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(R, V Z)

(M, P)

(M, S)

(C, P) (B, R)


An Introduction; Co-ordinates and Celebrations.

Art & Design Interdisciplinary

Coordinates


(C,H)

Cheryl Huntbach Programme Leader and GIDE Academic Co-ordinator (Group for International Design)

They inhabited, moved across and around the space – mapping out the fresh, new territory. They began by navigating new space in order to create a place in which to connect, differentiate and resonate with each other. As the year progressed they established and redrafted their positions within their community of practice and yet further, beyond the systems of the institution. Interdisciplinary students often engage with the wider community, making connections, creating projects and temporary spaces and events across the city, U.K and internationally. Many of them flourished as individual isolated elements, others working in supportive collaboration and many explored the flexibility of the nomadic. It is refreshing and moving to have been a part of this experience, to have been a catalyst within the process of their growth and development. To be a part of the transition, transformation, the finding of them-selves and positioning of their practice(s). These dynamic and flexible individuals have created their own vision of the future. They have questioned and re-evaluated their immediate environment,art, culture, design, education, economic and social structures. With great pleasure, satisfaction and prideWe congratulate and celebrate the achievements of these students. We wish them all the very best in their futures.


(M,F,B) Megan Frances Baker Throughout my practice I’ve incorporated aspects of disgust to elicit emotions in the viewer. As a jewellery artist I am interested in the intimate nature in which we view our adornments. Taking a form that is thought of as something that is stereotypically beautiful and using the medium of disgusting matter is the nature of my practice. Juxtaposition is a key feature to my work. Contrasting the ugly with the beautiful I combine precious metals alongside natural materials. Searching for curiosity and bewilderment in my audience I make accessories for the unconventional client. Touching upon moral disgust I focus my practice on a personal level through performance art. An exploration of my own views of morality. The taboo has always been a subject I have studied throughout art, literature and film. The process in which I make my jewellery is recorded as it is ritualistic in my development as an artist. Ranging from pubic hair to animal bi-products, I collect material that society deems as disgusting. My work is created to challenge the publics perceptions of disgust and may reveal how desensitised we are in the western society.

cargocollective.com/meganfrancesbaker meganfrancesbaker@gmail.com


(D,B)

Daniel Bamford Daniel’s work approaches a range of different mediums, from conceptual sculpture to interactive performance art, graphic design and photography. With no specific practice, he documents his explorations through an extensive use of photography, tending towards a minimalist aesthetic. “You see, you can’t have an experience of nothing; nature abhors a vacuum. So after you’re dead, the only thing that can happen is the same experience, or the same sort of experience as when you were born. In other words, we all know very well that after other people die, other people are born. And they’re all you, only you can only experience it one at a time. Everybody is I, you all know you’re you, and wheresoever beings exist throughout all galaxies, it doesn’t make any difference. You are all of them. And when they come into being, that’s you coming into being.” Alan Watts

BMFRD.com


(G,B)

Gemma Barnett I am an interdisciplinary artist exploring feminist issues as concept. My art practice takes the shape of collage, film installation and creative writing all of which primarily challenge the west’s patriarchal view of the modern woman. My collage work focuses heavily around the western ideal of the female body and gender inequality. By dismembering and reassembling the media image of both man and woman I aim to reflect on the standards set by the media and modern society to dismantle “traditional” and capitalist notions. My film and creative writing practice have recently been working alongside one another to form an autobiographical approach to highlighting women’s everyday experiences in modern society. Other works have explored female identity through the reinventing of my own. Through questioning and revealing women’s stance in modern society, including that of my own, I aim to challenge the viewer emotively and therefore enable wider reflection of their beings and that of society around them.

gemmabarnett86@googlemail.com


(M,B)

Megan Bolton Working with 16mm celluloid lends itself to a chanced outcome with each viewing at the point of contact between the fragile skin of the material and the captured image. With each split and scratch the narrative has a new dimension, echoing the mortality of human life. The fleeting moment of the projected image embodies the very nature of memory. And while psychoanalytic findings suggest the translation is into a verbal meaning. I focus on a more individually based bodily response as the reading is produced at the stage of our current sensuous perceptions meeting the archived, be this false or experienced histories. “Chi va piano va lontano� William Holt

meganabolton@hotmail.co.uk


(B,C)

Ben Chambers With my practice being a maker or craftsmen, which takes objects and materials and manipulates them in such a way to create interesting sculptural visual pieces. Which are thought provoking with an idea behind them, allowing a physical and mental interaction between the piece and the viewer. Using a range of different material mediums if it were new or old a material or an object. The practice to be able to go on a journey with a material an idea being creative with everything around you that you can see, touch, pick up along with key features within the work to do with re-using and recycling.


