__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Spring Edition 2016

LANA NEWSLETTER Contents Kids & Camelids Show Superintendent’s Message Show Results Show Pictures

1 3 7

Battling Those Pesky Insects

16

Fleece On - Fleece Off

19

What is Your Llama Feeling

22

LANA T-shirt information

24

THANK YOU for contributing to this newsletter: Susan Rich, Cathy Spalding, Joy Pedroni, Chela Grey, and Pam Parker.

www.lanainfo.org

Kids & Camelids Show by Superintendent Susan Rich No halter, no grooming, just kids and fun! Repurposed ribbons, barbecued sausages, volunteers aplenty, and phenomenal costume give-aways - the Kids & Camelids Show held at the Stanislaus County Fairground in Turlock, CA, April 2 was an event! The “sho-nic” was a half show (complete with judges and ALSA sanctioned status) and a half clinic (with consultation from experts). The show’s tagline: no halter, no grooming, just kids and all fun. $

Senior Performance Champion Trinity Harry

The youth who participated in the showmanship and three performance classes were gifted with the support of and assistance from many talented adults from the llama community. Margaret Drew volunteered her time for the second year in a row to judge the four classes. Each performance class participant ended his or her “run” with a review by the judge and a discussion over the score card. The youth then delivered the results to the show tabulator. New this year, Lora Crawford donated her time and advice through a “Consult with Crawford” moment when 1


Spring Edition 2016

youth were advised about conformation and consequent best shearing choices, handling and training. Also a first for the the Kids & Camelids Show, Maureen Macedo offered advisement about fiber during “A moment with Maureen.” Hence, the sho-nic feel to the day’s activities.$

It takes a village !

!

Intermediate Performance Champion Ariana Terbijhe - left Intermediate Reserve Performance Champion Anica Terbijhe - right

!

Kathy Nichols filled in as ring steward and “thank you” coordinator. Joy Pedroni wo-manned the tabulator table and doubled as announcer. Sophie Jones and Hailey Brown changed out obstacles and blew up balloons and served as petters. Trinity Harry, a high school junior, designed the courses. She and her mother, Nicole Grass, hauled obstacles, set up courses, and broke down the show. Fred and Kenny Rich provided a tasty lunch for participants, parents, and volunteers. They say, “it takes a village,” and the villagers were out in full to make this day happen.$

Great Costume Give-Away! A unique, one-time feature of this show was the Great Costume Give-Away. Years ago, Deborah Slocum’s fabulous and creative costume collection came into the hands of Show Superintendent Susan Rich. Dennie Hansen ensured that the costumes that had come into her keeping ended up with youth handlers. Sue sorted, bagged, and created 20+ give-away options for participants and volunteer judges. Lucky recipients went home with Christmas blankets, 4th of July vests and hats, dragon wings, lighted Mardi Gras masks and more.$

Swag Bags and Sponsors ! Sponsors of the show included NASCO (every participant received a bag, grooming brush and catalog), Quality Llama Products (catalogs and gift certificates were distributed), and Starbucks (volunteers were gifted with coffee beans and cups).$

!

Intermediate Reserve Performance Champion Mykenzie Franks - left Intermediate Performance Champion Kirsten Franks - right

! ! ! ! ! ! ! 2


Spring Edition 2016

!

It was a beautiful, educational, and satisfying day watching kids build better, stronger relationships with their animals and seeing talented adults pass on their wisdom to youngsters coming up through the ranks.$ A huge thank you to everyone who made the show possible. Stay tuned for next year’s plans!$ editor’s note: This is the third LANA youth performance show. Sue Rich has done a fabulous job as superintendent. Many thanks to Sue and her show crew for a great show and a fun day.!

! ! ! !

