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Welcome

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November 2012

November 2012 | Vol. 6, No. 3 Publisher: Bill Patterson The contents of this free publication are copyrighted by Denton Publishing Company, 2008, a subsidiary of A.H. Belo Corp. (www.ahbelo.com, NYSE symbol: AHC) with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. Kid Life is published monthly by Denton Publishing Company, 314 E. Hickory St., Denton, TX 76201. E-mail: drc@dentonrc.com

On the cover: Savannah Elementary students Ainsley Buss (back) and Paige Myers join Principal Michael McWilliams in showcasing one of several CHAMPS posters located throughout the school. Courtesy photo/ Denton ISD

Learning how to act properly in any setting is a good skill to learn. It is a skill you will use many times in the future in play, work and with family. Through the CHAMPS program on campuses at the Denton school district, elementary students can now learn such lessons as how to speak with an inside voice, how to listen while others speak and other behaviors that show respect for both yourself and those who are near you. In fact, this program, CHAMPS, is an acronym (remember first letter of every word) for Conversation, Help, Activity, Movement, Participation and Success. Read all about it in English and Spanish on Pages 4 and 5 respectively.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Denton ISD Update . . . . . . . . . 4-5 Top of the List . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Teachers & Principal Profiles . . . . 7 Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Lunchbox Bites. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Kid Scoop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Sincerely,

Dawn Cobb dcobb@dentonrc.com 940-566-6879 P.O. Box 369 Denton, TX 76201

Dawn Cobb

Shawn Reneau

Editor dcobb@dentonrc.com 940-566-6879

Advertising Manager sreneau@dentonrc.com 940-566-6843

November library events offered Twilight Toddler Time Bring your toddler (ages 12-24 months) for this evening Toddler Time that promotes literacy, social interaction, and caregiver bonding. Tue. 11/13 Emily Fowler Library 6:30 pm Treblemakers Get ready for an afternoon filled with singing, listening and moving! Join music instructor Kim Forguson as she brings books to life through music-centered games and activities. Best for ages 6-8. Sat. 11/17 North Branch Library 2 pm Preschool Play and Read Help your child’s early literacy skills while having fun as a family! This come-and-go program offers children age-appropriate games, activities and crafts that assist in developing pre-reading skills. For children ages 3-5 and their caregivers.

Wed. 11/14 South Branch Library 9:30-10:30 am Sat. 11/17 North Branch Library 10-11 am

theme or build a creation of their own. Ages 6 and up. Fri. 11/16 Emily Fowler Library 4 pm

B.O.Y.S. - Boys Only Yucky Stories Calling all boys grades 2 – 5! Join the yuckiest book club ever! We’ll read and talk about funny, yucky and gross stories. You won’t have to sit still while we talk because you will be too busy with funny, gross or downright bizarre projects. Each month a new book and exciting activity. 11/15 The Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom Angleberger Thursdays Emily Fowler Library 6:30 pm

History Explorers: Flight November is National Aviation Month and we will celebrate by learning about the history of man trying to fly. We will read about the Wright Brothers and build and test different paper flying machines of our own. Best for ages 6-8. Wed. 11/7/12 North Branch Library 4 pm

LEGO Builders Club Drop in and get creative by building with the library’s LEGOs. A different theme is picked for each month and kids can build on that

Titanic Remembered Want to learn more about the sinking of the Titanic? Explore the fate of the RMS Titanic with hands-on activities such as iceberg navigation, Morse code, and shipinspired crafts. Supplies are limited, so register at 349-8752. Ages 612. Fri. 11/9 Emily Fowler Library 4 pm

Science Explorers: Food November is the perfect month to start thinking about our taste buds, and the kitchen is the perfect place to start learning about chemistry. We will learn about our tongues, and perform simple experiments. After this program, you may even want to help your parents cook Thanksgiving dinner! Best for ages 6-8. Wed.11/14/12 North Branch Library 4 pm Thanksgiving StoryTime We will talk turkey and give thanks at this StoryTime filled with turkey books, songs and rhymes. Our puppet friends will join in the fun, too. For ages 1-5. Fri. 11/16 South Branch Library 10 am Fri. 11/16 North Branch Library 11 am Wed. 11/21 Emily Fowler Library 11 am

DPL Teen Advisory Board Help plan & run library programs. Discuss books, movies and music. Write reviews, make book trailers, work on service related projects, earn community service hours for school and more! For teens grades 6 – 12. For more information call Juli Gonzalez at 940-349-8741. Tue. 11/13 North Branch Library 6:30 - 8 pm International Gaming Day @ Your Library Join us as we celebrate International Gaming Day with a library full of gaming options! From challenging board games, chess, card and video games, to painting miniatures for miniature strategic/war gaming, there will be games to keep everyone challenged and entertained. Sat. 11/03 North Branch 10 am 5 pm


