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LINDSEY MAYES

9501 Shannon Green Dr. Apt E, Charlotte, NC 28213 TEL 910.374.7266

EMAIL LMM008@YAHOO.COM

EDUCATION

University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina - Masters of Architecture, July 2011-Current (May 2014) University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, North Carolina- Bachelors of Science in Biology, May 2010

WORK EXPERIENCE

TEACHING ASSISTANT, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE CHARLOTTE, NC August 2013-Current • Student orientation; including proper use of laser cutters and vacuum formers, printing from drafting programs,

• Ensuring machinery is ventilated and properly used. ARE TEST PREP, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE CHARLOTTE, NC June 2013 • Prepared and edited sample tests for ARE preparation for seminars given by David Thaddeus. • Referenced building codes with questions for easy look up. INTERN, STUDIO 1 ARCHITECTS CHARLOTTE, NC September 2013 • Prepared digital models and renderings for upcoming deadline. • Prepared physical model for upcoming deadline. • Worked as needed.


DESIGN SKILLS Code and ADA knowledge, computer and hand rendering, construction document knowledge. Programs- Revit, AutoCad, Rhino, Grasshopper, InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Google Sketchup, Vasari, Ecotect

LEADERSHIP Mass (Masters of Architecture Student Society) Treasurer- collaborated with other members to plan, organize and hold the 2013 Critical Mass event for graduating thesis students.

INTERESTS Exploring the connections between ecology and architecture and how ecosystems combined with architecture have the ability to improve sustainable design.

AWARDS Critical Mass thesis presentation to guest architect Joshua Prince-Ramos from REX. Two students chosen from a class of 20 from UNC Charlotte to present their work with 12 other students chosen from colleges across the country


Research Projects:

thesis

Group Work

olympics

Studio

comprehensive phenomenology


Built Projects

light box shadow box

Photomontage

photoshop

Painting

acrylic on canvas

Photography

travels


Research Thesis Fall/Spring 2013/2014

Toward an Ecology of Building: the symbiotic relationship between habitats


Problem: as population increases (83 million/yr. currently) land use also increases, (Buncombe county 2.77 acres per day) thus reducing the habitable area of other species.

built

environment

natural

environment

Due to: agriculture to feed the people, commercial and housing developments. Solution: design with ecology in mind, for both humans and other species. Strategy: design for honeybees (they are responsible for 1/3 of our food supply) they also pollinate plants which attract other species thus increasing the number of habitats for other species.

habitats

working together

As the human population increases other populations that are essential to our health and well being decrease. As architects we design for human habitation but can’t we change that, and begin to design so that other species can occupy our cities as well? Our cities are parasitic to other organisms and as architects it is essential for us to begin to understand ecology because that is what we affect.

Birds build nests, spiders build webs and humans build cities


Distance Travelled to

Overall less wax used to gain enough space.

Average change in Hive

Weight over 18 days

get Food

95o

5

70o

3

4

44o

.5 0

1

1

2

Wasted space

.5

Wasted space I’m hungry

Wasted space

Capacity of bee hive is

80,000

usually bees. Once reached a group of bees leave to form a new hive. UV

350

400

450

500

550

600

650

700

IR

80,000 flowers

bees x per

1,000

day

> 1 ,0 0 0

flowers per bee per day

80,000,000

flowers = pollinated per day per hive. NW

Distance

The waggle dance, done by bees to let the other bees know distance and direction to nectar.


“Loss of biodiversity is real. Biologists have alerted each other and much of the general public to the contemporary mass extinction of species.”

“Biologists agree that the major proximate causes of biotic impoverishment today are habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation”

“The most obvious kind of loss is quantitative-the conversion of a native prairie to a corn field or to a parking lot.”

“It has been estimated that approximately 1/3 of everything we eat benefits from bee pollination. That includes plants that are fed to livestock...Bee pollination adds $15 billion a year to the agricultural base of the US alone.”

Bears

Parasites

Raccoons

Frogs Bears

Birds

Wasps

Honeybees

Butterflies

Birds

Parasites

Wasps

Raccoons

Honeybees

Butterflies

Loss of Honeybees Vegetables

Flowers

Fruits Vegetables

Flowers

Livestock Livestock

Humans Humans

Fruits

Frogs


Just as one bee makes all the bees in her hive, one site will become part of a community. The project becomes a strategy for the community by focusing on breweries in the area. Networks can then be created allowing for habitats to work together.

