Issuu on Google+


2 Denton Time

09 26 13

EVENTS

Denton Time

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

THURSDAY 7 a.m. — Denton County Farmers Market at Sycamore Street and Carroll Boulevard. Visit www.denton farmersmarket.com. 9:30 a.m. — Crafters’ Corner at Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St. Work on projects and learn new techniques. Free. Call 940-349-8752 or visit www.denton library.com. 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. — Story Time at South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Lane. Stories, songs, puppets and more for children ages 1-5 and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 11 a.m. — UNT Fall Forum, featuring a panel of community experts who will talk about erasing the stigma of mental illness, in the UNT Coliseum, 600 Ave. D. Free lunch will follow the panel discussion. 3:30 p.m. — Afternoon Adventure Club, stories and a handson workshop for kids in kindergarten through third grade, at South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Lane. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 4:30 p.m. — Afternoon Adventure Club, stories and a handson workshop for kids in kindergarten through third grade, at Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 7 p.m. — “Succulents and Cacti,” a talk by UNT professor Richard Dixon, during a meeting of the Trinity Forks Chapter of the Native Plant Society of Texas, in TWU’s Ann Stewart Science Complex, off Pioneer Circle. Refreshments are served at 6:30 p.m. in the foyer, and the program begins at 7 p.m. in the secondfloor auditorium/classroom. Visit www.npsot.org/trinityforks. 7 to 8 p.m. — Conversation Club, for those wishing to practice their English language skills with others, meets at Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St. Free. No registration required. Call 940-349-8752. 7 p.m. — Thursday Night Music at UNT on the Square, 109 N. Elm St., featuring Quartz trombone quartet at 7 p.m. and Laura Otero and Daniel Pinilla at 8 p.m. Free. Call 940-3698257 or visit http://untonthesquare. unt.edu. 7:30 p.m. — Denton Community Theatre presents August: Osage County by Tracy Letts at the Campus Theatre, 214 W. Hickory St. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $18 for seniors 62 and older, $10 for students and children. Call 940-382-1915 or visit www.dentoncommunitytheatre.com. 7:30 p.m. — Festival Brasileiro: UNT Symphonic Band, conducted by Dennis Fisher, in Winspear Hall at the Murchison Performing Arts Center, on the north side of I-35E at North Texas Boulevard. Tickets cost $8-$10. Call 940-369-7802 or visit www.the mpac.com. Event will be streamed live at www.untmusiclive.com. 7:30 p.m. — UNT Department of Dance and Theatre presents Proof, a play by David Auburn, in the Studio Theater at the Radio, TV, Film and Performing Arts Building, at Welch and Chestnut streets. Tickets cost $10

ON THE COVER FESTIVAL BRASILEIRO Brazilian music, including works by composer Joao Guilherme Ripper, is at the center of the University of North Texas College of Music’s current festival. (Courtesy photo/Rodrigo Castro) Story on Page 9

FIND IT INSIDE MUSIC Concerts and nightclub schedules. Page 5

MOVIES Reviews and summaries. Page 8

DINING Courtesy photo

Restaurant listings. Page 11

Matt Bell, author of “In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods,” will answer questions and read from his work Tuesday at the University of North Texas.

TO GET LISTED INFORMATION

Productive pen he University of North Texas’ 2013-14 Visiting Writers Series brings its first man of letters to town, novelist and editor Matt Bell. Bell will visit the campus at 4 p.m. Tuesday for a questionand-answer session at Curry Hall in Room 211. At 8 p.m. Tuesday, Bell will read from his work and sign books in Room 108 of the UNT Business Leadership Building. Bell’s debut novel, In the House Upon the Dirt Between the Lake and the Woods, was released in June. Heaps of praise followed from the likes of Booklist, National Public Radio, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. It’s no easy feat to describe the novel, but it chronicles a

T

troubled marriage pushed to the brink by a damning cycle of fertility followed by miscarriage. And the couple at the book’s center is the stuff of science fiction or fantasy — a vaguer conjuring than Sheri S. Tepper’s bent interpretation of fairy-tale fatales in her novel Beauty, but with similar allusions to magic and mystery. Bell might have a preoccupation with the pitfalls of parenthood and the tolls of babymaking on the venerable yet vulnerable institution of marriage. Before In the House, Bell published Cataclysm Baby, a novella that presumes infants survive an environmental disaster, but rise from the ashes wilder than they ought to be. The novella’s 26 fathers cling

UNT series brings novelist to town

to the manhood of days gone by, and look on as the children evolve past their doddering dads. Bell is a senior editor at Dzanc Books, a publishing house that is both wet behind the ears and already respected for its mission to turn more Americans into fearless readers of literary media. Bell is also editor of The Collagist literary magazine and a creative writing professor at Northern Michigan University. Both the Q-and-A session and the reading are free. Curry Hall is located at 200 Ave. A near Mulberry Street, and the Business Leadership Building is at 1307 W. Highland St. — Lucinda Breeding

Include the name and description of the event, date, time, price and phone number the public can call. If it's free, say so. If it's a benefit, indicate the recipient of the proceeds.

TELL US ONLINE: Visit www.dentonrc.com, and click on "Let Us Know.

E-MAIL IT TO: drc@dentonrc.com

FAX IT TO: 940-566-6888

MAIL IT TO: Denton Time 314 E. Hickory St. Denton, TX 76201

DEADLINE: Noon the Friday before publication. All information will be verified with the sender before publication; verification must be completed by noon the Monday before publication for the item to appear.

REACH US EDITORIAL & ART

for adults, $7.50 for students, UNT faculty/staff and seniors. Call 940565-2428 or visit www.danceand theatre.unt.edu.

FRIDAY 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Garage sale benefiting Born 2 Be Therapeutic Equestrian Center at 2324 Yorkshire

St. Visit www.born2betec.org. 9:30 a.m. — Mother Goose Time at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Stories and activities for infants (birth to 18 months) and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. — “Learn to Knit” at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Free. Knitter Hanci Tollefson teaches basic stitches. Bring

size 8 knitting needles and a skein of worsted yarn. Free. To register, call 940-349-8752. 11 a.m. — Story Time at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Stories, songs, puppets and more for children ages 1-5 and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752.

Continued on Page 3

Features Editor Lucinda Breeding 940-566-6877 cbreeding@dentonrc.com

ADVERTISING Advertising Director Sandra Hammond 940-566-6820 Classified Manager Julie Hammond 940-566-6819 Retail Advertising Manager Shawn Reneau 940-566-6843 Advertising fax 940-566-6846


EVENTS Continued from Page 2 7:30 p.m. — UNT Department of Dance and Theatre presents Proof, a play by David Auburn, in the Studio Theater at the Radio, TV, Film and Performing Arts Building, at Welch and Chestnut streets. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $7.50 for students, UNT faculty/staff and seniors. Call 940565-2428 or visit www.danceand theatre.unt.edu. 7:30 p.m. — Denton Community Theatre presents August: Osage County by Tracy Letts at the Campus Theatre, 214 W. Hickory St. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $18 for seniors 62 and older, $10 for students and children. Call 940-382-1915 or visit www.dentoncommunitytheatre.com. 8 p.m. — Festival Brasileiro: “An Evening of Brazilian Chamber Music,” in Voertman Hall at the Music Building, at Avenue C and Chestnut Street. Pre-concert lecture starts at 7:30 p.m. Free. Call 940-565-2791 or visit www.music.unt.edu.

