships and class projects helped me identify my strengths and come out of college workforce-ready.

PEOPLE

Congratulations on TECHNOLOGY 125 years, UNT!

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

THE ONSTEAD PROMENADE IS THE OFFICIAL NAME OF THE LIBRARY MALL. ALUMNI CHARLES AND JODY ONSTEAD, WHO ATTENDED IN THE 1940S, DONATED MONEY TO RENOVATE THE POPULAR STUDENT GATHERING SPACE IN 2004-05.

NOW AND THEN:

1970s & 2015 Speech and Drama Building: Cars are parked along Avenue A in front of the Speech and Drama Building, as it appeared in the 1970s. Renamed the Radio, TV, Film & Performing Arts Building, it now has a sidewalk running in front of its revised front entrance. David Minton/DRC


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presents

featuring

RICHARD W. FISHER

November 10, 2015 â&#x20AC;˘ Hilton Anatole Dallas More information at kuehneseries.unt.edu

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

THE UNT CENTER FOR INTERDISCIPLINARITY HAD ITS FIRST COMICS STUDIES CONFERENCE IN 2011. IT FOCUSES ON “INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES TO GRAPHIC NARRATIVE OR SEQUENTIAL ARTS.” STUDENT PAPERS AT 2014’S

Discovery Park

In labs, possibilities abound By Caitlyn Jones Staff Writer

Kyle McDougal sits surrounded by machinery and car parts. The Mean Green Racing team just wrapped up its third competitive season with a disappointing finish at the annual Formula Society of Automotive Engineers contest in Lincoln, Nebraska. McDougal labels boxes in preparation for next season and takes parts, some from corporate sponsors, off the race car. “We did a lot of new things this year that didn’t really work out,” he said. “But we’ve got some new people interested in joining and we’ll get started on the new car next week.” After getting his automotive engineering degree, McDougal came to UNT for mechanical engineering technology. Wanting to put his skills to good use, he joined the racing team housed at UNT’s Discovery Park. “I’m a hands-on guy,” McDougal said. “Sitting in front of a computer is not my thing.” Luckily for him, Discovery Park has more than just computers. In addition to the racing team, the 300-acre campus houses the College of Engineering, the fastest-growing program at UNT, and the College of Information. Labs filled with billions of dollars of equipment function in place of the traditional classroom for students interested in anything from robotics to sustainability. As the university’s first satellite campus, Discovery Park jump-started expansion that now includes a Dallas campus, health science center, law school and an upcoming medical school. “It’s been very important in UNT’s growth, not only in academics but also in research,” said Darlene Callahan, the university’s director of space management and planning. “There’s no way we could’ve accommodated the large College of Engineering on the main campus.”

Discovering the park Before it was a science mecca, the property at 3940 N. Elm St. was owned by Dallas-based semiconductor company Texas Instruments Inc. Built in 1988, the building was used for defense electronic system manufacturing but after only four years of use, the campus was put on the market. In November 2001, UNT purchased the 290-acre campus for $9.5 million and ren-

People tour UNT’s zeroenergy lab at Discovery Park during a ribbon-cutting ceremony in 2012. The facility is used to research and test new green-energy technology. David Minton/ DRC file photo

ovated what was then known as the North Texas Research Park. Today, development continues as more students take advantage of research opportunities. “Any time we put somebody out there, we’ve had to do significant renovations,” Callahan said. “It’s not been one of those things where you move in and it’s ready to go.” As the first property that wasn’t contiguous with the main campus, Discovery Park acted as a guinea pig for the university. When the College of Engineering moved into the building, transportation to and from the main campus, about 4.5 miles away, became an issue. “We didn’t have enough buses in the beginning, but we also didn’t have a whole lot of students out there in the beginning,” Callahan said. “What we found is that students who were taking courses at Discovery Park who had to get to the main campus couldn’t schedule back-to-back courses because of the 10-minute window.” To combat the problem, the registrar’s office set Discovery Park class times a half hour ahead of normal class times at the main campus to ensure plenty of time to get back. “I think this will be our second fall semester that we’ve done this and it’s been wildly successful,” Callahan said.

Discovering the research In addition to a 600,000-square-foot

building, Discovery Park now boasts a greenhouse, a new material-science labs and the state’s only zero-energy lab. Known to Discovery Park students as ZOE, the lab’s goal is to generate as much energy as it uses for a net gain of zero. Students use solar, wind and geothermal energy to power the lab, which is also equipped with living quarters for observation — or just to catch some ZZZs. “Oh, there’s definitely been some naps taken in here,” UNT publications specialist Angela Nelson said. The university also spent $1million on a state-of-the-art nanofabrication cleanroom laboratory. Students working in the lab are required to undergo special disinfection procedures to ensure no outside contaminants sneak in. It’s not only the labs that are impressive, but also the findings that happen inside. Some students work on cold-form steel processes to help the material better withstand wind, while others tweak a “companion bot,” a robot that could potentially assist people with depression. The video game programming department unveiled a new game called Untangled that has players reconfigure network connectivity. On the other side of the building, material science students test frictionstir processing, an alternative to welding. Multiple faculty members have received grants and awards from the National Sci-

ence Foundation to continue their research at UNT. Just this year, the National Security Agency named UNT a National Center for Academic Excellence because of cyberdefense research at Discovery Park. Last summer, researcher Yan Wan showcased WiFi-enabled drones at the White House that could be used in disaster situations. “It’s really up to the student’s own imagination as to what they can create here,” Nelson said.

Discovering the possibilities Even with numerous lab spaces, expansion is in the works both physically and academically for Discovery Park. With a new biomedical engineering program about to debut, Callahan said the space management office is looking for room for that department. The College of Engineering recently instituted a mechanical engineering Ph.D. program. The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has also approved an electrical engineering Ph.D. program. “It seems that just about every year, we get something new,” Nelson said. “It helps us attract high-quality faculty and students.” Startup companies have also taken advantage of the space through Discovery Park’s incubator program. The incubator allows burgeoning enterprises access to office space and lets them collaborate with


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CONFERENCE INCLUDED TITLES LIKE “IDEAS ARE BULLETPROOF: DELEUZIAN FACIALITY ACROSS V FOR VENDETTA AND OWS PROTEST” AND “HOLY GENDER HEGEMONY! SUBVERTING COMICS SEXISM IN THE HAWKEYE INITIATIVE.”

David Minton/DRC

UNT’s Discovery Park is always changing. “The western part of the land is more for public growth and the east side is more for academic research growth,” says Darlene Callahan, who directs UNT’s Office of Space Management and Planning. students and faculty. “The western part of the land is more for public growth and the east side is more for academic research growth,” Callahan said. Whether students stare at pixels or work with wire, there’s never a boring day at Discovery Park. In the machine shop during the

peak of summer, Kyle McDougal records an inventory in preparation for the next week’s Mean Green Racing meeting. “Yeah,” he says as he looks around the room full of tools and opportunity. “I think I made the right choice.” ●

Joe Louis

Terry Brewer

Degree: Ph.D. in molecular biology, 2011 City: Lincoln, Nebraska Occupation: Assistant professor, Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? My fondest memory at UNT was taking a stroll across the campus during those beautiful evenings. Overall, I enjoyed the atmosphere of UNT. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT was full of resources and opportunities to help students succeed. It provided an excellent opportunity to collaborate and conduct research with really great faculty members in the Department of Biology. Teaching was also an integral part of my graduate training at UNT. It helped me to realize that a vibrant interaction between teacher, student and the subject matter that occurs in the teaching-learning situation results in the making of an effective teacher.

Degree: Ph.D. in physical chemistry, 1969 City: Rolla, Missouri Occupation: Founder and president of Brewer Science Inc. What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Meeting and dating my wife, UB coffee cake, outdoor jazz and hearing the “Pines of Rome” concert performed at the old auditorium on the old organ that could vibrate the seat you were sitting in. Other memories include hearing loudspeakers, set up in open dorm windows, broadcasting the news of the assassination of President Kennedy. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? Through teaching assistantships and research grants at North Texas, I was able to attend college and graduate school. My major professor, Dr. Glaze, let me find my own research topics; the Chemistry Department was an open and engaging environment.

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GRAMMY WINNER NORAH JONES STUDIED JAZZ PIANO AT UNT AND SANG WITH THE UNT JAZZ SINGERS BUT LEFT BEFORE FINISHING HER DEGREE. “I TOOK ALL OF MY MUSIC CLASSES MY FIRST TWO YEARS, SO I WAS FACED

Linda Truitt Creagh

Dennis Kalk

Gianna Driver

Degrees: B.S. in chemistry, 1962; M.S. in chemistry, 1963; Ph.D. in chemistry, 1967 City: Denton Occupation: Technical marketing professional for Dimatix; retired technical director, Spectra. What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I remember graduation January 1967 as the very best day. I’d been in school and working for almost eight years. When I walked across the stage to receive the first Ph.D. in chemistry conferred by UNT, I believed those long hours were now enabling me to be a scientist as I had dreamed. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? As a chemistry major, math/physics minor, my schedule included not only technical courses but also English, foreign languages, even library science and history. This breadth of subjects improved my ability to communicate and work successfully with fellow scientists from other countries and other technical backgrounds.