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Denton ISD Update CHAMPS emphasizes positive behavior Ainsley Buss remembers how loud the Savannah Elementary cafeteria could get last year when every student was talking or laughing at the same time. “Last year we didn’t have CHAMPS and sometimes it would get so loud in the cafeteria that you couldn’t hear anything. I’d be like, ‘Oh my gosh, I can’t believe it’s this loud in here!’” said the fourth-grade student. “Now, the cafeteria is a lot quieter. You can talk to your friends and hear what they have to say, too.” CHAMPS, a school-wide behavioral management program, is in place for the first time at Savannah. In fact, every Denton ISD elementary school is using the program to help students understand the importance of positive behavior and to take responsibility for their actions. Students like Ainsley and her friends are learning the proper way to act, and more importantly, react, in and out of the classroom. The program gives teachers a model they can follow to effectively manage their classrooms and activities. “We’re a little more than six weeks into the school year and you can already see a big difference. The students know what’s expected of them and understand why those expectations are there,” said Savannah Principal Michael McWilliams. CHAMPS is an acronym that stands for Conversation, Help, Activity, Movement, Participation and Success. For each letter in the acronym there is a behavioral expectation that every student knows to follow and an accompanying hand signal that a teacher or administrator can use to grab the attention of all the students at the same time. For example, in the cafeteria students follow the Conversation portion of the CHAMPS guidelines by knowing that they can speak at a Level 1 (whisper) or Level 2 (quiet talking) level. Should they need Help, students know to raise their hands

Students at Lee Elementary show their command of the CHAMPS behavioral program by walking in a singlefile line with her hands behind their back in the hallway. Lee was the first Denton ISD school to implement the CHAMPS program.

Photo courtesy of the Denton school district

and an adult will assist them. The Activity every student should be performing is eating, while Movement in and out of their seat is only allowed with permission. Any Participation by a fellow student, like helping to open a carton of milk or peeling an orange, should be accompanied by use of good manners. The result of following these behaviors leads to Success. The program was started by Dr. Randy Sprick, an educator known for creating positive behavior in

schools. The basic idea with CHAMPS is that organization in the classroom and school helps limit disruptive behavior. At the local district, Larry Mankoff, coordinator for student and staff assistance programs, helped to initiate the program. Lee Elementary was the first campus in Denton ISD to use CHAMPS. Since its launch in 2009, the school has seen the behavior and attitude of its students improve each year.

“It’s amazing how quickly the kids recognize what to do when a teacher puts up her Panther Paw. It’s like an instinct now,” said Tiffany Gonzalez, assistant principal at Lee. “I think it’s totally helped the kids behaviorally and with their work in the classroom.” Walk the halls at any Denton ISD elementary campus and you are likely to see students walking in line, hands to their sides or behind them, with little more noise than the occasional whisper. Students working on a group activity in a

classroom can get loud quickly when they get excited, but it’s also not unusual to see them stop what they’re doing and listen once their teacher uses the school’s CHAMPS signal (a hand sign, clap or saying) that gets their attention. And even the students themselves notice a big difference in how everyone is acting. “I like doing CHAMPS because it seems like everyone is nicer and friendlier now than last year,” said Paige Myers, a first-grader at Savannah.

STAR STUDENT IVY NICOLE ADAMS Name: Ivy Nicole Adams Nickname: Doodle Bug Community/school activities: Orchestra – plays the violin School/grade: Blanton Elementary/5th Grade Family: Parents - Chris and Jennifer Adams & sister Rosie Adams My hobbies are: Sewing, ballet, and playing the violin My favorite school subject is: Science Two people I’d most like to meet are: Taylor Swift and Ellen Degeneres What’s in my CD player/iPod right now: Taylor Swift

When I finish school I plan to: Become a marine biologist The best book I ever read was: Willowood by Cecilia Galante The last movie I saw: Hotel Transylvania The best movie I’ve ever seen is: Soul Surfer I wish I knew how to: Surf I’m so sick of: Pollution My worst habit is: Being hard on myself My favorite restaurant is: Palermo’s Italian Cafe The best summer I ever had was: Going to the beach and learning more about sea animals.


