Issuu on Google+

DESIGN PORTFOLIO     UNIVERSITY OF OREGON 2011

LIZZIE

FALKENSTEIN `

8380 SW Crestwood Lane Portland, OR 97225 503.734.7678  efalkens@uoregon.edu

EDUCATION University of Oregon Bachelor of Architecture + Art & Business Minors

June 2011

EXPERIENCE Lizbags

Portland, OR 06.2010 - Present

University of Oregon: Sustainable Cities Initiative

Eugene, OR 12.2009 - 06.2010

DesignBridge: Community Design Build

Eugene, OR 09.2008 - 06.2010

CBT Architects

Boston, MA 06.2009 - 09.2009

PKA Architects

Portland, OR 06.2008 - 09.2008

Owner + Founder Editor + Author of SCI Project Documentation Student Volunteer + Project Manager Intern Architect + Model Making Intern Architect

PROFICIENCIES Digital Media:  Adobe CS5  AutoCAD      Microsoft Office      Sketchup    SolidWorks      Softimage      Rhino    CNC Milling    Laser Cutting

Hand Media: Metalsmithing     Model Making     Sewing      Slip-Casting     Woodworking

UNION PARK TAROkit ROCKWOOD BOULEVARD CROP GRESHAM CITY HALL CRINKLE CUPS LIZBAGS UNZIPIT LUMINAIRE

Project:  Union Park + A New Urban Campus Site:        USPS Headquarters: Portland, OR Studio:    Thesis 2010-2011 A new University of Oregon campus has the potential  to be a primary and lasting keystone element in the city  of Portland that not only represents but helps fuel  Portland’s sense of place. A campus in Portland  possesses the potential to substantially assist in the  development of Portland urban aspects on a variety of  levels and scales.  This institutional addition placed near the heart of the  city will enhance the city’s urban vitality by providing  programmatic variability, in regards to its civic function,  to a part of the city that is at the beginning of a  transition towards becoming a mature mixed-use  district. The campus will provide an academic arena  that will foster a new intellectual aura in a location,  which has been primarily used for routine industrial  activities, further enhancing the city’s verve. It should  exemplify the new ideals of an architectural and  planning era which work towards the ‘development’ of  a city by using its existing potential as opposed to  mere ‘expansion’, an unfortunate reality today  exemplified by urban sprawl. And perhaps, most  importantly, a new University of Oregon campus in  Portland can become the flagship of sustainability,  providing “the most sustainable city in the country,” an  iconic, active, public site that represents the city’s  current and continual efforts towards a sustainable  future. The thesis work presented on the following pages  focuses on the spaces used for social functions of a  campus and how these functions can start to integrate  with social functions within the community. This  concept is explored at an urban scale and building  scale formally, programmatically and most importantly,  through its impact on social sustainability. 

adaptable space for...

accommodating a variety of users:

indoor and outdoor spaces to...

demonstration

food

flex-space

research

student ammenities

A PLACE THAT INTEGRATES THE NEEDS OF  THE COMMUNITY WITH THOSE OF THE  UNIVERSITY TO CREATE THE ULTIMATE HUB  OF EDUCATION, INNOVATION AND  RECREATION.

CONNECTING SITE IN  MULTIPLE DIRECTIONS

CENTRALIZING SOCIAL  AMENITIES

CREATING UNIQUE  URBAN SPACES

exhibition

retail

park

CONTINUING URBAN  PARK FABRIC

FORM STUDIES

Combining the social amenities of the university with those of the community allows for a unique  architectural expression. These study models start to explore different ways in which the public and social  amenities can be formally expressed and allow visitors and users to know that they are on campus rather  than just in the city. The green strips used represent how public green spaces can start to draw people onto  the site and move them through or around it. The pink strips study how unique built forms can differentiate  themselves from the rest of campus while still moving people through the site. These study models led to  investigating ways to use both green spaces and building form to acheive this unique identity. 

RA

AMP ACCESS

LAYERING SPACES After establishing the concept of the park blocks ramping up onto the roof to  create an urban public park, it was important to understand how this  influenced and formed the adjacent interior spaces. Many studies were done  to understand how people experiencing the park could start to connect with  what is happening inside as well as how interior spaces can start to connect  to each other to create a much more transparent and interactive environment. 