Degree: B.A. in biology/chemistry, 1973 City: San Antonio Occupation: Pharmaceutical sales manager, WyethAyerst, federal sales, Southwest manager What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? The long days in biology and chemistry classes/ labs are my fondest memory of NTSU. I worked long hours in classes and partied after my work was finished. I remember the fun taking adult drinks into the football games in my date’s purses and yelling our heads off with a great bunch of fans. After one football game, my date and I went through the window of the biology lab to count fruit flies for a genetics class. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? My career was much like my college time because of all the time I spent studying and working to keep my grades up. It was an easy transition to do the same in the medical field. The determination and drive my professors and mentors gave me enabled me to balance my studies and outside activities to help me get through my biology and chemistry studies.

Degree: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Sciences, 2001 City: Redwood City, California Occupation: Vice president of human resources for a Silicon Valley global technology company What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I spent many days studying in the Union (or sometimes reading historical fiction) while sipping hot green tea watching students go by. I also recall many fond memories sitting in Mac Cafe watching fellow TAMSters do various performances as part of our Student Activities Council. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? Relating to other people in an authentic way and being unafraid to empathetically listen and share ideas has been invaluable in my career leading global human resources departments and teams. Thankfully, my time at UNT was not only rich with the academic rigor of the TAMS program, but it also taught me how to openly share my heart and mind with others, build incredible relationships with diverse people, and listen to the inner voice we all have that tells us where to find “true north.”

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WITH HAVING TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL AND ONLY DOING ACADEMICS FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS, AND I JUST DIDN’T WANT TO,” SHE TOLD MAGNET MAGAZINE IN 2012.

College of Business

Logistics gets goods where they’ve got to go By Stanton Brasher For the Denton Record-Chronicle

Logistics is a word that can strike fear into the hearts of the uninitiated. Every day, people make plans to start new enterprises, travel around the world, get married, or accomplish various other goals. In the general sense, logistics is the process in which these goals are met. However, at UNT’s College of Business, the definition is a bit more refined. “Essentially, it is the transportation of goods from one location to the next,” College of Business spokeswoman Monique Bird said. “It’s the system that is in place to get those goods to that location.” The logistics program resides within UNT’s College of Business — a partnership that has exploded in growth since it began in 1997. What was once a humble, quiet program is now a major player among some of the biggest logistics schools in the country. Recently, the program was ranked No. 6 in the nation by Gartner Inc. and No. 3 by Software Advice, both technology

Professor Brian Sauser, center right, and logistics Ph.D. candidates, from left, Yolanda Obaze, Cigdem Kochan and Saba Pourreza discuss logistics equations in the Complex Logistics Systems Laboratory in UNT’s Business Leadership Building. Michael Clements/ UNT

Proud Supporters of the University of North Texas 2015 Kia Optima

2015 Subaru Outback

888-715-3049 HuffinesDenton.com

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

ALUMNUS SAM MOON OWNS SAM MOON TRADING CO., A LEADING SPECIALTY RETAILER OF WOMEN’S ACCESSORIES.

research companies. One of the program’s newest areas of study is aviation logistics. Considering commercial flight has only been around for a hundred years, aviation logistics is a relatively new and often-changing industry. “When I was growing up as a kid in West Texas, if we didn’t make our own wine, we didn’t have any wine,” aviation logistics lecturer Steve Joiner said. “Wine didn’t travel well in those times, so if you weren’t within, you know, a day or so truck drive, you weren’t going to have wine. Well, now, wine flies.” What is taken for granted by the average person, aviation logistic professionals have to spend hours and days coordinating. Medicine, electronics and even prize horses require the use of aviation logistical planning. With as many goods flown into and around the U.S., Dallas has become a central hub for activity. This puts UNT’s logistics and supply chain management program in an advantageous position. Now, the program’s students come to Denton for education and stay in the region to work after they graduate. That comes as no surprise for Joiner, who said the pay scale’s average is around $55,000 per year. Logistics is vital to some degree for almost every big industry, he noted, and private firms and large warehouses are located all over the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Several of them operate out of Denton. Naveed Amirhekmat, 23, a recent aviation logistics major at UNT, decided to try logistics after an injury permanently removed him from the football field. After spending some time thinking about it, he followed in his parents’ footsteps and enrolled at UNT. “I think the passions I had for the game and because I was part of a team made me

Gabriella Draney Zielke Degree: B.B.A. in finance, 2002 City: Dallas Occupation: Tech entrepreneur and investor How did UNT help prepare you for

realize that I can easily adapt to other things and accept change,” Amirhekmat said. “After I got injured, I was realistic on where I wanted to be long term-wise and I never knew that a logistics degree even existed until I transferred to UNT.” Amirhekmat originally researched Kansas State University, but even with a small scholarship, KSU was too expensive for him. Since his parents and most of his father’s family were UNT graduates, Amirhekmat decided to look into what North Texas had to offer. His decision was not only positive for Amirhekmat — it proved to be historic, too. “I wanted to be the first Iranian-American to graduate with a B.S. in aviation logistics and represent my home country as well,” Amirhekmat said. “No one has ever done it, so it was an honor and a great opportunity to create history.” Amirhekmat credits the networking opportunities and hands-on teaching for making his experience a positive one. Not only did he score an internship with American Airlines, he also managed to nab a job with the multibillion-dollar aviation giant. He is currently working as an agent, but hopes to eventually make it into the company’s “ramp tower” or the operations management division. This transition for Amirhekmat makes perfect sense to professor Joiner, who believes aviation logistics should remain a focal point of the business school for the foreseeable future. With Love Field, Dallas/ Fort Worth International Airport and various smaller airports in the area, Joiner said, recent studies show international air cargo contributed $16 billion to the region’s economy in 2013. “Now that’s some money,” Joiner laughed. “That’s some jobs.” ●

the career you chose? UNT helped me gain confidence and clarity in my business dealings. It also introduced me to the world I now work in with the first Murphy Enterprise Center business plan competition in 2002. The real-world experience of my professors allowed me to apply concepts to my business while I attended school. How did your experiences at UNT help shape your life? My experience at UNT gave me a broader awareness and respect for diverse people and their backgrounds. As a CEO and investor, I must be adept at understanding and working with a broad range of personalities, nationalities, age groups, business types, etc. Our culture reflects that, and innovation is the result.

THEN

NOW The University of North Texas College of Education is the one that started it all ... Founded as a teacher’s training institution 125 years ago, UNT is still known for its exemplary College of Education. We prepare more than 1,000 teachers every year, and our alumni taking the state teaching certificationexamhavea97percentpassrate.Ourcounselingprogram is regularly ranked first in Texas and among the top 20 programs nationwide by U.S. News & World Report. And our Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion and Recreation is filling a growing need for professionals in fitness, public health and more. We’re proud to be the foundation upon which UNT was built. Much has changed in 125 years, but our goal will always remain the same: To prepare the education professionals of tomorrow.

coe.unt.edu | 125.unt.edu

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IF YOU LOVE, LOVE, LOVE YOUR “PERVERSION” MASCARA AND EYELINER FROM URBAN DECAY, YOU HAVE A UNT ALUMNA TO THANK FOR IT. WENDE ZOMNIR IS CO-FOUNDER AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF THE COSMETICS COMPANY.

David Drury

Amanda Regan

Chris Briggs

Degree: B.A. in geography, 1993 City: Flower Mound Occupation: Director of GIS, Acosta Mosaic Group What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? The best memories revolve around the Center for Spatial Analysis and Mapping, which is a computer laboratory shared by the Department of Geography and the Institute of Applied Silences. CSAM is outfitted with the latest in computer technology and geographic information system software and provides a great environment for students learning how to utilize GIS to solve real-world problems. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? I was prepared to quickly and successfully transition into the “real world” based on the combination of classroom and laboratory learning opportunities that were available through the Geography Department. Also critical to my success were the intern opportunities cultivated by the department. These opportunities have been enhanced over time by the department’s ability to maintain connections with alumni.

