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THE WORKS OF

317.340.4547 | lk.e.haas@gmail.com

LUKE HAAS

161 Rivington St. apt 1a New York, NY 10002

ARCHITECTURE

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OTHER PROJECTS

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BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK RE-DEVELOPMENT AND MASTER PLAN HOTEL | RESIDENTIAL | RECREATION date:

ARCH 601 FALL 2011 designer:

LUKE HAAS distinction:

EARMARKED FOR SCE ACADEMIC ARCHIVE


BROOKLYN BRIDGE PARK RE-DEVELOPMENT AND MASTER PLAN My third graduate studio project focuses on the application of a diverse program-including a hotel and convention center, restaurants, residential units, and a velodrome --on a small, topographically challenging site adjacent to the Brooklyn Bridge Park and the neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights in New York City. Currently, Brooklyn Heights and the Brooklyn waterfront are separated by the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, which effectively is a sixty foot cliff of unrelenting vehicular traffic. The Architecture acts as a connection between Brooklyn Heights the new developments along the waterfront (including Brooklyn Bridge Park and several other parcels which are under development) through the topographical manipulation of spaces which have been leftover since the BQE’s construction. These topographical manipulations allow for a multileveled engagement with the site as well as an elevated, defensive posture towards potential storm surge and sea level change. Brooklyn Heights enjoys a panoramic view of lower Manhattan; thus, it was important that my project be able to capitalize on these views without compromising the views of the existing neighborhood.


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SPLASH HOUSE PARSONS DESIGN WORKSHOP NEW ENTRY SEQUENCE AND PAIR OF CHANGING PAVILIONS 2301 AMSTERDAM AVENUE date:

ARCH 502 SPRING 2011, TO BE COMPLETED FALL 2012 designer:

2011 PARSONS DESIGN WORKSHOP client:

NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT


SPLASH HOUSE PARSONS DESIGN WORKSHOP The 2011 Parsons Design Workshop (a design build program operated by the School of Constructed Environments) collaborated with the NYC Parks Department and the High Bridge Coalition to revitalize the Highbridge Pool and Recreation Center, a historic landmark in New York City. Due to the limited space within the existing building, recreational programs must be suspended during the summer to accommodate the storage and changing space required for the thousands of pool-goers. Upon completion, the Splash House-- a pair of outdoor pavilions --will allow the recreation center to remain open year-round and offer more recreational programs to the Washington Heights community.


The design reorganizes the current circulation and provides new changing and locker areas on the pool deck. The architecture uses natural systems of light, ventilation, and water to provide a porous structure as efficient and lightweight as possible, while simultaneously reaming sensitive to its historic context. Additionally, the structures will include a water feature to fulfill the need for required showering before entering the pool while also creating a playful place for children.


When the pool opens in the morning, patrons queue up to have their bags checked before entering the pool. Patrons then steadily enter the facility throughout the day in moderate volumes. When the pool closes, as many as 1000 patrons leave the pool at once. The pavilions respond to this daily flux of occupant volume with four 12’ sliding doors that open to larger volumes of patrons while simultaneously converting the locker space into an enclosed changing space (see top).


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RIVERKEEPER OFFICES AND OUTREACH GRADUATE STUDIO PROJECT date:

ARCH 501 FALL 2010 designers:

LUKE HAAS GLEN FUJIMURA DANIELLE EPPSTIEN distinction:

EARMARKED FOR SCE ACADEMIC ARCHIVE

N

meeting/ class rooms interior voids- exhibition space laboratory auditorium office space


RIVERKEEPER OFFICES AND OUTREACH Representing interior design, lighting design, and architecture, my colleagues and I collaborated from the initial schematic phases to produce a substantially resolved project. We also strove to developed a workflow that simulates the realities of integrated building design which will be encounter in the field. Our client, Riverkeeper (a New York based, non-for-profit water quality and environmental advocacy firm), outlined their needs for a building program that fulfills their office requirements as well as their burgeoning outreach program. Further, their values as an environmentalist organization called for an architecture that expresses Riverkeeper’s role in their community as a leader for ethical environmental practices.


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PORTLAND MUNICIPAL COURTHOUSE CRIPE ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS COMPETITION date:

ARCH 401 FALL 2009 designers:

LUKE HAAS BEN FREUHLING distinction:

FIRST PLACE AWARD


PORTLAND MUNICIPAL COURTHOUSE I consider courthouses, as a building type, to be about the law and how it can best serve the population, and I sought to explore this throughout the design of this project. I gave special consideration to the occupants’ experience of security and circulation and how the two can interact. This is illustrated in the diagram above. Further, because the site I worked with is located in downtown Portland, I felt that it was important for my design to serve its economic context of mixed-use and retail as well. In order to respond to and stimulate this context, I elevated the courthouse program over a cushion of retail spaces on the first floor. This also permits enhanced security, as sensitive spaces are held above and are protected from the street.


