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Michael Modecki/TWU

Cover story: In addition to four planned construction projects in the next three years, consultants are starting to help TWU administrators look out at the next 20 years, too.

Although TWU athletics have achieved notable success over the years, the department is equally proud of the success its athletes have attained in the classroom.

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TWU dance graduates are working as teachers, choreographers and performers in Denton, in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and beyond.

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TWU has a bevy of independent partnerships, ranging from NASA to community colleges to pre-schools to overseas organizations.

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In its fifth year at the university, the TeachLivE lab allows education students to practice their teaching skills in a low-risk environment getting up in front real kids.

TWU has four institutes supporting its core mission of education while providing beneficial services to students, faculty and staff, and the Denton community.

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The university has a multitude of alluring exhibits and attractions that bring in folks from all around who are searching for an interesting day in Denton.

Flexibility to work with students on a case-by-case basis to find the most effective solutions has made TWU one of the safest university campus in Texas.

Chancellor’s message: Page 7 Mobile Go Center: Pages 8-9 Experiential program: Pages 26-29 New Teacher Academy: Pages 35-38 NASA legacy: Pages 41-44 TWU Dallas: Page 42 Veterans: Pages 74-80 WASP National Archive: Page 75 College of Nursing: Page 78 Resources: Page 82 Community service: Pages 83-89 Helping Hands: Page 87 TWU Houston: Page 91 Alumni profiles: Pages 17, 18, 29, 32, 38, 40, 63, 64, 81, 90 Did you know?: Pages 33, 53, 59, 65, 92

Texas Woman’s University: Strong past, bold future A special publication from the Denton Record-Chronicle August 23, 2017

Publisher: Bill Patterson Managing Editor: Scott K. Parks Section Editor: Jenna Duncan TWU Content Coordinator: Amanda Simpson Cover Design: Commerce House Page Design: Brandon Wilken

Advertising Director: Sandra Hammond Retail Advertising Manager: Shawn Reneau Retail Advertising Representatives: Linda Horne, Joanne Horst, Rennea Howard, Shelly Vannatta, Tanya Malena

Denton Record-Chronicle | DentonRC.com 3555 Duchess Drive, Denton, TX 76205 Phone: 940-387-3811 | Fax: 940-566-6888 Email: drc@dentonrc.com The contents of this free publication are copyrighted by Denton Publishing Company, 2016, a subsidiary of A. H. Belo Corporation (www.ahbelo.com, NYSE symbol: AHC), with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited.

Michael Modecki/TWU

From the editor

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exas Woman’s University has been an integral part of the Denton community since classes began there in 1903 with 186 students and 14 faculty members. The 270-acre campus has become a Denton landmark. Its two high-rise dormitories, Stark Hall and Guinn Hall, are the tallest buildings in Denton. The nondenominational Little Chapel in the Woods, an architectural masterpiece, has been a campus landmark since 1939. But bricks and mortar don’t define TWU. The spirit of pioneer women striving to improve themselves, their families and their communities through higher education remains the driving force behind TWU. The inspiring statue of “Pioneer Woman” between the music and art buildings is much more than a mascot. It stands as an enduring symbol of America’s determined march toward equal rights for all people. This magazine is a joint venture between the Denton Record-Chronicle and TWU. It provides powerful testimony about the university’s bright and dynamic future. The Record-Chronicle is proud to publish the good news about a vital institution that has helped make Denton great for 115 years. Scott K. Parks Managing Editor Denton Record-Chronicle


Denton Record-Chronicle presents Texas Woman's: Bold Future

From the chancellor

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ear Friends and Neighbors:

In the coming fall semester, Texas Woman’s University will welcome about 16,000 students to our three campuses. Our institution has grown up from its humble beginnings in Denton to being the nation’s largest university primarily for women with health science centers in Dallas and Houston. And today, we have nearly 90,000 alumni across Texas and around the world. In concert with our growth and evolution, you will find that this special supplement of the Denton Record-Chronicle heralds a new look for Texas Woman’s University. You will certainly see the familiar maroon and white, but our visual identity, from athletic uniforms to our logo, has been updated. We even have selected an athletics mascot, at the enthusiastic encouragement of our students. In this publication, you also will learn more about the important work our faculty, staff, students and alumni do across our university, in their communities, and about the pride we all share in being engaged citizens here and around the globe. Among other things, I hope this supplement will help you engage more with Texas Woman’s, whether in taking classes; offering internships and job opportunities to our students; enjoying a theater, music or dance performance; planning a wedding at our Little Chapel-in-theWoods; visiting our historic children’s literature collection and women’s archives; or seeking services at our nutrition, speech and hearing, family counseling or dental hygiene clinics. We have a strong past, and see a bold future for our university. We have taken important steps in recent years to build upon our foundation, propelling us on our upward trajectory. As we continue to mark a trail in a pathless wilderness — words etched in stone at the base of the Pioneer Woman statue on our Denton campus — we lead in a collaborative way, guided by a new strategic plan that builds on four areas of distinction: ■ women and leadership ■ health ■ veterans ■ experiential learning I invite you to learn more about our strate-

Courtesy photo/TWU

TWU Chancellor Carine M. Feyten congratulates former student regent Monica Mathis, who earned a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology this spring. Now pursuing a graduate degree in physical therapy at TWU’s Dallas campus, Mathis’ description of the library fountain helped inspire the concept for the university’s new logo.

gic plan (twu.edu/strategic-plan). Starting soon and continuing over the coming years, you also will begin to see some significant structural changes on our campuses. Our first parking garage, a new student union, a new science and technology building, and a new student housing project have all been approved by the State of Texas and our Board of Regents.

We will boldly go into the future with even greater focus, energy, and distinction—and with a huge amount of pride and gratefulness that we are part and parcel of thriving communities in the great State of Texas. With warm regards, Carine M. Feyten, Ph.D. Chancellor and President Texas Woman’s University

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Getting them on the right path Mobile Go Center helps first-generation students get access to higher ed By Morgan Villavaso TWU Lasso

Michael Modecki/TWU

The TWU Mobile Go Center travels across North Texas to encourage area high school students, especially first-generation students, to apply to college. TWU G-Force mentors staff the center and help students through the admissions and financial aid application processes.

One Texas Woman’s University program is responsible for successfully getting thousands of first-generation and low-income students on the path to higher education. The Mobile Go Center is an outreach initiative within the TWU Go Program. This program is a part of the Closing the Gaps campaign adopted by the 77th Texas Legislature. The Mobile Go Center travels to school districts around the D-FW area sharing information about and access to higher education. “We work to serve students and families that come from a variety of backgrounds,

aiming to bridge that gap between high school and college,” said Philip Kwong, the outreach coordinator for the center. “We aim to work with students who aren’t familiar with the college going process, specifically first-generation students and students at schools with a lower socioeconomic background.” Inside of the Mobile Go Center, students gain access to laptops, televisions and highspeed internet, which can be used in researching education options. With these tools, students learn about college readiness and completing the application process. Other Mobile Go Center resources include presentations on college life and financial aid, college checklists, scholarship searches and college guides and catalogs. A lot of the students would be the first in their families to go to college, so helping

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Mobile Go them apply for financial aid or register for testing like the SAT makes a difference, Kwong said. “It’s so important that we focus on first-generation families because they don’t have someone in their family who has gone to college before,” he said. “Most people who graduate from college typically have someone that’s been in college to serve as a role model or an example. That’s one of the biggest hurdles.” The Mobile Go Center primarily is staffed by TWU students volunteering as mentors. Associate Director of Go Programs Angelica Landeros-Henderson said having younger people who can relate to the high school students helps the program’s success. “The majority of the time at these events, there are Spanishspeaking families, so a lot of our GForce mentors are bilingual,” Landeros-Henderson said. “That assists us tremendously. Sometimes, the high school students don’t feel comfortable speaking to

the staff, but our student mentors can really relate to them because they are about the same age.” Both Go Program staff and GForce mentors recognize the importance of focusing on first-generation students. “I did not have help trying to get through college applications, and there was just a lot of Googling and unnecessary stress that would have been relieved if I had somebody to help me,” G-Force team leader Alexis Sikorski said. For Maritsa Guerrero, a team leader representative for the center, she just hopes the students she’s helped can pass the information along and help and encourage others. “I think the most rewarding thing is knowing [the students] have applied to the universities or colleges or technical schools, and knowing that there’s someone there who cares about them and wants to help them succeed,” Guerrero said. “I hope that they can pay that forward.”

Tabitha Gray/TWU Lasso

From left, Sandy Smith, Sydney Carr, Jan Onwuegbuchu and Shiley Ferguson are TWU G-Force members who help first-generation or low-income students on their path to higher education.


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Making the grades

Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU’s gymnastics team won its 10th USA Gymnastics National Championship this past spring, and it joins other successful school programs in receiving recognition in and out of the classroom. Following this past spring semester, Pioneer athletes posted a department GPA of 3.494, marking the 70th consecutive semester in which TWU athletes have averaged an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.

By Randy Cummings For the Denton Record-Chronicle

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TWU student-athletes excel on court, in classroom

or years, TWU Athletic Director Chalese “It fits perfectly for what TWU Connors has heard a recurring question stands for,” Connors said. “It fits she’s happy and eager to answer: perfectly in our strategic plan. It fits “Why do the Pioneers’ compete in the perfectly in what we want our students on our campus to experience.” NCAA’s Division II?” Although TWU athletics have Connors’ answer is simple and direct, achieved notable success over the and it aligns with the stated commitment years — most recently, the school’s from the NCAA that Division II student- 10th USA Gymnastics National athletes can and should strive to be both by Championship this past spring, softball’s berth in the national balancing their college experience between championship tournament in 2013 pursuing success in the classroom as well and basketball’s first Lone Star Conference crown in 2011 — the deas in their particular sport.

partment is equally proud of the academic success its athletes regularly have attained in the classroom. In fact, Connors called the department’s cumulative grade point average — the average GPA for all of its athletes — “our longest winning streak.” Following this past spring semester, Pioneer athletes posted a department GPA of 3.494, marking the 70th consecutive semester — that’s 35 school years running — in which TWU athletes have averaged

an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher. What’s more impressive is 27 Pioneer student-athletes (76 percent of the school’s total) finished the 2016-17 academic year with a 4.0 GPA. “It’s a phenomenal statement that these young women really do take their grades seriously,” Connors said. “And the coaches are bringing in athletes that are going out there and being successful.”

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Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU added its soccer program in 2002, and Fleur Benatar was the team’s first coach. Now coached by Babak Abouzar, the Pioneers begin the 2017 season at home Sept. 1 against Colorado School of Mines.

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Athletics Since joining the Lone Star Conference in 1988, hundreds of TWU’s athletes have received conference academic achievement honors. In the past six years, TWU has boasted six LSC Academic Players of the Year and 12 Academic All-Americans. TWU athletics have won or shared the LSC’s Women’s Academic Excellence Award for the league’s top overall GPA since its inception four years ago. “The NCAA has formally stated that Division II has a ‘life-in-the-balance’ approach to athletics,” Connors said. “In Division II, we emphasize our commitment to academic success, ability to award athletic scholarships as well as academic scholarships. “And we have access to NCAA championships, which every student-athlete wants. We really do value the studentathlete experience in her college career, balanced with, ‘I’m an athlete, I want to win, I want to compete. I also want to graduate and get a degree, hang that diploma on my wall and go to grad school ... open my own business or go on with life.’” TWU’s approach to recruiting quality athletes who also desire to succeed in the classroom is a philosophy that long has been the department’s foremost objective. Head coaches know when they are hired their top priority is twofold: have a

competitive and successful team during the season, while also maintaining a year-round environment for their student-athletes to remain engaged and successful in the classroom. “We definitely look for players that have the total package,” said Pioneers head basketball coach Beth Jillson, who is the department’s longest-tenured coach as she prepares to enter her 11th season with the school. “For us, academics is a priority, and [the athletes] know this when they come here. Of course, they’re great basketball players, but they’re also great in the classroom. “[As a coach], if you do your research when you come in to interview, you know about the academic expectations.” Division II institutions annually monitor their student-athlete graduation rates and have come to consider even more heavily the NCAA’s Academic Success Rate, which charts the athletes’ academic progress in relation to attaining a degree. For the 2016-17 school year, two of TWU’s five athletic programs registered a well-above-average ASR of 100 percent, meaning every eligible upperclassman in those sports attained their degree.

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Athletics “It’s the culture we have here and the belief system,” Connors said. “I’m extremely proud of what our coaches have done and what our senior staff has done to support them. What this means to me is we have identified student-athletes who love Texas Woman’s University, who love our athletics program and who want to compete in the sport they have intense passion for while they go to school.” Unlike many of the schools the Pioneers compete against, the TWU athletic department does not have its own academic support office that, for example, might include a staff of tutors and a dedicated space for studying. Instead, TWU’s athletes receive the same academic support that the school provides for its entire student body. Creating an athletic academic center for TWU’s future studentathletes is high on Connors’ wish list. “We have [academic support]

resources that the whole school has access to,” Connors said. “There are all kinds of tutors in each of the departments and our staff, mostly Charolotte Hunt, our assistant athletic director for compliance and academic services, have great relationships with all of these departments on campus. She can pinpoint a place for a studentathlete to go when they come to her.” With the track record TWU athletics has compiled over the years, it’s become quite obvious student-athletes who choose to compete for the Pioneers not only will have a good chance at enjoying a successful collegiate athletic career, but they also likely will leave the program with the ultimate achievement: A college degree. “That’s what makes us truly unique,” Connors said. It’s also why the union of the Pioneers and the NCAA’s Division II is so easy for Connors and the school to promote.

Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU’s softball program made it all the way to the NCAA Division II Super Regionals before losing the Angelo State, the nation’s top team. The program won the 1978-79 AIAW Women’s College World Series, and the 2013 team won the Lone Star Conference championship.


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Ann Ferrell Williams

Stacie Dieb McDavid

Ron Tester

Degree: M.A. in dance and related arts, 1968 City: Dallas Occupation: Black Dance Theatre Founder, recently retired What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? Being able to train and study under giants in modern dance: Doris Humphrey, Charles Weidman, Ruth St. Denis and others. Dr. Nancy Duggan, head of the dance department, was a life changer. She provided us with the best for learning and receiving dance training. Why did you choose TWU? I chose TWU because, at that time, it was one of only two universities offering a Master of Arts program in dance and the only one in Texas. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? My time at TWU provided the opportunity to choose lifetime friends and develop goals that have helped me to be successful in my career, my family and community. Most of all I credit TWU for my character and strength in making decisions throughout my life.

Degree: B.S., 1979 City: Fort Worth Occupation: CEO, McDavid Companies What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? My fondest memories are of daily workouts on the track and field with Dr. Bert Lyle and my teammates. I chose TWU because Coach Lyle offered me a track and field scholarship. I threw the javelin. How did TWU help prepare you for your career? TWU gave me a solid formal education, which allowed me to make prudent choices about life and my career. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I have a great sense of pride of being a graduate of TWU. I am grateful for the outstanding education I received. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? The 1970s was the beginning of the women’s movement; the atmosphere was empowering. It made me feel as though I could do anything, achieve anything as long as I had the work ethic.