SATURDAY 7 a.m. — Denton County Farmers Market at Sycamore Street and Carroll Boulevard. Visit www.denton farmersmarket.com. 8 a.m. — Denton Race for the Cure 5K and 1-mile fun run/walk, benefiting Susan G. Komen for the Cure, at South Lakes Park, 556 Hobson Lane. Race-day registration starts at 6 a.m. Registration costs $20-$50, plus fundraising. Visit http://bit.ly/ VXBMlG. 9 a.m. — Denton County Master Gardener Association science fair for Denton County middle and high school students, at the Joseph A. Carroll Building, 401 W. Hickory St. Set-up begins at 9 a.m. and judging starts at 11 a.m. The theme of the fair is “Water-Wise.” Guidelines can be found at www.dcmga.com. Finalists will present their projects at the Master Gardener Fall Garden Festival on Oct. 5. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Denton Community Market, a local artists and farmers market, at the Denton County Historical Park, at Carroll Boulevard and Mulberry Street. Visit http:// dentonmarket.org. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Garage sale benefiting Born 2 Be Therapeutic Equestrian Center at 2324 Yorkshire St. Visit www.born2betec.org. 10 a.m. — Story Time at South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Lane. Stories, songs, puppets and more for children ages 1-5 and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 10 a.m. to noon — Free math tutoring for students in kindergarten through 12th grade at Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St. Registration is required; forms are available at all library locations. For more information, e-mail gilsiklee@ intellichoice.org. 10 a.m. to noon — Preschool Play and Read at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Come-andgo program offers age-appropriate games, activities and crafts to help children ages 3-5 develop pre-reading

Courtesy photo/Amanda Breaz, UNT

Caroline Dubberly portrays Catherine in the University of North Texas staging of “Proof,” and Evan Scott plays Hal. The drama chronicles a mysterious proof that might be the work of a late mathematical genius, Robert, or his daughter, Catherine.

You do the math Triangles triumph in UNT’s ‘Proof’ niversity of North Texas theater professor Andrew Harris spent last year staging his original play about Shakespeare’s mysterious dark lady. This semester, Harris has his eye on the Department of Dance and Theatre Arts’ triedand-true play: David Auburn’s Proof. A triangle of sorts is at the center of the drama about a

U

late mathematical genius whose brilliance — and instability — emerge in his adult daughter, Catherine. Catherine is desperately afraid that she inherited her father Robert’s mental illness. Her older sister, Claire, fears the same. Things grow exponentially more difficult when one of Robert’s last doctoral students, Hal, discovers a proof in the master’s notebooks. That proof could be groundbreaking, but its authorship is uncertain. Hal starts to fall for Cather-

ine, and the possibility that the paradigm-shifting proof could be her work, not Robert’s, changes the equation for both Hal and Catherine. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the Studio Theater in the UNT Radio, TV, Film and Performing Arts Building, at the corner of Welch and Chestnut streets. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $7.50 for students and UNT faculty and staff. For reservations, call 940-565-2428.

skills. Free. Call 940-349-8752 or visit www.dentonlibrary.com. 1 to 8 p.m. — GreenFest on the Greenbelt at the Ray Roberts Lake Greenbelt Park, 5900 E. FM455, near the dam. Family-friendly event includes outdoor activities and demonstrations, food, children’s activities and music, including Brave Combo at 2 p.m., Mi Son, Mi Son, Mi Son and AM Ramblers. Event raises money for the Greenbelt Alliance. Tickets cost $5 in advance at www.friendsofthegreenbelt.org, or $7 at the gate, free for children 5 and younger. Leashed dogs are welcome. Gates open at noon. Noon to 5 p.m. — Fall festival at Nelson Elementary School, 3909 Teasley Lane. Event includes carnivalstyle games, bounce houses, face painting, a cake walk and vendors. Proceeds benefit the Nelson PTA. Call 940-369-1400. 3 p.m. — Celebration of the life of the late Alfred F. Hurley, former UNT president and first chancellor of the UNT system, in Winspear Hall at the Murchison Performing Arts Center, on the north side of I-35E at North Texas Boulevard. A reception in the Gateway Center Ballroom will follow. 6 to 10 p.m. — Wild Beast Feast at the North Texas Fairgrounds, 2217 N. Carroll Blvd. Event features tastes of exotic cuisine, live music, silent and live auctions and drinks. Benefits Greater Denton Arts Council projects, programs and operations. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $5 for children ages 5-12, free for ages 4 and younger. Visit www.dentonarts.com. 7 p.m.— Live webstream of “Harvest America” at Calvary Chapel Denton in the Fine Arts Theater, 115 N. Elm St. Broadcast from Philadelphia includes music performances by Needtobreathe, Kirk Franklin and LeCrae and a Gospel message by Greg Laurie. Visit www.harvest.org/newsroom/events/ harvest-america.html. 7:30 p.m. — Denton Community Theatre presents August: Osage County by Tracy Letts at the Campus Theatre, 214 W. Hickory St. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $18 for seniors 62 and older, $10 for students and children. Call 940-382-1915 or visit www.dentoncommunitytheatre.com. 7:30 p.m. — UNT Department of Dance and Theatre presents Proof, a play by David Auburn, in the Studio Theater at the Radio, TV, Film and Performing Arts Building, at Welch and Chestnut streets. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $7.50 for students, UNT faculty/staff and seniors. Call 940565-2428 or visit www.danceand theatre.unt.edu. 8 p.m. — Festival Brasileiro: “An Evening of Brazilian Chamber Music With String Orchestra,” in Voertman Hall at the Music Building, at Avenue C and Chestnut Street. Free. Call 940-565-2791 or visit www.music. unt.edu. 9:30 p.m. — Festival Brasileiro: After-concert of Brazilian jazz at Sweetwater Grill & Tavern, 115 S. Elm St. Free. Call 940-565-2791 or visit www.music.unt.edu.