(C,C)

Chantelle Clark Process is often forgotten alongside the final outcome, however it has a strong significance with my work as a creative practitioner. My practice aims to be a process driven exploration of memory and craft through interdisciplinary roots. Being drawn to traditional female crafts and how they bear feminine aesthetics, my work reflects forms taken from these crafts through mixed media’s, from metal and casting work to photography based pieces, both 2D and 3D. I believe this extensive process driven research defines my practice as interdisciplinary. To me, as a maker, the most important part of my work is to show the process behind the making. It is this journey that strongly informs the ideas and the end results. This piece aims to be the collective result of bringing together the techniques and themes I have explored over the past few years.

chantelleclark.wordpress.com chantelly-lace@hotmail.co.uk


(D,C)

Daisy Craik My work focuses on the psyche and exploring this through research into various subjects, which in the past have included dream analysis and, more recently, folklore and its influence on the development of society. My current work explores the importance of narrative in the unconscious and in culture. Pliny’s Origins of Drawing and Plato’s Allegory of the Cave have become the primary theoretical focuses explored through my current practice. I use glass and shadow to create a narrative through the progression of images and texts, in order to convey the importance and intrinsic nature of narrative in society. I am fascinated with the glass manipulation process and the shadows that this can create, and plan to continue exploring this material further.


(R,F)

Rachael Forster Texture, form and hapticity in the surfaces of architectural space explore the nature of our experience and connection with the world around us. Without allowing vision to dominate, what is the scope of the surfaces and textures we encounter to authenticate our visual experiences? The haptic is a lost domain in a vision-centric society – the integrity of touch is explored as a design ethos and alternative to the forgetfulness of body. Using design methods that revolve around sensory and haptic approaches, we look to discover fresh experiences of encountering objects and surfaces in space. In this remit my practice seeks to explore the capacity of surface effect to impact our direct haptic experience, as well as shifting and defining the character of space created by the boundaries there present.

rachaelforster.com hello@rachaelforster.com


(D,H)

Daniel Horsman My work explores the relationship between sound, nostalgia and sculpture. I take products of the past, such as the photograph, old gramophone record players, old film cameras, and join them with sounds that enhance the feelings invoked by the memories of these. My work is interactive to the viewer and performative in nature. Everything is visual, audible and tactile. Â My work also explores the nature of confidence and competence over the that of the amature and the unsure; those who jump in to experience something new and those who wait.

danielhorsman.wordpress.com horsman.dan@gmail.com


(L,I)

Luke Ingham ‘Clear some space out so we can space out’ Palaceer Lazaro My practice is concerned with the use of physical space, exploring the manner in which institutions use this pragmatically to create encounters and how this can affect our personal journey through these spaces. Academically I am engaged in discussions upon the dilemma of site and place, architecture and how all of these aspects affect the experience of galleries spatially. These concepts are realised both through sculpture and photography, which are used as objects to interrogate space. There is an underlying concern with breaking the rules, with the construction of my physical pieces utilising an ad hoc approach.  This is mirrored in my photographic work through the use of the ‘wrong tool’ within photo-editing software and the expansion of the frame. The work is then places less importance on finished outcomes and focuses instead on their more specific role of interrogating the space that surrounds them.

amaturian@hotmail.co.uk


(N,K)

Natalie Keech By looking at the everyday life and the relationship between mankind and their objects within society, I explore how we treat and perceive the objects that surround us in our mundane settings. I draw inspiration from how shapes and colours are used in our daily life, within the mass media and the belongings that form our identity. My work is based on the use and interaction between materials and practices. Exploring various disciplines from ceramics to video. By my work constantly evolving, an organic process is developed, where the documentation of each stage and process leads to new discoveries and an exploration into new media.

nattkeech.wordpress.com nat_keech@hotmail.com


The Studio

Art & Design Interdisciplinary

53º48’31.6”N 1º33’04.8”W

Coordinates


53º48’31.6”N 1º33’04.8”W

The Studio The studio is a shared space. Each sheet of this book opens up to reveal a poster that has been created collaboratively, exploring the course’s diverse range of practices.