Degree: M.S. in physical therapy, 1995 City: Corinth Occupation: Physical therapist and owner, Advanced RehabTrust Home Health What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? I would say graduation day. I was the president of my physical therapy class and got to address my fellow students and their loved ones during a moving ceremony. Why did you choose TWU? When I wanted to become a physical therapist, there were only a handful of programs in Texas. Of those, TWU had the best reputation. All the physical therapists I knew encouraged me to attend TWU. Because of the excellent instruction, I was able to advance quickly in my career and had the confidence to begin my home health company. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? I love the way TWU celebrates diversity, and it's something that has informed the way I live my life and run my business. I believe that honoring who we are — as individuals and as a community — makes us all better.


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Anngienetta Johnson, Ph.D. Degree: B.A. in mathematics, 1971 City: Cedar Hill Occupation: Retired NASA and American Red Cross official What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? I was honored to be selected to participate in NASA’s Cooperative Education program at NASA’s Johnson Space Center while at TWU. My education and experience led to this opportunity, which later inspired me to make a difference by linking my science passions with my giving passions. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I attended a Colorado Hazards Workshop back in the 1990s. Leaders came from across the world to collaborate on leading-edge technologies and techniques to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters. Hundreds of attendees introduced themselves one by one. More than five women had already introduced themselves as graduates of TWU when I introduced myself as a TWU graduate representing NASA. It was a proud moment and a pronouncement of the TWU reputation. One male introduced himself and expressed regret that he was not a TWU graduate, but his mother graduated from TWU in the 1940s. I am proud of my membership in this league of bold, well-prepared women leaders.

Nancy P. Paup Degrees: B.S., 1973; M.Ed., 1976 City: Fort Worth Occupation: Self-employed, fundraising, real estate, ranching, historical preservation, TWU Regent Why did you choose TWU? Being a native of Dallas, I had met so many outstanding women in Texas that had graduated from TWU, including my grandmother, Thelma Merrifield Painter. She was an artist and attended classes at TWU in the early 1900s. Other reasons included the desire to attend a smaller university; interest in becoming a teacher (TWU had one of the best teacher education programs in the state); interest in a smaller classroom setting; and the fact it was a university primarily for women. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? Throughout my college career at TWU, I had so many rewarding experiences both inside and outside of the classroom that always challenged me to strive for excellence in any endeavor that I undertook. Influential role models included TWU professors, staff and fellow students who were highly motivated leaders and mentors. We were encouraged by our professors to learn to think critically, analytically, objectively, and to speak-out in the classroom! These learned skills have made a tremendous impact upon both my professional and personal life.


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Out of the box

Nationally accredited dance program has global connections By Lucinda Breeding Staff Writer

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he studios at the Dance and Gymnastics Laboratory look like they’re all about function. Tall mirrors line the walls. The floors stretch out in neutral, sandy-gray tones. And there’s room — a lot of it. It’s up to the faculty and students to bring things like drama, color and structure into the studios. It’s up to the people to paint the studios and stage with whatever they can imagine, said Mary WillifordShade, chairwoman of the Texas Woman’s University Dance department. And it’s the people in the studios — students and faculty — who have taken their degrees from TWU out into the world. TWU dance graduates are working as teachers, choreographers and performers in Denton, in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and beyond. “TWU has a long history of leadership, thanks to Dr. [Penelope] Hanstein,” Williford-Shade said. “And not just Dr. Hanstein, but the previous faculty. They were very forward-thinking women. They were the people who were interested in new technologies, and they made sure the program was student-centered.” Dance students at TWU spend a lot of time in the studio, but they do their share of research, study and writing, too. Although dance culminates in choreography and performance, TWU faculty and graduate students study everything from body mechanics to dance ethnography — a fancy term for multidisciplinary approaches to dance. TWU’s dance program is nationally accredited, and for years, TWU was one of the few university dance programs that offered doctoral studies in dance. Williford-Shade said the program evolved even further when Hanstein and Linda Caldwell formed a “low-residency PhD program — a program that lets dancers work on their doctorate while working a full-time job.” “That made a big difference for dancers and students who wanted to get their doctorate but didn’t want to take time off and go back to school full time,” Williford-Shade said. “On this program, you can come to campus once in the fall, once in the spring and then do five weeks in the summer.”

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DRC file photo

TWU dancer Marina Gonzalez preforms in March 2016 in Arche/types, a collaborative work by Jana Perez, associate professor in the department of visual arts, and Matt Henley, assistant professor in the department of dance. TWU’s dance program is nationally accredited, and for years, it was one of the few university dance programs that offered doctoral studies.


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Arts TWU also offered dance classes online before digital college work practically was compulsory. “We were doing that before most dance programs thought that was even possible,” Williford-Shade said. Williford-Shade took the helm of the dance program six years ago. Under her leadership, the program has added a staff musician and three tenure track faculty positions. She said the program will hire another tenure track position in the coming year. The program recently re-evaluated its mission and vision. “Our mission is to educate a diverse body of students in an inclusive community. We want to focus on skill-based practices, and we want to encourage creative research for our bachelor, masters and doctorate students,” she said. “And we believe everybody can dance. Our job, really, is to create global citizens, and our faculty are doing international work as choreographers and performers. We have faculty working in Taiwan, in China, the United Kingdom, Lebanon and Brazil.” Williford-Shade said dance faculty look at everything they do through the lens of

Courtesy photo/Sharen Bradford

Nycole Ray, the artistic director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre Encore, has taught at TWU as an adjunct. In 2005 and 2008, Ray taught West African dance at the university. the mission. Whether a student is studying to become a dance teacher or the next great artistic director, their education will be filtered through inclusivity, skill and a future as a global citizen. “What this is really all about is teaching students to be creative, flexible and truly resourceful. You know, a lot of dancers say, ‘I

don’t want to teach.’ But the reality is, if you mean to be a choreographer, you’re going to teach. How else are you going to get dancers to perform your choreography? You have to teach them,” she said. The humanities and arts get knocked in the marketplace by critics who insist graduates won’t find employment with a Russian

literature or dance degree. But WillifordShade said the dance program focuses on preparing students to join the workforce. More students are seeking dance certification at TWU, which prepares them to teach dance in secondary schools.

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Arts But TWU graduates are founding companies and forging community initiatives. Graduate Jose Zamora founded CholoRock Dance Theatre, and graduate Carissa Laitinen-Kniss is a co-owner of Twisted Bodies, a Denton fitness studio that teaches pilates, yoga, pole fitness and aerial arts. Graduates Lily Sloan and Amanda Jackson are two of the four directors of Big Rig Dance Collective. TWU’s dance program has connections in companies across the country. Nycole Ray, the artistic director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre Encore, has taught at TWU as an adjunct. In 2005 and 2008, Ray taught West African dance at the university. “I’d heard of the program from Ms. [Ann] Williams [founder of Dallas Black Dance Theatre], of course,” Ray said. Williams earned a Master of Arts Degree in Dance and Related Arts at TWU and later served the university as a regent. Ray taught at the university along with Melissa M. Young, the associate artistic director of Dallas Black Dance Theatre. While Ray taught West African dance, Young taught the Horton technique, a respected modern dance training method that builds on ballet. “I wanted to figure out how we could improve the connections between the program and the company,” Ray said. “I wanted the students going there to know the opportunities we have for them at our company. Ray said the Dallas company employs ethic, modern and classical styles to create the internationally acclaimed dances. As an adjunct at TWU, not only was Ray teaching West African dance, but also marketing her company as a possible destination for performers. “We wanted to give them an opportunity to know the type of work that we do, the programs we have in the summer, and for students to know that they can come down and participate in our auditions,” Ray said. “A lot of times when you are a student, you don’t always think about where you fit in, what company you might belong to. You don’t always think about what you can do after school. Back in the day, we were in the box of studying, graduating, teaching and maybe performing. “Those boundaries we had back in the day, they aren’t there now. You might think that if you’re a dance student, you either teach or perform. But students are taught they can do anything now. They can start their own companies. They can do their own projects.” The 21st century dance student needs a program that can prepare them for the marketplace.

TWU dancer Marina Gonzalez preforms in March 2016 in Arche/types. TWU dance requires students to study broadly and condition themselves for the spectrum of styles they’ll use, so once a dancer walks across the graduation stage, they’re ready to join the workforce with muscles and mind prepared. DRC file photo

“You need a well-rounded program,” Ray said. “You have conservatories and things where you can go in and you can do ballet or you can do modern dance. You can emphasize one of those forms. Today, with dance being mainstream, though, you’re training a dancer to be versed in different styles. You do not know what a choreographer is going to ask of you. Some dancers want to be a ballet dancers. But ballet companies are doing contemporary dance. “Yes, you need classical ballet and classical modern training. But you also need to bring in contemporary and ethnic styles. Being a good dancer is being a well-rounded dancer. If you offer that then students can be prepared.” Cross training is important, too, for institutions, Ray said. “You need pilates, gyrotonics and yoga,” Ray said. Gyrotonics is a conditioning method that blends yoga, dance, tai chi, and swimming. “You need the cross training, so the dancers can understand a holistic approach to movement as well, and to prevent injury. If you have knowledge to safeguard your body, you can avoid injury. People are going much longer now. I think it’s fantastic. If you start training your body in a certain way, you can do it longer. And if you have an injury, you recover faster.” TWU dance requires students to study broadly and condition themselves for the spectrum of styles they’ll use. Williford-Shade said once a dancer walks across the graduation stage, they’re ready to join the workforce with muscles and mind prepared. “Really, the program is training women

to be leaders,” she said. “Being creative isn’t just about being able to create dance, or perform or teach it. It’s about being truly flexible. Because when you go out into the world, you might be the director of your

own company. You might be designing your own lighting. You might be doing all of the marketing. Creativity means being able to deal with the questions and solve problems that are bound to come up.”


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Attracting transfers

Photos by Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU has about 240 program-to-program agreements with other institutions, included many other colleges and universities, which can make it easy for students to transfer in and retain credits for courses they have taken.

Through partnerships with organizations, other schools, TWU making itself more appealing to students By Kyle Martin Staff Writer

T Beginning this fall, students who enrolled in the newest joint UNT and TWU graduate program can begin studies towards a master’s degree in social work, a program which neither school offered before now.

exas Woman’s University has many partnerships with different universities, organizations, businesses and more. Each partnership brings a unique connection to the university and its patrons. Partnerships range from NASA to community colleges to preschools to overseas organizations. TWU has about 240 program-to-program agreements with other institutions, said Barbara Lerner, associate provost at TWU.

Students who transfer to TWU can be worried about whether their credits will transfer. With record-setting enrollment numbers in the fall 2016 semester reaching 15,655 students, TWU attracts students from all around the world to the university. According to information from TWU, more than half of all new students are transfers. With many other schools partnering with TWU, Lerner said students who often ask about transferring their credits easily can have their questions answered. Roughly half of TWU’s undergraduate population has transferred to TWU.

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Partnerships “What we’ve really tried to do is make transfer as transparent as possible for our students,” she said. “On our website, we make very clear where all of these partnerships apply with all of the community colleges.” One particular partnership that brings in students is the automatic admission of high school graduates in the top 25 percent of their classes. Another is scholarships TWU offers to three school districts in Denton County as part of the Pioneer Promise program. The Pioneer Promise launched in 2015, started first with Denton ISD and later added on Little Elm and Lake Dallas ISDs. Students who will attend TWU after graduation are hand-picked by their schools’ principals to each receive a renewable $2,000 scholarship from the university. Overall, TWU offers more than $15 million in scholarships per year. “What we’ve done with these three partners is we’ve taken the idea of college access — because you always hear about, you know, ‘who can get into college?’ — and we’ve moved it from college access to also college success,” Lerner said.

Michael Modecki/TWU

One partnership that brings in students to TWU is the automatic admission of high school graduates in the top 25 percent of their classes. Another is scholarships TWU offers to three school districts in Denton County as part of the Pioneer Promise program. TWU partners with area schools in other ways, too. The school’s dental hygiene program teams up with Denton Christian Preschool to offer free dental checkups to

young children in need. TWU soon will debut another local program partnership. Beginning this fall, students who enrolled in the newest joint UNT and TWU

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graduate program can begin studies towards a master’s degree in social work, a program which neither school offered before now. Students can complete the program in one or two years, depending on the number of credits they already have, and will take classes at both universities. Students’ transcripts will have UNT and TWU noted on their degree upon graduation. “This way we’re able to share resources, we’re sharing faculty, we’re sharing class space and I think it will be a really good addition because obviously social work is a real concern right now and there’s a demand,” Lerner said. This is the first program of its kind in which both schools will share students and a degree program, along with campus resources and faculty. Lerner said the last obstacle the schools ran into was parking. But she said she believes TWU has a solution, and they are “fully intending to be operational in the fall.” “I think what it speaks to is what you can do when the focus is students,” Lerner said. “Each institution could have said, ‘Well, we’re just going to go ahead and do our own,’ but that would really not have been the best thing for students. And it would not have been the best for the state, quite honestly.”


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Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU biology professor Camelia Maier views a student’s research photo at Golden Triangle Mall during a science poster show. Beginning as a pilot in 2014, the Experiential Student Scholar program’s goal is to bridge theory with practice by engaging students in experiential project partnerships with faculty.

Learning by doing

TWU Experiential Student Scholar program bridges theory with practice

By Laura Byerley TWU

As a candidate for a moleculary biology doctorate at Texas Woman’s University, Paramita Basu said she always is searching for opportunities to connect her theoretical knowledge to hands-on experience. In the program’s advanced cell biology course, for example, she learned about how dysregulations in biological pathways can cause cancer. In her individual studies, she learned about how plant antioxidants can

be used to prevent and treat health conditions. Eager to put this knowledge into practice, Basu applied for TWU’s Experiential Student Scholar program, which is part of the university’s Quality Enhancement Plan, called “Pioneering Pathways: Learn by Doing.” The plan helps support and assess experiential learning at TWU, and it represents a commitment to the original TWU motto, “We learn by doing.” Accepted to the summer 2017 Experiential Student Scholar program, Basu incorporated knowledge

from her coursework into a project evaluating anticancer compounds from the plant, Euphorbia bicolor (Snow-on-the-prairie). “We found that these phytochemicals could be very good candidates for the treatment of cancers,” said Basu, who worked with faculty mentor professor Camelia Maier. “This project has been a great way to incorporate knowledge from the classroom, and I would highly recommend all undergraduate and graduate students apply for the Experiential Student Scholar program.” Beginning as a pilot program in 2014, the Experiential Student Scholar program’s primary goal is to bridge theory with practice by engaging students in experiential project partnerships with faculty. The secondary goal is to accurately assess knowledge and skills related to students’ goals, including collaboration, application and problem-solving. More than 150 students have gone through the Experiential Student Scholar program since it began. To be eligible for the program, applicants must be enrolled undergraduate or graduate students with declared majors and in good academic standing.