Degrees: M.S. in applied geography (business geography), 2013 City: Dallas Occupation: Vice president of site selection and research at Cresa Dallas What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? The professors were available, engaged and incredibly personable. We had a Friday happy hour each week that allowed us to connect and discuss things that may not always come up in a classroom or an office. Then there were my fellow grad students who helped keep me sane through it all! How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT, specifically the geography department, prepared me by teaching me how to think critically and evaluate research. Also by exposing me to other related fields under the “geography umbrella,” which allows me to understand and consider things from a big-picture perspective when making important real estate decisions — things my competitors are not typically thinking of, which is one of the reasons I have been so successful.

Degree: B.S. in geography, 2004 City: Denton Occupation: Senior executive at Buxton, an international customer analytics and technology firm What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I have two days that I am very fond of. The first was the day I walked into a Maymester intro geography course taught by Dr. Oppong and realized that I had found what I wanted to study — that I had a passion for understanding where things were and why they were there. The second is the day I received an A on my research project in Dr. Schoolmaster’s applied geography course. I poured my heart and soul into that project and it opened the door for my employment at Buxton. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? There are some fundamental skills that were sharpened and enhanced by my education at UNT and have had a lasting positive impact on my career so far. These skills include the ability to reason, effective written and verbal communication, and the ability to apply the scientific method beyond the classic sciences.

CONGRATULATIONS on your 125th Anniversary

CONGRATULATIONS

Sharon K. Lowry Attorney at Law

• • • • • • •

Wills Durable Powers of Attorney Medical Powers of Attorney Living Wills Probate Heirship Applications Applications for Guardianship

ON YOUR 125TH ANNIVERSARY. - Melisa Denis Proud Graduating Class of 1986!

121 W. Hickory Suite 105 • Denton, TX 76201 Ph: 940-765-4992 • Fax: 940-488-4992 • www.sklowrylaw.com

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Dear

Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

,

On behalf of the 27,000+ students you help us support with creative initiatives... the 1,300+ teachers and administrators who proudly consider themselves Mean Green alumns... and the 17 communities that consider our district their educational home... congrats on your 125 years of excellence! Sincerely,

IP


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“GLORY TO THE GREEN AND WHITE,” BY STUDENTS JULIA SMITH AND CHARLES LANGFORD, BECAME THE ALMA MATER IN 1922, AND STUDENTS CHOSE THE EAGLE AS THE SCHOOL’S MASCOT.

Tier One

UNT in pursuit of top status By Jenna Duncan Staff Writer

For years, the University of North Texas has chased after the elusive title of “Tier One university.” This can mean a lot of things: breaking into U.S. News & World Report’s Top 100 university list, being labeled a very high-activity research university or just spending more than $100 million annually on research. Pretty much everything UNT President Neal Smatresk is working on relates to achieving the elusive Tier One status. Projects in the works include increasing funding for research and faculty, improving retention and bringing in more doctoral students. As the university continues its strategic planning process, looking at what the community wants UNT to be like in 20 years, Smatresk said each stakeholder has to think about how they can help improve the institution to compete with the likes of the University of Texas, Texas A&M and Rice University, Texas’ Tier One institutions.

Aaron Schad, a research scientist with UNT, holds up a milkweed pod before a dig in Dallas’ Great Trinity Forest last year. Dallas Morning News file photo

“What we need to do now is to say to faculty: What are we going to do to close the gaps? How will all of our departments contribute to this goal? And to the staff, we need to say: How will each of your support units contribute to the goals?” he said. “What can you do personally to commit to being a Tier One institution? To the students, we need to say: How can we further

enhance your education and give you incredible pride in this place? How we do we build a sense of community so you’re a happy alum, and we have the same zealous support that UT, A&M and even Texas Tech alums have?” However, Victor Borden, the project director of the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, said there are

several colleges that are considered among the best in the country, but aren’t in the top class of Carnegie Classifications’ “very high” research activity. Currently, UNT is in the next category as having high research activity. Borden said the Carnegie Classification is “value neutral,” rather than a typical ranking that rates some schools as superior to others. Instead the classifications represent diversity between university programs. “We do not intend to suggest that any category is ‘higher’ than another,” Borden said. To determine the level of research activity, the classifications take into account factors such as the school’s amount of federal research funding, its number of non-faculty researchers with doctorates, and the distribution of doctoral degrees the school grants, Borden said. “It’s very hard to predict where the line will fall that distinguishes ‘high’ from ‘very high,’ but that is what will determine their fate,” he said. Some things have already changed to

Winning isn’t everything. Saving hundreds on car insurance is.

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THIS FALL, 16-YEAR OLD NOEL JETT ENROLLED IN UNT — AS A DOCTORAL STUDENT. FOR NOW, SHE’S PURSUING A PH.D. IN EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. HER FOCUS? GIFTED AND TALENTED YOUNG PEOPLE. “AS A GIFTED PERSON, I

NOW & THEN:

1942 & 2015 Administration Building: In a photo from 1942, a crowd of students forms outside the entrance to the main auditorium of the Administration Building during freshman orientation at North Texas State Teachers College. The building, which served as the Administration Building until the construction of the Hurley Administration Building in 1955, is now known as the Auditorium Building and is the home of the English Department. David Minton/DRC


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WANT TO KNOW HOW PEOPLE LIKE ME WORK,” JETT SAID. ■ COME ON, BIG MONEY! CAMILLE HALL, WHO EARNED DEGREES AT UNT IN 2008 AND 2010, WON $67,538 AND A TRIP TO JAMAICA LAST MARCH ON WHEEL OF FORTUNE.

help UNT administrators align more closely with research universities. They’ve changed the standards for professors receiving tenure, so those who reach the target are of comparable quality to other top schools. This year’s budget already reflects some of the major initiatives to help improve the university. UNT officials are adding almost $13 million for faculty and staff raises and new positions to help attract and retain professors and academic advisers. There’s also funding for mentoring in place, so faculty stay. Another issue is that UNT simply doesn’t have the space for a higher research capacity. Currently, the university has about 30 percent of research space that the average Tier One school has, Smatresk said. The university’s governing body, the Board of Regents, approved funding $15.5 million to renovate the Science Research Building. Plus, UNT received $70 million from the state to build a new College of Visual Arts and Design building to help expand space. “To move toward Tier One, we have to improve our facilities,” said Bob Brown, vice president for finance and administration. “Our Science Research Building will be renovated … to provide more wet labs for biologists and biochemists. That, with CVAD, which the Legislature approved, will be two giant steps toward improving research.” ●

John-David Ray Rocha

Monica Thieu

Degrees: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Sciences, 1993; B.S. in chemistry, 1995; M.S. in chemistry, 2002 City: Rochester, N.Y. Occupation: Assistant professor of chemistry and materials science What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I always enjoyed Homecoming weekends! I was lucky enough to be a part of two winning teams in the Yell Like Hell competition — 1991 with TAMS/McConnell Hall and 1993 with West Hall. Additionally, I was honored to be nominated by the Residence Hall Association to the Homecoming Court in 1994 alongside Meredith Scott (Martin). My wife and I still love to take our daughters to the Homecoming game when we have the chance. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? UNT gave me my first taste of life engulfed in education — science, math, music, teacher ed, higher ed … it was all there! I found my love for chemistry and basic science research alongside the opportunity to work with students of all ages to help them grow into their own career paths. Countless programs in their infancy, including TAMS and the Ronald E. McNair Program, built me up to be a leader prepared to soar.

Degree: Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science, 2012 City: San Francisco Occupation: Graduated Stanford undergrad class of 2015; currently working as a memory neuroscience researcher with plans to pursue a Ph.D. in neuroscience. What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? One night my senior year, my TAMS friends and I piled into my car to go and see Adam and Jamie from MythBusters live in Grand Prairie. We had requested a curfew extension to come back late after the show, and we grabbed a late-night snack at McDonald’s on University Drive on the way back just to prove we could. At TAMS, I loved that our high school late-night hangouts could be totally nerdy and un-self-conscious. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? Thanks to the UNT courses I took through TAMS, I was able to graduate a year early from Stanford and fasttrack my education by taking graduate-level courses as an undergrad. I’m thankful for the chance to get ahead in school in an environment where we were held to a high standard because important people believed that we could perform.

Congratulations on 125 years of remarkable transformation! From humble beginnings in 1890 as a teacher’s training school, to its standing today as the nation’s 25th largest university, the University of North Texas is transforming itself into a university of the future. Ayers Saint Gross is honored to be a part of the journey. Image: View of the campus as proposed in the Ayers Saint Gross 2013 Master Plan Update.