Notas sobre su zona escolar Programa CHAMPS ayuda a obtener comportamientos positivos Ashley Buss se acuerda que ruidosa se sentía la cafetería de su Primaria Savannah el año pasado cuando los alumnos parecían que hablaban y se reían al mismo tiempo. “El año pasado no teníamos CHAMPS y a veces estaba tan alto en la cafetería que no se podía escuchar nada. Yo me decía, ¡No puedo creer lo ruidoso que está aquí!,” dijo un alumno del cuarto grado. “Ahora la cafetería se siente más callada, puedes conversar con tus amigos y escuchar lo que ellos tienen que decir también.” CHAMPS, en sus siglas en ingles significa campeones y es un programa que ayuda a regular el comportamiento para todo el sistema educacional. Es la primara vez que se implementa el programa en la Primaria Savannah. En realidad, CHAMPS es un programa que se utiliza dentro de todos los planteles del distrito escolar. El cual les ayuda a los alumnos a entender la importancia de tener un comportamiento positivo, y saber tomar responsabilidad por sus acciones. Los alumnos como Ashley y sus amistades están aprendiendo la manera adecuada de actuar, y lo algo más importante –– como reaccionar dentro y fuera del salón de clases. El programa le ofrece a los maestros un paradigma que ellos pueden seguir y también, los ayuda a manejar las actividades y el salón de clase. “Ya tenemos más de seis semanas en la escuela y se nota la diferencia. Los alumnos saben lo que se espera de ellos y entienden porque hay esa expectativa,” dijo el director de Savannah Michael McWilliams. La sigla de CHAMPS se traduce al español como – Conversación, Ayuda, Actividad, Movimiento, Participación y Éxito. Cada letra en ingles representa una expectativa de comportamiento que cada alumno debe seguir. Como acompañante, cada sigla tiene una señal de mano que cada maestro/a o administrador puede usar para conseguir la atención de los alumnos. Por ejemplo, en la cafetería los

Siguiendo la reglas del programa CHAMPS, los alumnos de la Primaria Lee participan caminan con sus manos detrás de sus espaldas.

Photo courtesy of the Denton school district

alumnos pueden siguen una parte de la sigla, como la de Conversación sabiendo que ellos pueden (susurrar) durante el primer nivel, y (conversar en tono bajo) en el segundo nivel. Los alumnos necesitan Ayuda deben alzar sus manos para recibir asistencia de un adulto. La Actividad que los alumnos deben ejecutar es almorzar, mientras que el Movimiento de estar o no en sus asientos, se adquiere solo con permiso. Cualquiera Participación con algún compañero, como ayudarlo abrir un cartón de leche o ayudarlo a pelar un naranja, debe ser acompañada de buenos modales. En fin, el resultado de seguir todas estas

instrucciones ayuda a todos a tener Éxito. El Dr. Randy Sprick, un educador conocido por crear comportamientos positivos en las escuelas, fue el fundador del programa. La idea básica de CHAMPS, es que al obtener organización dentro del salón de clase y en alrededor de la escuela, ayuda a limitar comportamientos desfavorables. Al nivel local, Larry Mankoff, coordinador de programas del personal y de los alumnos del distrito, ayudó a implementar el programa. La Primaria Lee, fue el primer plantel que implementó el programa CHAMPS. Desde su inicio en el 2009, los administradores del plantel han visto las actitudes y los

comportamientos de los alumnos mejorar cada año. “Es increíble que rápido los niños reconocen lo que tienen que hacer cuando el maestro/a usa la señal de la pantera. Es como un instinto,” dijo Tiffany Gonzalez, asistente al director de la Primaria Lee. “Creo que las reglan han ayudado mucho a los niños con sus comportamientos y con sus trabajos dentro del salón.” Camine los pasillos de cualquier plantel de primaria del distrito escolar y probablemente verá a los alumnos caminar en línea, con sus manos al lado o detrás; se escucha menos ruidos y se los ve susurrando. Los alumnos que trabajan en

actividades de grupo dentro del salón pueden llegar hacer más ruidosos cuando se sienten entusiasmados, pero también no es raro verlos parar sus actividades y escuchar a su maestro/a usar las señales del programa CHAMPS (una acción de la mano, un aplaudo o un comentario) para obtener su atención. Los propios alumnos también se han dado cuenta del cambio de actuación de sus compañeros. “Me gusta que todos seguimos CHAMPS porque ahora todos los compañeros se sienten más amistosos y más acogedores que el año pasado,” dijo Paige Myers, una alumna del primer grado de la Primaria Savannah.

ESTUDIANTE ESTRELLA IVY NICOLE ADAMS Nombre: Ivy Nicole Adams Apodo/Sobrenombre: Doodle Bug Actividades de la escuela y de la comunidad: orquesta – toco el violín. Plantel y grado: Primaria Blanton, 5º grado

Familia: mis padres Chris y Jennifer Adams; y mi hermana Rosie Adams. Pasatiempos: coser, el ballet, y tocar el violín. Mi materia favorita: la ciencia. Dos personas que me encantaría conocer: Taylor Swift y Ellen

DeGeneres.