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Experiential “Really, any TWU student is best suited for this program,” said Kimberly Miloch, director of Quality Enhancement Programs and associate dean of the TWU College of Health Sciences. “The best type of student is a motivated student. This program is truly designed so all students at any level or GPA can gain maximal educational benefit.” Danyelle Casterline, a junior majoring in marketing, said the program has allowed her to build a business. Casterline had originally mentioned the idea to professor David Rylander, who recommended the Experiential Student Scholar program and agreed to serve as a mentor. Casterline’s project, CORKS (Creating Opportunity by Reaching out through Kindness and Strength), repurposes donated wine bottle corks into household items, such as coasters, candle holders and magnets. Casterline finds stores willing to sell the products and then donates proceeds to Refuge for Women, a restoration shelter for women. Eventually, Casterline said she hopes to train the women at the shelter to run the business. She said she strongly recommends the Experiential Student Scholar

program to all students. “Go for it; if you have an idea, make it happen,” Casterline said. “This program gives students the support to see if an idea or a hypothesis can work. It has made me seek out vendors and donation potential from the community, and it has built my confidence that I can make a difference with a simple business idea.” Rylander said Casterline’s project is a great example of how the Experiential Student Scholar program complements coursework. In this case, it complemented Rylander’s principles of marketing course. “Experiential learning allows students to apply what they are learning in business classes in real situations that make a difference,” Rylander said. “This deepens their understanding of the importance of the concepts they are learning and also shows them how challenging business/marketing can be. Some of the best learning comes from making mistakes while applying concepts.” Gladys Acosta, a senior majoring in bilingual education, said the Experiential Student Scholar program has allowed her to apply the strategies she learned in her theories of second language acquisition, teaching diverse learners and foundations of bilingual education courses.

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TWU Chancellor Carine M. Feyten stands with experiential scholar Paramita Basu, a Ph.D. candidate in molecular biology. More than 150 students have gone through the Experiential Student Scholar program since it began. Ronda DuTeil/ TWU


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Experiential Working with assistant professor Mandy Stewart, Acosta created the Spanish Literacy Institute, a bilingual education program for students ages 5 to 15. The program’s goals were to help students become fully bilingual, biliterate and bicultural. “The Experiential Student Scholar program helped me learn how to best teach Spanish-speaking students to develop their first language abilities and take pride in their language and culture,” Acosta said. “I loved to see their smiles any time they discovered something new, and it fulfilled my heart to see them smiling, singing and dancing to Spanish children’s songs.” Other Experiential Student Scholar projects include: ■ A Student Hunger Literacy project to dispel misconceptions about hunger and food insecurity ■ A School of Occupational

Therapy and Denton Community Health Clinic project to assess the occupational therapy needs of patients and provide occupational therapy services ■ Research on UVB’s negative effects and progression to squamous cell carcinoma ■ An initiative to improve health care access for an elderly Vietnamese community in Houston After submitting final project reports on Aug. 15, the summer 2017 scholars will present their project findings at a variety of conferences. Students have presented at the National Society for Experiential Education’s annual conference, Texas Undergraduate Research Day and at TWU’s Annual Student Creative Arts and Research Symposium. To learn more about or apply to TWU’s Experiential Student Scholars program, visit www.twu.edu/qep/experientialstudent-scholars.

Carissa Laitinen-Kniss

Shawn Saumell

Degree: B.A. in dance, 2003 City: Argyle Occupation: Co-owner, Twisted Bodies Pilates and yoga studio Why did you choose TWU? When looking for colleges, I was impressed by the depth and vastness of the TWU dance program. TWU was the only dance program I could find that encompassed all parts of a career in dance. This was a rare find back in the ’90s; as most dance programs focused just on performance.The TWU Dance Program offered me so many opportunities over four years; I have never regretted my decision. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? My time at TWU taught me to be confident in myself, my beliefs and who I am as a person. In an everchanging and socially dynamic, politically frustrating world, you can easily lose track of yourself or mold yourself to fit an image. TWU taught me this was not necessary to be successful. Be bold, be you and do all things confidently, even your mistakes.

Degree: B.F.A. in art, 2008 City: Aubrey Occupation: Artist (klikdesigns.com) Why did you choose TWU? TWU was a recommendation to me by my mentor. She made a connection between the aesthetic of my work and the work of the TWU photography professor Susan Kae Grant. I researched her work and attended one of her shows. I then contacted her to set up an appointment to share my work and aspirations with her. It only took one afternoon at the TWU campus to feel like I was home. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I am proud to be a man who graduated from the nation’s largest public university primarily for women. TWU really produces a great deal of amazing people who just happen to be females. I feel that TWU is perhaps the most underrated university in Texas. The way that I communicate with and support my wife and the values that I instill in my children are definitely impacted by my education and experiences at TWU.


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The next generation Partnerships, tech help teach those who want to teach By Caitlyn Jones Staff Writer

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ucked away in a corner of Stoddard Hall sits a small classroom occupied by five seventh-graders. Sean in the front row eagerly waves his hand in the air while Maria quietly buries her nose in a book. Ed jabbers on about Steph Curry and the Golden State Warriors, while C.J. sneaks out her phone to check for Kardashian updates. Meanwhile, Kevin — the selfproclaimed “cute one” — leans back in his chair like an anti-hero in a John Hughes film. There’s only one difference between this group of teens at Texas Woman’s University and the ones peppering middle schools across the country: They aren’t technically real.

The students are avatars in the university’s TeachLivE lab. In its fifth year at the university, the lab allows education students to practice their teaching skills in a low-risk environment before they get up in front of living, breathing kids. “Some of my students are terrified to come in to teach,” associate professor Diane Myers said. “Once they see it, it takes them 15 to 30 seconds to be fully immersed. They forget they aren’t flesh and blood students.” Through a partnership with the University of Central Florida, TWU was the first university

DRC file photo

Texas Woman’s University student Lauren Whited uses the TeachLivE classroom computer simulation program in 2014. In its fifth year at the university, the lab allows education students to practice their teaching skills in a low-risk environment before they get up in front of living, breathing kids. in the state to set up a TeachLivE lab. But the school is no stranger to being first. Since its inception in 1901, TWU has been pioneering new methodologies and technologies in teacher education. About 300 new teachers graduate from the university each year and score an average of 96 percent on the state teaching certification exam. “TWU does a really good job of fostering a love of teaching and surrounding you with people who will uplift you and make you want to be a better teacher,” said Daisy Lopez, a recent graduate and first-year teacher in Allen ISD.

“I want to be constantly changing for my kids and keeping up with the times. You have to be adaptable. I’m sure there’s techniques we’ve learned now that within a year will become obsolete. You can never stop learning.” Daisy Lopez, recent TWU graduate and first-year teacher in Allen ISD

Curriculum

Before they were even allowed to vote, women were learning how to teach at TWU. A handful of students would pile in the school’s only building — now the Old Main Building on campus — to practice teaching mostly rural students how to

read and write. At the time, TWU was the only college in the state with a teacher education program for women. Today, faculty members strive to put a dent in the 1.9 billion teaching jobs that will be available by 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“Students are much more diverse today, especially in Texas,” said Gina Anderson, interim associate dean of the College of Professional Education. “Preparing teachers for lots of English language learners is really important. Preparing teachers for various cultural backgrounds is important. Teaching students to traditionally prepare for basic curriculum has changed and evolved greatly.” In addition to the undergraduate teacher education program and 33 certifications, students can branch off into other departments like library sciences or reading education.

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Education Current educators can continue getting their master’s degree in areas like deaf education and special education. The college also received millions in grant money recently to foster new bilingual education programs. Current and former students also credit hands-on student teaching and faculty support as a big part of their success in the field. “The professors were so knowledgeable,” graduate and first-year Sanger ISD teacher Katy Richardson said. “They were able to get to know us and provide that one-on-one experience. That extended outside the classroom as well. They would answer emails or phone calls. The teaching didn’t just end at the end of class.”

Experience

Amber Hale remembers her first time getting up in front of a class. Although she felt prepared, the recent graduate and first-year teacher at Aubrey ISD said the experience was “nerve-wracking.”

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DRC file photo

Texas Woman’s University student Lauren Whited uses the TeachLivE classroom simulation program in April 2014.


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Education in.

That’s where TeachLivE comes

Outside of student teaching, aspiring educators can interact with life-like avatars without the pressures of a real classroom setting. The avatars can be programmed to speak only Spanish to test bilingual teachers. There’s also an adult avatar for teachers to practice communication with parents. “It was very strange at first,” Hale said. “But it was neat, too, because the students would fidget or talk out like they would in a regular classroom. I really liked it. I wish I would’ve had more experience doing it because that was less nervewracking than standing up in front of my peers teaching.” Three floors above TeachLivE, one of the university’s newest labs is in its first year of operations and has become a tech lover’s dream. The Future Classroom Lab has a slew of Microsoft Surface Pro tablets, an interactive touch screen panel, green screen technology and iPad-based robots to act as a proxy so kids who are home sick won’t miss a lesson. There’s also smaller technology, like bug-shaped coding games and virtual reality goggles. “This is what kids are using today,” professor and lab co-founder Ludovic Sourdot said. “We’re using what they already know to teach and engage with them on their level.” The lab is based off a Belgian model with a wide network of partner schools across the globe. Since TWU partnered with European Schoolnet, it is the only university in the nation with a Future Classroom Lab. As more school districts transition to device usage in the classrooms, recent TWU graduates know keeping up with changes in technology is crucial. “I want to be constantly changing for my kids and keeping up with the times,” Lopez said. “You have to be adaptable. I’m sure there’s techniques we’ve learned now that within a year will become obsolete. You can never stop learning.”

Partnerships

Less than a half-mile away from TWU sits the central office of Denton ISD, a local school district that continues to reap the benefits of the

Sen. Sylvia R. Garcia Degree: B.A. in social work, 1972 City: Houston Occupation: Senator, State of Texas What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? My student government activities really ignited my passion for public service and introduced me to other students and faculty with similar values. Those experiences gave me the opportunity to develop my leadership skills, which have brought me to where I am today. Why did you choose TWU? I was raised in a very small farming community in South Texas, and I appreciated the strong sense of community on the TWU campus, something that I feel is missing in many large universities. I also appreciated the fact that, even in the late 1970s, TWU was focused on preparing women leaders. I knew that with a degree from TWU I would not just be ready to succeed professionally, but ready to lead. Additionally, my student leadership involvement prepared me well for the challenges of real life politics.

DRC file photo

The avatars on TeachLivE can be programmed to speak only Spanish to test bilingual teachers. There’s also an adult avatar for teachers to practice communication with parents. nearby university. University administrators are actively involved in Denton ISD’s TEACH Denton program. Students in the district who exhibit natural teaching abilities have the opportunity to get a jump start on an education career and learn about scholarships and course waivers offered by TWU. “It’s a great way to grow your own teachers for high-need areas,” Anderson said. “We can prepare that pipeline and help students transition seamlessly from high school to college. Then, they can go back into the district they grew up in to serve. It’s a great benefit to the community as well because they know the area and the people.” The university is using federal grant money for its new PIONERAS program, which will provide more training and preparation for bilingual Denton ISD teachers.

McMath Middle School’s Denton Regional Day Program for the Deaf also takes advantage of the Future Classroom Lab to participate in technology-based projects. But it’s not only Denton ISD that collaborates with the university. TWU hosts a reading program at Barnes & Noble and also sends students to districts across the metroplex for student teaching. Many times, those student-teaching gigs lead to full-time jobs. Although many are only getting started in their teaching careers, several graduates see a return to the university somewhere along the horizon. “Without a doubt, I would come back to TWU for my master’s,” said Sarah Welch, a TWU graduate and first-year teacher in Denton ISD. “For the cost, the people, the community and the location, it’s just a combination you can’t beat.”

Sheryl Luna Degree: M.A. in English, 1993 City: Wheat Ridge, Colorado Occupation: Freelance writer What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? My fondest memory is being told by my professor, Dr. Florence Winston, that I had talent and that I could write. It helped me believe in myself, and I eventually wrote two books. TWU’s English department instructors brought my imagination to life and inspired me to read and think analytically and creatively about what I’d read and how it related to life. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I am proud to be a TWU graduate because it is still a school with a solid reputation for success. I received a stellar education there, and I remember those years with fondness. The professors were kind yet challenging. The campus was beautiful. Graduating from a well-respected women’s college is an honor. I found my voice and confidence as a writer there, and for that I will always be grateful.


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Did you know? ● In 1901, The Girls Industrial College was founded by an act of the 27th Texas Legislature. House Bill 35, which created a public college for women in Texas, passed by a narrow margin. After a tie vote in both houses, the measure was sent to Gov. Joseph Sayers, who Sayers signed the bill into law on April 6. ● In 1939, The Little Chapel-in-the-Woods, designed by noted architect O’Neil Ford with the assistance of A.B. Swank of Dallas and Preston M. Green, of Fort Worth, was built on the Denton campus, with Jeff Woo/DRC work on the art projects being done by students. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt dedicated the building on Nov. 1.

● For about 30 years, TWU has provided holiday gifts to the children of our students who are parents. TWU’s Holiday Gift Program for students who have children is believed to be the only program of its kind in the country. The 2016 TWU Holiday Gift Program broke all records — the university community provided gifts to Jeff Woo/DRC more than 430 children from 226 families of our enrolled students in Denton, Dallas, Houston and online in Arkansas, Louisiana and Washington State. ● TWU’s music therapy program is the oldest ongoing program in Texas and one of the first programs of its kind in the U.S. Promising external national research suggests that music therapy may have a role to

play in minimizing the effects of stroke and helping to improve stroke patients’ quality of life. ● In 1964, The TWU Board of Regents voted to integrate the university. Alsenia Dowells is the first African-American woman to enroll at TWU.

Dowells

● TWU’s Fitness and Recreation Center is the state’s first LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified recreation center at a public university. The U.S. Green Building Council awarded the fitness center a Wikimedia Commons LEED Silver certification for its environmental design, making the facility one of the nation’s top “green” buildings.


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Michael Modecki/TWU

The New Teacher Academy at Texas Woman’s University is designed to calm those nerves by delivering an extra measure of support for recent TWU grads in the first three years of their teaching careers.

Fending off 1st-year fears In its fourth year, TWU’s New Teacher Academy offers support for new educators By Karen Garcia | TWU

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or some, the beginning of a new school year means a new school, new classrooms and new students. A teacher just starting out understandably would be nervous. The New Teacher Academy at Texas Woman’s University, now in its fourth year, is designed to calm those nerves by delivering an extra measure of support for recent TWU grads in the first three years of their teaching careers. The 2017 academy, held in collaboration with alternative certification program iTeachTEXAS, took place July 18 on the university’s Denton campus. “Our research areas focus on preparing teachers to meet the demands of the 21st-century classroom,” said Sarah McMahan, who, with Rebecca Fredrickson, began the academy in 2014. “We firmly believe that supporting our recent graduates into their first few years of teaching increases the likelihood they remain in the profession.” About 80 beginning teachers who

will enter classrooms across North Texas this fall took part in a full day of workshops on things like classroom management and instructional strategies. One session focused on incorporating STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and technology applications into classroom instruction.