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MAXIMUM EXPOSURE URBAN SHED INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION date:

ARCH 401 FALL 2009 designer:

LUKE HAAS


URBAN SHED INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION An “urban shed� is the scaffold-like canopy which is commonly placed over the sidewalk at the bases of high-rise buildings during times of renovation or construction. Unlike buildings, these ubiquitous structures lack a defined context and must therefore posses the flexibility to accommodate the myriad of urban variety. Sidewalk sheds are inherently linear, and there may be many miles of these sheds in a given city. A successful urban shed should feel appropriate no mater the location of deployment, without causing its given environment to loose its sense of place. Thus, I strove to produce a design which is dynamic enough to respond to any conditions while simultaneously maximizing the exposure of the facades they cover as much possible.


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BALL STATE MULTICULTURAL CENTER GRESHAM SMITH DESIGN COMPETITION date:

ARCH 302 SPRING 2009 designers:

LUKE HAAS BEN FREUHLING distinction:

SECOND PLACE AWARD


BALL STATE MULTICULTURAL CENTER This project began as a discussion of what multiculturalism means for a college campus. My partner and I determined that our design should be organized in a way that maximizes the extent to which different groups of students can inhabit the same space and learn from each other. Thus, the spaces of our project are flexible and overlap with multifunctionality. Attention was paid to an articulation of level changes which enable groups and individuals to observe each other or meet by chance in passing. A large courtyard intended to bring students together for informal gatherings is encapsulated by the two opposing wings of the building. The southern wing (a small library), which addresses the street (see left-hand image), folds upwardt to reveal the courtyard and any activities which are occurring within.


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BALL STATE GLASS BLOWING STUDIO date:

ARCH 302 SPRING 2009 designers:

LUKE HAAS This project was developed as a response to the existing conditions of the site which was given. Its geometry was developed with the intention of integrating the natural and the built elements while also re-activating a network of derelict trails which circumambulate the grounds. Considering that students tend to take the shortest possible rout to class, I engaged the building directly with the trail system; thus the trails become the rout by which students can access the building, while a formal entrance serves administration and visitors. As a glass blowing facility, I explored modes by which the act of forming glass can become part of the experience of the building and ultimately the site. Within the building, I organized the program about two kinds of gallery spaces: exhibition of act and artifact. Variable levels of translucency were also explored.


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SALVAGED LAYERS SITE SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS

IRVING THEATER 5505 E WASHINGTON ST, INDIANAPOLIS, IN date:

client:

ARCH 402 SPRING 2010

DALE HARKEN

design team:

performance and coreography team:

BALL STATE ARCHITECTURE DEPT

BUTLER UNIVERSITY DANCE DEPT

Jay Weeks Brad Wanek Mark Vanden Akker Paul Reynolds Michael Neizer Austin Lucari Eric Jenson Greg Hittler Luke Haas Ben Greenberg Veronica Eulacivo

Chris Ziegler Jacqueline Vouga Amanda Miller Amanda Lynn Meyer Jeff Irlbeck Jill Harman Steph Gray Joe Esbenshade Jessica Conger coordinator: Melli Hoppe

coordinator: Professor Timothy Gray

ceiling plane installation:

LUKE HAAS MARK VANDEN AKKER BRAD WANAK

“Salvaged Layers; a Collaborative Site Specific Performance project was an interdisciplinary collaboration between two groups of students from separate Universities. The studio challenged students to explore issues of craft, making and place through a series of full scale built interventions in a historic Indianapolis theatre which had been gutted in anticipation of a planned renovation. The raw state of the theatre’s interior gave students a rich and evocative palette to engage while simultaneously liberating them from the conventional notions of stage and audience. Throughout the process, the activities of the architecture students differentiated themselves from that of preparing a stage set because they led rather than followed the choreography of the performance. While students were encouraged to think of installations that could define space, or were kinetic and ripe with potential for interaction, there was no narrative to which they were responding. By the same token, the theatre students were allowed to react / interact with the work on their own accord, and engaged the installations in bold and unexpected ways, amplifying the potential of the architecture student’s projects. There was a very real excitement and synergy between the two groups, and there was great consensus among those involved in the project that the collaboration resulted in a whole that was in fact greater than the sum of the parts.” Kelly Minner, archdaily.com


SALVAGED LAYERS The design team for this project was divided into groups; each group focusing on a single, semi-independent component of the installation. Some groups focused on prosthetic interventions that were tailored to specifically fit the derelict nature and physical parameters of the theater. As a coordinated point of contrast to this, my group designed a manipulation of the existing fabric of the building to produce new and dynamic spatial conditions which were derived from the existing architecture. Further, we sought to provide a means for the performance team to modify and interact with the space itself during their performance. A continuous plane of exposed ceiling joists defined the theater space; so my two colleagues and I devised a mechanism which permitted this plane to be modified through a system of counterweights. Thus, during the performance, the ceiling plane could be disrupted more or less as the choreography required.