La música que toca mi reproductor: Taylor Swift. Cuando termine la escuela quiero: ser Bióloga marina. El mejor libro que he leído: Willowood por Cecilia Galante. La última película que vi: Hotel Transylvania.

La mejor película que he visto: Soul Surfer Me encantaría saber cómo: ser surfista. Estoy tan cansada de: la contaminación. Mi peor hábito es: ser difícil conmigo misma. Mi restaurante favorito es: Palermo’s Italian Café

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Reviews

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November 2012 {BOOKS}

TOP OF THE

LIST

Imogene’s Last Stand by Candace Fleming, 2009 Unpaged, ages 4-8 Enamored of history, young Imogene Tripp tries to save her town’s historical society from being demolished in order to build a shoelace factory. Includes notes about historical figures quoted in the story. Wild Times at the Bed and Biscuit by Joan Carris, 2009 124 pages, ages 6-9 Dr. Adam Bender, the veterinarian at the Bed and Biscuit, accepts four sick animals from the wildlife shelter for treatment and tries to make them feel at home, with the help of the domestic animals already there. Warriors: The Darkest Hour by Erin Hunter, 2004 315 pages, ages 10 and up ThunderClan’s darkest hour is upon them and Fireheart, the warrior cat, must protect his clan from a threat unlike any the forest has ever seen, as the time comes for prophecies to unfold and heroes to rise. Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare, 2010 479 pages, ages 14 and up When sixteen-year-old orphan Tessa Fell’s older brother suddenly vanishes, her search for him leads her into Victorian-era London’s dangerous supernatural underworld, and when she discovers that she herself is a Downworlder, she must learn to trust the demon-killing Shadowhunters if she ever wants to learn to control her powers and find her brother. 14 Cows for America by Carmen Agra Deedy, 2009 36 pages, ages 6-10 Maasai tribal members, after hearing the story of the September 11th attacks from a young Massai, who was in New York on that day, decide to present the American people with fourteen sacred cows as a healing gift.

{MOVIES} The Rescuers (1977) Two brave mice try to rescue a kidnapped young orphan from the hilariously evil Madame Medusa, who is obsessed with getting her hands on the world’s largest diamond! Rated G Adventures of Tintin (2012) Unquenchably curious young reporter Tintin and his fiercely loyal dog Snowy discover a model ship carrying an explosive secret. Drawn into a centuries-old mystery, Tintin find himself in the sightlines of Ivan Ivanovitch Sakharine, a diabolical villain who believes Tintin has stolen a priceless treasure tied to a dastardly pirate. With the help of Snowy, Captain Haddock, and bumbling detectives Thompson & Thompson, Tintin will travel half the world to find the final resting place of the Unicorn. Rated PG Hugo (2012) Tells the tale of an orphan boy living a secret life in the walls of a Paris train station. When Hugo encounters a broken machine, an eccentric girl, and the cold, reserved man who runs the toy shop, he is caught up in a magical, mysterious adventure that could put all of his secrets in jeopardy. Rated PG-13 Happy Feet Two (2011) Mumble, The Master of Tap, has a problem because his tiny son, Erik, is choreo-phobic. Reluctant to dance, Erik runs away and encounters The Mighty Sven, a penguin who can fly! Mumble has no hope of competing with this charismatic new role model. But things get worse when the world is shaken by powerful forces. Erik learns of his father’s ‘guts and grit’ as Mumble brings together the penguin nations and all manner of fabulous creatures. Rated PG Chicken Run (2000) While the chickens on Mrs. Tweedy’s farm dream of a better life, a clever hen named Ginger is hatching plans to fly the coop for good. The only problem is, chickens can’t fly, or can they? Rated G - Stacey Irish-Keffer is the Youth Services Librarian at the Emily Fowler Central Library


Head of the Class

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Brandy Guilford is 2012 Stephens Teacher of the Year Brandy Guilford is entering her fifth year teaching – all in Denton ISD. Ms. Guilford joined Denton ISD as a first grade teacher at Rivera Elementary in 2008. She joined the Stephens Elementary staff a year after the school opened, teaching first grade for two years, before moving on to second grade last year. Ms. Guilford is a two-time recipient of the Stephens Teacher of the Month award and a member of the national Society of Leadership and Success and the Chi Sigma Iota International Counseling Honor Society. She has served as a CHAMPS grade level representative and as a mentor for student teachers through the University of North Texas student teacher program. She is a UNT graduate, earning her bachelor’s degree in kinesiology. Ms. Guilford is also a graduate student, currently working on her

Principal Profile

Meet W.S. Ryan principal Debbie Merki

master’s degree in counseling and development at Texas Woman’s University. Her teaching philosophy: “A teacher should bend to become what a child needs or become flexible enough that a positive regard is embedded in the lives of the children they come in contact with every day.”

