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Expand Your Reach


Connecting With The Right Audience How are you marketing your business?

What demographics are you trying to reach?

Have you advertised in print publications? Online media?

How well is your marketing strategy working for you?

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D E N T O N M E D I A C O M PA N Y | E X PA N D YO U R R E A C H


Denton County is the fastest-growing economy in the nation. There is no better time to reach customers in this vital area. And there is no better way to reach them than by working with Denton Media Company. Denton Media Company is uniquely positioned to help you connect with more local customers than any other media company in the region. Top counties in projected economic growth 2017-2021, in GDP 1. Denton, TX

4.1

2. Collin, TX

4.0

3. Montgomery, TX

3.4

4. Will, IL

3.2

5. San Francisco, CA

3.2

6. Fort Bend, TX

3.1

Source: Oxford Economics

E X PA N D YO U R R E A C H | D E N T O N M E D I A C O M PA N Y

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Reach Matters Denton Media Company reaches more people in more ways than any other company. The Denton Record-Chronicle reaches over 170,000 readers weekly.

The “Wake Up With the DRC” newsletter is sent to 27,000 opt-in subscribers each day.

DentonRC.com has 1.4 million page views and over 300,000 unique visitors monthly.

Denton Media Company’s social media channels have nearly 58,000 followers.

 Denton County magazine reaches an estimated 75,000 readers with each issue.

All above data is as of September 2018

These multi-media solutions can help you communicate with Denton County residents across 17 ZIP codes and communities.

76266

Pilot Point Sanger

Aubrey 76249

76227

76207

Krum

76201

76209

Denton

76208

76259

Ponder

76205

76210

76207

Argyle

75065

76226

76247

Justin

76262

Roanoke

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D E N T O N M E D I A C O M PA N Y | E X PA N D YO U R R E A C H

75022

Flower Mound

75028

Lake Dallas

76258


Denton Record-Chronicle and DentonRC.com Denton County’s Trusted News Source Since 1903

Denton County’s Go-To for Up-to-the-Minute Info

For more than 115 years, advertisers have relied on the Denton RecordChronicle to reach their target audience and to drive sales. Local business owners use local newspaper advertising to help increase brand recognition, product sales, new foot traffic and repeat business. The newspaper reaches over 170,000 readers every week. 63% of these readers have a household income over $75,000.

DentonRC.com now reaches over 300,000 monthly unique visitors, generating 1.4 Million page views, which include more than 800,000 on mobile devices. Wake Up With the DRC has 27,000 opt-in subscribers on a monthly basis. Reach a connected, tech-savvy Denton County audience with this online platform. All above data is as of September 2018

31% are between 30 and 49 years old.

SUNDAY IN DENTON Coupons & savings of

$192

(not in all areas)

LOW

HIGH

Guyer kicker back on field after traumatic eye injury / Sports, 1B

79 96

Denton in top 10 markets in DFW for apartments Business, 1D

30 percent chance for storms Weather, 2A

Sunday, August 19, 2018 || Denton, Texas || Vol. 115, No. 17 || DentonRC.com

Aretha Franklin remembered for voice, spirit Arts & Community, 2D

32 pages, 4 sections || $2.00

Bond projects come up short By Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe Staff Writer pheinkel-wolfe@dentonrc.com

Jeff Woo/DRC

Motorists wait on East McKinney Street while a train passes at a railroad crossing near North Bell Avenue. Engineers with the city and Union Pacific Railroad have evaluated four downtown crossings for the changes needed to make them into quiet crossings.

The long wait for railroad quiet crossings makes a good case study for the recent problems with Denton’s bond packages. In 2014, Denton voters enthusiastically approved about $1 million for quiet crossings along with the rest of a $98 million package for smoother roads, bigger fire stations, nicer parks and better drainage and flood control. The bond package listed railroad crossings downtown and along Mingo Road as part of the upgrade. Since then, Denton voters have waited for the quiet to come. Some bond projects weren’t ready for prime time when they were listed on the 2014 ballot. City Manager Todd Hi-

leman has been working with the Denton City Council and the bond oversight committee to close out the $120 million in work from the 2014 bond package, and the 2012 and 2005 packages, too. Some of the work needs not only final plans but also a lot more cash to get done. Council members realized this week that yet another bitter financial pill was headed their way after the engineering department briefed them on the quiet crossing project. The staff met for the first time with representatives from Union Pacific Railroad about the quiet crossings just recently. City Traffic Engineer Pritam Deshmukh said they focused on the four crossings downtown. Union Pacific will get back to the city within the next few months with plans and estimates for the work.

