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Chapter 1

The Wampus Cat When residents of Trussville began to discover their pet cats and small dogs slaughtered by an animal in 2014, official thoughts went to coyotes, but according to the Mobile Press-Register, canines didn’t match eyewitness reports. One unnamed witness told the newspaper, “Several of the residents have confirmed it is a feline creature. It jumps tall fences and is extremely quick.” Thoughts of Trussville citizens went to one cause  —  the Wampus Cat. This spectral panther-sized beast has been reported across the American Southeast for centuries. Although there are numerous legends about the origin of this cat, the following two are most common in Alabama. The first legend comes from a Native American tradition. A Cherokee woman, suspicious of her husband’s hunting trips, dressed in the skin of a mountain lion and followed the hunting party into the woods. She came upon the hunters sitting around a fire listening to stories about magic. She hid, staying to hear these stories that were forbidden to women. The men discovered her, and cursed her to spend eternity as a half-woman, half– mountain lion. The second legend is slightly more modern, but just as magical, or at least Wellsian. According to the McDowell News of Marion, North Carolina, during World War II, the United States military succeeded in crossbreeding mountain lions and gray wolves in rural Alabama in an attempt to create a species of intelligent, vicious creatures to use as messengers in a war zone.

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Chasing American Monsters, by Jason Offutt  

From Alabama to Wyoming and every state in between, the United States is crawling with monsters lurking in the dark corners, just waiting fo...

Chasing American Monsters, by Jason Offutt  

From Alabama to Wyoming and every state in between, the United States is crawling with monsters lurking in the dark corners, just waiting fo...

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