! 1st

Kids & Camelids Show Results SENIOR YOUTH

PACK

Trinity Harry

McShaggy’s Memnon

class of 1 Orange Blossom 4-H 3


Spring Edition 2016

1st

1st

SENIOR YOUTH

OBSTACLE

Trinity Harry

McShaggy’s Memnon

SENIOR YOUTH

PUBLIC RELATIONS

Trinity Harry

McShaggy’s Memnon

GRAND CHAMPION

SENIOR YOUTH PERFORMANCE

Trinity Harry

McShaggy’s Memnon

class of 1 Orange Blossom 4-H class of 1 Orange Blossom 4-H

Orange Blossom 4-H

INTERMEDIATE YOUTH PACK

class of 2

1st

Anica Terbijhe

S'Murry

QT Farm

2nd

Ariana Terbijhe

Winter

QT Farm

INTERMEDIATE YOUTH OBSTACLE

class of 2

1st

Ariana Terbijhe

Winter

QT Farm

2nd

Anica Terbijhe

S’Murry

QT Farm

INTERMEDIATE YOUTH PUBLIC RELATIONS

class of 2

1st

Ariana Terbijhe

Winter

QT Farm

2nd

Anica Terbijhe

S’Murry

QT Farm

GRAND CHAMPION

INTERMEDIATE YOUTH PERFORMANCE

Ariana Terbijhe

Winter

RESERVE CHAMPION

INTERMEDIATE YOUTH PERFORMANCE

Anica Terbijhe

S’Murry

QT Farm

QT Farm

JUNIOR YOUTH

PACK

class of 4

1st

Kirsten Franks

Aloha Andiamo

Royal Farm

2nd

Mykenzie Franks

Cachete

Royal Farm

3rd

Lily Mogler

Cadfael’s Mulan

Mogler Madness

4


Spring Edition 2016

JUNIOR YOUTH

PACK

Ethan Busha

Lora’s Cup-Java

JUNIOR YOUTH

OBSTACLE

1st

Kirsten Franks

Aloha Andiamo

Royal Farm

2nd

Mykenzie Franks

Cachete

Royal Farm

3rd

Lily Mogler

Cadfail’s Mulan

Mogler Madness

4th

Ethan Busha

Lora’s Cup-Java

Macedo’s Mini Acre

JUNIOR YOUTH

PUBLIC RELATIONS

1st

Kirsten Franks

Aloha Andiamo

Royal Farm

2nd

Mykenzie Franks

Cachete

Royal Farm

3rd

Lily Mogler

Cadfael’s Mulan

Mogler Madness

4th

Ethan Busha

Lora’s Cup-Java

Macedo’s Mini Acre

4th

GRAND CHAMPION

JUNIOR YOUTH PERFORMANCE

Kirsten Franks

Aloha Andiamo

RESERVE CHAMPION

JUNIOR YOUTH PERFORMANCE

Mykenzie Franks

Cachete

class of 4 Macedo Mini Acre class of 4

class of 4

Royal Farm

Royal Farm

! ! SUB-JUNIOR YOUTH

OBSTACLE

class of 3

1st

Aiden Pedroni

Happy Hiker Vladimir

Black Cat Llamas

2nd

Jackson Pedroni

Happy Hiker Vladimir

Black Cat Llamas

3rd

Ethan Pedroni

Happy Hiker Vladimir

Black Cat Llamas

SUB-JUNIOR YOUTH

PUBLIC RELATIONS

1st

Ethan Pedroni

Happy Hiker Vladimir

Black Cat Llamas

2nd

Aiden Pedroni

Happy Hiker Vladimir

Black Cat Llamas

! class of 3

5


Spring Edition 2016

3rd

SUB-JUNIOR YOUTH

PUBLIC RELATIONS

Jackson Pedroni

Happy Hiker Vladimir

SENIOR YOUTH

SHOWMANSHIP

Trinity Harry

McShaggy’s Memnon

class of 3 Black Cat Llamas

! 1st

class of 1 Orange Blossom 4-H

INTERMEDIATE YOUTH SHOWMANSHIP

class of 2

1st

Anica Terbijhe

S'Murry

QT Farm

2nd

Ariana Terbijhe

Winter

QT Farm

JUNIOR YOUTH

SHOWMANSHIP

1st

Kirsten Franks

Aloha Andiamo

Royal Farm

2nd

Mykenzie Franks

Cachete

Royal Farm

3rd

Lily Mogler

Cadfail’s Mulan

Mogler Madness

4th

Ethan Busha

Cup Java

Macedo’s Mini Acre

class of 4

6


Spring Edition 2016

!