GREEN SPACE

PUBLIC PATHWAYS

ROOF AMENITIES

PROGRAM:

SECTION MODEL 1/8” = 1’ 0”

ROOFTOP PARK

STUDENT LOUNGE

CLASSROOM

Project:  TAROkit Site:        Locations Around the World Studio:    Metropolis Design Competition 2010 TAROkit is a catalyst, a kit of parts, and a response to  the pervasive problem of polluted waterways globally. It  cleans contaminated drinking water, and offers a  versatile housing solution for displaced or  impoverished people. It can be applied anywhere a  shipping container can go and a wetland can grow.  This ecological improvement package restores a basic  human right; clean water for third world communities. It  provides housing and micro-economic opportunities for  people, and re-establishes a dwindling ecosystem  essential in alleviating the effects of natural disasters.   The pollution of drinking water is a problem for over  half of the world’s population. Water pollution that  results from natural disasters, sewage discharge into  bodies of water, and a lack of knowledge about  appropriate sanitation techniques, causes 250 million  related diseases and 5-10 million deaths a year. In  addition to affecting humans, pollution as a result of  water-based transit and nutrient loading is causing  higher global oceanic temperatures. This significantly  alters the lifecycles and causes death in a vast number  of marine species. Adapting to meet the global water  pollution crisis is rich with ecological, social, and  economic opportunities.  By plugging into existing maritime transportation  networks, and a global surplus of shipping containers  TAROkit becomes a ready-to-go ecological  improvement package useful nearly anywhere in the  world. Far too often shipping containers leave  developing countries full of goods and return to those  same nations empty. Instead of empty, containers  modified for minimal dwelling will be packed with a  “wetland starter kit,” sufficient to begin the process of  restoring habitat, cleaning water and igniting local  micro economies. 

ESTIMATED GDP

GLOBAL SHIPPING ROUTES

COUNTRIES WITH <40% POPULATION  WITH ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER

IMPORTED SHIPPIING CONTAINERS ARRIVE AT  UNITED STATES PORTS

SHIPPING CONTAINERS ARE  RELOADED WITH TAROk

 UNLOADED AND  kit SUPPLIES

TAROkits ARE EXPORTED AND ARRIVE AT VARIOUS  LOCATIONS AROUND THE GLOBE

TAROkit OF PARTS:

SOLAR PANELS:

RENEWABLE ENERGY

MODIFIED CONTAINER:

SHELTER

WETLAND BEDS:

CLEAN PHASE II OYSTER BEDS:

CLEAN PHASE I

Project:  Rockwood Boulevard Site:        Burnside + SE Stark: Gresham, OR Studio:    Fall 2009 This studio focused on community place making in the  unique setting of Rockwood, Oregon.  The six-acre  parcel of land sits on the outskirts of Portland and on  the edge of Gresham. Unclaimed by either city, this site  lacks its own identity but has the potential to be a town  center for a community in need. Much of the  surrounding neighborhood consists of residents of  Latino and Russian decent as well as people that have  been pushed out of Portland due the rising housing  prices. The majority of these community members are  hard working and desire a neighborhood center that  they identify with and be proud of. We were challenged to create our own program  combining social and community goals to transform an  isolated and distressed site into a vibrant  neighborhood. At the heart of the six-acre site is  Rockwood Boulevard, a street lined with local  businesses creating an atmosphere bursting with  activity and unique flavor. The street is small in scale  with numerous opportunities for shop owners to  customize their storefront, creating a sense of  ownership. The design mixes inspirations from other  successful community spaces with elements that are  uniquely Rockwood to create a meaningful urban  center. Rockwood Boulevard facilitates a growing  sense of pride among the residents in something as  simple as a place to call their own.  Rockwood Boulevard is the spark that will initiate the  transformation of this area into a community and  economic driver. The flavorful and varied architectural  aesthetic is paired with environmentally sustainable  features creating a Rockwood regional style. The site  design facilitates the many functions necessitated by  the community and creates a space for interaction  between visitors and community members alike. 

ROCKWOOD DENSITY

GEO-PROXIMITY

MAX PROXIMITY

LAYERING SPACES To create a vibrant new streetscape for the people of Rockwood different spaces are layered and merged to reflect the  personalities of its users. Combining places to sit, shop, eat, and live help to create an interactive street that is adaptable to  a variety uses and users. These places can be created by something as small as a bench and as large as a building.

HO U

SIN

G

HOUSING

COMMUNITY CENTER

LARGE  COMMERCIAL

HO U

SIN

G

close proximity to the max station street access access to community space views of mountain peaks medium density housing (+)110,592 ft 35 units per acre tuck under parking

a place to safely gather a place for celebrations and events 12,000 ft park covered pavilion playground 16,000 ft community center conference rooms & rental facilities

LARGE  COMMERCIAL

close proximity to the max station supported by large retail & many other small businesses large volumes of pedestrian traffic flavor unlike any other (+) 40,000 ft of small and medium size spaces 50% of parking provided through on-street & off-street surface parking

economic ways to travel to work work close to home comfortable places to take breaks variety of jobs offered office 20,000 ft small business (+)40,000 ft large commercial 38,000 ft community services 18,000 ft

rain

PARK STUDY

nfall

At the heart of the six-acre site and on the edge of  Rockwood Boulevard sits the new Rockwood  Park. A place for impromptu soccer games and  family barbeques, this park provides numerous  amenities to the public that were previously  lacking. 