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CELEBRATE THE PAST. INSPIRE THE FUTURE. Leave a Legacy at UNT. Much of the incredible growth the University of North Texas has experienced over the past 125 years is due to the generosity of valued friends and alumni of the university. By partnering your legacy with UNT, you help strengthen one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest public universities and ensure our growth in the future. The 1890 Society at the University of North Texas honors those who have named the university in their estate plans. Named after the year UNT was founded, the 1890 Society ensures continued growth for our communities. The legacy you create at UNT will expand resources and opportunities for our students and faculty. Help UNT remain a world-class educational institution by crafting your legacy today. For more information on legacy giving through your estate plan, contact our Office of Planned Giving at 940.565.3683 or contact Roy Grisham, Senior Director of Planning Giving at roy.grisham@unt.edu or visit plannedgiving.unt.edu.

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LOS CHICANOS, THE FIRST H ISPA N IC GROUP ON CA MPUS, WA S FO R M ED TO “M EET THE SO CIAL, CU LTU R AL, AND EDU CATIO NAL NEEDS O F M EX ICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS,” ACCORDING TO THE 1970 YUCCA.

Innovation Greenhouse

Office nurtures ideas By Caitlyn Jones For the Denton Record Chronicle

Nancy Hong paces around her office. As sunlight streams into the room in UNT’s Sycamore Hall, she prunes the leaves of the plants that call her windowsill home. “I’m so ADD that I have to be doing stuff when I talk to people,” she says, inspecting the soil with her finger. That ability to jump from one task to another has served her well in her position at the university. As the executive director for Innovation Greenhouse and a startup business guru, she has helped hundreds of students turn ideas into reality. “I’m more like a coach than a teacher,” Hong says. “A teacher is so specific. I’m an innovation coach.” In its third year, Innovation Greenhouse has enabled students to realize the potential of ideas involving anything from music to medicine. Sticking to the organization’s motto of “we grow ideas,” Hong helps would-be entrepreneurs cultivate their ide-

as into tangible businesses, all while connecting them with CEOs of major corporations and community startup leaders. “My mantra is to help create 100,000 jobs,” Hong says. “I don’t have a big company where I can hire 100,000 people, but I have students and startups that will help me create 100,000 jobs.” One of those jobs could go to computer engineering senior Noel Behailu. He visited Hong after he decided to develop a platform that explores the human relationship between millennials on social media. “As it stands, tools today are flooded with content-based thoughts that are potentially random,” Behailu says. “What I’m working on plans to focus on people rather than posts.” Hong helped Behailu practice presentations, draft business plans and apply to different accelerator programs. Behailu says he’s in talks to start prototyping his product. But innovation doesn’t happen only in

technology, Hong says. “Innovation is a just a way to do things better with the same or less resources,” she says. In fact, Innovation Greenhouse hosts music and art showcases every third Friday of the month and aspiring artists are invited to perform. Last year’s Sherman/Barsanti Inspiration Award went to jazz student Drew Zaremba, who formed a large-scale ensemble of classical and jazz musicians he called the Unity Orchestra. The annual award comes with a $10,000 prize. “This is what this generation of students want to see. They don’t want to go to class and be lectured to,” Hong says. “Now, the students get concepts in the classroom and they come here to do stuff, whatever that stuff may be. They see it as more meaningful that way.” As he finishes his degree in May, Behailu agrees with Hong’s observation. “We need more information about what

Gary Payne/UNT

Nancy Hong is the director of the Innovation Greenhouse at UNT. true entrepreneurship is and what the reality is like, other than the Mark Zuckerberg stories or Steve Jobs quotes,” Behailu says. That’s where Hong will continue to make her mark. She says she may not have Ph.D. attached to her title, but instead has something more valuable for her students. “I have ‘comma, LIFE’ after my name,” she says as she makes sure the plants in her office continue to prosper. ●

Congratulations UNT on 125!

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On 125 Years of Educational Excellence!

www.TrinityCareers.com EEO/AA/Minorities/Females/Disabled/Vets

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THE YEAR THE MUSIC DIED: IN 2007, THE DELTA LODGE ANNOUNCED IT WAS RETIRING FRY STREET FAIR. THE INDEPENDENT FRATERNITY’S MUSIC FEST, FIRST HELD IN 1979, DREW AS MANY AS 20,000 PEOPLE IN 2002. TODD

University Union

Student space reinvented By Caitlyn Jones

For the Denton Record Chronicle

Behind blue construction fences, machinery revs and hammers bang away as workers work on the new University of North Texas Student Union building, a $128 million project set to open this fall. “They should be wrapping up the exterior brick sometime in the next couple of weeks. For the interior, they’re starting to put finishes down like tile and terrazzo,” said union director Zane Reif. “All that stuff is going in, so we’re really close. It’s only a matter of time.”

The road to renovation

The idea for a union renovation began as far back as 2009. That year, the university brought in Komatsu Architecture to conduct a study of the building, which was designed for 17,000 students. Enrollment that year had surpassed 36,000.

The study found that it would cost $34 million to do mechanical, engineering and plumbing renovations without adding any additional space. “We had all kinds of behind-the-scenes issues that caused so much trouble,” Reif said. “It was hard for people to see that. We had the ceiling caving in. We had issues with drainage.” Dissatisfied with the current structure, a master plan committee composed of 29 individuals within the university began looking at alternatives. One of the committee members was then-freshman Laura Horn, who served on the committee throughout her college career. “I joined because I saw the enormous potential impact of this on campus,” said the recent graduate, now a Southwest Airlines network planning analyst. “I wanted to listen to what students wanted and make it a reality.” Reif said student input was an integral

part of the process, as16 students served on the master plan committee and multiple student surveys were conducted. Requests included additional space for seating, enhanced UNT branding, energy-efficient structures and updated technology. In 2010, the committee drew up plans for a new building that would double the center’s size. “This plan was kind of a genesis of what they wanted in a union,” Reif said. “This is their vision coming true.” But the committee had to convince the rest of the student population to help fund that vision. Over the next two years, signs popped up all over campus encouraging students to vote on a union fee increase of $115 per semester to finance the project. When the vote finally came around in April 2012, only 10 percent of the student body voted and the majority voted in favor of the increase. Before construction could begin, the

master plan committee went down to Austin in fall 2012 for approval from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. After hearing the plans, the board rejected the project because of high costs. “I think there were some issues when it came to the funding per square foot of the renovation,” Reif said. “The board just wanted accurate numbers and needed more clarification.” Then-President Lane Rawlins and Chancellor Lee Jackson appealed the vote, and plans were approved the following spring.

Boots on the ground

By the time demolition began in October 2013, parts of the campus had been shuffled around by construction. The university bookstore became a large white temporary building on the corner of Chestnut Street, dining services occupied a food pavilion in the middle of campus, and student services including the post office

Congratulations

to the University of North Texas

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KAASTAD, A LODGE FOUNDER, SAID THE FESTIVAL HAD BEEN LOSING MONEY. “WE JUST SEE THIS AS A REALLY GOOD TIME TO RE-EVALUATE WHAT DELTA LODGE IS ALL ABOUT.” THE LODGE SOLD ITS HOUSE NEAR FRY STREET, TOO.

and Wells Fargo were relocated to the Stovall Hall Temporary Union Building, known to students as the STUB. “For a temporary building, it has done its job, but I wouldn’t want to stay in here much longer,” Reif said. The dance and theater department and the College of Visual Arts and Design, both formerly housed in Stovall, were moved to temporary buildings on the east side of campus. Plans for a new CVAD building were approved in this year’s legislative session. University communications specialist Leslie Minton said students have been patient throughout the construction process. “Construction fences are where we’ve appreciated students’ patience,” she said. “They are there for safety but they have impeded pedestrian traffic a bit.” Originally, the building was set to open in August 2015, but because of unusually wet weather this spring, the opening will be delayed until late October or early November, Reif said. “It’s not very pretty to look at,” freshman Anna Davis said of the site. “It blocks off everything and it’s just an eyesore.”

The payoff When the doors open to that “eyesore,” Reif said students will feel the “wow” factor. “The weirdest thing about this union

University Union director Zane Reif stands in front of the main entrance to the new student union building as construction work continues in August. The building is a near-total rebuild and expansion of the 1976 University Union, which replaced the original Memorial Union Building from 1949. David Minton/DRC

now is that a couple years have gone by and we have a whole generation of students who have never experienced what a student union is,” he said. “There’s going to have to be some education about what the building’s about and why it’s important.” The new building will be LEED Platinum certified. Cisterns will collect rainwater for the rooftop garden, and solar panels will help power the building.