Asheville... walkable beer art sustainable Bee City USA Beer City USA

r

Asheville NC


Seasonal Changes migration store for winter migration

JAN.

FEB.

MAR.

APR.

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG.

winter survival

bats

SEPT.

butterflies migration/hibernation bats hummingbirds winter cluster honeybees

OCT.

NOV.

DEC.

butterfly bush (plant) peaches and figs

H ON E Y B E E S

hummingbirds butterflies

beets

parsnip

broccoli asparagus lettuce

carrots

brussel sprouts artichokes onion

lettuce soybean carrots parsnip broccoli beets green peppers okra eggplant cantaloupe cucumber lima beans

peaches and figs

Uses thistle and milkweed for nesting material

redbird of paradise (plant)

vegetables on site pomegranate fig watermelon tomatoes grapes pear raspberry apple citrus blackberry

strawberry

bats species on site

peach plum blueberry apricot

pumpkin

persimmon

Butterfly bush and redbird of paradise and thistle

lays eggs on milkweed

fruits on site


Kitchen

Seating

Bar

Bottling Gallery

Mechanical

Office

Brewery Production

Viewing

hives

visitors center Lobby

Coolers

Records

Offices

Beekeepers Gardens

Research Lab

Containment

Tele Lounge Storage

Equipment

Conference

Lobby

Meeting


NIGHT POLLINATION

BAT ZONE

3/4” GAP

1/2” PINE WOOD UNFINISHED

ENTRY AND EXIT

1 1/2” 3/4” OPENING

VENTILATION

GUANO

BATS

FERTILIZER

PLANTS

ENTRY AND EXIT

DAY POLLINATION

SMOKE ADDED TO CALM BEES

LOWERED HIVE FOR VIEWING

BEE ZONE


LAB B

R REEC C OR O D RD S S

TE TE LE. LE .

BREWERY

SEATING

KITCHEN

TASTING/BEE TASTING/BEE PRODUCTS PRODUCTS

TA PR ST O ING D UC /B TS EE

SAMPLES

LO LO BB BB Y Y

O F O FIC FF E IC S ES

TELE.

S SEEAT AT IN IN G G

LAB S SAAM M PL PL ES ES

EQUIP/STOR.

LA LA B B

MECH.

EQ EQ UIP UI /S P/ TO ST R O . R.

M M ECH EC . H.

OFFICES

LA LA B B

A

LOUNGE

B BAAR R

LAB

LA LA B B

CONFERENCE

K KI ITC TC HE HE N N

MEETING LO LO UN UN GE G E

C O C N O FE N R FE EN RE C N E C E

SECTION A 3/8”=1’

P PRRO O DU D C UC TI TIOON N

M M EET EE IN TIN G G

RESEARCH BEEKEEPER

SECTION B 3/8”=1’ SECTION C 3/8”=1’

RECORDS

LOBBY

C

BAR

PRODUCTION D


GLULAM STRUCTURE STEEL PLATES

STEEL PLATES FIT INTO GLULAM FORM SHELVES FOR HIVES LATERAL SUPPORT

EACH LAYER HAS SEPARATE FRAMES

HOUSING FOR HIVES PINE WOOD

FACE OF HIVE HOUSING OPENS

STEEL PLATES INSIDE GLULAM

HIVES ADDED SEPARATE SPACES FOR BROOD AND SUPERS

HIVES REMOVED

BOLTS CONNECT GLULAM AND STEEL

SECOND LAYER OF PINE FORMS HIVES

SUPER REMOVED

HEXAGON FORMED

FRAMES FOR HONEYCOMB

HONEY TAKEN TO BREWERY


BEESWAX

SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP PPA PAARRK RKKIINNG IN G G

G GA G ATTH A HEE TH RRI ER INNG IN G//F G FEE /F EED EE DIIN D NG IN G A G ARR A EEAA RE A


NEW HIVES MOVE INTO CITY

HIVE SPLIT ONE HIVE

PARKS

BREWERIES


Group Work Fall 2013

Charlotte Olympics 2024/2030 Plans | The Linked City


Urban design

http://issuu.com/nbrow/docs/olympicsstudio_uncc

This project is a collaboration between a group of eight students to research, organize and plan for the possibility of the 2024 Olympics coming to Charlotte. A plan that investigates costs, precedents, development, and infrastructure that would happen before, during and after the Olympics. This includes up fitting current stadiums, developing new stadiums, preparing for future population growth, new transit, sustainability, and improving streets by adding strips of parks through them.