Building those four quiet crossings will probably eat up most of the $1 million in the bond package, Deshmukh said. To continue the work up Mingo Road, or anywhere else in the city, the City Council will have to come up with more money to fulfill the promise to Denton voters of quiet crossings. It’s a familiar tune now. Council members wrestled for several work sessions last summer to find the money to pay for new fencing around the city’s two public cemeteries, work that had been shelved for a decade. Then, Mayor Chris Watts balked as fire station construction bids came in much higher than the original estimates. See BONDS on 15A

FAI R PL AY

Lucinda Breeding COMMENTARY

Fried fare How to bust your belt at the food court

S

ome come to watch the bulls and broncos buck in a fury. Others come to study the livestock, ride the rides, browse over the merchandise or dance the night away at the concerts. Then there are the proud few: People who come to the North Texas

E X PA N D YO U R R E A C H | D E N T O N M E D I A C O M PA N Y

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Denton Record-Chronicle Special Sections Special Advertising Opportunities In addition to the daily newspaper, the Denton Record-Chronicle also presents several special sections: Weekly “Denton Time” section: Covering movies, books, music, restaurants and local events Monthly “Denton Business Chronicle” section: Providing the most comprehensive local and regional business news

Annual sections: • Best of Denton • Arts & Jazz Festival • Discovering Denton County • North Texas Fair & Rodeo • Football Guide • Holiday Traditions • Christmas in Denton County These special sections can help you sell to the right people at the right time. CALENDAR EVENTS ‘Radiolab’ creator to visit UNT Page 6

Trot out your dog and enjoy music, attend a clothing swap Page 2

MOVIES Popcorn fare to see in theaters Page 3

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Center stage DENTON

AuguSt 2018

An audience watches a performance on the Little D Performance Platform. The backyard venue in Southeast Denton is free, and proceeds of pay-what-you-can performances are used to pay performers.

Business CHRONICLE www.dentonbusinesschronicle.com

Shop’s new owners make vegans’ mornings brighter

Photos by Jeff Woo

Emily Summitt, below, and her husband, Chris, bought a doughnut shop at 703 Londonderry Lane and renamed it Fresh Morning Donuts. While catering to all breakfast lovers, the shop specializes in vegan options.

DoughNutS | CoNtINuED oN PAgE 5

best of

H

2 5

and husband Chris’ hours as a Denton police officer were unpredictable. They decided it wasn’t the time. Fast-forward to early 2018: The couple, both 47, was searching online for local businesses for sale and discovered the owners of their favorite

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By Chase Carter For the Denton Record-Chronicle

Emily Summitt first had the idea to open a doughnut shop 10 years ago. Summitt was teaching English as a second language to adults for the Denton school district, and one of her students told her selling breakfast confections was an easy and safe way to make money. Summitt had never owned her own business, but the idea had charm. But she was raising four children,

018

T

Doughnut dreams

AN

VE NI

RSA

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Photos courtesy of West Oxking

A couple dances on the Little D Performance Platform in Southeast Denton. Alex Cole and West Oxking turned their backyard into a space with a sprung floor for dancers, but musicians, actors and spoken word artists are welcome as well.

Denton couple creates performance venue in their Southeast Denton backyard By Lucinda Breeding | Features Editor | cbreeding@dentonrc.com A local couple decided they couldn’t wait for another affordable performance venue to open in Denton. Instead, Alex Cole and her husband West Oxking decided to turn their Southeast Denton backyard into a venue. Little D Performance Platform has one major difference

from other house show spaces, though. This space gives priority to dancers and dance companies. “There are studios, but they’re geared for younger dancers,” said Alex Cole, who graduated from Texas Woman’s University in 2014. “The Campus Theatre and the [PointBank] Black Box Theatre are fantastic, but they’re almost always reserved.”

Cole and Oxking said other spaces in town are too expensive for a lot of dancers to reserve. So the couple created Little D Performance Platform about 25 paces away from their back door. See PLATFORM on 4

Crafty kids

We're not Dallas, Fort Worth or Austin.

Arts council resumes after-school program

We're

Staff report

The Greater Denton Arts Council will open its Arts After School program on Sept. 5 at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center. Sara Greenberg, the council’s education coordinator, said the council developed this year’s after-school program to complement the testing curriculum of Texas public schools: Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills curriculum standards. “The program will only focus on the fine arts portion of the TEKS curriculum,” Greenberg said. As they explore and make art, the children will use and build on the skills mandated by the Texas Education Agency. The Arts After School Program serves elementary school children, ages 6 to 10, which covers children in kindergarten through fifth grade. The children meet in the workshop space at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday from Sept. 5 through Nov. 7. “The other change we made is that this year, there’s going to be an overarching theme for each week,” Greenberg said. This fall, students will explore how artists used fantastical creatures such as griffins, dragons and sphinxes in watercolor paintings, illuminated manuscripts and ceramics. Students also will learn how artists used See PROGRAM on 4

E

xplorium Denton has had a roller coaster of a summer. Now, though, the children’s museum is in the fun phase of the ride. Not only are the exhibits and programming spaces coming together, but donations are still coming in. Last weekend, we reported on Soma Massage Therapy donating the furnishings for the nursing room. Naton Edwards, a senior at Argyle High School, led an Eagle Project in partnership with Explorium Denton children’s museum. Edwards and some of his fellow scouts helped furnish the Explorium entry with a 10-foot-long, steel-frame desk clad with weathered wood and a handmade butcher block surface. Edwards’ parents, five friends, four family members and 19 scouts from Troop 192 helped with the project.