Dining options will expand to include Fuzzy’s Taco Shop, Jamba Juice, Starbucks and Which Wich. The two-story Syndicate lounge will host jazz nights and may potentially serve beer and wine after 5 p.m., pending the approval of university officials. Student activity space will expand by 100,000 square feet, while additional computers and power outlets will line the walls. Interactive screens will showcase the histo-

ry of UNT and wall panels will honor famous alumni. Even though she graduated in May, Horn said she’s excited to come back and see her vision brought to life. “Of course I’m going to come back and see it,” she said. “Seeing everything come to fruition and seeing the students’ faces will be extremely satisfying.” ●

S TAT E R E P R E S E N TAT I V E DISTRICT 64

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THE COLLEGE’S FIRST L IV E BIRD MA SCOT , SCRA PPY , A PPEA RED IN 1950. ■ TO DAY, THER E AR E 34 CHR ISTIAN STU DENT O R G ANIZATIO NS AND FIVE NON-CHRISTIAN STUDENT GROUPS AT UNT. THERE IS AN ATHEIST AND

UNT Health Science Center

Medical programs diversify By Jeff Carlton For the Denton Record-Chronicle

FORT WORTH — Sprinkled into the backstory of UNT Health Science Center — home to Fort Worth’s flagship medical school — are some of the most famous names in the city’s history: Fort Worth Star-Telegram publisher Amon Carter, oilman Sid Richardson, U.S. Rep. Jim Wright. It is heady company for a school with such humble beginnings. The UNT Health Science Center now comprises five graduate schools on a 33acre hillside home in the heart of the Cultural District overlooking downtown Fort Worth. But it wasn’t so long ago that UNTHSC was little more than a nascent osteopathic medical college that trained its first classes of students in a renovated bowling alley. Today, when UNTHSC talks of expansion, it means opening an M.D. school with Texas Christian University or starting a new physician group and teaching-hospital relationship with JPS Health Network, the publicly funded safety-net hospital in Fort Worth. But 45 years ago, expansion meant buying a vacant lot, a seedy apartment building, a liquor store and a go-go bar. It was part of an ultimately successful effort to expand the young college’s footprint — and spruce up the neighborhood. Founded in 1970 as the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth’s only medical school was kept viable in its early years with critical funding from foundations started by Carter and Richardson, along with federal dollars secured by Wright. That early support for TCOM was critical, serving as a bridge until the Fort Worth school could solidify its relationship with North Texas State University. In 1972, NTSU agreed to provide basic science instruction in Denton to first- and second-year medical students. By 1975, TCOM had become a state-supported medical school under the direction of North Texas State’s Board of Regents. The schools — which eventually became UNT Health Science Center and the University of North Texas — have been linked ever since. Bowling alleys and go-go bars may not be the traditional origin story for most health science centers, but there is little about UNT Health Science Center that could be considered conventional. What is

Courtesy photos

An aerial views shows the UNT Health Science Center in Fort Worth. The first home of Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (left) was a building that once housed Tavener Bowling Center (below, before its transformation). indisputable, however, is its impact on Fort Worth and beyond. The Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine has trained several generations of front-line caregivers and now boasts of producing more primary care physicians than any other medical school in Texas. Each year, roughly two-thirds of its 220 graduates go into primary care, ranking it among the top five of all medical schools nationally. The medical school also has deep roots in rural communities, partnering its students with physicians in small towns across Texas to ensure training for the next generation of rural caregivers. The Health Science Center is interwoven into the fabric of Fort Worth in other ways. In 1979, its Institute for Human Fitness established the Cowtown Marathon, now the largest multi-event race in Texas.

The Pediatric Mobile Clinic brings basic health care to children in four underserved neighborhoods of the city. The Mighty Care Program targets Medicaid-eligible seniors, offering primary care services through freestanding neighborhood clinics. And medical students and volunteer physicians treat

the homeless at regular clinics at the Presbyterian Night Shelter and in other community settings. The university has expanded its footprint in other ways, transforming from a medical college into a true health science center with the 1993 founding of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. In addition to offering advanced degrees in fields such as cancer biology, molecular genetics and pharmacology, the biomedical school has fueled rapid growth in research opportunities. UNTHSC’s annual research expenditures have more than doubled in the last 10 years to roughly $40 million. One area of focus: a highly reliable and simple blood test to detect Alzheimer’s disease that could be a key to early diagnosis and more effective treatment. Within the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences is UNTHSC’s internationally renowned Center for Human Identification and Missing Persons Unit, a forensic DNA lab used by law enforcement agencies around the country to help identify human remains. The team is the largest contributor of unidentified DNA profiles to the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System and is helping the state clear a two-decade backlog of untested sexual assault kits. In the last two decades, UNTHSC has added three schools to its campus: the School of Public Health, the School of Health Professions (to train physician assistants and physical therapists) and the UNT System College of Pharmacy. A 2015 announcement to begin a sixth school — the M.D. program with TCU — allows UNTHSC to offer one of the most comprehensive health care educations on a single campus anywhere in the United States. Such health care diversity enhances UNTHSC’s efforts to train health care providers and experts to work across disciplines as members of the same team, one that keeps the patient at the center of its focus. UNT Health Science Center sits at the intersection of health care, higher education and cutting-edge research. For more than 40 years, it has been an innovator in training health care professionals, in pushing the frontiers of scientific knowledge and in improving public health. Not bad for a little college that started in a converted bowling alley. ●


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AGNOSTIC STUDENT GROUP, JEWISH STUDENT GROUP HILLEL, AND THE MUSLIM STUDENT ASSOCIATION. A UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST GROUP IS ACTIVE, AS IS THE CAMPUS GROUP WORLD BUDDHIST REVOLUTION.

Cameron Hernholm

Leroy Whitaker

Yea-Wen Chen

Degree: B.A. in sociology/political science, 1999 City: Dallas Occupation: Chief development officer, Resource Center What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? The highlight of my time as a student was when I was inducted into the Mortar Board national honor society. Mortar Board was a select group of diverse seniors from different disciplines and interests who were all committed to scholarship, leadership and service. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? During my tenure at UNT, I volunteered and served with numerous organizations and clubs. From NT40 to the Student Government Association, I was always surrounded by students and professors who exemplified a commitment to community service and making the world a better place for everyone. I established lifelong friends and mentors at UNT and cannot imagine that my career choice or career success would have been possible without UNT.

Degrees: B.S. and M.S. in chemistry, 1950 and 1952 City: Dallas Occupation: Retired patent attorney, research chemist What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I enjoyed the close relationship with the chemistry faculty, the meetings of the D-FW chapter of the American Chemical Society, my classmates, my fraternity (Falcons) brothers, football and basketball games and track meets, and of course, the Saturday night stage shows. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The foundation for my career was laid at UNT. My basic training in chemistry started there. Among other things, I learned how to do research. Professor Price Truitt is the reason I went on to get a Ph. D. with a fellowship at the University of Illinois to study under Roger Adams, one of the leading organic chemists in the world. Dr. Adams was truly a legend and was the guru of organic chemistry in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. I was blessed to have studied under him and am thankful to Dr. Truitt for giving me that opportunity.

Degree: M.A. in communication studies, 2006 City: Athens, Ohio Occupation: Assistant professor, School of Communication Studies, Ohio University What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Sitting, chatting and waiting in a circle with my graduate friends — both domestic and international — for an evening class to start. Those were usually the highlights of my days. By then, I had survived my undergraduate teaching, completed my readings for class and printed out my article summaries for the professor. Finally, I could slow down, relax and anticipate enlightening discussions about intricate communication phenomena. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? Fundamentally, it opened my mind to how rewarding it could be to live an intellectual life as an academic researching social problems in attempts to better address them. The interactions I had there renewed my love for learning, reignited my passion for teaching and reaffirmed the democratic values and potentials of education.

Congratulations UNT on 125 years!

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Good Luck to All of Our Local Teams & Have a Great Season!

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EMMY WINNER BILL MOYERS STUDIED JOURNALISM FOR TWO YEARS AT NORTH TEXAS STATE, WHERE HE WAS ELECTED OUTSTANDING STUDENT BOTH YEARS, BEFORE TRANSFERRING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS.

Alan Bigelow

Craig Beasley

Jimmy Perdue

Degrees: B.S., 1991; M.S., 1993; Ph.D., 2000, all in physics City: Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. Occupation: Research science What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Teaching the musical acoustics course offered by the Physics Department. As a physics grad student and a guitarist, it was a pleasure interacting with outstanding music students about the science and technology of their musical instruments. I particularly loved each time students demonstrated their instrument in class and grasped the connection between the tone they played and the wave form we recorded and analyzed. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The particle-accelerator program provided ideal training for my research career in radiation biology. My thesis project involved building a lab from the ground up, and I acquired skills crucial for my career: electronics, ion optics, lasers, computer automation and even plumbing! My professors were experts in their field and they consistently encouraged me to persevere through tasks that seemed impossible at the time.