infiltration through pores in pavers

recharge ground water

SE Stark Street

Burnside Road

SE Oak Street

Rockwood  Boulevard

STREET  IMPROVEMENTS The streets surrounding and intersecting the new Rockwood  development are in desperate need of change. These streets  discourage walkability by consisting primarily of large spans  of pavement with little greenery and large flows of traffic.  By  providing wide sidewalks, on street parking, bike lanes, and  an abundance of street trees, the area will begin to create a  more walkable and energetic community.

Project:  CROP: Culinary Experience Site:        Granville Island, Vancouver B.C. Studio:    Spring 2010 Granville Island is a distinct urban playground that  encompasses a variety of uses and spaces. The 42.9  acres of land and water draws both locals and tourists  from all over Vancouver and is the most popular  destination in the city. In 1916 the Canadian Federal  Government developed the industrial land that is now  Granville Island.  The local character and flavor of the island can be seen  through its pedestrian dominated streets, distinct  architectural style and various iconic destinations.  Places such as the Public Market on the Northwest  side of the island encompasses the industrial aesthetic  with its steel siding and open interior while providing  numerous visitors with local produce and food vendors.  Grandville Island’s variety of uses can also be seen  through its local maritime, educational, retail, fine arts  and industrial program elements.  CROP, the Granville Culinary Experience is located on  the east side of the island, which lacks the activity and  vibrant character seen on the west side. This new  culinary establishment hopes to draw people to the  east side while also contributing and complimenting  the successful public market and other west side  functions. CROP’s program integrates the public in the  culinary experience through interaction and hands on  experiences with activities such as cheese making,  wine tasting and cooking. Integrating the existing context and local flavor into this  new culinary institute was challenging. Through the use  of recycled corrugated metal from condemned  buildings on the island and a modern take on the  industrial character of the island, CROP is well  integrated into its surroundings and contributes to the  overall feel of the island. 

PUBLIC ATRIUM

GREEN SPACE

PUBLIC VIEWS

CULINARY AMENITIES

LOCAL TRAFFIC

RESPONDING TO THE UNIQUE  CHARACTER OF GRANVILLE  ISLAND The unique character of Granville Island is often described as a contrived industrial  aesthetic, imitating the true industrial activities of the island’s past. Brightly colored  industrial pipes line pedestrian pathways across the island leading to buildings constructed  of corrugated steal. Pedestrians dominate the island and are welcomed into markets and  artist studios and are encouraged to explore the island from all angles. 

DAY USE

NIGHT USE

THIRD FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

FIRST FLOOR

PROGRAM:

RESTAURANT:

CULINARY INSTITUTE:

RETAIL:

HOTEL:

SCHOOL LOBBY

CULINARY LIBRARY

MAIN ATRIUM

HOTEL ROOM

CULINARY GARDENS

RECYCLED FACADE

Pieces of recycled corrugated steal were used for the north and south facades, creating  unique horizontal bands of glass and panels while also connecting to the existing buildings  on the island that use this material. Metal panels on the third floor hotel rooms are designed  to fold like an accordion, allowing for users to create privacy or experience the views of  downtown Vancouver.

Project:  Gresham City Hall Site:        SE Division + Main: Gresham, OR Studio:    Winter 2010 Gresham, Oregon is known as one of the large  expanses of suburban sprawl on the outskirts of  Portland. The area has very little identity and lacks  planning that will start to change this perception. The  current City Hall is a few blocks away from the  proposed New City Hall, tucked behind a large outdoor  shopping mall with little civic presence to the city.  The location for the New City Hall would create a  strong presence along SE Division Street, a major  thoroughfare, allowing for people entering the area to  understand that there is forward thinking for the years  to come. The New City Hall does not only address the  high traffic street running along the north edge of the  site, but also embraces the MAX Lightrail line and  neighborhood to the south through its ecological  landscaping and civic plaza. To create visual connections throughout the site and  educate the public about sustainable thinking, a green  sweep of plantings that originate at the tip of the civic  plaza are continued through the building, turning  vertically to create a unique central atrium space for all  users to experience. These green strips not only  provide visual interest but also help with way-finding  and are a major sustainable aspect of the building such  as moderating interior temperature, filtering water and  aiding in ventilation.  The New City Hall is a building that provides its own  energy, takes advantage of nature’s lighting and wind,  collects and treats water, and draws a lush green  sweep in from the landscape around it. It is hoped, that  with these characteristics the building will be a civic  icon for the area and help generate new ideas for the  sustainable planning of Gresham, Oregon.