Head of the Class Don Holt is 2012 Hodge Teacher of the Year Don Holt has spent all 15 years of his teaching career with Denton ISD. Mr. Holt earned his first teaching position in 1997 as a sixth grade teacher at Rivera Elementary. Following a four-year stint at McMath Middle School, Mr. Holt joined the staff at Wilson Elementary as a third grade teacher. He has been a second grade teacher at Hodge Elementary since 2006. Mr. Holt is two-time team leader for sixth- and second-grade teams and is a current member of the Hodge Campus Leadership Team. He served a four-year stint on the North Texas Science Collaborative, was a mentor teacher in the Ready, Set, Teach! Program for five years and currently works as a mentor teacher to Texas Woman’s University student teachers. He has been working with students on after-school tutorials

November 2012

since his first year in the district. Mr. Holt is a graduate of the University of North Texas with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology. His teaching philosophy: “A teacher should be a model learner not only for their students, but for themselves, both in and out of the classroom.”

Name: Deborah Kay Merki Nickname: Debbie My School: W.S. Ryan Elementary My School’s mascot: Wrangler Where you were born: Grand Saline, Texas My favorite food is: Mexican food My favorite color is: blues and purples My favorite subject in school was: reading

My favorite teacher was: too many to mention My most memorable moment as a child was: vacations with my family at the lake and summers at grandparent’s ranch Do you have any pets? no My hobbies are: Texas Aggie Football, gardening, reading The best movie I’ve ever seen is: Steel Magnolias My favorite thing about my school is: our kids and our families

Denton Independent School District briefs Hawk, Houston named to state comptroller’s Texas Honors Circle Hawk Elementary and Houston Elementary were recently named to the state comptroller’s 2012 Texas Honors Circle. The two Denton ISD elementary schools were part of a group of only 329 campuses in the state to meet the requirements established by the comptroller’s office annual Financial Allocation Study for Texas and receive this honor. The FAST study evaluates spending practices by districts across the state as they relate to academic performance. Hawk and Houston each received a five-star rating, the highest possible score, by increasing their academic progress while spending less than most of their fiscally comparable campus peers. “In these challenging times where schools are under pressure to do more with less, it is more important than ever to shine a spotlight on those that are achieving strong student performance with costeffective spending,” Susan Combs, state comptroller, said in a written release. “These schools’ efforts to help our state and local governments wisely manage educational spending while preparing students for success in college or the work force is crucial to the future of Texas,” the comptroller added. To receive the distinction state elementary schools needed to receive a five-star rating and secondary schools needed four-and-a-half-star rating.

Ginnings hosted first Jag Jog Ginnings Elementary invited students and parents from all Denton elementary schools to participate in the first Jag Jog 5K and 1-Mile Walk held on Saturday, Oct. 27, at Ginnings Elementary, 2525 Yellowstone Place.

Registration for the event was $10 for the 1-mile run and $20 for the 5K. Participating schools with at least 10 members paid $100 per school team. Students or staff with Denton ISD identification cards, paid $15 for the 5K. The top finishers were recognized. All proceeds from the event benefit the Ginnings Physical Education Department, which is raising funds for new playground equipment. For more information about the event, contact the school at 940-369-2700.

Ann Windle School for Young Children holds open house October is Head Start Month and the Ann Windle School for Young Children celebrated by inviting parents and the public to an open house on Oct. 30 at the school, 901 Audra Lane. Ann Windle School is the Denton school district’s headquarters for its Head Start program. It is federally funded and provides a full-day educational program for economically disadvantaged children who are at least 3 years old. The instruction includes a strong preschool instruction, individualized attention and low student-teacher ratios. Head Start was initiated nationwide in 1965 as an eight-week summer program, and it was extended to public schools that fall. In 1998, it was expanded to full-day services. Head Start has been housed at the Ann Windle School since it opened in 2002. The district implemented Head Start in 1990, and it was previously part of the Sullivan-Keller Early Childhood Center. Ann Windle School provides Head Start to more than 190 students for the entire school day. For more information about the school, call 940369-3900.


Kid Clubhouse

Artistic Endeavors Students in Monica Criswell’s art class at Paloma Creek Elementary recently created amazing artwork, including (clockwise from top) fourth grader Emily Burnet’s fish, third grader Quianna Gomez’s elephant and third grader Sydney Hammond’s lizard.

November 2012 Monday

Sunday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Birth flower: Chrysanthemum Visit www.dentonisd.org for more information on Denton Independent School District events and holidays. Learn more about the historical events and information on this calendar by visiting the Encyclopedia Britannica at www.britannica.com.