Object/Sculpture (R,P)

(B,C)

(N,K)

Narrative/Experience (D,C) (M,F,B)

(M,P)

Visual Communication (N,M) (B,R)

(G,B)

(M,S)

Art & Design Interdisciplinary

Coordinates


53º48’31.6”N 1º33’04.8”W

The Studio

Photography (G,L)

(M,B) (R,P)

Material/Process (C,C)

(C,P)

2D Media (E,M)

(D,B)

Architecture/Space (R,F)

(R,VZ)

(L,I) (E,K)

Art & Design Interdisciplinary

Coordinates


The Studio

Art & Design Interdisciplinary

53º48’31.6”N 1º33’04.8”W

Coordinates


(E,K)

Edward Kelly When fighting erupts in Israel I hear our media: lawful, soldiers, positive, strike, action, unintended damage. Of the ‘others’: extremist, corrupt, terrorists, murderers. Arguably one of the biggest human rights abuses in 65 years happened with the ethnic cleansing of Palestine. There are now 5 million refuges with no right to return. Israel continues to illegally occupy and steal land. Injustice and gross human right abuses are being perpetrated in Palestine. The world does nothing. Repressed, persecuted, tyrannized, freedom fighter. ‘’We know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians’’ Nelson Mandela


(G,L)

Granville Lythe Granville Lythe grew up in the North of England in the early 1960’s. His practice takes inspiration from the places of his childhood, revisiting locations and documenting change, whilst also considering his own emotional responses towards these. He questions the misplaced hope of utopias and our motives toward ideology and myth. Lythe’s photographic elegies are ambiguous, yet flawed; he creates out of focus images that trigger memory and a lamenting melancholy with the past. “The places of our origin never truly free us from the hauntings of our past.” Granville Lythe

glythe@tiscali.co.uk


(N,M)

Nathalie Mayer Utilising pattern as propaganda, I actively consider social and political subjects through textile based surface pattern design, subliminally confronting the audience with issues that may otherwise go unnoticed or unaddressed in their daily lives. The influx of global news media information can serve to desensitise us to the magnitude of political events and inequalities, with the largest issues of society often the easiest to ignore. My photography catalogues the impacts and expressions of society through the detritus of everyday urban environments. Removing the individual from the frame and observing the discarded items and graffiti left in their wake provides an insight in to their priorities and experiences.  The presentation of these issues through photography and surface pattern design serves to readdress their importance, forcing the viewer to consider their individual role within the social narrative.

nathaliemayer.com


(E,M)

Emrys Mullins Photography being his preferred medium of choice for its instantaneity and immediacy, Emrys Mullins attempts to capture snapshots of regular everyday events lifted out from the temporal flux of life itself. Working with low budget equipment and affordable colour 35mm film, many of his photographs are yet to be published or shared with the world, his subject matter varies widely and his work methods are often sporadic. On occasions he uses photography for documentary and evidence purposes only, some of his works have a multidisciplinary approach containing elements and fragments of his different interests and passions. His approaches and mediums range from; constructed sculptural objects, public interventions and graphic design, these works are often based around music and vinyl records.

emrys_mullins@hotmail.co.uk


(R,P)

Romana Patton Romana Patton is a contemporary photographer and conceptual artist. Her photography is largely experimental; using hand-processed optical distortion techniques she aims to undermine established modes of visual perception. Her aesthetic towards photography is not to produce flawless, edited images and she does not use any digital post production. She challenges a modern day obsession with superficiality and symmetrical perfection, looking beyond that and into the psyche of the photographic subject. Romana’s photographs focus on emotion and exploring the self in an abstract and constantly adapting form, capturing movement and multiple sides and faces of the psyche at once. Romana’s current series of work is a highly personal project focused around self-examination, exploring her own identity and the relationship between private emotion and ones public projection of self. Romana has produced multiple series of work that aim to reveal versions and manipulations of ones self that build up a complex web of anxieties, emotions, masks, facades and concealments that an outsider would not normally see nor consider. By combining photography and sculpture Romana explores a multifaceted, multi layered presentation of self, identity and the embodiment of physical, spiritual and emotional entirety.

romanapattonphotography.wordpress.com romana.patton@gmail.com


(M,P)