— Staff report

Continued on Page 4

3 Denton Time

09 26 13


4 Denton Time

09 26 13

Family dysfunction both bites back and oddly soothes those in Beverly and Violet Weston’s home during an Oklahoma summer in Denton Community Theatre’s “August: Osage County.” David Minton/ DRC

Family demons enton Community Theatre closes its run of August: Osage County on Sunday. An ensemble cast of established local actors — and some emerging talent — portray the dysfunctional extended family

D

EVENTS Continued from Page 3

SUNDAY 2 p.m. — Denton Community Theatre presents August: Osage County by Tracy Letts at the Campus Theatre, 214 W. Hickory St. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $18 for seniors 62 and older, $10 for students and children. Call 940-382-1915 or visit www.dentoncommunitytheatre.com. 2 p.m. — UNT Department of Dance and Theatre presents Proof, a play by David Auburn, in the Studio Theater at the Radio, TV, Film and Performing Arts Building, at Welch and Chestnut streets. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $7.50 for students, UNT faculty/staff and seniors. Call 940565-2428 or visit www.danceand

Company to close ‘Osage County’ this weekend

of patriarch Beverly Weston, a poet who drinks as passionately as he writes. As the Fordhams, Aikens and a few stragglers descend on the un-air-conditioned Weston house in Oklahoma in the deep of August, tempers flare, secrets

combust and past hurts do a slow burn. Drug addiction, alcoholism, infidelity and self-righteousness toil and bubble in the Pulitzer Prize-winning dark comedy by Tradcy Letts. Denton Community Theatre’s production stars Fred Cas-

sell as Beverly, Jeannene Abney as Violet Weston, Dena Dunn as Barbara Fordham Weston, Connie Lane as Ivy Weston and Betsy Jilka as Karen Weston. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Campus

Theatre, 214 W. Hickory St. Tickets cost $20 for adults, $18 for seniors 62 and older, and $10 for students with a valid ID. To purchase tickets, call 940382-1915 or visit www.denton communitytheatre.com.

theatre.unt.edu.

toddlers (12-36 months) and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 10:30 a.m. — Toddler Time at South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Lane. Stories, puppets and activities for toddlers (12-36 months) and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 11 a.m. — The Denton Newcomer Friendship Club meets at Dogwood Estates, 2820 Wind River Lane. Lunch is served at 11:30 a.m. The program will be “Decorating for Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas,” presented by Garden Gate. Call Sue Russell at 940-382-0520. 7 to 8 p.m. — Amazing YA Book Club, for adult fans of young adult books, meets at Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St. Free. Call 940-349-8718 or e-mail stacey.irishkeffer@cityofdenton.com. 7 to 8:45 p.m. — North Branch Writers’ Critique Group, for those interested in writing novels, short

stories, poetry or journals, meets at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Free. 8 p.m. — UNT Choralfest with the Collegium Singers, Concert Choir, Women’s Chorus, Men’s Chorus, University Singers and A Capella Choir, in Winspear Hall at the Murchison Performing Arts Center, on the north side of I-35E at North Texas Boulevard. Tickets cost $8-$10. Call 940-369-7802 or visit www.the mpac.com.

Stories, songs, puppets and more for children age 1-5 and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752 or visit www.dentonlibrary.com. 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. — Read to Rover at South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Lane. Free. Children ages 6-11 struggling with reading can read one-on-one with a trained therapy dog from Therapy Pals of Golden Triangle. Parents or guardians must register their children in person and sign a permission slip. Call 940-3498752. 7 to 8:30 p.m. — Exploring Philosophy at North Branch Library, 3020 Locust St. Join the ongoing discussions of time-honored philosophical issues with Dr. Eva H. Cadwallader, professor of philosophy. Free and open to the public. Call 940-349-8752.

MONDAY 6 p.m. — Chess Night at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Players of all ages and skill levels welcome. Free. Call 940-349-8752.

TUESDAY 7 a.m. — Denton County Farmers Market at Sycamore Street and Carroll Boulevard. Visit www.dentonfarmersmarket.com. 9:30 a.m. — Mother Goose Time at South Branch Library, 3228 Teasley Lane. Stories and activities for infants (birth to 18 months) and their caregivers. Free. Call 940-349-8752. 9:30 a.m. — Toddler Time at North Branch Library, 3020 N. Locust St. Stories, puppets and activities for

WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. — Toddler Time at Emily Fowler Central Library, 502 Oakland St. Stories, puppets and activities for toddlers (12-36 months) and their caregivers. Free. Call 940349-8752. 11 a.m. — Story Time at Emily Fowler Library, 502 Oakland St.

— Lucinda Breeding

Continued on Page 5


EVENTS Continued from Page 4

MUSIC The Abbey Inn Restaurant & Pub Each Wed, County Rexford, 7-9pm, free. 101 W. Hickory St. 940-5665483. The Abbey Underground Fri: Like Bridges We Burn, Light the Fire, 9pm. Weekly events: Each Sat, “’80s and ’90s RetroActive Dance Party”; each Sun, open mic hosted by Bone Doggie, signup at 7:30pm; each Mon, karaoke. 100 W. Walnut St. www.facebook.com/TheAbbey Underground. American Legion Post 550 Each Fri, free karaoke at 9pm; each Tues, free pool. Live band on the last Sat of the month, free. 905 Foundation St., Pilot Point. 940-686-9901. Andy’s Bar 122 N. Locust St. 940565-5400. Banter Bistro Thurs: Tim Bauckman Jazz, 6pm. Fri: Classical guitar, 6pm; Carolyn Campos, 8pm; Rance Parrot, 10pm. Sat: Bonduris Studio pre-recital, 4pm; Kent Shores and

Emily Davis (jazz), 6pm; Denton Rock, 8pm. Tues: Mister Joe & Friends, 8pm; Le Not So Hot Klub du Denton, 9pm. Each Thurs, open mic at 8pm; each Sat, live local jazz at 6pm. 219 W. Oak St. 940-565-1638. www. dentonbanter.com. Dan’s Silverleaf Thurs: Daniel Markham, Brent Best, Christian Lee Hutson, 9pm, $7. Fri: Ella Minnow, Savage and the Big Beat, Cozy Hawks, 10pm, $5. Sat: Erik Chandler Band, Ten Can Riot, 9pm, $7. Sun: Hares on the Mountain, 5pm, free. Mon: Paul Slavens and Friends, 10pm, free. Wed: Jamaican Queens, Hex Cult, Cutter, 9pm, $7-$10. No smoking indoors. 103 Industrial St. 940-3202000. www.danssilverleaf.com. Fry Street Public House Each Tues, karaoke, 9pm, free. 125 Ave. A. 940-323-9800. www.publichousedenton.com. The Garage Fri: Matt Dunn. Sat: Jaye Muse. 113 Ave. A. 940-383-0045. www.thedentongarage.com. Gerhard’s German Restaurant Thurs: The Texas Sky Band, 7-9pm. Fri: Ron and the Finkensteiners, 7-9pm. Sun: Quentin Bohrer, noon-2pm. 222 W. Hickory St. 940381-6723. www.gvrestaurants.com. The Greenhouse Mon: Tito Char-

neco. Live jazz each Mon at 10pm, free. 600 N. Locust St. 940-484-1349. www.greenhouserestaurantdenton. com. Hoochie’s Oyster House Live local music each Mon at 6pm. 207 S. Bell Ave. 940-383-0104. http://hoochies oysterhouse.com. Hailey’s Club Fri: Human Groove Hormone, the Gypsy Bravado, Super Hero/Super Villain, 9pm, $5-$7. Sat: Night School Ninjas, Born and Raised, Flee the Scene, Sonic Buffalo, the Infamists, the Lead Pipes, 8pm, $3-$5. Sun: Healer Warrior + Falcon Tribe and others, free-$5. Each Tues, ’90s music, 10pm, free-$5. 122 W. Mulberry St. 940-323-1160. www.haileysclub. com. J&J’s Pizza 118 W. Oak St. 940-3827769. www.jandjpizzadenton.com. La Milpa Mexican Restaurant Each Fri, Mariachi Quetzal, 7:309:30pm. 820 S. I-35E, Suite 101. 940-382-8470. Lowbrows Beer and Wine Garden 200 S. Washington St., Pilot Point. 940-686-3801. www.low brows.us. Mable Peabody’s Beauty Parlor and Chainsaw Repair Sat: Whiskey Tongue Burlesque. Each Tues, open mic, 9pm. 1125 E. University

