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Design Concept Studio Air Lucy Krimmer


Part C.1 Design Concept Finalized Renewable Energy Installation.

The final model was a result of appropriate application and understanding of the chosen renewable energy source combined with careful consideration of the site and lastly a desire to take risks in the design process. In addition to the LAGI criteria there were several other criteria which our model measured against: Surface Area- Maximizing energy generated through larger solar exposure. Visual Intrigue - The instillation provokes exploration from viewers and is also highly visible drawing attention to the site. Human Interaction - Stimulates and challenges visitors, engaging and encouraging them to interact with the structure. Considering how we would effectively maximise solar gain was one of the biggest challenges from the design ideation phase. Other than creating a solid form to be placed over the site, how would the series of pipes effectively utilize the maximum potential of dye solar cells, whilst maintaining a low embodied energy during construction.

Relationship with the site. After consideration of our first interim feedback it was decided to unwrap the sections of the pipe; creating fins. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the advanced dye solar technology we extended the panels the full width of the fins, which would curve around the form’s spine. Thus differentiating our technology from standard cells which would traditionally be placed in linear strips, as well beneficiating our design through increased energy generation. One of the benefits of using computational modeling for this brief was being able to accurately track the sun path over the site model and gain information on how much energy would be produced. Like the Endessa Pavilion which was examined previously in Part B, the final form was strategically designed according to accurate solar input/output data.

In addition to using Lady Bug, the solar computer software, a site analysis needed to be performed. From this we highlighted several key areas; the two entrances (water taxi/ land), the views across the water to the mermaid and the optimal solar position along the south perimeter. Also identified were the buildings that flanked the north and north east side; blocking views from the site and really driving the industrial ambiance of the location. Altering the topography of the site was another way to add dimension and safer height to installation; hills were created along the north side; raising the spine and fins so that access to the sun would not be obstructed by the south pieces and its shadow. In the central area the land was also raised to add another viewing area, where as the small valleys helped guide the users to and from entry points of the site. The final form was generated from the same algorithm that has been consistently developed throughout the semester, however it was a more informed and considered version; based on the solar analysis combined with a site and user analysis.


Human Interaction.

The aim of our installation was to develop an interactive site for Copenhagen that informs users about renewable energy sources. Our technology is clearing displayed through a simple system showcasing that solar is not simply linear panels. The organic form is especially apt to juxtapose the industrial background against which it is situated. We strived to engage with all types of users; those external and visiting the site. Within the site we manipulated the arches of the spines; making it interactive to walk through. The curves also help guide visitors through the site to a central meeting point or to views of the town. Due to the size of the fins and the panels, this instillation provides some shelter and the light passing through onto the ground making interesting coloured shadows, turning the industrial landscape into a playful, creative and informative space.

The benefit of the large scale, means that it is visible from far distances; inviting people to the site. As a tool for generating more intrigue about this project at night the fins are lit by LED lights, making it visible from afar and guiding users to at. The LEDs would use little power and make the site possible for night use.

Some feedback to consider would be what are the differnt colours of fins and how does it feel to be walking around under these panels. Should we consider more keenly the shelter provided or how different colour solar cells would change the overal aesthetic.


C.2 Tectonic Elements Early prototypes..

After critically examining the initial prototypes as discussed in our first presentation, we decided that these were not viable at all, so tried some new ideas. Our first attempt was a 3D printed print with ball and socket joint move, as our design desired and would hold the solar cells in the flat section of the tube. However this failed to demonstrate the benefits of our technology and was too similar to a traditional solar panel. What was discovered from this first test was that the joint worked well in terms of rotation and was both interesting and functional. We explored how paper could be unrolled to create fins that gave the apearance of being a segment of a pipe. This arrangement was more abstract to test out different methods of construction. We further began to explore this prototype and using the card cutter sampled a few more fins with paper to see how they worked on a larger scale. We then moved on to prototyping using polypropylene, to examine how this material would perform; would it bend as desired. Tested several however we then had to resolved the how these would join at different scales.

Finalizing the prototypes.

Due to the previous success of the ball joints we decided to further experiment with this design. Once it was determined the length of the joint did not need to house a solar panel the thickness of the entire length was superfluous. The thick bottom end would remain to keep batteries and other solar technology. The second type of joint had an exterior ring that slotted over the fin, fitting it in place. The polypropylene fins at worked well once we figured out how these could be attached to a tube for our 1:200 model. By slicing 4 little cuts at the base we realized we could use ties to attach these to the pipes. Our final 3D printed ball joints were the 1:50 scale joints that clipped on to the corresponding poly propylene panels. This method was selected for the ease of contractibility and did not restrict the fin unlike the previous 3D test did; the ring flattened the fins, limiting their arch.


Contractibility and Materials

The benefit of this system was that the ball and socket joints allowed the fins or solar panels to be rotated towards the south or wherever the strongest sun was. This is demonstrated in the diagram that changes from yellow to read (symbolizing the growing heat generated) as the panel rotates towards more direct sunlight.