GREEN STRIPS

PLAZA LAYERS

BUILDING WINDOW SYSTEM STRUCTURE

FACADE LAYERS

MESH SHADING

anatomy of:

A CIVIC PLAZA 

D SE

CIVIC PLAZA

New C

nS o i is

t

t ree

Mai

ity Hal l

nS

tree t

Div

ne

Li X A M

1 2 3 4 5 6

Adjacent to transportation networks Place to sit Place to eat, or nap Vibrant activity for all ages Manages water from impervious surfaces Protected from busy traffic

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

URBAN PLANNING DEVELOPMENT

MAIN RECEPTION

S

COUNCIL CHAMBERS IR STA

PUBLIC ATRIUM STAIRS

CAFE

STAIRS

POLICE

POLICE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

PARKS & REC

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES ECON & URBAN RENEWAL

OFFICE ATRIUM

RECEPTION MTG/SHARED SPACE OFFICE SPACE

FIRST FLOOR PLAN N

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

OFFICE OF GOVERNANCE & MANAGEMENT

CITY ATTORNEY’S OFFICE

S STAIR

ROOF TERRACE

ROOF GARDEN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

OFFICE ATRIUM

CONDITIONING STRATEGIES:

ENERGY STRATE

EVACUATED TUBES

PV EMBEDDED GLASS

Evacuated tubes on the north wing  of the building facilitate the heating  of water by the sun. This water is  then channeled to the absorbtion  chiller to be further heated or  transferred nto cool water that can  then move into the radiant floor  system

Horizontal glazing needs shading and  has the potential to harvest energy due  to its favorable southern orientation  without obstruction. PV embedded glass  allows the envelope to remain streamlined while facilitating the harvesting of  energy.

NEED: OPERATIONAL ENERGY

ABSORBTION CHILLER Absorbtion chilelrs can  both heat and chill water to  a level at which it can be  used for sinks, showers, or  radiant floor systems. It is  highly efficient and can be  an economical solution  when a source of waste  heat is available.

RADIANT FLOOR Radiant floor systems allow heating and  cooling to be more efficient by conditioning concrete masses and allowing the  material to re-radiate heat into the space.  This system is also based on circulating  water rather than air, which improves the  overall indoor air quality.

MINI COGENERATION PLANT

Cogeneration is significantly more efficient  traditional energy generation methods. It  produces not only energy useful in maintain the building’s electricity needs, but it also  channels waste heat into conditioning syst reducing overall energy needs as a result o heating and cooling.

EGIES:

 than 

ning 

tems,  of 

WATER STRATEGIES: GREEN ROOF

Green roofs on the south wings of  City Hall direct rainfall and filter it  before it makes its way into the  collection cisterns or green wall  irrigation system. It also reduces  urban heat island effect and is a  desirable amenity adjacent to the  roof terrace.

GREEN WALL STRIPS

The strips of green wall  running along the sides of  the atrium are fed by an  irrigation system sourced  at the roof as well as a  secondary collection  system in the basement.  They are not only part of  the water cleaning  strategy, but also have  valuable benefits to  indoor air quality due to  the potential for  humidifyinf and aiding in ventilation. 

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

Constructed wetlands on the south side of the site are an  essential step in cleaning stormwater and grey water  produced by the building before it enters the municipal  system. The water goes through a series of landscaped  terraces which remove specific types of water  contamination before it reaches the end, significantly  cleaner than when it began.

G

COUNCIL CHAMBERS

GREEN WALL TYPOLOGIES anatomy of:

A GREEN STRIP

DENSE PLANTINGS

PLANTING SHELVES

LOW-PROFILE STRIP

UNION PARK TAROkit ROCKWOOD BOULEVARD CROP GRESHAM CITY HALL CRINKLE CUPS LIZBAGS UNZIPIT LUMINAIRE

CRINKLE CUPS

These cups were designed in response to the excess amount of plastic used in  our society. By slip-casting plastic party cups out of porcelain an excessively  used commodity has been made more precious as well as reusable. 

LIZBAGS Lizbags is the accumulation of many years of goofing around with scissors, pipe cleaners  and whatever else could be found around the house. The wide variety of bags offered on  www.lizbags.com are designed and made in Portland, Oregon. The prints used and  designed to create Lizbags transform commonly drab bags into funky items that express  each customers individuality.  Over six-hundred bags have been sold so far.

UNZIPIT LUMINAIRE Unzipit Luminaire was designed using  the function of a zipper to allow users to  adjust the level of light. By opening or  closing the luminaire more or less light is  provided. The fabric panels have been  stiffened with wire around the edges,  allowing for users to easily control the  not only the light but the form as well.


Lizzie Falkenstein's Architecture Portfolio