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Academy “Many of the area districts contain Google campuses or districts, so we want to ensure that our graduates have more training in these apps and programs before starting their first year,” McMahan said. One element of the STEM focus was a presentation by Cynthia Maguire, a senior lecturer in the TWU’s department of chemistry and biochemistry and an official science wizard. The “Mistress of Potions” led participants through a series of chemistry experiments where liquids froze or changed color. The performance was designed to make science fun and accessible for students of all ages. The opening session began with guest speaker Bethany Weston, a 2016 TWU graduate, telling participants about her first year of teaching seventh-grade writing at Crownover Middle School in Denton. Weston said there were some “big personalities” in her class, leading to moments when she doubted whether she should have become a teacher. However, by the end of her first year, she learned “progress is success.” “You may find that the students you

care about the most struggle the most,” she said. “Don’t define your students by their [test scores].” Daisy Lopez, who will teach fourthgrade English, language arts and reading at the David and Lynda Olson Elementary School in Allen this fall, said it was helpful to get a first-hand account from someone who had completed their first year. Lopez, who knew Weston from their involvement in TWU’s Association of Texas Professional Educators chapter, found Weston’s words reassuring. “She had some positive, wonderful things to say [about teaching],” Lopez said. Recent graduates Amber Hale and Katy Richardson found the panel of area educators most helpful. The panelists — including administrators, teachers, directors and support services personnel — answered questions ranging from what to expect during an interview to school dress codes. Hale, who will teach third grade at Brockett Elementary School in Aubrey,

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Michael Modecki/TWU

In July’s New Teacher Academy, about 80 beginning teachers who will enter classrooms across North Texas this fall took part in a full day of workshops on things like classroom management and instructional strategies.


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Academy said it helped to hear what administrators expect from new teachers. “They don’t expect us to conquer the world,” she said. Richardson agreed, saying the panelists encouraged new teachers to ask for help. “They said, ‘If you need us, come get us,’” said Richardson, who will teach second grade at Chisholm Trail Elementary in Sanger. “I definitely will use that.” Sarah Welch, who will teach fifthgrade math and science at Bell Elemen-

tary in the Denton ISD, said she benefited most from the classroom management session. “They encouraged us to be solutionoriented,” she said. “If you focus on the problem, you won’t get anywhere.” The recent graduates said the academy was an added benefit to the preparation they received in the teacher education program at TWU. “I feel fortunate to come from a program where people treat us like a person, not just a number on a roster,” Welch said.

Mandy Goff

Anita Hufft

Degree: M.S. in kinesiology with an emphasis in adapted physical activity, 2008 City: Birmingham, Alabama Occupation: High Performance Manager for USA Wheelchair Rugby team, Lakeshore Foundation How did TWU help prepare you for your career? My time in the master’s program in APA shaped everything I am doing today. I work in an environment where we provide opportunities for persons with disabilities to be successful through activity, research and advocacy, and TWU gave me the tools to be the very best at what I do each day. I wouldn’t be where I am today if I wasn’t a part of that program. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? I’m proud to call myself a Pioneer and try to lead with the core values that they instill; things like excellence, opportunity and caring. It definitely helped shape the type of professional I want to be, but also reminds me to live out those same things in my every day personal life. I will be forever grateful for my time at TWU and the opportunity I was given because of it. Why did you choose TWU? I absolutely chose TWU because of the APE/APA program —it’s known not only across the U.S., but across the world. It’s one of the, if not the best, in the country. The leaders in our program are top notch and I received the best education.

Degree: Ph.D. in nursing, 1987 City: Denton Occupation: Dean and professor, TWU College of Nursing What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? My fondest memory is the defense of my dissertation — what a year! I had to move to take a job out of state and I had a broken leg when I came back to Texas to defend. Life had been pretty crazy for me, and I was really anticipating more work to do. The defense went really well and everyone signed my cast! Everyone made all of the problems I had experienced due to hard financial times, having to move my family, etc., seem not important. On that day, TWU made me feel like I could do anything in the world. Of course, there was the issue of having to change the title of my dissertation at the last minute and back then we didn’t have laser printers so it had to be typed. In our rush, I accidently typed Texas Woman’s Univeristy [stet] and that misspelled word is forever archived on that publication! What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I would not be where I am today; I would not have ever been successful in nursing education; I would not have ever been able to impact the development of forensic nursing theory and advanced practice education, were it not for my TWU Ph.D. education.


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Maj. Gen. Mary Saunders

Faizan Kabani, Ph.D.

Degree: B.A. in social work, 1970 City: Corinth Occupation: Executive director of the Leadership Institute at TWU How did TWU help prepare you for your career? Three of my professors taught me how an “ordinary person” can be a visionary, how to live a focused life and how to influence others to perform beyond what they imagined they could. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I attended at a time when women were just beginning to come into their own. We always felt that we could do whatever was required. I joined the U.S. Air Force to the surprise of many. I then returned to help create the Leadership Institute. During that time of being responsible for one to 32,000 people, I grew to appreciate increasingly TWU’s Pioneering Spirit.

Degree: B.S. in dental hygiene, 2011 City: Euless Occupation: Assistant professor, Texas A&M College of Dentistry What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? Receiving mentorship from Maj. Gen. Mary Saunders and Judy Elias of the Leadership Institute. Many educators have taught me various academic content and skills throughout my years, but none were able to teach me how to be a responsible cosmopolitan more than they did. Why did you choose TWU? As an aspiring first-generation student, I was overwhelmed with choices between various colleges and programs. My older sister, who was already a college junior at TWU’s nursing program, spoke highly of her experiences at the university. It was through her recommendation that I began my journey at TWU.

Jessica Setnick

Erin Maxwell

Degree: M.S. in exercise and sports nutrition, 1997 City: Dallas Occupation: Author of The Eating Disorders Clinical Pocket Guide and the forthcoming Making Food Your Friend Again What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? The time that Deep Blue Something played on the green space outside of the library. Every time I hear Breakfast at Tiffany’s it takes me right back to campus. Why did you choose TWU? It was ahead of the curve — one of only three schools in the country at that time with a Sports Nutrition program. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I’m part of a long chain of nutrition professionals who came before and after me. TWU has a great reputation among dietitians in Dallas.

Degree: B.S. in nutrition, 2017 City: Dallas Occupation: Graduate student, UTMB What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? As an athlete, it was beating our rival, Tarleton, on their floor. They have a big home crowd that can make it difficult, but we stayed focused and got the job done. Why did you choose TWU? I played D1 basketball, but I wanted to focus on my studies more. I saw all of my teachers at my university went to TWU! I knew that that was where I should probably go once I saw that. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I have so much school spirit. I am a part of a special tradition, and I feel a bond with all alumni of TWU. It is a sisterhood and I look forward to explaining my experience whenever someone asks!


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A group in Denton salutes those who supported SkyLab, America’s first space station, which launched in 1973. Pauline Beery Mack, in her typical tennis shoes, stands second from the right. Courtesy photo/ TWU Libraries Woman’s Collection

Space to grow

TWU aims to expand 50-plus year legacy with NASA By Deanna W. Titzler TWU

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hen Texans think of NASA, most refer to Houston’s NASA Johnson Space Center. However, Denton and, in particular, Texas Woman’s University have a long-standing connection with the space agency. After collaborating with the agency in the early 1960s, TWU is working to increase students’ interest in working at NASA again.

TWU’s strategic focus on human health and performance, in particular, aligns with NASA’s goals for human spaceflight and exploration. Areas of interest include exercise physiology, flavor chemistry, sensory protocols, psychological impacts on astronauts and their families, cybersecurity, cell and molecular physiology, and chemical processes for cleaning textiles used by astronauts on extended space missions. “When people think of NASA, they think engineers,” TWU Chancellor Carine M. Feyten said. “But, nutrition and

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Texas Woman’s goes big in the Big D By Ashley Spinozzi TWU

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exas Woman’s University has had a presence in Dallas since 1954 and opened its original Dallas campus near Parkland Hospital in 1966. Today, about 70 internationally and nationally renowned faculty and 1,300 students in Dallas engage in service learning and participate in an interdisciplinary approach to health care in state-of-the-art simulation laboratories and classrooms. Located in the prestigious U.T. Southwestern Medical District, TWU’s Dallas Center houses the Houston J. and Florence A. Doswell College of Nursing, the TWU Stroke Center-Dallas, the U.S. News & World Report nationally-ranked School of Occupational Therapy and the School of Physical Therapy, various MBA programs and the health systems management program. The LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver certified, 190,000-square-foot building opened in 2011 and is named for oil tycoon and philanthropist T. Boone Pickens, who donated $5 million toward the facility’s construction.

Nursing students engage in learning in a hands-on environment using state-of-the-art patient mannequins in the innovative nursing simulation labs at the TWU Dallas Center. Michael Modecki/ TWU

Michael Modecki/TWU

Occupational therapy faculty received a grant to build a non-prescriptive multisensory environment at the TWU Dallas Center. The environment features weighted blankets, a sound machine, a free standing swing and color changing water features, all elements that many people with sensory processing disorders, including autism, may find calming.

The TWU T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health SciencesDallas Center opened in February 2011, combining the university’s Parkland and Presbyterian sites into an eightstory, 190,000square-foot building in the heart of the Southwestern Medical District. Michael Modecki/TWU

Courtesy photo/Kristina Bowman

The EKSO robotic exoskeleton provides rehabilitation therapy for stroke or spinal cord injuries. In collaboration with the Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation, physical therapy faculty and staff engaged in research on the effectiveness of this advanced technology.


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From Page 41

NASA food science, textiles, psychology, kinesiology and health sciences also will play critical roles in the success of deep space missions. I know TWU can contribute in essential ways to help NASA in its future missions.” Earlier this year, the university became an academic affiliate of the Texas Space Grant Consortium. The consortium, a group of 59 academic institutions across Texas, industrial and nonprofit organizations, as well as government agencies, work together to ensure the benefits of space research and technology are available to all people in Texas. Because of the university’s status as an academic affiliate, TWU students are eligible to apply for Columbia Crew Memorial undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships and participate in the NASA Design Challenge team program, as well as other program

and funding opportunities. The consortium also focuses on assisting new researchers in establishing research careers, enhancing research collaboration and mentorship with faculty, and conducting research with NASA’s enterprises. In May, TWU hosted two NASA officials in Denton as part of the university’s quest to expand its historic relationship with the space agency. “Our strategic partnership could include joint research, joint technology and joint proposals,” said Kamlesh Lulla, director of Johnson Space Center’s University Research, Collaboration and Partnership Office. “We are looking for universities to help us identify emerging capabilities for extended space missions, not only in technology development but also in building our workforce.”

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Michael Modecki/TWU

Assistant Professor of Biology Christopher Brower, left, explains his team’s NIH-funded neurodegenerative research to Kamlesh Lulla during the NASA visit to the Denton campus in May. Brower’s research team includes TWU graduate students Yasar Kasu, second from left, and Jennifer Duncan, far right.


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NASA TWU and Nasa’s beginning

In 1962, four years after the founding of NASA and a year before the opening of Johnson Space Center, America’s space agency selected Pauline Beery Mack, then-director of TWU’s Research Institute, to conduct bed rest studies on healthy young men to evaluate the effects of inactivity on bone mass. Mack also studied the space travelers personally, both human — the Gemini and Apollo astronauts — and primate, a pigtail monkey who orbited the earth as part of the Biosatellite program. The research required Mack to take pre-flight and post-flight Xrays of the NASA participants. Because she was a woman, Mack was not permitted on the U.S. Navy ships used to retrieve the space capsules when they landed in the ocean after flight. Instead, she had a male technician perform the post-flight duties, and the astronaut X-rays were compared to the ones taken by Mack pre-flight. These X-rays now are housed in the special collections vault in TWU’s Blagg-Huey Library. Mack supported the space program into the early 1970s, when NASA prepared to launch Skylab, America’s first space station. In 1970, NASA’s astronaut corps presented her with a Silver Snoopy, a distinguished honor given to NASA employees and contractors for excellence in improving space flight safety. Known for wearing a mink shawl and white tennis shoes no matter the occasion, Mack served as a mentor to future female scientists during a time when there were few women in the field. “Dr. Mack helped me see a different view of what a woman’s role in society could be,” said Betty Alford, her former student. “She was certainly not your typical woman of the ’50s.” Alford, who now lives in Denton after serving as the head of TWU’s nutrition department, has another connection to NASA. Her doctoral research, sponsored by the space agency, focused on the optimum diet needed to maintain bone density in space. With her post-doctoral work, she supervised all the diets of participants in NASA research conducted by TWU.

Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU Libraries Special Collections Director Kimberly Johnson shares Gemini and Apollo astronaut X-rays and other NASArelated archives with NASA’s Kamlesh Lulla during a recent visit.

How TWU and NASA remain entwined

Since Mack’s time at TWU, there have been other notable connections with NASA. In 1991, Millie Hughes-Fulford, who received her doctorate in biochemistry from TWU, flew aboard the Spacelab Life Science 1. She was the first American female civilian scientist in space, and her job was to testing the biological changes that take place in microgravity. The nine-day mission included observing 2,000 tiny jellyfish, 30 rats and 30 mice. Anngienetta Johnson, who majored in math as an undergraduate student at TWU, participated in a cooperative education program with NASA in 1970, which led to a 40-year career with the space agency. More recently, three TWU students — Kimberly Beck (2005), Katie Schniebs (2010) and Emma Zemler (2011) — worked as interns for NASA in Florida, California and Houston, respectively.

Courtesy photo/TWU Libraries Woman’s Collection

In 1964, U.S. First Lady Lady Bird Johnson visited Pauline Beery Mack’s lab at TWU in Denton, where Mack conducted the NASA bed-rest experiments.


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Did you know? ● In 1903, the first building, now known as Old Main, was constructed on campus. The equipment purchased for the building included churns, ironing boards, typewriters, sewing machines, a scroll saw and a piano. The estimated cost of a full year of study — inMichael Modecki/TWU cluding room and board, books and incidentals — was $250. ● Eight women who taught visual art at the university from the 1920s through the 1970s are considered “Pioneers of Modernism” in Texas. These women were Mar-

LaSelle

jorie Baltzel, Edith Mae Brisac, Carlotta Corpron, Marie Delleney, Dorothy Antoinette LaSelle, Thetis Aline Lemmon, Mabel Maxcy and Coreen Mary Spellman. ● TWU researchers were the first to document bone loss in space in a project with NASA. Today, the TWU Institute for Women’s Health has the world’s largest database of osteoporosis imagery/scans. ● In 1972, men were admitted into TWU’s graduate programs and undergraduate and graduate health sciences Courtesy photo/TWU professions programs in Denton, Dallas and Houston. ● In 1982, Academy Award-winning actress Maureen Stapleton joined a group of TWU drama students for a pair of live performances of Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie at the Margo Jones Performance Hall in the TWU Music Building.