Charlotte 2024

Personal contributions: -Physical model -Panthers stadium redesign- adding streets, housing, office, and retail and integration with main concourse and Olympic park. (2030 plan) -Street improvement- locations, materials, typologies, park space -Sustainable strategies- improving water quality through the use of bioswales, bike and walking paths, and stadiums -Financial precedent studies: where majority of costs were spent, attendance to Olympics (helped with planning hotels), Atlanta Olympics precedent, infrastructure costs -Conceptual design (group discussion and collaging)


11% Residential : ~ 4.5 million s.f.

Charlotte data before / during / after

19% Residential : ~ 18.3 million s.f.

~ 26,326 units added

24%

Office : ~ 22.3 million s.f. ~ 5,600 units added

23%

Office : ~ 22.7 million s.f. ~ 2,620 units added

5%

Hotel : ~ 5.2 million s.f. ~ 5,600 units added

7%

Hotel : ~ 6.9 million s.f. ~ 1,750 units added

5%

Retail : ~ 5.4 million s.f ~ 100 units added

41%

Green Space : ~ 41.5 million s.f.

Hotel : ~ 1.3 million s.f.

18% Parking Spaces : ~ 7.5 million s.f.

Total Square Footage: ~42.8 million s.f.

2% OPEN park acreage (excluding cemetery) in uptown: 29.35 acres uptown footprint: 55.7 million s.f. uptown population: 14, 495 people 0.002 acres (87 s.f.) / person 494 people / acre

5%

Parking Spaces : ~ 5 million s.f. Total Square Footage: ~96.5 million s.f.

64% OPEN

2030 Uptown Charlotte

Retail : ~ 2.5 million s.f

14% Green Space : ~ 6 million s.f.

2024 Uptown Charlotte

2014 Uptown Charlotte

3% 5%

Hotel data

Residential : ~ 18.9 million s.f. ~ 1,084 units added

49% Office : ~ 21 million s.f.

5% Retail : ~ 5.2 million s.f. ~ 2,267 units added 42% Green Space : ~ 40.5 million s.f.

Financial data

18%

5%

Parking Spaces : ~ 5 million s.f. Total Square Footage: ~100.4 million s.f.

66% OPEN

park acreage (excluding cemetery) in uptown: 815.9 acres uptown footprint: 55.7 million s.f. uptown projected population(5% growth): 61,256 people

park acreage (excluding cemetery) in uptown: 849.5 acres uptown footprint: 55.7 million s.f. uptown projected population(5% growth): 67,763 people

0.013 acres (566 s.f.) / person 75.5 people / acre

0.012 acres (522.7 s.f.) / person 79.2 people / acre


Conceptual Diagram

Venue Placement (along transit)

Belk Field

Olympic Stadium - New

0.25 mi.

Panthers Stadium

0.50 mi.

Convention Center

Memorial Stadium

0.75 mi.

Aquatic Center - New

1.00 mi.

Time Warner Cable Arena

1.25 mi.


Remove of Panthers stadium after the Olympics allows for housing, retail, and office space to be brought into the city. It allows for the population within the city to expand in the future and the Olympics also bring a new stadium for the Charlotte Panthers.

2030 Plan

extended roads residential

existing roads

retail

areas that change

o ce

elevated train

elevated train

Panthers Stadium

proposed transit 1”=500’

1”=500’


SIDEWALK CONCRETE 7’

20’ 4’6” 1’

9’6” 6’

9’6” 1’ 4’6”

20’ 7’ 7’

10’ 4’6” 1’

9’6” 6’

9’6” 1’ 4’6”

10’ 7’ 7’

LAWN 4’6” 1’

9’6” 6’

9’6” 1’ 4’6”

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

LAWN

LAWN | TREES

SIDEWALK POROUS CONCRETE

LAWN | TREES

9’6”

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

10’

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

10’

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

9’6”

LAWN

5’

PLANT MIX | TREES

SIDEWALK POROUS PAVERS

PLANT MIX | TREES

TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

2’

LAWN | TREES

5’

TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

10’

SIDEWALK POROUS CONCRETE

2’

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

POROUS PAVERS BUFFER PLANT MIX | TREES

BIKE LANE POROUS CONCRETE

TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

POROUS PAVERS

PLANT MIX lined with porous pavers

SIDEWALK concrete BIKE LANE porous concrete

PLANT MIX/TREES lined with porous pavers

5’