Thursday

Friday

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Antigua and Barbuda achieve independence from UK (1981)

End of the Second Six Weeks

Saturday

3 Stephen F. Austin born (1793)

France’s MarieAntoinette born (1755)

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Beginning of the Third Six Weeks

Election Day

Last Quarter Moon

JFK becomes 35th U.S. president (1960)

Honduras declares independence (1838)

Benjamin Harrison becomes 23rd U.S. president (1888)

Tacoma Narrows Bridge breaks (1940)

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Christopher Columbus discovers the island of St. Martin (1493)

First flying trapeze act performed (1859)

New Moon

Harper & Brothers publishes Moby Dick (1851))

Artist Georgia O’Keeffe born (1887)

Second Roman emperor Tiberius born (42)

Suez Canal opens (1869)

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Opera singer Amelita Galli-Curci born (1882)

Thanksgiving Holiday

Thanksgiving Holiday

Thanksgiving Holiday

Thanksgiving Holiday

Thanksgiving Holiday

Abraham Lincoln delivers Gettysburg Address (1863)

First Quarter Moon

Mayflower Compact signed (1620)

Juan Carlos becomes king of Spain (1975)

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Suriname gains independence from The Netherlands (1975)

Nakasone Yasuhiro elected prime minister of Japan (1982)

Treaty of Neuilly signed (1919)

Full Moon

Writer Louisa May Alcott born (1832)

U.S. and Japan sign Root-Takahira Agreement (1908)

Hostage crisis in Iran begins (1979)

Writer Robert Louis Stevenson born (1850)

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China’s membership in World Trade Organization approved (2001)

Quadruple Alliance renewed (1815)

Wilhelm Reiss becomes first climber to reach top of Cotopaxi (1872)

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Safety

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November 2012

Do you know school bus safety? If your child is one of the millions of kids who ride the school bus, you should be encouraged by U.S. Department of Transportation statistics that cite it as the safest mode of transportation for children to get to and from school. Nevertheless, riding the school bus safely does require children to be aware and follow specific safety procedures. That’s why the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Chuggington, the educational animated children’s television program, have partnered to offer parents and children important school bus safety tips as part of the ‘Think Safe, Ride Safe, Be Safe!’ traffic safety campaign. The national traffic safety campaign helps parents teach their children about NHTSA’s recommended pedestrian, school bus, bike and car seat safety guidelines. Below are a few school bus safety tips from the ‘Think Safe, Ride

Safe, Be Safe!’ campaign for you to share with your children to make riding the school bus a safer experience:  Be especially careful around the “danger zone,” which is 10 feet in front, behind and on each side of the school bus. To avoid this area, wait for the bus at least five giant steps away from the road.  Wait to board the school bus until the school bus driver says it’s safe to do so. Kids should board one at a time and use the handrails to go up and down the stairs.  Once on the school bus, go straight to your seat and remain sitting, facing the front of the school bus.  Look out for cars before getting off the school bus. Once off, take five giant steps away from the school bus.  Wait for the driver or crossing guard to signal it is safe to cross the street. Always look leftright-left to make sure no cars are coming before crossing the road.

Traffic safety education should be a positive, shared family experience. Parents can go online with children and take the pledge to ‘Be Safe!’ together at www.chugging-

ton.com/safety. In addition to the pledge (to date, more than 500,000 children have taken the pledge to ‘Be Safe!’) families can access a safety game, activities, downloadable tip sheets and even a

free traffic safety app. By following the rules, both parents and children can help make getting to and from school each day safer for everyone. - StatePoint

Kids perform better in school when parents get involved Children spend five times as much time outside the classroom as they do in school. With all this time away from teachers, it’s important for parents to support their children’s learning. In fact, children whose parents are involved with them in family literacy activities score 10 points higher on standardized reading tests, according to the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL). “Learning can happen anywhere and at any time,” advises Emily Kirkpatrick, Vice President of NCFL. “Go beyond homework help and find learning moments in everyday life that fit in with your schedule.” Here are some tips for how you can take a more active role in your child’s education:  It all starts with you. With some preparation on your part, you can be a better resource for your child. Make sure that you, and those who spend time with your child, are well-equipped to support learning.  Turn a household shopping trip into a fun chance to do math. Take a walk outside to discuss nature or the community. Make a lesson plan out of the world around you.  Develop a partnership with your child’s teachers. Talk with them about homework

and be sure you understand what is expected.  Some children need and want time to play when they get home, while others may

want to get homework out of the way first thing. Set a schedule for your child that works for him or her, and make it a routine. Just be

sure that your expectations are clear.  Reinforce the idea that homework is not punishment, but a chance to practice new skills. You can help make it fun by rewarding progress.  Ask your children thought-provoking questions, like what they wonder about. For inspiration you can turn to free online resources that emphasize fun in learning, such as such as www.Wonderopolis.org.  Help set a timeline so that school assignments are not left until the last minute. Older children with assignments that will take several days or weeks to complete may need your help learning to manage their time.  Checking to be sure assignments are complete is great, but don’t forget it is your child’s assignment, not yours. Do not do homework for your child.  Read to your children or with them every night. Not only is this an enjoyable way to spend time together, it will benefit the child and help instill a love of learning. By getting more involved, you can help your children make this school year their most successful one yet. -StatePoint