The hall is named for the legendary director and TWU alumna. ● TWU is one of six regional SENCER (Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities) Centers in the country. SENCER is a comprehensive faculty development and science education reform project funded by the National Science Foundation. ● In 1904, the college had its first graduating class with one graduate: Beulah Kincaid, who later founded the college’s Alumnae Association along with 9 graduates of 1905 to raise scholarship funds and to provide opportunities to current and former stuKincaid dents and friends of the university for lifelong affiliation and volunteer partnership. ● TWU’s Reading Recovery training center is one of only 18 in the United States, one of two that trains faculty, and the only one in Texas that offers training in Spanish.


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Spotlight on safety

Jeff Woo/DRC

TWU’s Executive Director of Public Safety Samuel Garrison is replacing Elizabeth Pauley, who did 22 years of service at the university. TWU is one of the safest university campuses in Texas. The U.S. Department of Education reports only 42 recorded crimes between 2011 and 2015 at the school.

By Matt Payne Staff Writer

S

Focus on individuals helps TWU keep crime level low

amuel Garrison, interim executive director of public safety, feels a kinship to students he serves at TWU, especially when they call him “their” police officer. That camaraderie between patrollers and people exists thanks to the degree of integration between the department of public safety and the student body. The staff of 21 police officers experience law enforcement in a way uncommon elsewhere. Officers are in a total service mindset on a college campus. Garrison, who was appointed in June as president of the Texas Police Association, a 119-year-old group that aims to improve law enforcement nationwide, aspires to get students through college and back home as safely as possible.

“In a city, you’re call-driven. Here, we’re not call-driven — we’re peopledriven. We get the chance to get out and talk to the students,” Garrison said. “And they change. Every few years, we get a new batch that comes in. Our job is to make sure they get an education and feel safe in doing so.” Flexibility to work with students on a case-by-case basis to find the most effective solutions has made TWU one of the safest university campus in Texas. The U.S. Department of Education

reports only 42 recorded crimes between 2011 and 2015 at TWU, and DPS staff — together with other campus groups — is working to further improve those numbers. Garrison and his staff focus on the welfare of students at an individual level. Any member of the TWU community can request a police escort to areas

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In August 2016, TWU received a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to team with eight universities and colleges — including the University of North Texas — and five higher education organizations to increase sexual assault awareness.

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Safety on campus if they feel unsafe. Moreover, whenever the DPS determines the entire student body needs to be aware of a potentially dangerous situation, the Pioneer Alert system has the capability to send mass alerts via phone call and text debriefing the more than 15,000 people at TWU. At any given time, five officers are on duty throughout the campus. In his six years of service at TWU, Garrison knows working as a police officer at a college campus differs from working in a city. One key difference includes a focus on the student and a concentrated effort to actively help them for the betterment of the campus community.

“In a city, you’re call-driven. Here, we’re not call-driven — we’re people-driven. We get the chance to get out and talk to the students.” Samuel Garrison “With the university, we have opportunities to deter people from the justice system. We can get them to student life and get them the help they need,” Garrison said.

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Jeff Woo/DRC

“We have a vast group here with some officers who have more experience than I do,” TWU’s interim Executive Director of Public Safety Samuel Garrison said. “I want to at least take what I’ve learned and give back to them.”

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Safety Garrison said the department is working to address mental health concerns more than in the past so they can connect those with a particular need to professionals who can help them. DPS can serve as a liaison between students in distress and resources at Student Life, a division of the campus focused on the integrity of campus living, and counseling and psychological services. Classes on self-defense and awareness of surroundings are offered to all students, and resident assistants in the dorms are trained to recognize whenever things seem out of the ordinary and know the appropriate people to contact when they are. Another area TWU seeks to further improve its handling includes response on sexual harassment and assault. In August 2016, TWU received a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to team with eight universities and colleges — including the University of North Texas — and five higher education organizations to increase sexual assault awareness. The grant has enabled each partner to create a task force focused on implementing or revising policies, response programs and reporting mandates. “We’re trying to be part of the solution,” said Amanda Simpson, TWU’s director of media relations. “Not only are we aware, but there’s a group of people

working to get those numbers down.” Public universities must follow Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1972, which is a federal law banning sex discrimination in education. That includes mandatory reporting whenever sexual assault occurs. Mandatory reporting and expansion on the Clery Act in 2013, which outlines how colleges must go about reporting incidents of sexual indecency, resulted in an initial spike of sexual assault reports due to the increase in addressing all levels of sexual harassment and assault. Simpson assured the university is continually working not only to get sexual assault numbers down, but also to make sure the reported number of assaults is an accurate number. “We have done our job in training those that work directly with students and have streamlined reporting mechanisms,” she said. “Anybody at this university is a mandatory reporter.” As for Garrison, he wants to ensure officers are well-equipped with what it takes to assist students and all who stand on Pioneer ground for the integrity of public safety. “I feel that it’s my obligation to bring that same mentorship and development to the officers here,” Garrison said. “ We have a vast group here with some officers who have more experience than I do. I want to at least take what I’ve learned and give back to them.”

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Did you know? ● TWU’s Ph.D. in dance is the oldest continuing doctoral program in dance in the United States and one of only three Ph.D. programs nationwide. ● In 2010, TWU became the first university in Texas to offer a Ph.D. in women’s studies. TWU also was the first uniMichael Modecki/TWU versity in Texas to offer a freestanding master of arts degree in women’s studies (1999). ● In 1968, TWU graduate Ann Williams became the first African-American to receive a master’s degree in dance in Texas. She went on to found the Dallas Black Dance Theatre, serve on the TWU Board of Regents and was named to the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame. Williams

● Music professor Pamela Youngblood was named the 2016-2018 Artist of Phi Kappa Phi — the nation’s most selective all-discipline honor society. ● In 2014, The Chronicle of Higher Education cited Texas Woman’s as the fifth-fastest growing public doctoral university in America (55 percent growth from 2003 to 2013). ● Civil Rights advocate and heroine Rosa Parks visited the Denton campus on Nov. 22, 1996. A standing-room only crowd welcomed Parks for her address in Margo Jones Auditorium. Rosa Parks was greeted by TWU President Carol Surles and two young admirers.

Courtesy photo/TWU

● In 2016, TWU announced it will lead a consortium of universities and higher education organizations in a move to create a consistent, effective response to sexual assault on college campuses across the state. ● TWU offers the only undergraduate degree program in culinary science and food service management in Texas. ● About 12 percent of the university’s nearly 16,000 students are men. They have been admitted to the university’s graduate programs since 1972 and undergraduate proMichael Modecki /TWU grams since 1994.

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Michael Modecki/TWU

Texas Woman’s University wants to keep its small feel while accommodating more students and their needs, said Carine M. Feyten, chancellor and president of the university. The school has four planned construction projects in the next three years to try to accomplish that.

Future of T TWU comes into focus With several planned constructions projects, desire to grow footprint, TWU soon will have a different look

By Jenna Duncan | Staff Writer

exas Woman’s University is going to look different soon. Of course, classic landmarks like the Little Chapel-in-theWoods and the Blagg-Huey Library won’t change, but there will be new buildings, more housing and an expanded footprint through campus to accommodate the university’s tremendous growth in recent years. In addition to four planned construction projects in the next three years, consultants are starting to help TWU administrators look out at the next 20 years, too. The campus hardly has grown its footprint in the past 10 years, even as the student population has skyrocketed to almost 16,000 students.

Now, the university is looking to how to keep its small feel while accommodating more students and their needs, said Carine M. Feyten, chancellor and president of the university. “I think we have a sense of the right size for Texas Woman’s. If you think about it, we’re about the size of Baylor [University],” Feyten said. “You can not notice that when it grows up in your backyard … but even with the size we are now, it has a feel of a private school.”

What’s about to change

This fall, construction starts on a four-story parking garage between North Oakland and Austin streets, addressing years of concerns about a lack of parking on campus. The building will be able to fit 600 cars once it’s constructed on the surface

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Michael Modecki/TWU

In February, construction will begin on a housing and dining complex on the east side of Bell Avenue. The project will be built where TWU’s soccer field is now, with three residence halls and 30,000 square feet of dining space.

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Future lot, which fits about only 200 cars for parking now. Then, in February, construction will begin on a housing and dining complex on the east side of Bell Avenue. The project will be built where TWU’s soccer field is now, with three residence halls and 30,000 square feet of dining space. It will house 875 sophomores come fall 2019. The school’s Board of Regents approved the project in August, which will be a public/private partnership. This means Balfour Beatty Campus Solu-

tions is developing the project, and the nonprofit Collegiate Housing Foundation will own it. Then, TWU will lease the project back, and Balfour Beatty will remain as property managers. This type of partnership is a first for the university, and it is designed to meet a long-standing need for housing. Housing shortages in recent years have led to the university renting out hundred of apartments and having to house students in hotels at the start of

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Future each fall semester. “Since housing is self-funded cost paid by the students who use it, having a public-private partnership allows us to provide new housing for future students without having to pass along the costs to current students,” said Monica MendezGrant, TWU vice president for student life. “It is a cost-effective and efficient way to provide new housing with minimal investment from the university until it is complete.” Next spring, construction begins on renovation parts of Hubbard Hall and expanding it to create a new student union. There will be 106,000 square feet of existing space renovated, and 19,000 square feet added to create the union. When it’s done in fall 2019, the building will feature dining options, student support and offices for student organizations. “The current one is sorely inadequate for the current population in every aspect, just look at the restrooms and dining,” Feyten said. “Just overall, we would have to do major renovations and it still couldn’t meet our needs.” Then, next fall, construction starts on the Science & Technology Learning Center. The building was authorized by the Texas Legislature in 2015 and will focus on housing science and research labs in a central, safe location. It’s set to be movein ready by May 2020. The construction is scheduled to go in phases like this to make sure that campus is still usable when things are under construction, Feyten said.

Planning long-term

University officials are starting to look at a 20-year plan now that short-term needs are being addressed after years of discussion and planning. And no, plans for the golf course aren’t set, even though the school’s governing body passed a resolution two years ago to close the public 18-hole course. The golf course sits on 108 acres on the northeast portion of campus, just south of West University Drive. “We’re not building housing on the golf course, because right now those buildings would feel very isolated from campus, so first we need to build the community around it,” Feyten said. “We want to move into the golf course progressively.” Feyten envisions parts of the property

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Graphic courtesy TWU


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Future that aren’t the course get developed in the near future, while the actual course gets reconfigured for some golf usage, but also for other outdoor activities. Her biggest dreams for the campus include bike and walking trails, as well as open green space for recreational sports and gathering. Realizing what the students and professors need, though, will be at the top of list when administrators start work on the 20-year master plan. HKS Architects, a planning and architecture firm with ties to the university, will guide the planning process. It will study projected growth, what academic programs will need and make recommendations on smart growth, Feyten said.

Making sure students have space to gather, collaborate and practice wellness are just as important as these aspects as TWU plans for the future, Feyten said. “We’re paying very close attention to what makes degrees and college experiences worthwhile,” she said. “When our students leave here, they don’t just have a degree, they have the potential to become great, thriving citizens and they have a greater sense of purpose than when they came to us. “You don’t just gain this in your classes, it’s part of all the activities … It’s building a sense of community, being healthy and being smart financially.”

Holly Nelson

Margaret B. Randle

Degree: B.F.A. with a focus in graphic design, 2013 City: Denton Occupation: Senior design specialist, Texas Woman’s University What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? The time I climbed on Minerva for a video shoot. She’s colder than I expected despite knowing she’s marble. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? Being a woman and a Texan, I’m glad to have a degree from Texas Woman’s University. The success rate of my peers and fellow graduates consistently landing good jobs in our fields is when I feel the most pride. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? It’s the impact of the people you meet while at TWU. It’s not your typical school where you expect games, events, parties and the like. Nor is it a place where you find so many of the same type of person. The community is notably diverse and nontraditional, which adds a clever variety of ideas and perspectives I believe you won’t just find at any college. TWU students are at TWU first and foremost for an education. There’s a lot of value in that.

Degree: B.S. in special education, 1968 City: Lubbock Occupation: Retired school principal and teacher What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? I was honored to march with my big sister during the senior walk around the campus. We all wore white and carried a red rose; I cried during the entire march. I looked forward to the day when it would be my turn to choose a sophomore to march with me. White Breakfast was another event that seniors and their little sisters participated in. Lights in the dining hall were dimmed, tables were donned with white cloths and green grapes were coated with white powdered sugar. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? Being a graduate of TWU sets me apart from most college women graduates my age. I found my voice at TWU. TWU did not have male students. Women students were in all leadership roles. I learned that a woman can do anything a man can. TWU helped me to learn to network and to rely on other women. Now, I see posters and signs encouraging women to enter nontraditional fields. TWU was doing that in the sixties.

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Julie Glover

Ressa Gallardo

Joleesia Berry

Degrees: B.S. in mass communications, 1998; MBA, 2007 City: Denton Occupation: Economic development program administrator (downtown development), City of Denton Why did you choose TWU? My sister attended school at TWU in the early 1970s, while I was in high school. I have fond memories of visiting her in the dorm, eating Kentucky Fried Chicken (one of the few restaurants within walking distance, at the time) and staying up late. I started college right after high school but dropped out. When I went back to finish my undergrad as a working adult, I was living in Denton, and TWU was the obvious choice. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? I’m proud of being a TWU alum (twice!). I think the quality of education I received was superior, due to the student-to-professor ratios. I love the historic buildings and the fact that TWU values their place in Denton’s history. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? The skills and determination that it took for me to finish two degrees, while working full time, made me believe that I can accomplish almost anything.

Degree: B.S. in music therapy, 2015 City: Houston Occupation: Freelancer What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? My fondest memory was singing with the TWU Concert Choir for TWU Chancellor Carine M. Feyten’s inauguration in 2014. My choral director, Dr. Jensen, composed the piece specifically for the event, and I was so deeply connected with the choral arrangement and lyrics when rehearsing it and was in awe with the positive response after the performance. Being able to showcase my love for music while bringing so much honor and pride for TWU made that memory special to me. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? I faced many challenges during my time studying at TWU, but I learned how important it was to never give up. Being surrounded by a predominantly female population during my time at TWU made me learn the importance of empowering other women to achieve their dreams. I feel so much more confident as a person today because it made me value the power of friendship.

Degree: B.A.S. in business management, 2015 City: Dallas Occupation: Government and Institutional Specialist, Regions Bank What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? My fondest memory was the day I graduated. I am the first generation to graduate from my family. It was such an overwhelming experience knowing that I finally did it, I broke the “generational curse” in my family. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? I just can’t imagine what other higher education institution I would have rather complete my collegiate career at other than Texas Woman’s University. This school leadership has seen something in me since the very first day they accepted my application. I was able to accomplish so many great things at TWU and I am not sure if I would have been afforded those same opportunities at any other institution. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? Being a TWU graduate means that I am a strong and independent woman who is ready to make a difference in the industry I chose to follow.