Kids and Camelids Show Pictures Senior Performance Division

click center for video

Trinity and McShaggy’s Memnon 7


Spring Edition 2016

! Intermediate Performance Division

Anica and S’Murry

Ariana and Winter 8


Spring Edition 2016

Junior Performance Division

Lily and Mulan

Ethan and Cup-Java

!

! 9


Spring Edition 2016

Mykenzie and Cachete

Kirsten and Aloha Andiamo 10


Spring Edition 2016

click center for video

Sub-Junior Division

Ethan and Vlad

11


Spring Edition 2016

Jackson and Vlad

Aiden and Vlad

12


Spring Edition 2016

"

13


Spring Edition 2016

!

! ! 14


Spring Edition 2016

!

click center for video

15


Spring Edition 2016

! Battling Those Pesky Insects

!

By Cathy Spalding GentleSpirit Behavior &Training www.gentlespiritllamas.com cathy@gentlespiritllamas.com

! Spring gifts us with a vast array of re-appearances. The seemingly lifeless shrubs and trees begin to harmoniously blend in vibrant shades of green. Blooms appear where there had been only darkness. Life emerges with vigor from the silent earth and stillness of harsher times. Birds arrive and begin building homes. Slugs and snails once again become readily visible. Spring also marks to arrival of those pesky summer insects – most notably – flies, mosquitoes and those hard to see little biting bugs." Each year the camelid community revisits numerous ideas and practices in an attempt to mitigate and control the insect onslaught. Some prefer the use of chemical sprays. Others are partial to the introduction of insect predators. Still others prefer a homeopathic approach. No matter our preferences, the earlier we begin addressing the issue, the better the results." Following are a variety of thoughts and ideas. Perhaps one will be just the solution you were looking for. While I have tried some of these suggestions with great success, I have not personally experimented with every single one. And, I do not promote nor endorse any particular remedy. I can only vouch that each suggestion was said to work very well by the one who suggested it! " Fly Predators can be ordered from a number of sources. Each offers a schedule and number of suggested predators based on how many animals and how much area is to be covered. " Quality Llama Products – also offers repellants and traps www.llamaproducts.com" Spalding Laboratories www.spalding-labs.com" ValleyVet www.valleyvet.com" BioLOGICAL Fly Control www.sourcebiofly.com" There is a pyrethin-based product called Pyranha. Pyrethrums come from chrysanthemums. Pyranha is said to last a long time and does not have a heavy smell." 16


Spring Edition 2016

Warnings state you should not drink it or get it into your eyes. Further information on Pyranha can be found at: www.pyranhainc.com" Using flytraps can capture hundreds of flies. To be most effective, traps must be placed in the sun and contain a stinky bait. The stink is definitely a drawback to this otherwise quite effective method. Flytraps can be purchased through most camelid vendors as well as local farm and supply stores." Most farm and supply stores offer an assortment of equine fly repellants that can be directly applied on the animal. It is important to investigate that any of those products are indeed safe for alpacas and llamas. Some products are not recommended for use on a pregnant animal." Some folks swear that their insect population has significantly dwindled by inviting swallows, western bluebirds and purple martins to take up residence. They have placed numerous birdhouses around their property specific to the particular bird and are excited when they become inhabited. They have also reported a resulting dramatic drop in their insect population." Purification is a commercial brand of therapeutic grade essential oils. It is said to work for flies, gnats, ticks and fleas. The blend contains citronella, lemongrass, rosemary, melaleuca, lavender and myrtle. It is also said to be a great choice for cleansing wounds and drawing out toxins." Supershield Green by Absorbine is an all-natural insect repellant." Lemongrass Insect Lotion by Burt’s Bee’s seems to last all day. The ingredients for this lotion are grape oil seed, lemongrass oil, citronella oil, vitamin E and rosemary oil." Avon Skin So Soft comes in a spray on oil. " Rubbing Bounce fabric softener sheets on exposed areas such as the nose and ears has met with success over the course of a day." Following are a number of homemade fly spray recipes. Each is slightly different. Some are comprised solely of natural ingredients. Some are a combination. They are listed in no particular order -- " #1: This spray is said to last all day and can be “sweetened” by adding a few drops of lavender. 4 oz. Skin So Soft from Avon 1 oz. Citronella oil – health food grade ½ oz. Eucalyptus oil 1 T vanilla 12 oz. Cider vinegar 12 oz. Water"