DENTON PARKS & RECREATION Kids ages 3 1/2 to 4 can learn the basics of basketball in the Pee Wee Sports Instruction class from 11:40 a.m. to 12:40 p.m. on Saturdays. Or they can get an introduction to soccer, T-ball and basketball in the Pee Wee Sports Sampler from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Saturdays. Both courses start this week and run through Nov. 2 at North Lakes Recreation Center, 2001 W. Windsor Drive. Parents are encouraged to stay and participate. Call 940-349-parks or visit www.dentonparks.com to register by Friday. Cost is $35. ■ Sign up for basic dog obedience for dogs at least 9 weeks old. The first class at 7:15 p.m. Tuesday is an orientation for handlers only, and pet owners must bring a copy of their dog’s vaccination records. The classes meet from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. on Tuesdays through Nov. 5. For more information and to register, call 940-206-7156. Cost is $80 per trainer and dog. ■ Sign up for Les Mills Grit, a 30minute, high-intensity workout similar to Crossfit. Classes are twice a week, and the next session begins on Tuesday.There are classes for every schedule — 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; 5 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; 7:30 to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays; and 7:30 to 8 a.m. Saturdays. Call 940349-8287 to learn more, or visit www.dentonparks.com to register. Courses cost $50 per monthly session, or $5 per Saturday class. ■ Kids Rock is a night of fun for kids in grades 1-4. From 7 to 10:30 p.m. Oct. 4, youths can have fun with friends at the Denton Civic Center, 321 E. McKinney St., with plenty of chaperones.

There will be a DJ, bounce house, contests and much more. Call 940349-7275 for more information. Cost is $10 per child. ■ Kayak Bridgeport Falls Creek in a family-friendly outing from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 5. Ages 5 to 9 must ride in a tandem kayak with an adult, and ages 13 to 17 can attend without a guardian but must present a signed waiver. Bring a sack lunch. Call 940-349-8720 or visit www.denton parks.com to register by Tuesday.

Cost is $20 per kayaker. ■ Go on a night hike at Clear Creek with Elm Fork Master Naturalists after a short program on “night sounds” from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 5. Ages 8 to 12 have to hike with an adult guardian, and ages 13 to 17 can hike on their own if they bring a waiver from a guardian. To register, call 940-349-8720 or visit www.denton parks.com by Wednesday. Meet at the heritage center at 3310 Collins Road. Cost is $5 per hiker.

Drive, Suite 107. 940-566-9910. Rockin’ Rodeo Thurs: Clayton Gardner, Sam Riggs and the Night People, 8pm, free-$5. 1009 Ave. C. 940-565-6611. www.rockinrodeo denton.com. Rubber Gloves Rehearsal Studios Thurs: CxB, Dead Line, Tolar, Night Crimes, the Litigators, 9pm, $8-$10. Fri: Babar, Blessin’, Feverbones, Dome Dwellers, 9pm, $5-$7. Sat: Sour Boy, Bitter Girl, the Calmative, Isaac Hoskins, 9pm, $5-$7. No smoking indoors. 411 E. Sycamore St. 940-387-7781. www.rubbergloves dentontx.com. Sweetwater Grill & Tavern Sat: Brasuka, the Assum Trio. Sun: N’Awlins Gumbo Kings. Shows on the patio, 7-9pm, free. 115 S. Elm St. 940-484-2888. www.sweetwater

grillandtavern.com. Trail Dust Steak House 26501 E. U.S. 380 in Aubrey. 940-365-4440. www.trailduststeaks.net. Treehouse Bar & Grill Fri: Kites and Boomerangs, Johnny’s Body, Grace Lott, 10pm, free-$5. Each Wed, karaoke, 9:30pm. 1512 W. Hickory St. 940-484-7900. www.thetreehouse denton.com. UNT on the Square Thurs: Quartz trombone quartet, 7pm; Laura Otero and Daniel Pinilla, 8pm. Thursday Night Music series, nightly through October. Free. 109 N. Elm St. 940369-8257. http://untonthesquare. unt.edu. VFW Post 2205 Free karaoke at 8pm each Thurs, Fri and Sat. 909

Continued on Page 7

5 Denton Time

09 26 13


6 Denton Time

09 26 13


EVENTS Continued from Page 5 Sunset St. The Whitehouse Espresso Bar and Beer Garden Each Thurs, open mic hosted by Kelbe Schrank, 7:30pm, signup at 7pm. 424 Bryan St. 940-484-2786. www.twobzandav coffeehouse.com.

IN THE AREA Thursday through Sunday — Little Elm’s Autumnfest at Little Elm Park, 704 W. Eldorado Parkway. The festival includes carnival rides, vendors, a barbecue cook-off, the “Anything That Floats” watercraft race, a fireworks show and other activities. Coolers are allowed; glass containers and pets are prohibited. Visit www.littleelmtx.us. Friday and Saturday — Western Days festival in Old Town Lewisville, including Texas country music on three stages, arts and crafts vendors, gunfight re-enactments, cooking and grilling demonstrations, craft beer tasting, a car show, a boat show, children’s activities, a 5K race and 1-mile fun run, exhibits and more. Free tickets are required, available at www.lewisvillewesterndays.com. 1:15 p.m. Saturday — World Tamale Eating Championship, part of the Western Days festival, on the front steps of Lewisville City Hall, 151 W. Church St. Sanctioned by Major League Eating. To register, visit www.ifoce.com.

IN THE REGION Friday through Oct. 20 — State Fair of Texas at Fair Park, 3921 Martin Luther King Blvd. in Dallas. Tickets cost $17 for general admission, $13 for children shorter than 48 inches, free for ages 2 and younger, $13 for seniors, free for seniors every Thursday. Parking costs $15 on official State Fair lots. Visit www.bigtex.com or call 214-565-9931.