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Did you know? ● In 1938, the Pioneer Woman statue, a gift to the Denton campus in celebration of the Texas Centennial, was unveiled before a large crowd on Dec. 5. ● TWU is the only Texas university with Adapted PhysMichael Modecki/TWU ical Education master’s and doctoral specializations. ● TWU’s Fine Arts Building was the first facility in Texas designed and built specifically to house programs in the studio arts. ● TWU consistently is ranked among the safest campuses in Texas and in the nation. In fact, www.alarms.org/safest-colleges-2017 ranked it as No. 2 in safety in Texas. ● In 1992, the TWU Stroke Center-Dallas was established to provide treatment and training in

neurological rehabilitation specifically for stroke patients. ● In 1971, authors and feminist activists Gloria Steinem, Margaret Sloan-Hunter and Joanne Edgar led students in a Women’s Rights March.

● For more than 30 years, TWU student athletes have achieved an overall team GPA of 3.0 or higher. ● TWU is home to the Texas First Ladies Historic Costume Collection and the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame.

Courtesy photo/TWU

● In 2017, TWU graduated more speech therapists than any other program in Texas and is one of the largest programs in the U.S. ● In 1996, Alumna Maj. Gen. Mary Saunders, U.S. Air Force, retired, becomes the first woman to serve as the director of transportation at the United States Air Force Headquarters. She is a Distinguished Alumna Saunders (1998), executive director of the TWU Leadership Institute (2006) and member of the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame (2012).

● In 2002, Alumna Sylvia Garcia becomes the first Hispanic woman elected to the Harris County Commissioners Court. She currently serves as the Texas state senator for District 6 in Houston. (Elected in 2013).

Garcia

● In 2005, The Lowry Woods Community opens, bringing a new dimension to student housing at TWU by accommodating both single and married students, as well as those with children. ●TWU became home of the state’s first TeachLivE lab in 2014, a computer-simulated classroom developed at the University of Central Florida. The interactive lab allows teacher candidates to practice their skills on “student” avatars controlled by human trainers.


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FILLING THE GAPS

Four institutes help support school’s core mission, aid students, faculty and staff By Madison Wilson For The Denton Record-Chronicle

T

exas Woman’s University has four institutes that serve unique purposes at the school and throughout the North Texas community. One of the institutes, the Institute for Women’s Health, dates to 1993 while some of the others have only recently opened their doors, including the Center for Women in Business, which was established in 2015. One thing all of the institutes have in common is supporting TWU’s core mission of education while providing beneficial services to students, faculty and staff, and the Denton community. The Institute for Women’s Health

The Institute for Women’s Health is a statefunded institute that provides educational resources and supports research pertaining to women’s health. The institute operates a clinic, the Pioneer Performance Clinic, that provides health and wellness services to students at a discounted rate and to the Denton community. The clinic offers body composition screening, fitness assessments and nutritional counseling. “We’re very interested in promoting women’s health,” said institute director Nancy DiMarco. “We are not a disease organization. We promote health, so we are all about finding ways to incorporate physical activity and improve nutrition in individuals’ lives.” When a patient is diagnosed with a disease, physicians can refer them to the Pioneer Performance Clinic to receive the counseling they need to improve their overall health and wellness. The clinic also offers a grocery store tour where a registered dietician provides guidance for making healthy, budget-friendly options. “We know that the keys to a long healthy life are good nutrition and physical activity, so they are the things we try to promote at all levels in the institute, and because women are the gatekeepers of health in the family, if you can help a women understand the keys to health, then she’s much more likely to translate that to her family and get them on a better path as well,” DiMarco said.

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DRC file photo

Retired Maj. Gen. Mary Saunders, right, executive director of the TWU Leadership Institute, speaks during a 2012 event as Texas State Senator Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, looks on. The Leadership Institute is one of four institutes that serve unique purposes at the school and throughout the North Texas community.


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Institutes The Center for Women in Business

Courtesy photo/TWU

Faculty at Texas Woman’s University provide one-on-one counsel for aspiring entrepreneurs at the Center for Women in Business during different training sessions. The center is one of four institutes that serve unique purposes at the school and throughout the North Texas community.

The Center for Women in Business was established in 2015 with a goal to connect female entrepreneurs with the resources they need in order to build and grow successful businesses, said the center’s interim director, Annie Phillips. This state-funded center not only supports the university’s students, but also its faculty and the Denton County community, Phillips said. For TWU’s students, the center offers the Minerva Scholarship, which provides funding to help students pay for tuition and fees. Minerva scholars must participate in workshops, networking opportunities and events mandated by the university. Last academic school year, TWU awarded 12 Minerva Scholarships. Phillips estimates this upcoming school year, the number of scholars will at least double. “We just want to provide the education that [the students]

need to understand what it looks like to be a successful entrepreneur, and we just want to connect them to the resources that exist,” Phillips said. For the university’s faculty, the Center for Women in Business provides research grants. The first $10,000 grant the center awarded was given to a faculty member who is conducting a research study of the link between successful college athletes and successful entrepreneurs. For the Denton County community, the center aims to be a touchpoint between the community and various resources within TWU and Denton County. “There’s lots of people already supporting entrepreneurs, and we don’t want to duplicate what they’re already doing,” Phillips said. “We want to partner with them and find the gaps so we can fill the gaps.” Shannon Mantaro will assume her position as the center’s permanent executive director on Sep. 1. “TWU is just really the perfect place for a center like this,” Phillips said. “We have the academic support

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Judy Elias, associate director of the Leadership Institute, left, helps collect donations in 2010 for relief in Hati from TWU faculty and staff.

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Institutes through our school of management, we have the underlying focus on women, and we’re housed in such a great community that supports local businesses and understands the value of that.”

Leadership Institute

TWU’s Leadership Institute has helped prepare students to become leaders for more than 10 years. The institute’s three core values of leadership development, economic security and health and wellness all aim to increase leadership experience in students. To join the Leadership Institute, students need to go through an application process. Recruitment takes place in fall and spring, and a maximum of 35 students are allowed in the program due to the intensive nature of the leadership training. The program is open only to juniors and seniors at TWU. “This program is an academic program and very specifically targeted to students who in two years will enter the job force, and I don’t want them to graduate on Saturday with nowhere to go on Monday,” said associate director Judy Elias. Every year, several students from the institute attend a week-long leadership initiative called LeaderShape to supplement and build upon the leadership experience they gain from the institute. The program helps students narrow down their career goals as well and identify what type of leader each student is. “[This program] is not just to get a job,”

Elias said. “It’s to accept a position and then become a prepared leader, and I’ve stressed to [the students] that does not mean you have to be president of the United States. Leadership comes in a lot of different forms.”

The Woodcock Institute

The Woodcock Institute for the Advancement of Neurocognitive Research and Applied Practice aims to enhance neurocognitive research across the country, said institute director Daniel Miller. “What we’re really interested in doing is funding interdisciplinary research,” Miller said. “A lot of our research studies that we funded are pulling different study groups together to answer research questions and that’s really what TWU is about.” The institute, created by Dr. Richard Woodcock and moved to TWU in 2015, provides funding for research grants and dissertation awards each year. The institute funded seven research grants between 2016-2017. Some of the grants went toward examining cognitive and academic deficits in children with ADHD and memory and reasoning training in stroke survivors. The institute also funded two dissertation awards during 2016 and 2017. “We’re incredibly fortunate to have the institute at TWU,” Miller said. “It is the only national institute like that that’s really designed to preserve the integrity of what Dr. Woodcock wants to do with his money and resources.”

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Destination Denton

Michael Modecki/TWU

The Little Chapel-in-the-Woods hosted its first wedding ceremony in 1939 after more than 300 TWU students contributed to the design and artwork, which now are displayed in the nondenominational wedding venue.

University offers myriad alluring attractions for not only students, but anyone interested

By Kyle Martin Staff Writer

T

exas Woman’s University has plenty to see throughout the year, and several attractions on campus bring folks from all around searching for an interesting day at the university. On top of students and classrooms, TWU is home to summer camps, weddings, special collections and more. These are just a few of the alluring exhibits the university has to offer:

Texas Women’s Hall of Fame

The Texas Women’s Hall of Fame was created in 1984 by the Texas Governor’s Commission, and in 2003, TWU was selected as the home for the honorary hall. The hall of fame now displays the achievements and accolades of over 150 Texas women. Every two years, new women are inducted into the hall, with 2016 being the most recent inductees. “We celebrate today’s five honorees not only for their individual achievements,

but also for their unique contributions in making Texas an even more superior state,” said Texas Gov. Greg Abbott during the 2016 Texas Women’s Hall of Fame induction ceremony. “Their personal stories of passion and perseverance are a testament to the power of both dreams and hard work.” Women who are politicians, performers, astronauts and first ladies are all recognized in the hall.

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Destinations The most recent inductees are Emma Carter Browning, Susie Hitchcock-Hall, Ginger Kerrick, Dr. Renu Khator and Selena Quintanilla. Admission to the hall if free, open to the public and open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday in TWU’s Hubbard Hall.

Texas First Ladies Historic Costume Collection

This special exhibit at TWU, originating as a statewide project of the Texas Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, displays 21 gowns from First Ladies of Texas at a time from a collection of 47. Gowns in the collection come from First Ladies of Texas, as well as United States First Ladies. “People love to see what people are wearing,” said Ann Barton, a former archivist for TWU and current building attendant and tour guide for the costume collection and TWU’s Little Chapel-in-the-Woods. Included in the collection are interesting fragments in history coming from Texas women, including hair brushes, make-up kits, underwear and more. The exhibit is free and open to the public in the university’s Administration Conference Tower’s second floor. It is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and closed on weekends and holidays.

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Jeff Woo/DRC

TWU tour guide Ann Barton views a dress worn by Texas’ first lady Cecilia Abbott, on July 5 at the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame. The exhibit serves as a permanent commemoration of distinguished Texas women. It was created by the Governor's Commission for Women in 1984. In 2003, TWU was selected as the home for the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame.


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Jeff Woo/DRC

Paige Brassart, assistant director for conference services at TWU, walks across a stone walkway at the Texas Pond. During the 1930s and 1940s, faculty and students transformed a seven-acre weed patch into the botanical gardens. Historical figures such as first ladies Eleanor Roosevelt and Lady Bird Johnson have walked in the gardens.

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Destinations Cookbook Collection

TWU is home to one of the largest cookbook collections in the United States and contains more than 25,000 cookbooks, 10,000 recipe pamphlets and 1,800 international menus. Students and chefs alike from all over the country have toured and borrowed from the TWU cookbook collection. “The cookbook collection — that alone brings people to campus,” said Paige Brassart, assistant director for conference services. As an interesting note, Barton said TWU alumni over the years have asked for the recipe to the chocolate-covered cinnamon rolls, which were once served in the dormitories’ dining halls. Although they find the recipe in the cookbook collection, she said the alumni she has spoken with don’t often remember the cinnamon rolls tasting as they once did. “There’s no way that chocolate covered cinnamon rolls when you’re 70 taste the same way they did when you were 18 during your first time away from home,” Barton said. “They’ve given it out several times, and nobody ever says it’s right.” The Cooknook Collection can be

found in the Blagg-Huey Library on the TWU campus.

The Little Chapel-in-the-Woods

Not only can students get degrees at TWU, they also can get married, along with anyone else who’d like an intimate wedding in a beautiful chapel. The Little Chapel-in-the-Woods hosted its first wedding ceremony in 1939 after more than 300 TWU students contributed to the design and artwork, which now are displayed in the nondenominational wedding venue. The chapel, which seats 110 people, was awarded as one of Texas’ 20 proudest architectural achievements by the Texas Society of Architects and is the place of over 100 weddings per year. “We’re unique in that we have a lot of different people sign up for wedding’s here,” Brassart said. “If you want something small and intimate you can have that here on a Thursday afternoon, no problem.” Wedding ceremony rates can be found online, and reservations can be made through TWU Conference Services department via email. Call conference services at 940-898-3644 for more information.

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Advocates for all

Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU nutrition graduate Victoria Parades receives her U.S. Army Commissioning as an Active Duty Engineer Officer from Captain Thomas Chorman during the university’s spring May 2017 commencement ceremonies.

TWU offers plenty for veterans, nontraditional students who otherwise may feel out of place By Nancy Moen TWU

S

itting in a classroom with 18-yearolds can seem odd when you’re in your 40s. Nikki Perez, 45, of McKinney, felt out of place starting college after retiring from the U.S. Navy as a yeoman at a helicopter combat unit in Norfolk, Va. “College was difficult,” said Perez, a senior majoring in social work. “I felt like everybody knew more than me. Studying is something learned, and I had graduated from high school in 1989.”

After transferring to Texas Woman’s University from Collin College in her junior year, Perez found an important link for non-traditional students like herself — an expansive network of services for veterans and military-affiliated students. “TWU came highly recommended as a school because I’m a vet. I talked to other vets, who said it was a great environment, and they were right. I love it. I feel supported.” Perez recommends TWU for nontraditional students and veterans who may feel out of place in higher education because of their age and different life experiences.

From boots to books

Veterans are an important student base for TWU,

which serves almost 300 student veterans and just less than 400 dependents of veterans. The university also employs about 70 faculty and staff members who are veterans. “We have one of the largest percentages of women vets of any university. We’re great advocates of women who have served,” said Amy O’Keefe, who oversees TWU Veteran Student Services. Assisting veterans in their transition from the military to university life is a serious commitment — one of four strategic plan distinctions for TWU. The goal is to become a global leader in improving the quality of life for veterans and their families through education.

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WASP National Archive is a TWU treasure By Nancy Moen TWU

Texas Woman’s University is home to an archive that’s about to get a lot of attention:The official national archives of the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II — the first women to fly for the U.S. military. Associate professor of history Katherine Sharp Landdeck studied the archival information for 20 years to write her book The Women with Silver Wings, set for publication in 2018 by Penguin Random House’s Crown Imprint. Even before its publication, Fox 2000 has optioned the book as a movie, Silver Wings. Fox 2000 produced the Oscar-nominated movie Hidden Figures, which told the story of the unrecognized math, engineering and technology genius of three African-American women at NASA. Like the women at NASA and the Tuskegee pilots, the WASPs’ service went unrecognized for decades. “I am just thrilled that these amazing women, who are heroes

Courtesy photo/Dole Institute of Politics

From left, WASPs Millicent Young, Dawn Seymour and Lucille Wise, Dole Institute Director Bill Lacy, WASPs Jean McCreery Bee Haydu, Betty Jo Reed and Thelma Miller and TWU Associate Professor Katherine Sharp Landdeck stand at the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas in Lawrence. The WASPs were awarded the Bob Dole Leadership Prize on Oct. 3, 2010. in their own right as part of our ‘Greatest Generation,’ will finally get the recognition they have earned,” Landdeck said. “It has been the privilege of my professional and personal life to get to

know these women over the years and to tell their stories. I can’t wait for the world to read, hear and see these amazing women in action.” As WASPS, more than 1,000 female pilots stepped in to handle

domestic flying to relieve men for overseas assignments from 194244. The WASPs took on duties that included ferrying planes from factories to points of embarkation, test flying planes after re-

pairs and towing targets behind planes for gunners to fire at moving targets. The U.S. government finally recognized their service in the 1970s and awarded them Medals of Honor in the 2000s.