Rosemary Pothecary Semi-precious A world beneath our feet Rosie’s practise explores the idea of looking at mundane forms and enhancing their beauty to capture the viewer’s attention. With no intention to push her idea of beauty on others, she aims for her work to simply offer an insight in to a world some might not see. Focusing specifically on entities with a lower social value she creates living sculptures adorned with precious metals to heighten their position and draw attention to their natural aesthetic form.

rosiepothecary.wordpress.com rosiepoth@hotmail.co.uk


(M,P)

Meredith Powell Meredith works with a mixed media format, using collage, illustration and found materials in aid to express her experiences with mental illness. She works closely and personally with journal work exploring memory, personal insight and stigma within mental health. The concept behind the journal is that it acts as a communicative bridge between Meredith and her illness, spilling her emotions and thought processes in a fluid, visual and sensory dynamic. By further developing the journals works into a 2D projected imagery cast into confined spaces, enables Meredith to recreate aspects of her illness and memories to reflect, heal and resolve within herself.


(C,P)

Charlotte Price My practice developed from an interest in perception and how society contributes to us having a certain way of viewing objects in relation to gender. Traditional ways of thinking are constantly reinforced through the media and advertisement, some more subtle that others. I am most interested in how these traditional ideas are reflected through products, thus reinforcing how we associate certain objects and colour with gender. Pattern is another strong point of my practice; metaphorically the pattern of repeat processes which reflects the ongoing pattern of the media in regards to conventional ideas of male and female objects, and visually the intricacy and aesthetic quality of pattern when displayed in different ways. To explore my ideas I use a range of materials from paper and card to a mixture of found objects. The combination of materials and processes is an important aspect of my practice with the emphasis being on how the process pushes and develops ideas into unexpected outcomes. In my latest project I am working with materials and found objects that juxtapose each other, subverting and mocking conventional ideas that are represented and reinforced through gendered objects.

charlotte.jane.price@googlemail.com


(B,R)

Brendan Reilly I am an illustrator and publication designer focusing on instruction as my concept. I have previously made three publications that help different types of people in their everyday lives. “How to be an art student?” and “How to be a Graphic Design student? “ were books created in reference to university fee’s rising and to help people save money if they wanted to do an art degree? Instead of paying the rise in fees, buy this book instead! “What does what in your kitchen?” was created to help people that were moving away for the first time and do not have a clue about what the utensils and machinery in their kitchen does in a humorous way. My art practice consists of creating ironic yet humorous instruction manuals using my own comic style illustrations and my own instructions to help people in their everyday lives. I believe that laughter and humour are key elements to helping people learn. I am currently in the process of transferring my 2D illustrations into 3D models to experiment with how my drawings can be seen in everyday life.

www.brendanreilly.co.uk


(M,S)

Monika Szynkielewska Monika works predominantly with manual collage and photography. With her images she wants to explore how women’s bodies are implicated in various areas of social and cultural practices. Through her work she tries to investigate and make sense of the female body and its purpose. She seeks to subvert the viewer’s experience of the female form by attempting to create an uncomfortable situation for the audience, whether it is by producing repelling, provocative or overexposed visual imagery. Monika is interested in why the symbolic representations of the female body in media is so highly decorative, which is why in a lot of her work she manipulates Western, white women’s bodies to explore this cultural standard. In her most recent work she has photographed and worked with her own body to visually communicate the concept of ‘selfies’ and a thought process of this cultural condition amongst women.

www.monikaszynkielewska.com/home monikaszynkielewska@outlook.com


(R,VZ) Roxanne Van Zyl If we look we may find the geometry in architecture in those usual suspect locations, the shape of buildings or perhaps even the shape of the drawings of buildings. Quantified and measured we will find, on the whole, a stolid and dormant geometry.Its value and appeal laying within its dead certainty; these are its expected domains. But is the geometry in architecture really so reliable? The very statement is enough to make us think twice. If we were to think and feel geometry differently, to release it from its burden of certainty what might we find? How might our encounters with architecture change. Would architecture still mean buildings and how would we then understand space?

rtvanzyl.wordpress.com


With great pleasure, satisfaction and pride: We congratulate and celebrate the achievements of these students. We wish them all the very best in their futures. Cheryl Huntbach


(R, F)

(N, K)

(N, M)

(M, B)

(L, I)

(J, B)

(R, A, P)

(G, B)

(M, F, B)

(G, L)

(E, K) (D, B) (D, C) (C, C) (B, C)

(D, H)

(E, M)

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