Degree: Ph.D. in mathematics, 1981 City: Houston Occupation: Chief geophysicist and Schlumberger Fellow, WesternGeco/Schlumberger What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I remember the great times we had with other graduate students just doing normal things. We didn’t have money to do anything exotic, but it didn’t matter. Shared dinners, graduation parties, going swimming at the quarry, buying our first small house on Broadway are memories that I will always have. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The most important aspect of my studies at UNT was associating with world-class mathematicians who practiced the “Texas method,” so called because of its foundations at UT in the 1930s. This approach, in which students learn mathematics by doing it, has progressed to the point that today it is named IBL — investigation-based learning — and has a large following. Professors such as Neuberger, Mahavier, Mohat, Dawson and Appling, to name a few, were all from this school of pedagogy.

Degree: M.S. in criminal justice, 2006 City: Irving Occupation: Law enforcement, municipal government What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? As a nontraditional student, I was appreciative of the support the staff provided regardless of the hours and agenda. They worked hard to ensure my group had a full college experience yet remained flexible to accommodate our schedules. I was also able to see the growth of the university in both the quantity and quality of the students who chose UNT. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? By the time I returned to school at UNT, I had been working in law enforcement for 24 years and had a lifetime of experiences. I was ready to take my career to the executive level but was needing my master’s degree. UNT was able to provide me a foundation by combining academic knowledge with real-life experiences to give me the background I needed to further my career. They were instrumental in moving me forward into the next level.

Rob Graves

Paul Chandler BBA

Richard Reynolds

BS

Ben Joyner BBA, MBA UNT Foundation Board

BBA, MBA

& OUR LENDING STAFF ALUMNI Salute

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS FOR 125 YEARS OF

Bill McClellan BBA

COMMITMENT TO EDUCATION EXCELLENCE 1013 W. UNIVERSITY DR. DENTON, TX 76201 | 2532 LILLIAN MILLER PKWY. DENTON, TX 76210

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SAXOPHONIST “BLUE LOU” MARINI, PROBABLY BEST KNOWN FOR BACKING THE BLUES BROTHERS, CAME FROM NEW YORK TO ATTEND NTSU. “WHEN I GOT OFF THE TRAIN IN NORTH TEXAS,” HE SAID IN A 2005 INTERVIEW, “IT

NOW AND THEN:

1983 & 2015 Adminstration Building: In a 1983 photo, a student receives directions on where to go while trying to register for classes in the Administration Building. In 2015, the windows on the ground floor of the Hurley Administration Building are covered with large framed historical photos of the campus and Denton. David Minton/DRC


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WAS ONE OF THOSE DRY SUMMERS WHERE THE CICADAS WERE CRUNCHING UNDERFOOT, AND I WONDERED WHERE I WAS.”

Heather L. Servaty-Seib

S. Deborah Cosimo

Stan Weeber

Degree: Ph.D. in counseling/psychology, 1997 City: Lafayette, Indiana Occupation: Professor of counseling psychology, Purdue University What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? It seemed like everywhere you went you could hear live music — jazz, funk, rock, you name it. There were so many festivals and concerts and just all kinds of events happening on and off campus. I also remember favorite places to eat and hang out like Mr. Chopsticks, the Flying Tomato, Cool Beans and Riprocks — lots of great memories with friends. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? As a graduate student, all of my time at UNT was focused on becoming a psychologist. The foundation of that preparation was offered by the excellent faculty in the psychology department and most particularly by my adviser and mentor, Dr. Bert Hayslip Jr. Bert not only guided me in my research, but he also empowered me as a thinker and scholar. He was unwavering in his belief in my abilities and continues to support and encourage me.

Degree: Ph.D. in sociology, 2009 City: Denton Occupation: Senior program analyst, Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? My fondest memories are of the stimulating discussions that took place in our sociological theory classes. I am still enamored with C. Wright Mills’ concept of the sociological imagination, and the distinction between the “personal troubles of milieu and the public issues of social structure.” How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? When I began, my goal was to study applied sociology and learn how to conduct research. Serendipitously, I took courses in program evaluation, which led to an opportunity to evaluate domestic violence offender programs in Texas. Courses in the sociology of disaster and collective behavior continue to influence my work evaluating health care facilities’ emergency preparedness and response. UNT provided me with the opportunity to prepare for a career that, frankly, I had not considered.

Degree: Ph.D. in sociology, 2000 City: Lake Charles, Louisiana Occupation: Professor of sociology, McNeese State University What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? I met my lovely wife, Julie, in the mid-1990s when we were both employed at UNT. We got married in February 1997, at about the midpoint of my doctoral program. I also cherish many fond memories of my mentors and friends at UNT Sociology and Public Affairs & Community Service: Dan Rodeheaver, Tom Evenson, Syl Flores, Fonda Gaynier, David Hartman, Richard Mabry, Vijay Pillai, Jim Quinn, Rudy Seward, DeLois Spearman, Dale Yeatts. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? In my doctoral program at UNT, I survived 16 classes, five comprehensive exams, a dissertation proposal defense, the writing of the dissertation and a dissertation defense. I could not have survived without Dan Rodeheaver’s encouragement and support. I continued to consult with him during my career at McNeese State.

Congratulations on 125 Years of Excellence! Proud Supporters of

The University of North Texas

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Happy 125th!!!

More than 20 UNT grads work at CoServ. Visit the Careers page of CoServ.com to keep CoServ (Mean) Green!

Congratulations on your 125th anniversary, and thank you for providing us with such excellent Employees!

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015 UNT HAS MORE THAN 170 BUILDINGS ON ITS 900-ACRE CAMPUS IN DENTON. DISCOVERY PARK IS ON ANOTHER 300 ACRES, ABOUT 5 MILES NORTH OF THE MAIN CAMPUS.

NOW AND THEN:

1978 & 2015 General Academic Building: Students sit on a round bench on the second floor of the General Academic Building in a photo from 1978, the year the five-story building opened. David Minton/DRC

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Congratulations UNT on your 125th Anniversary!

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LAINA MORRIS, A.K.A. “OVERLY ATTACHED GIRLFRIEND,” STUDIED FOR A BIT AT UNT. THEN SHE GOT 1.2 MILLION SUBSCRIBERS ON YOUTUBE, WHERE SHE SKEWERS POP SONGS FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF A LOVER OBSESSED.

UNT Dallas

Higher ed in Dallas’ reach For the Denton Record-Chronicle

Like many historic achievements, the University of North Texas at Dallas started as a simple idea — albeit an ambitious one — that would take hold and blossom because of the vision and hard work of a diverse group of energetic and tenacious community leaders. Two area legislators — state Sen. Royce West and Rep. Helen Giddings — had taken the lead in making the university a reality. “I had felt for some time that Dallas County needed a state-supported university,” West recalled. “And I thought the single best place to put that institution was in the county’s southern core.” Establishing a new university was a collective effort that was supported wholeheartedly by the community: mayors, school districts, municipalities and chambers of commerce. “Imagining a state university for the city, and then having the energy and tenacity to turn something imagined into something real and tangible — that’s the kind of leadership that has made Dallas what it is today,” said Levi H. Davis, a former assistant city manager in Dallas. The first students enrolled in 2000 at what would become UNT Dallas, and it officially became an independent academic institution in 2009. It was soon decided that a university that truly had its community’s needs at heart would benefit from a public law school. In August 2014, the UNT Dallas College of Law seated its first class. That inaugural class represented what UNT System Chancellor Lee F. Jackson referred to as “10 years of active planning and 40 years of regional aspiration.” The law school selected retired federal judge Royal Furgeson Jr. as its founding dean. UNT Dallas will expand services for the growing number of military veterans on campus who are transitioning from active duty into the workforce and higher education, including a Veteran Success Center. By the end of 2016, the first residence hall is set to open, and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit blue line will terminate near the campus, effectively linking the university to all of DART’s service area in the Dallas area. Located in a predominantly AfricanAmerican area of southern Dallas, UNT Dallas is rapidly becoming a university of

Dallas Morning News file photo

Bob Mong, the new president of University of North Texas Dallas, leaves a conversation with students Jacob Gonzalez, right, and Cesar Gaona in July. first choice for many students who otherwise could not afford or would not have access to a quality college education. Spring 2015 enrollment exceeded 2,600 students. Applications are at a record high, making the university’s goal of 3,000 full-time students in the fall a very real possibility. “Ours is an ambitious goal. We want to make higher education more flexible,” said Lois Becker, provost and vice president of academic excellence and student success. Providing flexible opportunities means paying attention to where students are in life, and understanding that no two students are alike. A student working fulltime to support a family needs advising and tutoring options that are different from the traditional first-time freshman. It also means lessening the red tape and headaches for transfer students. “The students at UNT Dallas want to learn, and thrive if you give them opportunity. They’re eager to get out in the workplace to work,” said Dan Edelman, chief fi-

nancial officer and vice president of finance and administration. “If we weren’t at this location at this time, I’m not sure where these students would be right now. Thankfully, we can provide our students with the tools they need to create change, lead society and benefit their families’ lives, too.” Those tools for change stem from the university’s 21 undergraduate and six graduate degree programs in three academic schools: School of Business, School of Education and Human Services, and the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The School of Business is preparing students to become savvy business professionals, ready to hit the ground running in Dallas’ dynamic business climate. The curriculum is structured to meet the specific needs of Dallas’ businesses. M.B.A. students have the opportunity to finish quickly in one year, while undergraduates are encouraged to pursue industry-specific certifications that make them more marketable after graduation.