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Veterans Attesting to the success of that initiative, for the eighth consecutive year in 2017, GI Jobs, a national organization that promotes higher education, has named TWU a “military-friendly school” for its success in recruiting and supporting post-military students and their families. Among the most popular studies for veterans are nursing, nutrition, kinesiology, social work, business, criminal justice and computer science.

Extensive umbrella of support

Michael Modecki/TWU

For the eighth consecutive year in 2017, GI Jobs, a national organization that promotes higher education, has named TWU a “military-friendly school” for its success in recruiting and supporting post-military students and their families.

Walk into the Veteran and Military Student Center on the Denton campus, and you’ll experience extended family. It’s all part of a broad umbrella of assistance known as Veteran Student Services. “You can use the computers, sit, decompress, get a cup of coffee and meet friends who have also served,” Perez said. For veterans, another way to fit in is through the Student Veterans Association, which helps with the transition to college life by advocating for its members. The association is a chapter of the national Student Veterans of America. Across campus, student veterans can easily see where to find answers to their questions. Prominently displayed redwhite-and-blue Vet Zone logos announce which staff members have been trained to help. Staff training is a priority, and it is wide ranging.

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Michael Modecki/TWU

As leader of the TWU Leadership Institute composed of sophomores, juniors and seniors, retired Maj. Gen. Mary Saunders, left, identifies guest speakers who address subjects including leadership development, health and wellness, and economic security.

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Veterans Bringing together faculty and staff who share an interest in helping with veterans’ issues, the Veterans Advisory Council meets periodically as an advisory group. The council promotes discussion on policy issues and solves problems that arise. Key areas include financial aid and career connections.

A two-star general in command

Some veteran students are natural leaders, and TWU cultivates those traits through its Leadership Institute, led by Executive Director Mary Saunders. Retired from the U.S. Air Force as a twostar general, Saunders is a native Texan and TWU alumna with a bachelor’s degree in social work. She was the first female general officer to serve as the director of transportation in the Air Force, where she managed a $4 billion dollar budget and guided 32,000 active duty and civilian person personnel and was responsible for a fleet of 115,000 vehicles. As leader of the TWU Leadership Institute composed of sophomores, juniors and seniors, Saunders identifies guest speakers who address subjects including leadership development, health and wellness, and economic security.

ROTC with UNT

TWU students participate in the University of North Texas Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) programs to pre-

pare for a career as an officer. Active-duty and reserve Air Force and Army personnel provide all classroom instruction and program administration. Students register for courses through TWU, and classes meet at the University of North Texas campus. Students who complete either program with at least a bachelor’s degree are awarded commissions as U.S. military officers. TWU 2017 nutrition graduate Victoria Parades served as commander of the UNT ROTC and received her U.S. Army commissioning as an active duty engineer officer during TWU’s spring commencement ceremonies.

Sports for wounded warriors

Some student veterans are considered wounded warriors, dealing daily with injuries they suffered in service to the country. Those students, as well as their families and some non-students who are veterans, find therapeutic opportunities in adapted sports through a TWU project called Injured Veterans Engaging in Sport Together or Project INVEST. The success of playing Paralympic sports and the resulting camaraderie helps lift veterans out of a victim mentality. Project INVEST uses sports as a vehicle for wounded veterans to reintegrate into community and social settings, said Ron Davis, a professor of kinesiology whose focus is adapted physical activity and education. Davis directs Project INVEST. Nearly 60 wounded, ill or injured veterans participate in TWU’s wheelchair basketball competition, Davis said, and 10 to 12

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Michael Modecki/TWU

the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academic Partnership is funded through a $3.5 million national grant. TWU was one of only three universities nationally chosen for the program, which started in 2014.

College of Nursing part of innovative education, practice partnership By Nancy Moen TWU

Veterans who have been to war sometimes suffer from mental health and physical health problems related to the conflict they were in. Vietnam veterans, for example, may have Agent Orange as an issue, while Iraq and Vietnam veterans may be dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder. TWU College of Nursing students are choosing careers focused on the unique care of veterans, thanks to a partnership with the Veterans Administration North Texas Health Care System. The innovative education and practice collaboration known as the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academic Partnership is funded through a $3.5 million national grant. TWU was one of only three universities nationally chosen for the program starting in 2014. The collaboration offers students a veteran-centric curriculum as well as indepth exposure to veteran patients through clinical experience at the local VA. Forty students enroll in the program each year, including some students who

also are veterans. By listening to the stories of their patients, the students develop a competency of veterans and their unique health challenges based on when and where they served. “It’s like learning about another ethnic group,” said Stephanie Woods, associate dean of nursing who was active duty Air Force. “Students love the relationship they develop with these patients, and the veterans really invest in the students,” Woods said. “The vets feel like they’re helping this generation understand what the war was about and what the values of their generation were.” Nursing students also can work as technicians at the VA while going to school. “In conversations with VA leaders, they report that a large number of VA nurses will be retiring over the next ten years, and recruiting new nurses is a high priority for them,” Woods said. “The VANAP program provides a badly needed supply of future nurses, and the program well prepares TWU nurses to take positions within the VA.”


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to U.S. military service members and their families before coming to TWU in 2013. His work at TWU has continued, and he a 2016 ceremony in the U.S. Office of the Vice President honored his work with military children and families.

Veterans of those soldiers typically travel to military installations for competition. Grants from the Veterans Administration and from the Olympic Fund helped start the project. Heritage Health Solutions in Flower Mound donates funding for military personnel who wish to participate, and other gifts pay for travel to military bases for adapted-sport activities.

Going beyond the expected

Healing for families

Readjustment issues can be serious when veterans return from deployment and re-enter civilian life. Work may be needed to re-establish family roles. When family life has been disrupted, “often it’s the children who act out the stress in the family,” said Paul Jurek, supervisor of the Counseling and Family Therapy Clinic in TWU’s Department of Family Sciences. Veterans and their families receive free counseling at the clinic for a variety of problems and can attend a veteran support group. Jurek has a lot of experience working with veterans in university and nonuniversity settings. Focusing on children of the military, Karen Petty, professor and chairwoman of family sciences, has trained the care provid-

Michael Modecki/TWU

Veterans and their families receive free support at the Counseling and Family Therapy Clinic in TWU’s Department of Family Sciences for a variety of problems and can attend a veteran support group. ers of children on U.S. military bases nationally and internationally. Her book Deployment: Strategies For Working With Military Kids is the basis of curriculum for military children and others on installations and in Department of Defense schools, public schools and homeschool classes.

Petty and Ronald Palomares, assistant professor of psychology, developed and provided the first training at TWU for public school teachers who work with military kids in their classrooms. Palomares, a former U.S. Air Force captain, served as a military family life consultant who provided short-term counseling

People make a difference in the lives of veterans, especially when they find innovative ways to go above what’s expected. Consider the work of Susan Whitmer, TWU reference and instruction librarian. Labeling herself an “embedded librarian,” Whitmer assists veterans with their reference needs as part of her job. At the Veteran Student Center every Friday morning, she answers reference-related questions and teaches navigation of the libraries website. But Whitmer, who served in the the U.S. Army, also shares an unrelated talent that’s one of her favorite activities — yoga. Thanks to her yoga certification, Whitmer creates bonding experiences and helps relieve stress by leading “veterans-only classes” at TWU Fitness & Recreation. At TWU, there are a lot of projects in place for veterans, and faculty and staff consider it a privilege to participate. “We’re making TWU a friendly campus for those who made the world a better place,” O’Keefe said.


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Helen Benjamin, Ph.D.

Lottye Brodsky-Lyle

Darren M. Stevens

Degrees: M.Ed. supervision and reading, 1977, and Ph.D. in English, 1989 City: Dallas Occupation: Retired community college CEO currently serving as a community college consultant Why did you choose TWU? I chose TWU because it catered to women and offered the programs I needed for my master’s degree. The university also had a good reputation in the 1970s for its acceptance of African Americans. For the doctorate, I chose TWU because of the reputation of its doctoral program in English and the fact that, to my knowledge, two African American women had completed the program. That was encouragement for me. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? In addition to the academic knowledge I gained, the rigor of the programs, the high standards required for success, and meeting the demands of the challenging curriculum prepared me to ably meet the challenges facing me in my personal and professional life. Once I completed the program, I felt I could do anything. I was stretched in numerous ways.

Degree: M.Ed. in special education, 1967 City: Dallas Occupation: Retired educational administrator What is your fondest memory about your time at TWU? The close relationships I had with each of my professors: they were my teachers, mentors and friends all rolled into one. Our classes were small and we knew one another so very well. The classes were so interesting, relevant and inspiring, going was a pleasure. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? Being a TWU graduate in special education means I received an excellent education within driving distance from Dallas. I connected with professionals who were nearby and I called upon them for in service training programs I was in charge of developing. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? My time at inspired me to help others attend TWU. I went on the TWU Foundation Board and served 11 years, one as president. We raised money for scholarships for students to attend, and I am proud of the amount of money we were able to distribute to deserving students.

Degree: EMBA, 2006 City: Frisco Occupation: Assistant Chief of Police, Frisco Police Department Why did you choose TWU? TWU was offering the executive MBA in a condensed semester format that allowed me to expedite completing my degree, as well as affording me the opportunity to attend every other class online, which fit my schedule and life dynamics. Having a full time job, married and two children could have been intimidating when trying to decide if I had the time to go back to school. The mix of classroom and online format provided me the flexibility I needed and still gave me the in-class brick-and-mortar experience I felt was important. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? One of the most important aspects of law enforcement is interacting and engaging with diverse populations and empathizing with people from a myriad of backgrounds. At TWU, I had the privilege to meet and learn with and from people of different backgrounds, professions and life experiences.


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Community resources COMMUNITY EVENTS SPONSORED BY TWU

Annual ArtsWalk — March 30 Each spring, the Texas Woman’s University School of the Arts invites area residents to join students, faculty, staff for ArtsWalk to experience the arts at TWU. Performances by TWU dance, drama, visual arts and music students highlight this free, all-ages event. For more information, visit twu.edu/artswalk.

Youth sport clinics — fall/spring TWU’s athletic department sponsors free youth clinics throughout the year. All clinics start 15 minutes after the 2 p.m. home game ends. twuathletics.com/clinics ■ Sept. 10 — Soccer ■ Oct. 7 — Volleyball ■ Jan. 13 — Basketball ■ Mar. 4 — Gymnastics ■ TBD — Softball

Summer Camps 2018 TWU offers a variety of camp programs each summer, including Pioneer Choir Camp, nutrition/culinary camps, fashion camps, writing camp and CyberCamp. twu.edu/summercamps

Interested in nutrition, science, dance or sports or trick-or-treating on campus? Texas Woman’s University offers seminars and camps on these topics and as well as others. All sessions are held at TWU’s Denton campus, unless otherwise noted.

Dance classes — starting in September The Community Dance Center at TWU offers quality and affordable dance classes for toddlers to adults. The fall 10-week session begins in September. communitydancecenter.org Annual Boo at the U — October 19 More than 3,000 children attend the annual “Boo at the U” festival each year and enjoy treats, train and carriage rides, carnival games, inflatables and a haunted house. Admission is free and open to the public. Rain or shine, the event will provide a night of fun in a safe environment. Attendees are encouraged to bring one canned good per person to help support the TWU Food Pantry. Savor the Flavor Series at the Dallas Arboretum — November TWU’s nutrition instructors and students will share easy and immediately impactful food tips during this free series of seminars at the Dallas Arboretum, 8525 Garland Rd., Dallas. No registration required. All sessions start at 10 a.m. in A Tasteful Place. ■ Nov. 8 – Happy, Healthy Holidays ■ Nov. 11 – Eat Lean, Save Green ■ Nov. 18 – Fueling for Fitness ■ Nov. 29 – Savor the Flavor of Fall Spices and Herbs Culinary Nutrition for Health Care Professionals — Nov. 11 This specialized program is aimed at physicians, physician's assistants, nurse practitioners and other health care professional, who will learn techniques to motivate patients to eat healthier and participate in hands-on cooking demonstrations with registered dietitian nutritionists. www.twu.edu/nutrition-foodsciences Kids for Health event — Nov. 20 Children ages 5 to 12 receive discounted dental hygiene services and hearing and speech/ language screenings at this annual event. Advanced registration is required. 940-8982888 (dental hygiene), 940-898-2888 (hearing, speech and language) Festival of Lights — Nov. 30 The annual Festival of Lights evening celebrates the decoration of the Denton campus for the holidays. The event features performances by students from TWU music, drama and dance, as well as a visit from Santa, hot chocolate and other activities for the entire family. It coincides with the annual TWU Holiday Concert.

SERVING OUR NEIGHBORS: TEXAS WOMAN’S UNIVERSITY CLINICS

Texas Woman’s University has four clinics that serve the Denton community and let our students gain hands-on experience essential for their future careers. These Denton clinics and the TWU Stroke Center — Dallas allow the university to provide much-needed services to our neighbors to help their families and our community thrive. Counseling & Family Therapy Clinic ■ Purpose: Provides low-cost counseling for adults through family, couple, group and individual services as well as play therapy for children ages 3-10. ■ Contact: 940-898-2600; Counselingand FamilyTherapyClinic@twu.edu; Woodcock Hall 114, Denton; http://catalog.twu.edu/under graduate/services-available-students/ counseling-family-therapy-clinic. Dental Hygiene Clinic ■ Purpose: Offers free screenings and low-cost dental hygiene services to adolescents and adults. ■ Contact: 940-898-2888; DentalHygiene Clinic@twu.edu; Multipurpose Classroom Laboratory 102, Denton; http://www.twu.edu/ dental-hygiene-clinic. Pioneer Performance Clinic ■ Purpose: Provides nutritional counseling and exercise and fitness evaluations and testing. Special discounts available for veterans and first responders. ■ Contact: 940-898-2799; info@pioneer performanceclinic.com; Woodcock Hall 011, Denton; http://pioneerperformance clinic.com Speech-Language & Hearing Clinic ■ Purpose: Provides assessments, interventions and therapies to those in the community with speech, language, cognitive-communication, feeding or hearing difficulties. ■ Contact: 940-898-2285; comsclinic @twu.edu; Multipurpose Classroom Laboratory 601, Denton; http://www.twu.edu/speechlanguage-hearing-clinic/ The TWU Stroke Center – Dallas ■ Purpose: Offers neurological and physiological rehabilitation for patients recovering from strokes, including comprehensive assessments, plans of care and outpatient services. ■ Contact: 214-689-6592; strokecenter @twu.edu; T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences, 5500 Southwestern Medical Ave., Dallas, TX 75235; http://www.stroke centerdallas.org


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Nora Sierra/TWU

TWU faculty and staff sample the food during the TWU 2016 Chili Cook-Off, Pie Bake-Off & Basket Auction fundraiser.