Courtesy photo/Greater Denton Arts Council

Continued on Page 4

A child makes a craft during the Greater Denton Arts Council’s Arts After School program at the Patterson-Appleton Arts Center.

C0830ST001P_BRD_CMYK.pdf;29.Aug 2018 22:24:11

Retire decades early — with kids By Andrea Coombes | NerdWallet

By Sarah Sarder | Staff Writer Professionals began demolition at the Carriage Square Shopping Center in early August, preparing the area for renovation by the University of North Texas. The center held businesses such as restaurants the Bowllery, Pancho’s and Bawarchi Biryani Point, as well as Dollar General and Chase Bank. Some of the businesses closed as their leases ended earlier in the year, while a few relocated. The shopping center is located off Avenue C near Interstate 35E. Beauty salon LashUp BrowDown

will reopen at 519 S. Carroll Blvd., Suite 100, with a grand opening event at 7 p.m. Saturday to celebrate the salon’s recent expansion. The salon offers eyelash extensions, eyebrow microblading, brow tinting, waxing and more. The business has been in Denton for three years Health and fitness store Feel Your Best opened in Denton in mid-July. The store offers dietary supplements, after-alcohol aids, exercise equipment, home massage products and more. Feel Your Best is located at 260 S. uPDAtE | CoNtINuED oN PAgE 2

Retire early? “Sure,” you might say, “I could do that — if it weren’t for the kids.” But even with a full house, it’s not impossible. Meet Carl Jensen, founder of 1500 Days to Freedom, a website chronicling his journey to retirement in 2017 at age 43. He’s married with two kids who are now 11 and 8. Or take a page from the book of Justin McCurry, founder of Root of Good, who retired in 2013 at age 33. He’s married and has three children who are now 13, 11 and 6.

Taking different paths to early retirement

McCurry was planning to retire early anyway, but after an unexpected layoff, the day came sooner than he’d imagined. “That’s the point where I said, ‘Do I need to go out and look for a job, or am I just retired?’” says McCurry, who lives in Raleigh, North Carolina. So he checked up on his financial plan. “We were 99 percent of the way there. That day I figured out: ‘I’m just retired. I reached the goal.’” Jensen, who lives in Longmont,

getty Images

With careful financial planning, it’s possible to retire decades early while still raising children. Colorado, investigated the idea of early retirement after a bad day at the office. “I Googled something like ‘how do I retire early,’” he says. He came across Mr. Money Mustache, a well-known personality in the FIRE (“financial independence, retire early”) movement, and the alter ego of Peter Adeney.

Jensen was inspired to start on his own journey of financial independence. He was 37 years old. “We weren’t living a frugal lifestyle,” Jensen says, but, motivated by a financially insecure childhood, he and his wife already had saved almost $600,000 and REtIRE | CoNtINuED oN PAgE 4

C0815SX001P_BRD_CMYK.pdf;14.Aug 2018 20:33:08

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CYAN BLACK MAGENTA YELLOW

D E N T O N M E D I A C O M PA N Y | E X PA N D YO U R R E A C H

CYAN BLACK MAGENTA YELLOW


Denton County Magazine Connecting Communities With Quality Editorial Content Denton County magazine, the newest publication from Denton Media Company, tells the stories of the people, places, events and businesses that make Denton County unique with high-quality editorial and beautiful design. The bimonthly magazine focuses on the communities of Denton, Argyle, Aubrey, Krum, Lake Dallas, Ponder, Pilot Point, Justin, Sanger, Flower Mound and Roanoke. More than 23,000 copies are mailed to carefully selected households, and 2,000 additional copies are distributed to local businesses and waiting rooms. The highly targeted, influential audience provides a great opportunity for your business.

DentonCountyMagazine.com facebook.com/DentonCountyMagazine E X PA N D YO U R R E A C H | D E N T O N M E D I A C O M PA N Y

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DRC Digital Media Solutions for Your Budget The Denton Media Company can help you improve your online presence and reach the maximum number of potential customers with marketing options that work for your budget. Web design Redesign your existing site with responsive (mobile-friendly) design Choose from more than 30 customizable styles Secure monthly hosting and site maintenance Search and social discovery Weekly posts to Google My Business listing Weekly boosted posts to Facebook and/or Instagram Monthly planning and reporting DRCDigitalMedia.com

To learn more about how Denton Media Company’s wide reach and range of multi-media products can benefit your business, please contact our advertising department at (940) 566-6858 or advertising@dentonrc.com.

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