Health

Foundation names new executive director

Some simple tips to keep the flu away Fall is here and winter is right around the corner, so you can bet that the flu virus will be creeping up. In fact, the change in temperature can lead to a cough here and a sniffle there -possibly weakening your body and making it easier for the flu virus to sneak in. Being a virus, the flu is easy to catch and not easy to separate from the common cold, which is a virus but not as severe. You can get it from your parents, who can catch the flu from someone at work, from a classmate at school or from a friend at dance or basketball practice. Since flu season is basically here, below are actions you can take with your family to help prevent the flu in your household: Wash your hands frequently Many germs and illnesses are transmitted by direct contact, whether by touching someone else’s hands or a surface they touched. Germs, especially flu germs, can live on surfaces for many hours, only to be picked up by the next person that touches that surface. Wash your hands often, for a full 20 seconds with soap and water. You can usually say your ABCs by the time you should be done. If a sink isn’t available, use hand sanitizer. This is the num-

ber one way to prevent the spread of germs! Get your flu shot Although not 100 percent effective, the flu shot provides very good protection against the influenza virus. If you aren’t a fan of shots, the nasal flu vaccine may be for you. It is also effective and is approved for 2-year-old to adults who are healthy. Cover your sneezes and coughs Using your hands is a quick way to spread germs that can easily be avoided. Don’t touch your face with your hands. Germs, especially flu germs, enter your body through your eyes, nose, and mouth. Stay home when you’re ill Although school attendance is important, being responsible is also important. Stay home with fevers (temperatures of 100 degrees or more) and any symptoms that include: vomiting or diarrhea, red and draining/crusting eyes, greenish/yellow nasal drainage, and persistent almost constant cough. Eat healthy, nutritious meals Fruits and vegetables have several vitamins and minerals that naturally fight off viruses and may helpkeep you from getting sick. – Jonita Widmer, Director of Health Services for Denton ISD

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One of Denton’s top community volunteers, Jackie Jackson, has been named executive director for the Denton Public School Foundation. Mrs. Jackson has been actively involved in the community and especially with Denton’s public schools for more than two decades. As executive director, Mrs. Jackson will be in charge of developing, implementing and overseeing all fund-raising activities for the foundation. She will also guide the foundation’s many volunteers and committees. She is replacing Vicki Sargent, who was named executive director of elementary programs last month. Mrs. Jackson has served as the chair for the foundation’s annual Groundhog Gala for the past nine years and currently is treasurer for the foundation board. She has also served as the vice president for the community relations committee. Among her extensive community involvement, she has been president of numerous school PTAs and

Jackie Jackson president of the Denton ISD PTA Council. She served as the chair of the district’s Volunteer Advisory Board for six years. Under her leadership, the number of hours volunteers donated to the district increased from 280,000 to almost 360,000. She was founder and chair of STAR at Strickland Middle and

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chair of Renaissance program when it was first initiated at Ryan High. Mrs. Jackson co-chaired the 2007 Citizens Bond Committee, which oversaw the passage of $282 million in bonds for the local district. She currently serves on the Denton ISD’s Bond Progress Committee and on the School Health Advisory Committee. Other community activities include serving as president last year of the Denton Benefit League, past president of Denton County Medical Society Alliance, charter member of The Arts Guild and president of the Kensington Estates Homeowners Association Board. Mrs. Jackson is a licensed social worker and received her bachelor’s of arts with honors from the University of Texas at El Paso. She has been a social worker for the State of Texas in Houston and for Cook Children’s Community Clinic in Denton. She currently is the receptionist at Ryan High.