TWU community serves Denton By Amanda McKeen Simpson | TWU

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t Texas Woman’s University, “#campuswithaheart” is more than a hashtag. It’s a call to service that permeates the volunteer work students, faculty and staff perform in Denton to help make the university’s hometown a great place to live. “One of the things that attracted me to TWU was the unique vibe of Denton, and it makes me so proud when I see our community serving Denton and helping the city thrive,” said TWU Chancellor Carine M. Feyten, who serves on the Denton Economic Development Partnership Board of Directors. By serving on local boards and commissions, volunteering with local schools and community organizations such as Keep Denton Beautiful or engaging with large festivals like the Denton Arts & Jazz Festival, the university’s commitment to Denton remains strong. “Service is at the core of what our faculty and staff do when they engage with students, so it is only natural that this extends to the Denton community at large,” said Jennifer Martin, TWU executive vice provost. TWU faculty have left a lasting mark in the city, including retired Kinesiology Professor Bettye Myers, who Denton ISD named a middle school after in recognition of her years of community service in Denton and on the school board.

Don Edwards, professor and chair of the TWU Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, serves on the boards of the Denton Parks Foundation, Greater Denton Arts Council and Denton County Master Gardeners, which he co-chairs with his wife, Patricia, who served on the TWU staff for many years before retiring. Kinesiology faculty members Lisa Silliman-French and Ron Davis, along with their students, have worked with special needs students in Denton ISD for several years. Each Friday morning during the school year, students come to campus to engage in adapted physical education activities led by faculty and students.

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Michael Modecki/TWU

TWU faculty, staff and students painted the pantry of Denton’s Cumberland Presbyterian Children’s Home during the university’s 2017 Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service.

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Community Several College of Professional Education faculty members, including Annette Torres Elias, Betsy Kaye, Nancy Anderson and Connie Briggs tutor at-risk students in Denton ISD.

Ilana Morgan, assistant professor of dance, recently created a dance/theater unit based on Native American art and history for students in the Denton County Juvenile Detention Center. She worked with the art teacher and the principal of the Denton ISD school within the facility to create a unit that brought to life concepts

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Nora Sierra/TWU

TWU faculty and staff play in the 2016 Charity Ball volleyball tournament to raise money for the university’s 2016 State Employee Charitable Campaign.


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Nora Sierra/TWU

In 2016, faculty and staff set a new university record by raising more than $92,000 for the State Employee Charitable Campaign via the fall campaign, which includes a charity chili cook off and pie auction, a faculty and staff volleyball game and other events to encourage the university community to contribute.

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Community they were exploring in their art class. “I feel it is important to provide opportunities to connect and learn through the arts,” Morgan said. Nancy DiMarco, professor of nutrition, serves on the executive board of Serve Denton. She also is among the many TWU faculty and staff who volunteer with the Shiloh Field, run by Denton Bible Church, which is considered the nation’s largest community garden. This summer, DiMarco started a TWU student intern program for the garden. Nate Kerr, a junior majoring in nutrition, is farming a plot of land in the garden that is 50 feet by 50 feet. Produce from his plot is being sold at the Denton Farmer’s Market, and proceeds are going back to the Shiloh garden and funding future interns. “Working with Shiloh Field combines my professional calling in nutrition with my servant-minded heart to make a difference in the lives of those who are hungry,” DiMarco said. Several university staff members volunteer with area youth service organizations like the Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas, where Estée Easley, administrative assistant in nutrition and food sciences, has volunteered for more than 15 years. Others have helped start groups with a long history in the city, such as Carmen Cruz, associate director of counseling and psychological services, who helped found

Denton Pride more than 20 years ago. Some TWU staff are the volunteer power behind some of Denton’s major events, like the annual Denton Holiday Lighting Festival. Wallace Campbell, TWU senior network engineer, has been on the festival’s board for years and helps handle the logistics of festival operations. “I love living in Denton and enjoy being involved with many of the things that make this city so awesome,” Campbell said. Sandy Walker, executive administrative assistant in enrollment management, is part of the Association of Service and Support Employees of TWU, which adopts a spot in the city to keep clean through Keep Denton Beautiful. “Helping our community to be litter free is part of giving back to the city,” Walker said. For longtime staff member and Denton community volunteer Patrice Frisby, TWU development officer, community service is a family tradition. “My parents taught us by example that it was not only important, it was a responsibility of every citizen to support their community and place of worship,” said Frisby, who serves on the boards of the Denton Benefit League, United Way of Denton County, Texas Health Hospital-Denton’s Women’s Advisory Board and First Baptist

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Students lend helping hands across the region By Morgan Villavaso TWU Lasso

TWU’s Helping Hands Service Ambassadors is a community service organization that pioneers service projects each semester. Mendie White, the organization’s adviser, and a few of the Helping Hands student directors reflect on past service projects, discuss the impact of community involvement and encourage students to join them in lending a helping hand. “We try to have a variety of projects that suit different skill sets, interests and abilities,” White said. “We’ve done everything from volunteering at an elementary school, to homeless shelters, to nursing homes, to nature centers.” Helping Hands has volunteered with Denton Stream Clean, Mobile Food Pantry, North Texas Food Bank, Great American Cleanup, Dallas Life and other service-oriented organizations. The group of roughly 500 students is the only student group on campus specifically dedicated to service. Alexus Petty, the student director of special events, said volunteering provides a different type of reward than students are used to because they’re not do-

Tabitha Gray/TWU Lasso

From left, Helping Hands students Jazmine Beadle, Amber Jordan and Jahmeilla Hunter volunteer at Denton’s Shiloh Field. ing it for a class or being graded on their actions. “I think, for any college student, it’s good to volunteer because we’re so

wound up in our own busy schedule,” she said. “It’s just taking the time out to go volunteer and getting that warm fuzzy feeling of ‘Hey, I just did some-

thing really great, and it had nothing to do with getting an A or getting credit for a class.’” By working together on a project, it helps students form relationships with each other based on a shared experience that had a positive impact. Last year, they helped with gardening the Shiloh Field Community Garden, painted a middle school library and volunteered at community events like the Redbud Festival. “I think it’s neat, as an adviser, to see the students get excited about service,” White said. “They’ll come back from an event and they’ll be really happy about the impact they were able to make or the bonds they were able to forge as a group.” Through Helping Hands, volunteers have the opportunity to see the impact of their work immediately. “I think any time that we do some of the major clean up events and you can see the volume of trash that was picked up, you can also see what a big, tangible impact you had just from the couple of hours you were there.” said Hannah Meyer, student director of education and advocacy. “You’re directly interacting with the people who you’re serving.”


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Community Church Denton. “I enjoy serving my community, and perhaps — in a small way — doing my part to make Denton a better place to live, work and play,” she said. The university also encourages TWU students to volunteer from the very start of their college experience. Pioneer Camp, which welcomes firstyear students to campus with events and activities that start the Thursday before fall semester classes, culminates in a weekend volunteer service project. These student service projects extend to the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service at the beginning of the spring semester and Alternative Spring Break volunteer opportunities. “By offering opportunities to volunteer from day one, we are encouraging our students to grow as individuals and develop habits that can help them become active and engaged citizens in the community and in our world,” said Mendie White, TWU student development specialist and volunteer coordinator. “We want to show students that they truly can make a difference.” Perhaps nothing showcases the univer-

Nora Sierra/TWU

Fashion Professor Sheri Dragoo showcases a donated basket during the 2016 Chili Cook-Off, Pie Bake-Off & Basket Auction fundraiser. sity’s commitment to service more than TWU faculty and staff participation in the annual State Employee Charitable Campaign.

TWU has won multiple awards for participation and per capita giving for its SECC, including honors for highest per capita gift and highest participation in

higher education for state organizations with 751 to 2,000 employees. In 2016, the university’s faculty and staff set a new university record by raising more than $92,000 for the SECC via the fall campaign, which includes a charity chili cook off and pie auction, a faculty and staff volleyball game and other events to encourage the university community to contribute. Most of the funds raised from the go to Denton-based organizations, including the United Way of Denton County, another longtime community partner of the university. “We could not achieve our level of success without our partnership with TWU,” said Gary Henderson, president and CEO of the United Way of Denton County. “Students are actively engaged as interns and volunteers impacting lives on a daily basis. Faculty and staff serve as board members leading United Way of Denton County, they serve in leadership roles helping to identify and prioritize our greatest community needs, they volunteer to help raise critically needed donations and financial support and they leverage their skills and expertise to help develop and enhance services that improve lives across Denton County. ”


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Rachel Zimmerman

Adriana Blanco

Cynthia Nevels

Degree: B.S. in human biology, 2009; Doctor of Physical Therapy, 2012 City: Bon Repos, Haiti Occupation: North American Medical Director; Onaville Community Health Center How did TWU help prepare you for your career? I received a Doctor of Physical Therapy from TWU’s Dallas campus, so in every way this education prepared me for a career in physical therapy. I am currently directing a medical clinic in a growing community outside of Port au Prince, Haiti. Nothing could’ve truly prepared me for Haiti, but, in the same sense, all of my life experiences have prepared me for this cross-cultural life. I am thankful for the cultural diversity found at TWU. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? During my time at TWU, my desire for education and critical thinking was fostered and advanced. I was able to travel to Europe and the Caribbean. I was able to attend ballets, musicals and other art performances through the Honor Society. My faith was deepened through my church community and friends, and I was able to serve in the community. These are all part of who I am today.

Degree: B.S. in mathematics, 2014 City: Portsmouth, R.I. Occupation: Test engineer at Naval Undersea Warfare Center (U.S. Navy) How did TWU help prepare you for the career you chose? I learned so much professional development in terms of public speaking, self-confidence and time-management. Being an active leader on campus taught me how to lead and communicate with my team in a professional environment. Why did you choose TWU? I was granted the Presidential Scholarship as the valedictorian of my high school. I chose TWU because I wanted to learn on a smaller campus and have close relationships with professors, not be another number. I received incredible mentorship and support from faculty and staff. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? TWU has always been a special place for my family. My aunt and my sister both graduated from TWU, and now my cousin will be finishing her degree at TWU, as well.

Degrees: B.A. in accounting, 1996; B.A. in psychology, 2010 City: Dallas Occupation: Entrepreneur, founder of Integrality LLC and Soulgood Why did you choose TWU? My mother attended Texas Woman's University and shared many wonderful stories. She encouraged me to consider TWU because she felt the academic experience would be beneficial, the campus size would be manageable and the cost would not put me in debt. What does being a TWU graduate mean to you? Throughout my career, I have met TWU graduates at every job or opportunity I have had the pleasure of being involved in. From female executives at Tarrant County Public Health Department to Dallas County Community College District, I have met graduates who have helped to cultivate me and guide my career. We all connected because of the foundation TWU afforded us and were there to help each other. How did your time at TWU impact your life and/or values? It made me appreciate being a strong woman who could tackle challenges, take advantage of opportunities, and take on leadership roles without fear.


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TWU Houston advances health care in Texas Medical Center By Sue-Ella Mueller TWU

T

he Texas Woman’s University Institute of Health Sciences-Houston Center is located in the heart of the largest medical complex in the world, the Texas Medical Center. With a primary focus on advanced degrees, TWU Houston houses six schools and programs including U.S. News & World Report nationally ranked School of Occupational Therapy, School of Physical Therapy, the Nelda C. Stark School of Nursing, nutrition and food sciences, health care administration and MBA programs. TWU was first invited by the Texas Medical Center to come to Houston in 1960. In 2006, a new 10-story, 202,000 square-foot building was constructed using environmentally conscious concepts, qualifying it as a “green building.” Each year, approximately 1,300 students are enrolled in TWU Houston programs and have access to state-of-the-art computer, nursing simulation, occupational therapy and physical therapy laboratories, as well as to advanced medical equipment including a whole body scanner, anti-gravity treadmill and a body composition testing tool. Having access to this cutting edge technology provides an advantage for students as they may encounter these tools in the work environment.

Courtesy photo/TWU

TWU Houston’s advanced nursing simulation laboratories include 35 beds, 20 interactive simulation dolls including a Gaumard Noelle maternal and neonatal birthing simulator and a SimMan 3G patient simulator and several individual examination rooms. Among the many mock nursing episodes, each year students undergo a round-the-clock, 72-hour simulation featuring live actors and scripted scenarios.

Courtesy photo/TWU

Michael Modecki/TWU

Several two-story student lounges and study locations offer views of the southern gateway into the Texas Medical Center and are blanketed in sunlight. Yet, due to the buildings environmentally conscious architectural concepts, including high-performance glazing, heat is kept at bay.

Among the many medical simulation laboratories on the TWU Houston campus, the pediatric lab allows physical therapy and occupational therapy students the ability to assess and develop therapy plans for their youngest patients.


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Did you know? ● In 2003, Texas Woman’s University became the permanent home of the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame, created by the Governor’s Commission on Women to honor achievements of Texas women.

● In 1910, the College of Industrial Arts became the first institution of higher learning in Texas to establish and maintain a department of music.

Jeff Woo/DRC

● TWU graduates account for 24 percent of all Texas nursing doctoral degrees and 56 percent of all Texas allied health doctoral degrees from fouryear public universities. ●TWU offered the first bachelor’s degree in health and physical education in Texas. ● In 2004, TWU began the tradition of the Golf Cart Parade, a Spring Fling event where creatively decorated golf carts parade through the Denton campus.

DRC file photo

● TWU is the only university in the Lone Star State to offer doctoral degrees in occupational therapy, physical therapy, dance and women’s studies. ● TWU is ranked in the top 10 in the nation for student diversity by U.S. News & World Report. ● In 2017, the TWU gymnastics team won its 10th national championship. The program also won titles in 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008.

Michael Modecki/TWU

● TWU became the first public university in Texas to offer a specialist degree in September 2006. ● In 1976, Mary Evelyn Blagg Huey became the first woman and only alumna president of TWU. She led the university until 1986, the same year the Blagg-Huey Library was named after her to honor her decade-long tenure as president. Two years priCourtesy photo/TWU or, in 1984, she was inducted into the Texas Women’s Hall of Fame. ● In 1905, The college’s name was changed to the College of Industrial Arts. It was changed to Texas State College for Women in 1934. In 1957, it was changed to Texas Woman’s University.

● TWU faculty developed the treatment model taught globally in occupational therapy.

● TWU was the first higher education institution in Texas to offer a degree in music.

● TWU’s doctoral program in nursing was the first of its kind in the Southwest.

● TWU has the largest collection of research material on women in the southern United States.


Texas Woman's University Strong Past Bold Future