FUTURE BOOKINGS 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Oct. 5 — Ryan High School cheerleaders’

Christian hiphop artist Lecrae will perform during Harvest America on Saturday. The twoday revival and concert brings gospel and Christian artists to the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia. Courtesy photo /Harvest America

junior cheer clinic for students in pre-kindergarten to eighth grade, in the school’s gymnasium, 5101 E. McKinney St. Participants will learn cheers and routines. A short performance will follow. Registration cost is $25. Checks can be made out to Ryan High School Cheer, attention Christie Weir, and mailed to 5101 E. McKinney St., Denton, TX 76208. On-site registration will start at 8:45 a.m. Call 940-369-3000 or e-mail cweir@ dentonisd.org. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 5 — Denton County Master Gardener Association Fall Garden Fest at the Denton Bible Church campus. Event includes presentations, educational booths, vendors, children’s activities. Free. Visit www.dcmga.com, e-mail master.gardener@dentoncounty.com or call 940-349-2892. 10 a.m. Oct. 5 — Aubrey Peanut Festival at Aubrey’s Festival Grounds, 301 S. Main St. Parade starts at 10 a.m., followed by activities and contests, vendors and more. Call 940-343-1313 or visit www.aubrey peanutfestival.com. 1 p.m. Oct. 5 — Fry Fest on Fry Street/Avenue A, with music on three stages, food trucks, bars and more, for ages 21 and older only. Performers include Stoney LaRue, Vallejo, William Clarke Green, Brandon Jenkins and more. Gates open at 1 p.m. Tickets cost $25 in advance, $30 at the gate; VIP tickets cost $60. For tickets, visit http://fryfestdenton.com or go to Fry Street Public House, 125 Ave. A. 3:30 p.m. Oct. 5 — Canned Festival, an offshoot of the Untapped Festival, in downtown Denton. Event includes more than 25 craft breweries and live music by Menomena, Helio Sequence, Joe Pug and others. Tickets cost $17 in advance, $20 at the door, $25 for beer package, $40 for VIP ticket. Visit http:// untapped-festival.com/canned. 6 to 9 p.m. Oct. 5 — Gallery Night at Oxide Gallery’s new location, 115 Eagle Drive. Free. Call 940483-8900 or visit www.oxidegallery. com. 4 p.m. Oct. 19 — Taste of Home Cooking School in the auditorium at Denton High School, 1007 Fulton St. Advance tickets cost $10 (plus fee), available at DentonRC.com and at the Denton Record-Chronicle offices, 314 E. Hickory St.

7 Denton Time Lewisville’s Western Days Festival takes place Friday night and Saturday in Old Town Lewisville, including City Hall. Courtesy photo/ Susie Carter

Old West fest Lewisville set to bustle with music, vendors, activities Old Town Lewisville will be filled with staged gunfights, stick horse rodeo riders, world champion competitive eaters, gourmet chefs, Old West artifacts, runners, and the best of Texas country music during the 2013 Western Days Festival this weekend. The family event includes more than 100 vendors offering a variety of wares, from handcrafted treasures to retail products. The Western Market will be open throughout the festival on Main and Church streets. Festivalgoers can visit four live stages, a car show or cooking demonstrations or go for a run

in the Stonecutter Shuffle 5K. An exhibit of Old West artifacts will be inside the gallery at Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater. Children have activities along two city blocks to choose from. Offsite parking will be available at Vista Ridge Village Shopping Center, at FM3040 and Interstate 35E, and the Old Town and Hebron stations of the DCTA A-train. Free shuttles will carry visitors between the parking lots and the festival zone. Don Edwards, who’s been called “America’s Cowboy Balladeer,” will headline the indoor stage at the MCL Grand Theater on Friday starting at 7:30 p.m. The Randy Rogers Band will be the headlining act on Friday night, the opening night of the two-day event, starting at 10 p.m. on the Bud Light Main

WESTERN DAYS FESTIVAL What: A weekend of Lewisville’s Western heritage, live music and street shopping Where: Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater, 100 N. Charles St., and Old Town Lewisville When: 7 to 11:30 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Saturday Details: Admission is free with tickets available at www.lewisvillewesterndays.com. Patrons can print as many tickets as needed or can show tickets on mobile device screens.Those without a ticket must pay $20 at the gate. Free tickets also are available through entertainment sponsor “The Wolf” KPLX-FM (99.5) and at most Lewisville municipal facilities.

Stage. The Casey Donahew Band will be the featured act closing out the festival on Saturday night, taking the Bud Light Main Stage at 10 p.m. — Staff report

From Philadelphia to Denton Church on Square to screen event live A downtown church will screen a livestream of Harvest America on Saturday night. Calvary Chapel, a local church housed in the Fine Arts Theatre on the Square, will take advantage of its cinema dimensions to show the contemporary Christian concert at 7 p.m. Saturday.

Harvest America is a largescale revival service that will bring top Christian artists and bands to the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on Saturday. And this year, Harvest Christian Fellowship senior pastor Greg Laurie will preach the message. Harvest Christian Fellowship is based in Riverside, Calif. Jane Piper, an official from Denton’s Calvary Chapel, said the local church will screen just Saturday night’s events, which

will include gospel artist and choirmaster Kirk Franklin, Christian hip-hop artist Lecrae, contemporary Christian band Needtobreathe and the Katinas. Mercy Me and Jeremy Camp perform on Sunday. The two-day event will also stream at www.harvestamerica.com for locals who wish to watch the second day’s performances and preaching. Calvary Chapel is located at 115 N. Elm St. Admission is free.

09 26 13


8 Denton Time

09 26 13

MOVIES THEATERS Cinemark Denton 2825 Wind River Lane off I-35E. 940-535-2654. www. cinemark.com. Movie Tavern 916 W. University Drive. 940-566-FILM (3456). www.movietavern.com. Carmike Hickory Creek 16 8380 S. I-35E, Hickory Creek. 940-3212788. www.carmike.com. Silver Cinemas Inside Golden Triangle Mall, 2201 S. I-35E. 940-3871957. www.silvercinemasinc.com.

From left, Earl (voiced by Terry Crews), inventor Flint (Bill Hader) and Sam (Anna Faris) are up for adventure in “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2.”

OPENING FRIDAY Baggage Claim Determined to get engaged before her youngest sister’s wedding in 30 days, a flight attendant travels the country bumping into eligible ex-boyfriends and searching for Mr. Right. With Paula Patton, Derek Luke, Taye Diggs and Jill Scott. Written and directed by David E. Talbert. Rated PG-13, 93 minutes. — Los Angeles Times Don Jon (★★★★) Jon Martello’s relentless libido has a comic math to it. At the club, Jon (Joseph GordonLevitt) and his pals rate girls on a scale of one to “a dime.” He keeps a weekly tally of both his conquests and his far more numerous — and to him more rewarding — porn-aided masturbations. And being a good Catholic boy, every Sunday, he counts up his sins. Gordon-Levitt’s writingdirecting debut equals something quite substantial: a speedy little comedy about not just sex addiction but modern lives wasted on shallow gratification. Jon’s compulsive routine (echoing the “gym-tan-laundry” of “the Situation” from Jersey Shore) is broken when he meets Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson, in full sex bomb). When their relationship hits a road block, Jon finds himself drawn to an older, less glamorous woman from his night class (Julianne Moore). With Tony Danza, Glenne Headly and Brie Larson. Rated R, 90 minutes. — The Associated Press Inequality for All (★★★) Jacob Kornbluth directed this informative and often engaging documentary that features economics professor and former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich. Reich posits his theories on the economy with plenty of charts, graphs and interviews with the rich and the struggling. His main premise is that income equality hurts everyone as a society’s economy rests with the lower and middle classes, as only they can propel progress. Rated PG, 89 minutes. At the Angelika Dallas and Plano. — Boo Allen Rush (★★★★1⁄2) Ron Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan have twice now collaborated on what you might call coin-flip films: movies about dueling, diametrically opposed forces. Their latest, the Formula One thriller Rush, is a lot like their Frost/ Nixon, only on wheels. Chris Hemsworth plays the English bounder James Hunt, a classic, carousing, big-ego racer, while Daniel Bruhl plays

