Page 21

Alabama

9

segregated state. This act became a symbol of the civil rights movement. Famous people from Alabama include Helen Keller, Olympic gold medalist Jesse Owens, baseball hall of famer Hank Aaron, author Harper Lee, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. And then there are monsters.

The White Thang Reports of the White Thang (yes, “Thang”) date back to the 1930s, and reports of the monster vary. It has been described as everything from a dog to a Bigfoot to a ghost; but two things are constant—the monster’s long white hair and its scream. In the book Legends and Lore of Birmingham and Central Alabama by Beverly Crider, George Norris, an eyewitness in the 1940s, saw the monster, and “it looked like a lion … you know, bushy, betwixt a dog and a lion. It was white and slick with long hair. It had a slick tail, down on the end of the tail a big ol’ bush of hair.” In the 1930s, the monster was said to run on all fours—even climbing trees to wait for people to walk beneath it. In later decades, it has been described as upright and at least seven feet tall, although witnesses say they can’t make out any detail of the monster, like hands or facial features. But it’s not the beast’s appearance or behavior that causes fright (people who’ve encountered the White Thang say it’s nonthreatening); the monster’s scream is what shatter’s people’s spirits. The shriek, like a woman or a baby crying, not only barks in the woods at night, witnesses have heard the sound come from the hulking, white-haired monster as it loomed over them and screeched into their face.

Profile for Llewellyn Worldwide, LTD.

Chasing American Monsters, by Jason Offutt  

From Alabama to Wyoming and every state in between, the United States is crawling with monsters lurking in the dark corners, just waiting fo...

Chasing American Monsters, by Jason Offutt  

From Alabama to Wyoming and every state in between, the United States is crawling with monsters lurking in the dark corners, just waiting fo...

Profile for llewellyn