The School of Education and Human Services prepares teachers, principals, counselors and human service professionals for employment and leadership in their respective disciplines in the linguistically and culturally diverse communities of the North Texas region and beyond. The school’s emphasis on service extends beyond the walls of the university, and into the daily lives of faculty and staff, some who have given up their Saturdays to teach English to non-English speaking adults at a library in Oak Cliff. The School of Liberal Arts and Sciences is focused on the intellectual, creative and social potential of students. Many of the programs have a community service element that not only enriches students’ lives and prepares them for useful careers, but also allows the university to work with communities and programs in the area to help impact the lives of residents nearby. “Experience-based learning should flavor the curriculum of every class,” said Glenda Balas, dean of the School of Liberal


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

2012’S “THE REVISIONARIES” FOLLOWED DON MCELROY, CHAIRMAN OF THE HIGHLY POLITICIZED STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. THE MAN BEHIND THE CAMERA? SCOTT THURMAN, WHO STUDIED DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING AT UNT.

Arts and Sciences. “It changes the community’s perception of who we are and why we are here when we take the time to serve.” In August, Bob Mong became the university’s third president. Mong recently retired as editor emeritus of The Dallas Morning News following a distinguished journalism career that spanned more than 30 years. Mong’s predecessor, Ronald T. Brown, served as president from 2013 to July 2015, when he was appointed as associate vice chancellor of academic affairs at the UNT System. As Mong takes the reins, UNT Dallas stands ready to mature and adapt to become the university that Dallas needs, and a university that will bring the UNT System great pride. “We want people to know that we genuinely care about our students,” said Stephanie Holley, vice president of enrollment and retention. “Whether they come here from a high school down the street, the military or a community college, we will walk them through the process of applying, enrolling, registering, and finding a way to pay for school. Going to college can be a scary thing to people. We are changing that at UNT Dallas.” ●

Sean Enfield

Megan Van Groll

Degree: B.A. in English literature, 2015 City: Denton Occupation: Tutor/professor What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? Every strange, relatively enlightening conversation I’ve held with every strange, relatively enlightening person who called UNT their school. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? Dr. Diana Elrod, former director of UNT's McNair program, gave me all the tools I need to pursue my dream of receiving my doctorate in English and becoming a professor. Under her tutelage, I’ve grown as a student, a writer and a person.

Degree: B.F.A. in drawing/painting, 2008 City: Dallas Occupation: Artist and member of The Richards Group’s public relations team called Digital Journalism & Content Strategy What is your fondest memory about your days at UNT? There’s an amazing culture of creativity at UNT that I’ll always miss. Between the jazz and visual art crowds and the unassumingly casual yet historic atmosphere, I think I came to feel at home there in a way that defies my nomadic military upbringing. I loved low-key patio conversations on Fry

Street with the other summer hangerson, and walking around the Square. I spent hours digging through obscure art books at Recycled Books. How did UNT help prepare you for the career you chose? The intellectual stimulation that the Honors College provided sparked a curiosity for learning that has never left me. Between the heavy honors writing assignments and the tough painting critiques, I also developed a critical eye for fine art and writing that even informs my approach to my new role in digital content strategy. In the end, I suppose I just have an appetite for storytelling, and I’m fortunate to have found several different ways to explore that.

Congratulations on 125 Successful Years From Proud UNT Graduates

& A s s o c i a t e s P. C .

1300 Fulton St. #301 Denton, TX • 940-387-8930 IP


Congratulations to UNT on its 125th Anniversary!

Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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For more than a century, Texas Woman’s University has enjoyed “growing up” alongside the University of North Texas. We are proud to share with UNT our hometown of Denton as it has flourished into a booming, prosperous community—and risen to become one of America’s best campus towns. We salute our faculty and staff who have collaborated on many projects over the years and are proud of our students who have gained so much from committed faculty on both campuses. Our academic pursuits and our partnerships have resulted in graduating many of our state’s top health care, business and education professionals, and more. As colleagues, neighbors and friends, TWU’s entire community in Denton, Dallas and Houston congratulate UNT on this historic milestone. We wish UNT many continued successes and look forward to all that the next century holds for our community, our faculty, staff, students and alumni, and our families.

Carine M. Feyten Ph.D. Chancellor and President

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

UNT’S CHAPTER OF THE ALBINO SQUIRREL PRESERVATION SOCIETY ONCE BOASTED MORE THAN 400 MEMBERS.

UNT Dallas College of Law/Scott Peek Photography

The UNT Dallas College of Law requires students to combine some lecture courses with small lab groups.

UNT Dallas College of Law

Innovations drive law school For the Denton Record-Chronicle

Although UNT Dallas College of Law is in only its second year of full operations, the new public law school in the heart of downtown Dallas is bringing something new to legal education. How a school can have such impact in a short time period is due, in part, to being a new school planned and built from the ground up to address improvements in legal education under national discussion for the past two decades. “Starting a new law school is hard,” says Royal Furgeson Jr., founding dean. “But it also opens opportunities to innovate from the beginning. Since Furgeson we are new, we are not faced with legacy cost structures or resistance from faculty and alumni.” The new thinking at the College of Law is steeped in educational best practices and recommendations developed through extensive study of legal education by esteemed groups like the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the American Bar Association, among others. Goals at UNT Dallas College of Law reflect strong commitment to an integrated vision encompassing new approaches to

curriculum, tuition and admissions designed to address gaps in access to legal education, gaps in access to affordable legal services, and the changing demographics of the state and region. The intricacies of planning an innovative curriculum are a team effort undertaken by the faculty and led by professor Ellen Pryor, associate dean for academics. “The details of our planning result in conPryor crete changes in the classroom easily recognized by potential students and supporters as well as instructional experts,” Pryor said. “For example, classroom lectures are videotaped and then made available to students to assist in their studies — a practice rarely heard of in law schools. While the tradition in law schools is to give one final exam at the end of a semester-long course, at College of Law we provide multiple assessments in every course throughout the semester to every student. Our required courses cover a greater range of subjects tested on the state bar exam, too.” The curriculum approach goes beyond lectures and grading policies, however. With a goal to develop practice-related

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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UNT STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS INCLUDE THE CAMPUS CAT COALITION, JUGGLING AND FLOW ARTS, MU EPSILON KAPPA ANIME SOCIETY, BORED IN DENTON, THE GREEN TONES, BROTHERS IN SMASH AND THE QUIDDITCH CLUB.

competencies in students, as well as substantive knowledge of the law, the College of Law includes something called “experiential education” requirements for all students. Those requirements touch on legal writing and research. Other courses fulfill those requirements by combining lectures with smaller lab groups, where students apply legal principles to writing, drafting, oral communication, project and case management and problem solving. Experiential education is not limited to the classroom and labs. Starting with their first semester, all students interact with practicing attorneys who volunteer as mentors. These lawyers also participate in lab courses on client interviewing and counseling skills, and they conduct mock job interviews with students. In the 2014-15 academic year, more than 95 Dallas-area attorneys volunteered at the law school for the inaugural class of about 140 students. Every member of the inaugural class holds student membership in the Dallas Bar Association, the first class of any law school in the region to do so in the association’s history. The program gives students opportunities to network with local attorneys at educational and social events. Plus, all students participate in volunteer work each month through 16 community partners, usually working alongside prac-

ticing attorneys. Members of the inaugural class volunteered more than 2,000 hours of community service during their first two semesters in law school, and will continue in community engagement placements every fall and spring term they are in law school. Expanding access to legal education is another important goal at the College of Law, and a holistic approach to admission decisions has been successful in delivering against the goal for the law school’s first two enrolled classes. “Opening access addresses several issues in legal education,” says Assistant Dean Valerie James, director of admissions. “First, there are many prospective students who have the potential to become excelJames lent lawyers yet have not been able to attend law school in the DFW area due to cost, school location, their work schedules or other factors. Plus, we want to open access to students from communities that are underrepresented in the legal profession, and to older students who have significant career experience or military service.” The inaugural class, seated in fall 2014,

is 52 percent female, and 48 percent are students of color. Members’ ages range from 20 to 67, with an average age of 33 years. The stats for the incoming class of fall 2015 are similar. Such class statistics are uncommon in most Texas law schools, even though the state has significant Hispanic and African-American populations. “Developing future community, civic, and business leaders from all communities is part of our vision,” Furgeson says. “It is a high priority for us.” Keeping tuition as low as possible while providing an excellent educational experience is another goal at the heart of UNT Dallas College of Law. With an annual tuition of about $14,500, the law school is the most affordable in Texas and is among the cheapest law schools in the nation. (All courses are taught in classrooms — none are taken online or through distance learning.) “A lower tuition makes law school a possibility for a greater number of students, many of whom have wanted to become attorneys for a very long time but could not afford the education,” says James. “Yet many students choose our school for reasons other than cost, particularly for the emphasis on practical skills and the school’s commitment to service in the community.” Furgeson adds, “A lower tuition has another important impact. … Less debt