Continued on Page 10

Sony Pictures Animation

High chance of boredom Cheesy puns don’t mask stale flavor of ‘Cloudy’ sequel

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2

By Rick Bentley The Fresno Bee

The original Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs was a sweet treat of an adaptation of the 1982 book by Judi and Ron Barrett. From the visual smorgasbord — especially Lockwood’s secret laboratory where such electronic gimmicks of the 1980s Simon game and an Atari joystick create the Tron look — to the food jokes, the movie worked for all ages. The sequel, Cloudy With a

Rated PG, 95 minutes. Opens Friday.

Chance of Meatballs 2, comes across like eating leftovers. There’s still some pleasure out of the reheated dish, but it lacks the appeal of the original. Meatballs picks up on the island where all of the culinary madness started. Food items are evolving into living creatures

such as Shrimpanzes and Flamangos. The fear is the creatures will learn to swim and become a threat to the mainland. Flint Lockwood (voiced by Bill Hader), the wide-eyed inventor behind the original food fight, is recruited by mega-billionaire inventor Chester V (Will Forte) — head of The Live Corp Company — to find the source of the food transformations. With the aid of his friends and family, Lockwood sets off on an Jurassic Park-style adventure. The script — by five different writers — bounces between trying to recreate Jurassic Park scenes using fruits, vegetables and meats to food-inspired puns. If says, “It’s a piece of cake,”

then a piece of cake is in the scene. Variety among gourmet gags is so limited that one pun about a “leek in the boat” gets repeated. A writer who lives by the pun, dies by the pun. The jokes become as stale as week-old bread, plus there’s no way a young audience can pick up on 99 percent of the jokes. The only pun that seems to resonate through all demographics is a line about having to “cut the cheese.” Directors Cody Cameron and Kris Pearn give the film the frantic pace and bright colors needed to keep the attention of kids. It’s the kind of so-so cinema that will entertain those who aren’t too demanding.

Dizzy with suspense Short run brings ‘Vertigo’ to cinema Intrigue and crippling anxiety make Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo suspenseful enough, but adventuresome camera work and standout performances by Jimmy Stewart as Scottie Ferguson and Kim Novak as the icy blond leading lady make the 1958 thriller a masterpiece. Vertigo, which screens Sunday and Wednesday, is the final film in the summertime Cine-

mark classic series. Scottie is a retired cop stricken with acrophobia. He begins following the wife of a close friend and discovers she is keeping secrets. Screenings are at 2 p.m. Sunday and 2 and 7 p.m. Wednesday. The cinema is located at 2825 Wind River Lane. Matinee tickets cost $6.50. For evening screenings, tickets cost $8.50 for adults, $6.50 for children, seniors and students. — Staff report

Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak get entangled in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 film “Vertigo.” AP file photo/ Paramount Pictures


9

COVER STORY SCHEDULE The University of North Texas College of Music’s Festival Brasileiro continues through Saturday. For more information, visit http://music.unt.edu.

TODAY 7:30 p.m. — UNT Symphonic Band performs Joao Guilherme Ripper’s Chamber Symphony for Winds and Jose Urcisino da Silva’s Suite Pernambucana de Bolso in Winspear Hall at the Murchison Performing Arts Center, on the north side of I-35E at North Texas Boulevard. Conducted by Dennis Fisher. Tickets are $10 for the public; $8 for non-UNT students, seniors and UNT faculty and staff; free for UNT students with ID. For tickets, visit www.thempac.com or call 940-369-7802. Live streamed at www.untmusiclive.com

FRIDAY

Courtesy photos

Quinteto UnB is a faculty wind ensemble from the University of Brasilia. The ensemble will perform this weekend during the Festival Brasileiro at the University of North Texas.

Sounds from the south By Lucinda Breeding Features Editor cbreeding@dentonrc.com

See BRAZIL on 10

SATURDAY 8 p.m. — “An Evening of Brazilian Chamber Music” with the UNT String Orchestra, featuring cello professor Eugene Osadchy and the UNT Cello Choir with student soprano Jennifer Youngs; Trio Assum; chamber orchestra of UNT faculty, guests and students; and Quinteto UnB. Works include Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 by Villa-Lobos, and From My Window No. 2 and Concerto a Cinco by Joao Guilherme Ripper. In Voertman Hall at the Music Building, at Avenue C and Chestnut Street. Free. 9:30 p.m. — Brazilian jazz at Sweetwater Bar & Grill, 115 S. Elm St., featuring Brasuka and Trio Assum. Free.

Jazz and other styles from Brazil celebrated at UNT

When it comes to cultural exchanges at the University of North Texas College of Music, contributions from the Czech Republic have gotten a lot of love over the years. This fall, a new oboe professor in the college is putting our artistic neighbors to the south in the spotlight. Festival Brasileiro celebrates the familiar sounds of Brazil — namely the country’s considerable jazz accomplishments — as well as some of the sounds that

8 p.m. — “An Evening of Brazilian Chamber Music” featuring Trio Vientos Tejanos and Quinteto UnB with flute professor Terri Sundberg and guest artist Dennis Parker on cello, performing the works of Jose Vieira Brandao, Walter Burles Marx, Heitor Villa-Lobos, Joao Guilherme Ripper, Sergio Nogueira and Liduino Pitombeira. In Voertman Hall at the Music Building, at Avenue C and Chestnut Street. Free.

Trio Assum is a Brazilian jazz ensemble participating in Festival Brasileiro this weekend.