PLANT MIX | TREES

10’

SIDEWALK POROUS PAVERS

5’

5’

LAWN | TREES

9’6” PLANT MIX | TREES

PLANT MIX | TREES

PLANT MIX/TREES lined with porous pavers

SIDEWALK concrete

BIKE LANE porous concrete

22’

LAWN

11’

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

POROUS PAVERS BUFFER PLANT MIX | TREES

BIKE LANE POROUS CONCRETE

TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

POROUS PAVERS

10’

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

10’ PLANT MIX | TREES

2’

SIDEWALK POROUS PAVERS

5’

PLANT MIX | TREES

10’

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

10’ TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

2’

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

11’

11’

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

10’

LAWN

2’

RAPID TRANSIT

5’

PLANT MIX lined with porous pavers

BIKE LANE porous concrete

10’

LAWN | TREES

9’6” RAPID TRANSIT

10’ PLANT MIX | TREES

5’

SIDEWALK POROUS CONCRETE

5’

POROUS PAVERS

SIDEWALK concrete

PLANT MIX/TREES lined with porous pavers

11’

LAWN | TREES

5’

TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

BIKE LANE POROUS CONCRETE

POROUS CONCRETE

BIOSWALE PLANT MIX

10’

TRAFFIC LANE ASPHALT

PLANT MIX | TREES

SIDEWALK POROUS PAVERS

PLANT MIX | TREES

2’

LAWN

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

35’

10’

5’

5’ 5’

20’ 7’

POROUS PAVERS


10’

4’6” 1’

9’6”

6’

Porous pavers and bioswales added to streets in order to remove wastes from runoff water. This also created park space incorporated into the streets which allow for bikes as well as relaxation.

9’6”

1’ 4’6”

10’

SIDEWALK CONCRETE

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

LAWN

LAWN | TREES

SIDEWALK POROUS CONCRETE

LAWN | TREES

LAWN

TRAFFIC LANES ASPHALT

SIDEWALK CONCRETE 7’

7’


Comprehensive

Spring 2013

The Hub | Mixed use (business, retail, educational


NATURAL CHARACTER AND QUALITY | DOMINANT FEATURES SITE BUSINESS PUBLIC HOUSING PARKING

The Hub is a comprehensive studio project based on designing the UNCC uptown campus, starting with group site analysis and master planning and going into individual work to design one building (the hub) which is a mixed use program. Before beginning the master planning we were asked to consider future development plans for the area which included a parking deck and a market street along the northwest side of the site. The site sits in the middle of housing, business, students, and entertainment and the concept for the design was based on interlocking these areas through both the master plan and the building design.


4 8 16

32

64

4 8 16

4 8 16

Primary Pedestrian Link Secondary Pedestrian Link Movement

32

32

64

64

Primary Pedestrian Link

Primary Pedestrian Link Secondary Pedestrian Link Movement

Secondary Pedestrian Link Movement

Master plan iterations for the UNCC uptown campus (this part is group collaboration) Investigated: Building heights for solar and wind Building orientation Movement and circulation around the site Interactions in and around the site Traffic patterns


Conceptual Site Diagram Master Plan Used for Design

INTERLOCKING

PEOPLE, SITE, MATERIALS, PROGRAM

E. 9TH ST.

E. 8TH ST.

E. 7TH ST.

E. 7TH ST.

MARKET STREET

E. 9TH ST.

E. 8TH ST.

BUSINESS

STUDENTS

4 8 16

32

64

The site is accessible to people from the light rail, residential, market street, business district and students. The concept for the building like that of the site is interlocking. Light and heavy materials interlock to create special moments in the architecture, while integrating people coming into the site. Studio spaces along the street allow movement to be visible throughout the day and night allowing people passing by to get a glimps of the life of architecture students. The building moves away from the sidewalk make the site more inviting and visible as an extension of space rather than a boundary. The light materials mix with heavy materials to bring natural light through the building in interesting ways.