! #2: ¼ cup of Dawn dish soap and ½ cup vinegar 1 capful of Skin So Soft Mix with one quart of water and it is ready to spray 17


Spring Edition 2016

#3: T of eucalyptus oil 2 T of Skin So Soft Mix with one quart of water and it is ready to spray"

! #4: 10 drops each of good quality pennyroyal and citronella ¼ cup of almond oil a few drops of glycerin Can be used in this mixture or added to water. You must keep shaking the mixture if added with water."

! #5: 2 tsp tea tree oil 2 tsp liquid vitamin E 4 oz of regular Desitin" Mix together. It will be the consistency of honey. It is said to work well on those insect irritated bare spots most commonly seen on the ears and nose." Some folks swear by additives to the diet. An “old” horse remedy advocates adding apple cider vinegar into the water source. (It is said that white vinegar will have the same result.) It might take a short time for the alpacas and llamas to adjust to the taste but within three weeks; the number of flies on the animals should have lessened significantly." Fresh garlic seems to have the ability to change our smell and taste and insects tend to avoid it. Fresh garlic is also considered an excellent antibiotic." The complete B-Complex is said to also have the ability to change our smell and taste. " There are many thoughts and ideas on how best to address insect control. It is important to find what works best for you and your own herd management… and get started. Everything is in bloom… including the insect population."

! ! ! ! ! ! ! 18


Spring Edition 2016

! !

Fleece on - Fleece Off

While small in attendance, LANA’s Fleece Clinic was HUGE in information.
 "

!

LANA held its shorn fleece clinic on April 17th at Macedo’s Mini Acre. Maureen and Larry Macedo hosted the event at their lovely ranch in Turlock, California. ALSA Judge Maureen Macedo and Kathy Nichols were the presenters for this clinic." The morning session was taught by Kathy who brought two llamas for her demonstration. She started with how to prepare the fleece for shearing. Topics discussed for this were using a blower, brushing, and bathing (shampoos and conditioners and disadvantages of certain types). She blew out one of her llamas and discussed what to look for when using the blower (if any areas needs special attention). Next was setting up the shearing area and shearing. Using her other demo llama, Kathy sheared the prime area that she would use for show. She also showed how she collects the fleece. Different methods of collecting the fleece were shared amongst the group, as well as a question and answer time.

" 19


Spring Edition 2016

"

"

! After a yummy lunch of loaded baked potatoes, Maureen taught the afternoon session. It began with a hands-on activity. Attendees were treated with the opportunity to gather around a skirting table to skirt an alpaca fleece and a llama fleece. Alpaca and llama fleeces were displayed and compared. Maureen broke down the fleece score card by noting how the fleeces scored in points. Dierent ways to present the fleece for show were demonstrated and advantages and disadvantages discussed. Maureen explained how to fill out the fleece tags properly and which division to enter.

! ! ! ! ! !

! ! ! ! !

!

20


Spring Edition 2016

 

21


Spring Edition 2016

"

What is your llama [alpaca, goat, dog, cat, sheep, chicken…] feeling today?

!

PULLMAN, Wash. - Animals might not analyze their emotions the way humans do, but they do experience them, according to Jaak Panksepp, a professor and researcher at Washington State University. ! A relatively new addition to WSU's Department of Veterinary and Comparative Anatomy, Pharmacology and Physiology, Panksepp believes "people don't have a monopoly on emotion; rather, despair, joy and love are ancient, elemental responses that have helped all sorts of creatures survive and thrive in the natural world.”"

!