Denton Time

09 26 13


10 Denton Time

09 26 13

Over the rainbow Film examines clash at gay club in Fort Worth orty years after the patrons of the Stonewall Inn rebelled against the New York police who rushed the inn — one of the most well-known gay establishments of Greenwich Village at the time — to arrest them, a similar raid shut down the Rainbow Lounge. The Fort Worth gay bar had just opened when officials from the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission and the Fort Worth Police Department raided the venue. Officials were accused of using unnecessary force — with one patron sustaining a brain injury during a confrontation with an officer. The University of North Texas Multicultural Center and the UNT Media Library will present a free screening of Robert L. Camina’s documentary, Raid on the Rainbow Lounge, at 5 p.m. Oct. 3 in the Media Library, Room 111 in Chilton Hall, 410 Ave. C. Camina’s film, narrated by

F

MOVIES Continued from Page 8 Niki Lauda, an analytical Austrian. The film, based on the lives of the two famous racers, captures the climax of their collision in the 1976 world championship that came down to the final race and a crash that left Lauda’s face terribly burned. Racing films often speed inevitably toward cliches of fast-paced living catching up to the men behind the wheel. But Rush veers away toward something much sweeter: a simple ode to rivalry. Rated R, 123 minutes. — AP

NOW PLAYING Battle of the Year A hip-hop mogul enlists a hard-luck ex-basketball coach and an all-star dance crew to win an international dance tournament in which Americans have not triumphed in 15 years. Rated PG-13, 109 minutes. — Los Angeles Times Insidious: Chapter 2 A young married couple seek to uncover the mysterious childhood secret that has

openly gay actress Meredith Baxter, follows some of the bar’s patrons, including a former journalist, an accountant and a heterosexual woman who was at the bar that evening with her boyfriend. The documentary shows how the raid changed the patrons’ lives. The film also chronicles their search for answers about why the raid happened and how to ensure that a similar event won’t happen again. After the raid and the public outcry that followed, Fort Worth’s city manager created a diversity task force to advise the mayor and City Council members about issues related to the city’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered community. Fort Worth now offers domestic partner benefits to city employees and requires employees, including police and firefighters, to complete diversity training. The city extended its anti-discrimination policy to the gay, bisexual and transgender community and added a police liaison to the community. TABC also appointed a liaison and implemented diversity training. — Lucinda Breeding

left their family dangerously connected to the spirit world in this sequel to the 2011 film Insidious. With Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne and Lin Shaye. Rated PG-13, 105 minutes. — LAT Prisoners Frustrated by the police department’s lack of progress in locating his missing 6-year-old daughter, a distraught father decides to take matters into his own hands. With Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Melissa Leo and Paul Dano. Rated R, 151 minutes. — LAT A Single Shot (★★★) In this textually and thematically dark psychological drama, Sam Rockwell stars as John Moon, a West Virginia backwoods man who mistakes a woman for a deer and accidentally shoots her. He then takes her cache of stolen money. His misdeed does not remain a secret, however, and he quickly finds himself fending off variously violent drug dealers, crooked lawyers (William H. Macy) and an estranged wife (Kelly Reilly). Writer-director David M. Rosenthal ratchets up the tension, creating moody atmospherics along with creeping paranoia. Rated R, 116 minutes. At AMC Grapevine Mills 30. — B.A.

From Page 9

Brazil are lesser known, especially in the orchestral realm. The festival started Tuesday and continues through Saturday with several big concerts. Oboe professor James Ryon took a liking to Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos Ryon when he was a student himself. His love of Villa-Lobos’ music grew into a decades-long interest in Brazil’s broad musical ventures. Ryon was researching the country’s music on Brazilian soil when he met Joao Guilherme Ripper. At the time, Ripper was a rising star in the country’s classical music composition scene, and is now an international presence. Ryon wasn’t alone in his love for Brazilian music at UNT. Clarinet professor Kimberly Cole Luevano was performing in Brazil a few years ago, and met clarinetists from Goiania and Brasilia while she was there. Ryon and Luevano both joined the UNT faculty two years ago, and both learned of the other’s affinity for the country’s musical heft. They tapped bassoon professor Kathleen Reynolds to join them to start Trio Vientos Tejanos. The three teachers and artists didn’t let the dust settle from their project: They got to work planning an exchange with Brazilian musicians. Trio Vientos Tejanos will travel to Brazil in December to continue the exchange. “The festival and other exchanges give students, faculty and the general public the opportunity to discover more about the two largest nations in the Western Hemisphere and their distinctive cultures,” Ryon said. The festival ramps up this week with performances of Brazil’s classical music. Locals can sample Ryon’s longtime favorite, Villa-Lobos, during the festival concerts, and Ripper arrived on campus to lecture and conduct ensembles as a guest. University of Brasilia wind faculty mem-

ABOUT JOAO GUILHERME RIPPER Brazilian conductor and composer Joao Guilherme Ripper is known for his rhythmic and melodic works for symphony and ensemble. In his most recent compositions, the rapid expansion and modernity of his home rings through with clarity — in Ripper’s From My Window, feverish piano rushes make use of the whole keyboard, with the bright sound of the violin racing off, parallel to the piano. The cello and double bass are sonic counterweights, lower and a touch slower than the piano, violin and viola. Ripper paints a narrative of a lively street — little bodies hurrying to the market or to work, cars stopping and going — all creating a song that, though sometimes jarring and atonal, is the sound of a city. Ripper was born in Rio de Janeiro in 1959, near the tail end of the country’s populism and industrial

bers are in town, too. The Brazilian teachers and artists make up the wind quintet, Quinteto UnB and visiting jazz ensemble Trio Assum. Ryon and other UNT faculty members are also taking advantage of the college’s relationship with Denton’s bustling down-

boom. He studied music in his country and came to American Catholic University in Washington, D.C., to earn Ripper his doctorate. He returned to Brazil in 1997, and resumed his post as a professor of composition, analysis and Schenkerian analysis and harmony at the School of Music at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. (The UNT College of Music is home to the Center for Schenkerian Studies.) During his career, Ripper has regularly engaged with the communities and nonprofessional musicians where he’s lived and worked. Ripper has served as the director of the Sala Cecilia Meireles, a leading concert hall in Rio de Janeiro, since 2004.

town jazz joint, Sweetwater Grill & Tavern. Brasuka, a Dallasbased Brazilian jazz ensemble that includes UNT faculty in its lineup, will share the patio stage with Trio Assum on Saturday night. LUCINDA BREEDING can be reached at 940-566-6877.


