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Introduction Humanity

has always had monsters: creatures that

lurk in our periphery, skulking, stalking, waiting until we’re at our most vulnerable to show themselves. In the early days of humanity, sometime between climbing out of the trees and creating stone tools, there were real monsters. The cave bear, the woolly rhinoceros, the cave lion, the moa—all capable of instilling fear in man because they were all capable of killing us. Humanity lost many of its real monsters during the late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions (around 11.7 thousand years ago); however, the rise of civilization brought us new monsters, like the minotaur, the cyclops, griffins, and dragons—all attempts to explain nature and theology with humanity’s growing intellect. As we’ve found throughout history, as society changes, so does its monsters. Many of the creatures in Chasing American Monsters may sound familiar. When people move to a new land, they bring with them more than just their families, their heirlooms, and their traditions. They bring with them their legends and, in some cases, the things that have always lurked in their shadows and hidden under their 1

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Chasing American Monsters, by Jason Offutt  

From Alabama to Wyoming and every state in between, the United States is crawling with monsters lurking in the dark corners, just waiting fo...

Chasing American Monsters, by Jason Offutt  

From Alabama to Wyoming and every state in between, the United States is crawling with monsters lurking in the dark corners, just waiting fo...

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