Steel Casing that holds electrical infrastructure, 2 meters in diameter.

Hollow steel core that allows for services to be run through the middle, 7 meters in length.

The joints extend from the ground much life a tree with the root connections; through a pile dependant on the terrain. To help these large forms arch we have slumped some together, the compression against each other increasing stability. The single spines are low lying to reduce the stress and likelihood of failing due to the size of each component.

Glass supported by steel frames inset with dye solar technology; 14 meters length/ 6.3 meters width at the base.

Some feedback that was give which could be further developed would be to reduce the size of the fins and ball joints; at One meter in diameter the joints are still large, something to consider is would this just increase the number of components needed.


C.3 Final Model


Documentation of the process.

Previous pages (Left) 1:200 Site Model Foam core base creating new topographic layers. LED light strip coiled around the site and through cut outs in the foam core to accurately represent the spine of the model. Polypropylene fins were threaded* with ties and attached to the light strip.

Previous pages (Top Right) 1:50 Construction Joint 3D printed Ball and Socket joint. Polypropylene fin connected to the ball joint component via a series of four small clips (highlighted in red). The was another benefit of using computer modeling; allowed for accurate measurements and precision. When constructing joints (Top Left) 1:50 Construction Joint 3D printed Ball and Socket joint fitted together, demonstrating how the connections would work in real life. Highlights how the fins overlap to hide the connection joints from above.

*The deicision to thread the ties was due to the number of fins and feasibility at a 1:200 scale of creating a informative model within the time constraints. The ties were threaded through the highlighted section at the base of the fin.

This page 1:2 Renewable Energy Detail Two polypropylene fin components, that between them house the dye solar cells*. In real life construction the glass would act as an energy conductor for the cells. The glass is supported by steel framming as depicted. Some limitations with this prototype was that; due to the scale only a small section of the could feasibly be constructed

*One consistent colour was selected to avoid the model looking to fanciful and detracting from the overall detail. The use of different colours to the installation was explored, has been explored further via renders and Photoshop since the final prototypes.


C.4 LAGI Brief Steel Casing that holds electrical infrastructure, 2 meters in diameter.

We generated a number of dynamic results that were not commonly associated with solar but we decided to continue with this stream for a more creative and challenging design. Applying this to the site in a way that would best highlight the versatility of our chosen renewable energy system dye solar cells. The aim of our installation was to develop an interactive site for Copenhagen that informs users about renewable energy sources. Our technology is clearing displayed through a simple system showcasing that solar is not simply linear panels. The organic form is especially apt to juxtapose the industrial background against which it is situated. We strived to engage with all types of users; those external and visiting the site. Within the site we manipulated the arches of the spines; making it interactive to walk through. The curves also help guide visitors through the site to a central meeting point or to views of the town. Due to the size of the fins and the panels, this instillation provides some shelter and the light passing through onto the ground making interesting coloured shadows, turning the industrial landscape into a playful, creative and informative space.

Hollow steel core that allows for services to be run through the middle, 7 meters in length.

Glass supported by steel frames inset with dye solar technology; 14 meters length/ 6.3 meters width at the base.

The benefit of the large scale, means that it is visible from far distances; inviting people to the site. As a tool for generating more intrigue about this project at night the fins are lit by LED lights, making it visible from affair and guiding users to at. The LEDs would use little power and make the site possible for night use.

Our final form responds from critical site analysis;Firstly the solar component - how do we maximise solar gain from organically shaped spines. Thus the solar panels on glass

Dye Solar cells can be inserted between a conductive layer such as glass. Panels can be flexible and colours and patterns of dye may vary, in addition to its other qualities*. Copenhagen is a realitively green city however, the number of tourists who visit each year are often not from such sustainable cities. By having a interesting and inteactive art installation, hopefully people will be able to engage with the idea of renewable energy more freely. This energy has a low embodied cost are could be used directly on windows technology of buildings.

fins determined there were a number of zones in the site these were used to form the installation and help guide users through these spaces topography to maximise views and help define the form. Two entrances with a central meeting point and a viewing platform. Another way to help users engage with the site was to rearrange the topography of the site based on the solar analysis and we positioned the form to respond.


C.5 Learning Outcomes and Objectives Over the last 12 weeks using computational modeling has really helped develope a design that would not have been possible otherwise. The number of iterations that were possible easy to create has vastly influenced the final design outcome. In the first weeks looking at peoples journals and seeing something like this was so very daunting, I feel more confident that I could use my (still limited knowledge) to generate an interesting design.

I have found working in this particular group most rewarding as we all come from such different back grounds, it is a good mix to generate far more creative ideas. I have really enjoyed experimenting with different software such as Lady Bug or 3D coat, and I have myself pushed to design better many times. The brief was probably one of the most enjoyable I have ever had and really gave me an opportunity to pursue something I was interested in to generate a very unexpected design, that I really believe in. I think the lack of rendering skills has let me down, however this is something to focus on for my next studio.

Krimnmer lucy 538055 part c  
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