11

DINING RESTAURANTS AMERICAN CUISINE Central Grill 1005 Ave. C. 940-3239464. Dusty’s Bar and Grill Laid-back bar just off the Square serves a beltbusting burger and fries, a kitchen homily for meat and cheese lovers. 119 S. Elm St. Daily noon-2am. $-$$. 940-243-7300. www.dustysbar.com. Hooligans 104 N. Locust St. 940442-6950. www.hooligansonline.com. The LABB 218 W. Oak St. 940-2934240. www.thelabbdenton.com. The Loophole Square staple has charming menu with cleverly named items, like Misdemeanor and Felony nachos. 119 W. Hickory St. Daily 11am-2am; food served until midnight. Full bar. $-$$. 940-565-0770. www.loopholepub.com. Pourhouse Sports Grill Classy sports bar and restaurant boasts large TVs and a theater-style media room and serves burgers, pizza, salads and generous main courses. Full bar. Smoking on patio only. 3350 Unicorn Lake Blvd. Sun-Thurs 11-10, Fri-Sat 11-12. $-$$. 940-484-7455. Rocky’s Sports Bar Big games on big screens plus some pretty big tastes, too.Homestyle burgers; savory Caesar salad with chicken. Full bar. 2000 W. University Drive. Daily 11am-2am. $. 940-382-6090. Rooster’s Roadhouse “We Ain’t Chicken” is what the eatery claims, though the menu kindly includes it on a sandwich and in a wing basket — plus barbecue, burgers and hangout appetizers. Beer. 113 Industrial St. Sun-Wed 11-10; Thurs-Sat 11-midnight. $. 940-382-4227. www.roostersroadhouse.com. RT’s Neighborhood Bar 1100 Dallas Drive, Suite 124. 940-381-2277. Sweetwater Grill & Tavern It may claim a place among the world’s other memorable pubs, rathskellers, hangouts and haunts where the food satisfies as much as the libations that wash them down. 115 S. Elm St. Tues-Sat 11-2am, Sun-Mon 11-midnight. $-$$. 940-484-2888. www.sweetwatergrillandtavern.com. Treehouse Bar & Grill 1512 W. Hickory St. Mon-Sat 11am-2am, Sun noon-midnight. 940-484-7900. www.thetreehousedenton.com. II Charlies Bar & Grill 809 Sunset St. 940-891-1100.

ASIAN Gobi Mongolian Grill and Asian Diner 717 S. I-35E, Suite 100. 940387-6666. Little Asia 7650 S. I-35E, Corinth. 940-269-1110. Mr. Chopsticks This pan-Asian

eatery does a little Chinese, Japanese, Thai and even Indian food. Many vegetarian dishes. Beer and wine. 1633 Scripture St. Mon-Sat 11-10, Sun 11:30-9. $-$$. 940-382-5437.

BARBECUE Clint’s BBQ Barbecue spot serves up brisket, ribs, pulled pork, sausage, chicken and breakfast too. 921 S. U.S. Highway 377, Aubrey. Tues-Thurs 6am-8pm; Fri-Sat 6am-9pm; Sun 6am-3pm. 940-365-9338. www.clintsbbq.com. Gold Mine BBQ 222 W. Hickory St., Suite 102. 940-387-4999. www.texasgoldminebbq.com. Metzler’s Bar-B-Q Much more than a barbecue joint, with wine and beer shop, deli with German foods and more. Smoked turkey is lean yet juicy; generous doses of delightful barbecue sauce. Beer and wine. 628 Londonderry Lane. Daily 10:30am-10pm. $. 940-591-1652. Old House BBQ 1007 Ave. C. 940383-3536. The Smokehouse Denton barbecue joint serves up surprisingly tender and juicy beef, pork, chicken and catfish. Good sauces, bulky sandwiches and mashed potatoes near perfection. Beer and wine. 1123 Fort Worth Drive. Sun-Thurs 11-9, Fri-Sat 11-10. $-$$. 940-566-3073.

BISTROS AND CAFES Banter Bistro Gourmet sandwiches and salads, breakfast items, coffee and espresso. Beer and wine. No smoking inside. 219 W. Oak St. Daily 10am-midnight. $. 940-565-1638. www.dentonbanter.com. Bochy’s Bistro Fusion menu grabs elements of European cuisines with many salad and sandwich selections. Artful desserts: tuxedo cake, cream cheese brownie. No smoking. 2430 I-35E, Suite 136. Mon-Thurs 8-3, Fri-Sat 8-9, Sun brunch 8-3. $$.

940-387-3354. www.bochys.com. Cachette Bistro 144 N. Old Town Blvd., Suite 1, Argyle. Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm, Sat 8am-3pm. 940464-3041. www.cachettebistro.com. The Chestnut Tree Salads, sandwiches, soups and other lunch and brunch options served in back of small shop on the Square. Tasty quiche. Decadent fudge lava cake and rich carrot cake. Revolving dinner menu. No smoking. 107 W. Hickory St. Mon-Fri 9am-3pm, Sat 9am-2:30pm; dinner Thurs-Sat 5:30-9pm. $-$$. 940-591-9475. www.chestnuttearoom.com. Sidewalk Bistro 2900 Wind River Lane, Suite 132. Sun-Mon 7am-3pm, Tues-Sat 7am-9pm. 940-591-1999. www.sidewalk-bistro.com.

BRITISH The Abbey Inn Restaurant & Pub Full bar. 101 W. Hickory St. Sun-Wed 11-10, Thurs-Sat 11-midnight. $-$$. 940-566-5483.

BRUNCH Cups and Crepes Eatery serves up both traditional American and European breakfasts and lunch. 309 Fry St. Tues-Sun 8am-3pm. $. 940-387-1696. Loco Cafe Casual breakfast/lunch cafe that’s a sister restaurant to the Greenhouse Restaurant across the street. No smoking. 603 N. Locust St. Mon-Fri 6am-2pm; Sat-Sun 7am-3pm. $-$$. 940-387-1413. Royal’s Bagels & Deli 503 W. University Drive. Daily 6:30am-2pm. $. 940-808-1009. Seven Mile Cafe Breakfast, brunch and lunch spot, including vegan options. 311 W. Congress St. Daily 7am-3pm. 940-808-0200. www. sevenmilecafe.com.

FINE DINING The Great American Grill at Hilton Garden Inn, 3110 Colorado Blvd.

Dinner: Daily 5-10pm. 940-891-4700. The Greenhouse Restaurant Casual dining atmosphere complements fresh seafood, beef and chicken from the grill. Refined cocktails and rich desserts. 600 N. Locust St. Mon-Thurs 11-10, Fri 11-11, Sat 12-11, Sun noon-9 (bar stays open later). $-$$. 940-484-1349. www.greenhouse restaurantdenton.com. Hannah’s Off the Square Executive chef Sheena Croft’s “upscale comfort food” puts the focus on local, seasonal ingredients. Full bar. Smoking on terrace only. No checks. 111 W. Mulberry St. Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-3. Brunch: Sun 10:30am-3pm. Dinner:

Sun-Mon 4:30-9; Tues-Thurs 4:30-10; Fri-Sat 4:30-11. $$-$$$. 940-566-1110. www.hannahsoffthesquare.com. Queenie’s Steakhouse Chef Tim Love’s steakhouse just off the downtown Square. Live jazz nightly. Full bar. 115 E. Hickory St. Lunch: Fri 11:30-2:30. Dinner: Wed-Thurs 4:3010pm, Fri-Sat 4:30-11pm. $$-$$$. 940-442-6834. www.queeniessteakhouse.com. The Wildwood Inn Elegant dining room tucked away in a bed and breakfast. Beer and wine. No smoking inside. 2602 Lillian Miller Parkway. Thurs-Sat 6-10pm. $$$. 940-2434919. www.denton-wildwoodinn.com.

Denton Time

09 26 13


12 Denton Time

09 26 13


13 Denton Time

09 26 13


14 Denton Time

09 26 13


15 Denton Time

09 26 13


16 Denton Time

09 26 13


September 26 Denton Time