FYI: UNT DALLAS COLLEGE OF LAW ■ UNT Dallas College of Law was created by the Texas Legislature in 2009. The law school is housed in a historic building on Main Street in downtown Dallas and will eventually also occupy the iconic Municipal Building. The College of Law was originally administered by UNT System and merged with UNT Dallas on Sept. 1. ■ Annual tuition is about $14,500 for full-time resident students. The American Bar Association reports that the national average tuition in 2012 was $23,214 for public law schools and $40,634 for private law schools. ■ The college offers full-time and part-time (evening division) programs for earning the J.D. degree.

means they may be able to charge lower legal fees, making access to legal services more affordable in the community.” “We are so very proud of our students,” he says. “They inspire us every day with their sense of service, their dedication to succeeding in law school, their participation in helping us form the law school during our early years, and their love of justice. Although not all our students are young in years, they share an enthusiasm for the law that speaks well for the future.” ●

Congratulations to UNT on 125 years! ………………………………..

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

Congratulations UNT th on 125 Anniversary

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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

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THE EAGLES DEFEATED EAST TEXAS STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 34-0 ON NOV. 11, 1929, ONE OF THE UNIVERSITY’S EARLIEST HOMECOMING CELEBRATIONS TO INVOLVE A FOOTBALL GAME.

HOMECOMING SCHEDULE

6 p.m. — Powder Puff Football Game at Apogee Stadium. Support a fun event where girls play flag football while the boys dress up like cheerleaders and cheer the girls on. Free. Visit http://homecoming.unt.edu or call 940-565-3807.

nonperishable food items to raise awareness about hunger. All food collected will go to the Denton Community Food Center. Visit http:/// leadandserve.unt.edu, email leadandserve@ unt.edu or call 940-565-3021. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Spirit Day on the Library Mall. UNT students, faculty and staff can enjoy music, activities and entertainment from various UNT organizations. Email student.activities@ unt.edu or call 940-565-3807. 8 p.m. — Comedy Night at the Auditorium Building, presented by the University Program Council. Free with valid UNT student ID. Email upc@unt.edu.

TUESDAY, OCT. 6

THURSDAY, OCT. 8

11 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Homecoming Picnic on the Library Mall, presented by Student Activities on the Library Mall. UNT students, faculty and staff can celebrate Homecoming week with food, activities and giveaways. Pep rally at noon. Wear green. Barbecue will be served. Free with valid UNT ID. Email student.activities@unt.edu or call 940-565-3807. 4 to 6 p.m. — “Sharpen Your Writing Skills” at the UNT Writing Lab, Sage Hall, Room 152. Students, staff, alumni and the public can visit the Writing Lab to learn how to sharpen their writing skills. Email Writing Lab director Lisa Jackson at ljackson@unt.edu.

6 to 9 p.m. — Distinguished Alumni Achievement Awards in the Gateway Center Ballroom. The UNT Alumni Association will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the UNT Distinguished Alumni Achievement Awards. Make reservations by Sept. 30. Tickets cost $50 each, or $400 for a table of eight. Visit www.untalumni. com/alumni/pages/alumni-awards or contact Annie Carter at anniecarter@unt.edu or 940-3697001. 7 p.m. — Yell Like Hell at the UNT Coliseum. Competition includes skits, dances and music. Presented by the Progressive Black Student Organization and Student Activities. Free. Email untpbso@gmail.com.

Homecoming Week 2015, celebrating UNT’s 125th anniversary, is set for Oct. 4-10. The week culminates with the Mean Green’s football game against Portland State on Oct. 10. This year’s theme is “Forever Mean Green: A Journey Through Time.” for more information, visit http://student affairs.unt.edu/homecoming.

MONDAY, OCT. 5

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Canstruction on the Library Mall, presented by the Center for Leadership. Teams will design and build structures out of

FRIDAY, OCT. 9 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. — Alumni at the Bonfire at the Alumni Pavilion outside Apogee Stadium.

Visit www.untalumni.com/alumni/pages/ homecoming or contact Annie Carter at anniecarter@unt.edu or 940-369-7001. 5 to 7 p.m. — UNT National Pan-Hellenic Council’s Flashback Friday Takeover on the Library Mall. Council alumni are invited to come stroll, party-hop and strut. Email untnphcpresident @yahoo.com. 7 p.m. — Spirit March starts at Fraternity Row on Maple Street and proceeds to the bonfire site at Eagle Point on the northwest side of Apogee Stadium. Email student.activities@unt.edu or call 940-565-3807. 8 p.m. — Homecoming Bonfire and Pep Rally, on the northwest side of Apogee Stadium. The bonfire has been a tradition for over 50 years and is built entirely by the Talons. Email student.activities@unt.edu or call 940-565-3807.

SATURDAY, OCT. 10 7:15 to 8:30 a.m. — Rec Sports Intramural 5K Homecoming Fun Run, starting and finishing at Pohl Recreation Center. There will be men’s and women’s divisions, broken into age groups. The winner of each division will receive a T-shirt. Call 940-565-2275. Visit http://recsports.unt.edu. Students, faculty and staff can register at IMLeagues.com. 9 to 11 a.m. — Golden Eagles Reunion at the Gateway Center Ballroom. Class of 1965 members celebrate the 50th anniversary of their graduation. Tickets cost $20. Reservations must be made by Oct. 2. Visit www.untalumni.com/alumni/pages/ alumni-events-golden-eagles-2015. Contact the UNT Alumni Association at 940-565-2834 or

alumni@unt.edu. 10 a.m. — Homecoming Parade, including participants from the UNT community and Denton community. The parade begins at Welch and Hickory streets, travels down Hickory and goes around the Square. From Oak, turn left on Welch, right on Hickory (going the wrong way on Hickory through campus) and left on North Texas Boulevard. Visit http://homecoming.unt.edu. 1 to 3:30 p.m. — Mean Green Village Tailgating near Apogee Stadium. Organization, department and college tents add to the Homecoming spirit along with live music, the Junior Mean Green Fun Zone and the Mean Green March, featuring the cheerleaders, dancers, marching band, head coach Dan McCarney and the Mean Green football team. For tailgate tent package options, visit www.meangreensports.com/ homecomingtailgate or call 940-565-2527. ● Graduate Student Council tailgate, email Brian Tatum at gsc-vppo@unt.edu. ● College of Education tailgate, noon to 3:30 p.m. Email Claudia Taylor at claudia.taylor@ unt.edu. 2 to 3:30 p.m. — Alumni Association’s Alumni GameDay Grille at the Alumni Pavilion outside Apogee Stadium. Alumni are invited to get together before the game. Weekend admission to the Pavilion is free. Contact Annie Carter at anniecarter@unt.edu or 940-369-7001. 4 p.m. — Homecoming Game: Mean Green vs. Portland State at Apogee Stadium. Ticket options start at $12. Visit NorthTexasGame Day.com or call 940-565-2527.

Congratulations UNT on 125 years of Academic Excellence.

IP

“Proud Member of the UNT System”


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Denton Record-Chronicle presents UNT: 125 YEARS | 1890-2015

ACTRESS ANN SHERIDAN WAS A STUDENT WHEN HER SISTER SENT HER PHOTO TO A PARAMOUNT STUDIOS BEAUTY CONTEST IN 1932. HER WIN SENT HER TO HOLLYWOOD, WHERE SHE LATER BECAME AMERICA’S “OOMPH GIRL.”

NOW AND THEN:

1942 & 2015 Chilton Hall: Three students pose for a photo in 1942 in front of a doorway on the front steps of Chilton Hall, a men’s dormitory that opened in 1938. Today, the doorway is surrounded by a staircase inside an atrium area. A renovation in the 1980s filled in the building’s courtyard, completely enclosing what had once been an exterior wall. Chilton Hall now houses offices and classrooms. David Minton/DRC


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UNT 125th Anniversary  

A special publication from the Denton Record-Chronicle.

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