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November 2012


Lunchbox Bites

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November 2012

Sweet Potato Balls Makes 8-10 Servings Prep Time: 20 min Cook Time: 20 min Ingredients 4 to 5 large sweet potatoes 1/2 cup brown sugar 3 tablespoons orange juice 2 teaspoons orange zest 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 cup shredded coconut 1 cup corn flakes (crushed) 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 cup sugar 8 to 10 large marshmallows (one per ball) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bake potatoes until tender. Remove, let cool and then peel and mash in a bowl. Stir in brown sugar, orange juice, nutmeg and zest. Mix until

ingredients are well blended into potato mixture. Toss coconut, sugar, cinnamon and crushed cornflakes in a separate bowl and mix. Take potato mixture and form into 3- to 4-inch balls. Take each ball and separately roll into the coconut/sugar/cornflake mixture until well coated. Push marshmallow into the top. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Nutritional Facts Calories: 375 Fat: 39 g Saturated Fat: 3.9 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 175 mg Protein: 3 g Carbohydrates: 84 g - Recipe courtesy of Food.com

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Denton City Contemporary Ballet Artistic Director, Lisa Racina-Torre presents

A Gift for Emma A Holiday Fantasy in Dance for the Whole Family!

• Winter Programs Begin Dec. 15th (No Holiday Games)

Nov. 30, 2012 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1st, 2012 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2nd, 2012 2:00 p.m.

• Coed Flag Football and Cheer Ages 4-12

Tickets: Reserved Seating, $12 - $18

• Convenient same day practice & games One trip to the fields each week! J5

Group Rates for Sunday Matinee!

Special Guest, Chris Koehl

Krum High School Performance Center 811 East McCart St. Krum, TX 76249 Call 940-383-2623 for more info Go to: www.DentonCityContemporaryBallet.org for tickets!

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Study tips

14 Toddler Time

set at Borman Parents with 3-year-olds staying at home with a relative and those with no access to regular daycare will get the opportunity to have their children in a school environment this month. Borman Elementary will kickoff its Toddle Time program at 9 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, in an effort to give these children the chance to â&#x20AC;&#x153;play schoolâ&#x20AC;? with their families and members of the Borman staff. For approximately 45 minutes the children, who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to live within the Borman attendance zone, will be able to take part in fun activities that will touch on letter and number recognition. Robert Gonzalez, principal at Borman, said the program will work in getting these students better prepared for school by having them interact with potential teachers and classmates on a regular basis. The experience, in turn, will mean school wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be as scary for them when they enter a prekindergarten or kindergarten class. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every year, when the new PreK and kindergarten classes would come in, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d see these 3- yearolds coming in, wearing their little backpacks, to drop off their big brother or big sister,â&#x20AC;? Mr. Gonzalez said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The parents

would always tell us, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ready to come right now,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; so we thought: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;If the kids are eager to be here, why couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we have something for them, too?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? School Librarian Elaine Downey will read to the children and provide families with a worksheet or game they can do at home that will help them retain what they learned during Toddle Time. Music and art will also be incorporated into the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time at Borman. Mr. Gonzalez said if the willingness to participate is there, Borman will offer Toddler Time on a weekly basis. The hope is for participating families to see the value in the program, attend regularly and grow happy with the experience that they choose to stay at Borman for Pre-K and beyond, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobody knew we had extra Pre-K classes this year, but as soon as we got the word out, everyone wanted to be in them. This is the same thing. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to make ourselves friendlier and more welcoming, not just to our Borman families, but the entire community,â&#x20AC;? Mr. Gonzalez said. For more information on the Toddler Time program, please contact Borman Elementary at (940) 369-2500.

Study tips offered The staff of Denton Independent School District encourages parents to be involved in their child or childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learning process by helping them study at home. The following study tips are recommended for parents to help their students succeed at school. Vocabulary: Ask the meaning of a new word or explain the meaning of a new word to your child. Math: Relate math concepts to everyday life. For example â&#x20AC;&#x201C; talk about building things with blocks and count, add, multiply them together; use math skills while shopping together, when traveling discuss distances, miles per hour and other math problems, etc. Writing: Children need to write, write, write. Encourage them to have a journal and/or diary. Look over their writing assignments, check for errors and discuss how to

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ERIC S. SMITH, DDS Our Values:

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Snapshots

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November 2012

Evers Park Elementary Principal Linda Tucker (left) and Lauren Turley, the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistant principal, show a group of fifth graders one of several boxes of school supplies donated by the local Office Max in conjunction with the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A Day Made Better Program. Jessica Carter, a fifth grade teacher, was the Denton winner and won more than $1,000 worth of school supplies for her classroom. The store also donated more supplies purchased by its customers for Evers Park students.

Game On Athletics personal trainers (from left to right) Cody Marr, Chris McIver and Chris Shapley gather students from Stephens Elementary and the Providence Place apartment complex before the start of their Fitness Field Day on Saturday, Oct. 13. More than 40 students participated in the free event, which was sponsored by Game On and Stephens staff in an effort to promote physical fitness and healthy lifestyles to students.


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November Kid Life 2012