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STEEL PRIVACY AND RAIN SCREENS INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA date:

SUMMER 2009 designer:

LUKE HAAS I was commissioned to design a treatment for the large openings on the side of a house near downtown Indianapolis. My client had been having problems with rain water splashing from the ground onto the floor of his screened-in porch, and he approached me seeking a solution to this problem which would add interest to his home. My proposal is photographed as installed. My client is an accomplished gardener and takes pride in the large number of trees on his property; so, I drew inspiration from the foliage of the numerous plants he keeps. Ultimately, I designed a screen which uses leaf profiles to generate apertures. the density of the leaves increases gradually towards the bottom of the screens, and this reduces the size of the apertures. Thus, splash is blocked by the lower, more solid portions of the screens. Steel was selected as the material for the screens, as it will react and record the splashing in a way that will complement the color of the brick of my clients house.


PORTA-BOWL

HANDHELD, PORTABLE DINING SOLUTION date:

designer:

SPRING 2011

LUKE HAAS

Though I prefer architecture, I appreciate design at all scales. Smaller objects make more contact with the human body; thus special consideration must be paid to the interface between an object and the user. With the form and materiality of the cereal bowl depicted above and below, I was interested in developing the point of contact between the hand and the vessel. Intended to be held rather than placed on a tale surface, the bowl relies on projecting, ergonomically configured handles to create points of leverage. The result is a dining object which is cradled by the palm, rather than clutched as other similar products or mugs may be.


HERD

RE-CONFIGURABLE SEATING FOR PUBLIC SPACES date:

designer:

WINTER 2011

LUKE HAAS

Furniture has always interested me; as it seems to lie somewhere between the realms of architecture and space and objects in space. With this project I was particularly motivated by this interaction that furniture can have with space. This piece is intended to be used to create localized bubbles of focus in large public spaces with high traffic volumes. The seating consists of modules, which may vary in number, that allow for either a static configuration or an amorphous configuration (or chains) of pivoting seats. When the seats are pushed into a ring, a new semi-private space is created in their void.


SERIGRAPHY designer:

LUKE HAAS Depicted above and below are two of many screen printed garments I have produced. The graphics were specifically designed to be printed, and were composed using a limited color pallet for this reason. In the interest of achieving a composition which is more adept to being worn, both images were designed without a distinct graphic frame or boundary.


GRAPHICS AND DESIGN designer:

LUKE HAAS Throughout my architectural education, I’ve developed an interest in graphic design. Above and below are two recent commissions I was given to design the labels and image for two beers by an armature brewer. My client was interested in a clean appearance for both products and wanted the graphics to be suggestive of the two brew’s titles, Jurassic Amber and Hail to the Pale.


Luke Haas

Employment

161 Rivington St. apt 1a New York, NY 10002 317.340.4547 | lk.e.haas@gmail.com portfolio: www.lkhaas.com

Gray Architecture; Indianapolis, IN 317.926.1962 Internship- June 2010 through August 2010 Design Development and Documentation Presentation Graphics CSO Architects; Indianapolis, IN 317.848.7800 Internships- May 2008 through August 2008; May 2009 through August 2009 Produced and edited drawings using AutoCAD Worked on a project model and created components using Revit Documentation and field dimensioning of existing buildings Indianapolis, IN 317.630.0064 James T. Kienle and Associates; Internship- January 2006 through August 2006; Managed archival of correspondences Managed filing system of building materials

Education

Parsons the New School for Design, School of Constructed Environments; New York, NY Master of Architecture Graduation Date: May 2012 Ball State University; Muncie, IN Bachelor of Science, Cum Laude Graduation Date: May 2010 Major: Architecture

Accomplishments

Parsons University Merit Award- continuing scholarship; Dec. 2010 First place award- Cripe Architects + Engineers Competition; Dec. 2009 Second place award- Gresham Smith & Partners Competition; May 2009 First place award- Indiana Concrete Masonry Association Competition; May 2008 Work featured by Archdaily.com, Fastcodesign.com, Metropolismag.com, C3 magazine, and publicly displayed in the Indianapolis Arts Center Gallery

Skills

Experienced with design and 3D modeling programs AutoCAD; Revit Architecture; AutoDesk 3d Studio Max; Rhinoceros; Google SketchUp Proficient in utilization of Adobe graphic manipulation software Proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint Experienced with employment of CNC fabrication/prototyping techniques Construction experience though the Parsons Design Workshop, design build program Produced and sold freelance graphic design work, including silk screened prints


luke haas portfolio march 2012