E. 9TH ST.

RESIDENTIAL

N. BREVARD ST.

E. 8TH ST.

E. 7TH ST.

N. BREVARD ST.


Program Breakdown and Use Patterns WHO USES THE SPACES, WHEN, HOW OFTEN, AND THE OVERLAP BETWEEN USERS 7AM

WELCOME AREA RETAIL SPACE OPERATIONAL OFFICES GALLERY (PUBLIC) LARGE MEETING HALL SMART CLASSROOMS

STUDENTS BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS FACULTY WORKERS GENERAL PUBLIC

SMART ROOMS BUSINESS CENTER GALLERY CATERING GENERAL STORAGE STUDIO SPACE PRESENTATION SPACES COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES

MOST USE

ADMIN. OFFICES FACULTY OFFICES

LEAST USE

STORAGE

12PM

5PM

Examination of separate programmatic elements show 10PM how they overlap and can become integrated. (Spaces were still designed to meet code requirements based on program type and capacity)


IL TA

RE

IL TA

RE RY

LE

AL

Y|G

BB

LO

IL TA

RE

IL TA

RE AIL ET

R

IL TA

RE

IL TA

AIL ET

RE

R

IL TA

IL TA

RE

RE IL TA RE


METAL ATTACHMENT FOR ROD SYSTEM TO ATTACH DECKING, CONCRETE, VAPOR RETARDANT, INSULATION, ROOFING MEMBRANE

SPIDER ROD SYSTEM RUNS UP WALL AND MOUNTS AT ROOF AND FLOOR

TRUSS RUNS IN VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL DIRECTIONS FOR LOADS

COMPOSITE BEAMS | SPAN 42’ DEPTH 15” CEILING MATERIAL IS PULLED AWAY FROM WALL TO ALLOW FOR REVEALS AND LIGHTING, FLOOR TO FLOOR IS SEALED WITH METAL PIECES FOR FIRERATING

DIAGONAL BRACING RUNS FLOOR TO CEILING ACROSS TWO SPANS AND OPPOSITE AFTER THOSE SPANS SLAB DEPTH 4” 2” DECK SPAN 8’ SPANDREL GLASS RUNS BENEATH CANTILEVER CONNECTED TO METAL STUDS BY SPIDER CONNECTORS, GLASS CONTINUES 3’ UP WALL

COLUMN 12”X10”

JOIST SPAN 30’ DEPTH 15”

LIMESTONE CLADDING ATTACHED BY STUD WALL, THICKNESS OF STONE RANGES FROM 2” TO 1”, STONE SIZES ARE 1’X1’, 2’X1’, 4’X4’, AND 6’X4’


SOUTHWEST ELEVATION


ELEVATION SECTION


ON

T ES

HW

S

T OU

EL

I AT V E

=

8”

1/


Studio Phenomenology Spring 2012

Chapel, Crematorium, Columbarium


This studio was about creating an experience on the site as well as the building. The program was for a chapel, crematorium and columbarium and research was done to look at how different cultures deal with death. The site is located in Pinewood Cemetery in Charlotte, NC and because it was a burial site for slaves only two graves have markers. The site is also next to a factory and train tracks which give constant noise to the site. Because of the vegetation on site many birds make their home here, adding a more pleasant sound to the site and scatter as the hourly train passes. Stepping stones were scattered along the procession to the chapel in order to make people aware of their footsteps as they would in a cemetery with grave markers. The chapel is an unconditioned space made with a gabion wall system to allow light and shadows to move within the space and the columbarium becomes a birds nest where loved ones can place objects within the nest and experience the fluttering of birds as they say their good byes. The architecture uses materials and spatial arrangements to create different experiences.


Site Plan


"

!

South Elevation


Section 1

West Elevation


Built Projects

Light Box


Allowing regulating lines to inform a design. This project utilized three sets of rectilinear shapes to create relationships which informed a shallow relief and was then transformed into a light. It examines how objects transform space.

Step 1: The First ...

Step 2: ...

Step 3: ...

Step 4: ...


Step 5: ...

Step 6: ...

Step 7: ...

Step 8: ...


Step 9: ...

Step 10: ...

Step 11: ...

Step 12: ... The Shallow Relief ... Done


Step 13: ...

Step 14: ...

Step 15: ...

Step 16: ...


Built Projects

Shadow Box


Structures project requiring students to design a shadow box which uses wood, metal and rockite. Weight requirements and minimum and maximum dimensions had to be met. For inspiration for the project students were to choose an artist. The artist chosen for this project was ART + COM, they make amazing kinetic structures which are very delicate. My project utilized glass and magnets to carry the weight of the glass and allowed light to shine through the colored glass to produce varied reflections and shadows.


Photomontage

Photoshop


Painting Acrylic on Canvas


Photography



Architecture Portfolio