Many, if not most, of the people we’re acquainted with who have the pleasure of living with llamas, alpacas and animals in general know the above statement to be true. "

! Take for instance what happens when a new member is introduced into an established herd. If a female, does your alpha female readily accept the newbie? Does your favorite gelding take to new geldings like a brother from the get go? Or, when you show attention to the newbie does your once top of the line guy become stand-offish, not only with other herd members, but also with you? Or perhaps he begins picking on the other guy … keeping him away from the food or from other llamas, or from you? Working in rescue and bringing in new animals on a regular basis gives us the opportunity for a lot of anecdotal evidence for emotions in animals."

! We recently took in two geldings whose owner had to relinquish them due to her health issues. Our most favored (read spoiled) gelding appeared to think about this turn of events for maybe a few days and came to the conclusion that he was not willing to put up with “his” humans paying any attention to these guys. He began to stand between them and food, he chased them away from the humans. He began jumping on the newbies and then on other llamas who tried to get near them. It would be tempting to call all of this “just territorial behavior”, and no doubt to some extent it is, but one look at that guy’s eyes tells a bigger story. Sad, hurt, jealous all come to mind, closely followed by anger. Instinct, yes, but behavior exacerbated by feelings/emotions."

! Then there is the episode of our having to euthanize one of three llamas who had been together since birth. The one who had to be sent on cried. Yes, real tears. The other two 22


Spring Edition 2016

stood by his stall for days prior to the vet visit sometimes humming, sometimes just looking at him and only leaving to eat or poo. When the vet came the other two boys were outside the barn, but followed the vet in. After the vet left the two boys came to the stall to say goodbye. They only left when we asked them to go outside. For several days after their brother was buried, they would come to the stall where he had been, obviously looking for him. Their confusion was palpable. "

! Our most heartrending episode of grief among the llamas was when my wonderful boy, “Gregory” died in my arms, with his mother, “Masquerade”, who had spent the last several days in a stall with him, lying close by. Over the next week or so, she became more and more withdrawn. She would often go to spots where she and Gregory used to hang out together and just stand looking into space. One evening when I went to find her to bring her in for her pre-sleep snack, I found her in the last place the two of them had eaten together . . . she had gone over the Rainbow Bridge."

! And, there is relief and happiness too. On an occasion when we took a female llama to the hospital to be a companion for one of her herdmates who was ill, the companion’s mother spent the entire rest of the day near the gate humming and watching the road. We returned very late at night with the companion llama. The rest of the herd were all off somewhere in the dark, but when we opened the trailer the companion llama’s mother came running out to greet her daughter, humming and quite obviously very happy to see her while also seeming to demand to know where she’d been and was she OK."

! It’s difficult, I realize, to believe without seeing the facial expressions and body language involved, that any of this is proof of emotions. But, take a good look at faces, eyes, body language in your animals on a daily basis and it can just about be guaranteed you’ll see evidence of real emotion. Once we start seeing the animals as more than “just” an animal our treatment of them and concern for their welfare becomes much deeper and the animals respond to us in a much more intimate and cooperative way."

! Chela Grey StillPointe Llama Sanctuary www.stillpointesanctuary.org"

! !

! 23


Spring Edition 2016

Clinic Ideas LANA provides programs and services to its members and continuously looks for new ways to help members and their animals. Educating the llama community, whether new or experienced owners, is important to the organization. LANA is looking for clinic ideas. Is there something you want to learn about? Packing, llama wellness and veterinary care, fiber arts, driving, fleece, business and marketing? Let LANA know. Email Kathy at KathySVA@aol.com with your ideas." "

Get Your LANA T-shirt NOW!

$16 per shirt $6.45 Express mail shipping (we can ship 3 or 4 shirts in a single package) This is an ongoing fundraiser to benefit LANA programs throughout the year. You can order by email (lanaquestions@gmail.com) and send a check or you can order on LANA’s webpage, www.lanainfo.org, and pay with PayPal. Help support LANA and order your shirt today! 24

Profile for Llama Association of North America

Lana spring newsletter 2016  

Lana spring newsletter 2016  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded