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I am a designer who strives to combine seemingly separate ideas and aesthetics, where the dichotomies of light, form, or program may drive my concepts and final proposals. I strive to be efficient and allow my work ethic to creatively influence my designs. You will see digital and manual work, rural and urban design, and domestic and international projects within this portfolio. It is important to have diverse skill sets and a global sensibility as a responsible architect of the future.


Roebuck Fishcamp

Bottoms Organic Farm

Container

Cc i t r u s S i n e n s i s

Door, Window, Stair

S p a t i a l Ss t i m u l a t i o n

resumĂŠ

Va l u e a n d F o r m Personal Work

Everson Museum Cinema Park Graduate Coursework

Undergraduate Coursework


Spatial Stimulation Spring 2011 Professor: Toni Montes Partner Project The goal of the design is to form a topographically continuous sports park in conjunction with a transparent screen which creates a stimulated space. Through an extensive series of sun and continuity studies, our aim was to connect and restore the open space within the center of the block in the 22@ District in Barcelona.

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Honorary mention: “Spatial Stimulation. Project completed during my semester abroad in Spain. Graduate Architecture, undergraduate architecture, and landscape architecture students from Clemson University and Texas A&M participated.

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Summer Solstice

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Altitude Angle: 69.14 degrees

Winter Solstice Altitude Angle: 20.70 degrees

In order to analyze the quality of light within the existing site, we studied the sun patterns during the summer solstice and winter solstice.

Shadow Diagrams Summer Soltice

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Winter Soltice


The observed result was a discontinuous plane with irregular sunlight throughout the day. To resolve the issue of discontinuity between the light and available surfaces for program, we chose to intervene in an area including three spaces with ideal sun exposure.

Intervention Area Summer Soltice

Winter Soltice

Combined

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Southwest facing Section B

Showing below grade pool and spa, and Screen Interior

Three spaces with optimal sun exposure were connected to the center through a series of ramps, varying between 5%-8% grade. These spaces, with an additional platform at the northwestern edge, were used as areas for the badminton courts. The resulting topography serves as a connection to the upper fitness areas and the below-grade pool and spa. Component 1: Topography

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Southwest facing Section B

Showing court use and pool acces

The screen, acts as a connection between the verticality of the urban context to the lower public sports park in the center of the block. It is mostly composed of transparent and semitransparent materials that allow for the maximum amount of sunlight to pass through and reach the lower levels.

Component 2: Screen

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Badminton Courts Program: 1 - Reception 2 - Dressing Rooms / Showers 3 - Pool 4 - Pool Dressing Rooms / Showers (Male) 5 - Sauna 6 - Spa 7 - Pool Dressing Rooms / Showers (Female) 8 - Mechanical / Storage

Overall, the public sports park addresses the existing conditions concerning light within the block and creates an urban response to Cerda’s plan of Barcelona. The public sports park receives optimal sunlight during the winter and summer seasons, provoking stimulation and allowing for activity throughout all parts of the year. 9

s p a t i a l

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exploded axonometric drawing


floorplans

below-grade pool/spa

grade-level topography and dressing rooms

above-grade topography and badminton courts

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Threshold A

B

C

Door, Window, Stair Fall 2009 Professor Garland

A series of threshold exercises resulted in a topographical layer to be incorporated within the project.

This early project served as a introduction to the integration of two important architectural components: circulation and pause. Designs were driven by a self-declared narrative, where three moments of pause were to be organized about a spatial “L”. My design was focused on an ambitious, emotional voyage, where the individual treks from beneath the terrain to the top tower that overlooks the path of their journey.

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Three moments of pause were arranged about an organizational “L” space, which intersected the topographical plane.

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Compilation


A Pause 1: skyward vantage point B Pause 2: place of rest C Pause 3: elevated vantage point

B C Circulation simultaneously passes through each moment, while wrapping around an axis created by the first place of pause (also the stem of the “L�).

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Citrus Sinensis Fall 2010 Professor Hogan Partner Project

The Magic Orange Tree, a popular Haitian folktale, recounts the story of a young girl who overcomes harsh circumstances with help from a magic orange tree, in order to become a proud, self-sustaining woman. Using the cultural moral derived from this story, the design of the Haitian Boarding School for Girls,- located in Port-au-Prince, is organized in a way that represents the growth of a tree. Students begin with the roots of education and community, progress through individual and collective growth, and finally bear the fruits of their labor as independent women who are ready to revitalize society. 13

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When a child is born in Haiti, a seed is planted with her umbilical cord; the tree that results is a symbol of the child’s identity and life course.

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Site Context

fruit

stem roots 15 c i t r u s

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The final stage includes program associated with performance, such as an openair theater, soccer field, and classrooms for the various arts. Graduating girls will proudly exit through this area after their education has been completed.

The stem consists of programs that support the body and mind. This includes the dormitories, infirmary, and cafeteria.

The roots of the school contain the front entrance, classrooms, library, and other programs strictly related with academia.


Fruit: Performance Creative and Practical, applying learning to follow their passions and contribute to their community

Stem: Growth

Personal and Social, developing individuality and an identity as part of a whole

ABOVE: wall condition used for most of the construction of the institution.

Roots: Knowledge Cultural and Academic, drawing on established knowledge and the surrounding community of Haiti

The design allows for passive heating and cooling. Interior walls of layered, undulating concrete have larger gaps near the floor in order to allow cool air to flow inside. The roofs angle upwards towards the exterior of the building in order to allow hot air to flow outwards. e l i z a b e t h

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Longitudenal Section

Performance Couryard

Core Courtyard

Academic Courtyard 17 c i t r u s

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Each “stage� is situated about an internal courtyard in order to ensure safety for the students while providing outdoor access. Interaction between students and faculty is encouraged, and internal growth is supplemented with natural light exposure.

Transverse Section: Core Courtyard

Transverse Section: Academic Courtyard


West-end view: Graduation space and arts building.

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East-end view: School entrance (library and academic spaces) 19 c i t r u s

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West-end view: Graduation space and arts building.

Interior courtyard space

By building no higher than three stories and keeping with more modest materials, the design addresses the surrounding conditions, while expressing a new identity for the surrounding community. e l i z a b e t h

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C o n t a i n e r Fall 2009 Professor Garland This portfolio vessel created at the end of my first architectural studio is designed to be efficiently carried and displayed, while respresenting the poetic nature of the growth of a tree. It branches outwards from its compact, seed-like form into an expanse show of the work and progress of the semester.

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Bottoms Organic Farm Fall 2011 Professor Lynn Craig Clemson University’s “Bottoms,� the oncampus organic farm, is a leading force for developing new sustainable practices in agricultural. As such, the need to teach and spread the sustainable-living culture is paramount. The intent for this project was to develop a comprehensive interpretive center which is open to the public and has the opportunity to teach and involve the community in the new, upcoming practices in sustainable agricultural and design.

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Lee Hall Feature: “Interpretive Grid: Bottoms Organic Farm.� My project was featured in the main lobby of the architecture hall during NAAB week, where the Graduate Program of Architecture was evaluated for reaccreditation.

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A thorough analysis of the site was conducted, which included understanding the climate properties, boundaries, available views, topography, and elevation within the context of the site. The “Bottoms� is named such for its low elevation on Clemson campus. After the analysis, a scheme was developed based upon the idea of procession and the existing organizational parameters of the organic farm.

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The intent expressed by the scheme is a series of movements and pauses based around a hiearchy of program. The exhibit, as the most important space, becomes a moment of disturbance in the linear passage through space. The design itself was informed by two organizations grid: organic farm orientation, and the cardinal directions, while keeping the use of a transformational procession through space, as seen in the Founder’s Center, in order to connect seemingly disconnected pieces of the bottoms organic farm.

pause view of fields

towards ponds

journey through progression of space

pause diversion of path

traffic from parking

traffic from stairs

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Master Site Plan

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The Interpretive Center makes use of the proposed location of the new road in its placement of the associated parking.


Butterfly Shelter

The design creates both literal and implied connections to four new “cardinal points� defined within the site of the Organic Farm: Green Stairs

The Butterfly Shelter The Green Stairs Aquaculture Ponds Center Parking Lot

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In addition to installed geothermal pumps and photovoltaic panels, the inherent design of the buildling incorporates aspects that will help conserve energy and relieve some of the need for artificial heating or cooling and interior lighting of the building.

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Exhibit Section

North facing windows receive natural light which will not provide excessive heating of the interior spaces. Awnings over south or western facing windows passively block summer heat whille allowing winter sun to enter. The curtain walls have manually operated blinds that may be opened or closed when deemed necessary.

Longitudenal Section

Classroom 1500 sq. ft

Materials which provide natural insulation are used in the construction of the building, including wood and concrete.

Exhibit

1500 sq. ft

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PHASE ONE

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PHASE TWO

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PHASE THREE

Phasing would be completed over time through three steps. 1: exhibit, adjacent boardwalks. 2: office, laboratory space, adjacent programs 3: classroom area, amphitheater space


Clemson University Organic Farm

Interpretive Center

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Roebuck Fishcamp Spring 2012 Professor Kevin Hyslop This 2-week charette project focused on renovating the facade of a fish camp and restaurant. The original facade consisted of only red aluminum cladding and had no windows or outside seating. I chose to focus on making this location guestfriendly and inviting by adding a variety of materials, long windows, and rhythmic structure.

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The front entrance is “pushed” outwards to create a more celebrated entry into the restaurant.

The front facade is “bookended” with the original aluminum cladding. This is to address the other facades of the building.

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Everson Museum Cinema Park Fall 2012 Professor Martin Haettasch

The architectural project builds upon previously pursued inquiries regarding site, formal structure, spatial strategy, and operation. In order to generate a successful architectural project, it is necessary to gear all components towards a spatial, programmatic, and/or urban ‘ambition’. The site rests withinin downtown Syracuse, New York, and the plaza area of the Everson Museum of Art designed by I. M. Pei in 1968. In approaching the project, I tried to understand how the existing architecture affected the urban figureground and how the implications of an addition to the museum could improve the urban landscape of Syracuse. 35

Everson

Museum Cinema

Park


Syracuse University Graduate School of Architecture e l i z a b e t h

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Site Photomontage: Subtractions in and around the Everson Museum My analysis of the city and specific site focused on the different types of subtractions from the city Figure-Ground at varying scales: 1) Macro Cuts- important “edges” formed in the overall city plan, 2) Micro Cuts- subtraction from individual buildings or blocks, and 3) Rectangular Insertions- “fields” formed by voids betewen the edges of bulidings.

The Everson Museum of Art is an object lost in the “field,” and does not participate in the city fabric.

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Everson

Museum Cinema

Park


Object (Everson) lost in the field

A result of macro rectangular cuts in the urban fabric.

Spatial division

Form Generation

In order to reduce the green field and keep a relationship between “edge” and “object,” I extrapolated spatial divisions from the Everson to determine the proportions of the proposal’s form. The micro cuts then create inhabital void and circulation.

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Axonometric Perspective - Aerial The intervention reduces the size of the field (rectangular insertion), and allows the Everson to particpate in the urban fabric as an edge along with the Cinema Park addition.

Axonometric Diagrams The spatial divisions derived from the original Everson create a formal sequence: edge, joint, object; in which all of these parts relate directly back to the site and change the conditions of the urban field. The circulation paths between levels are created by the same logic of the mirco cuts. These cuts are either diagonal or vertical.

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Everson

Museum Cinema

Park


Formal Sequence

Circulation

Final Form

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PROGRAM VOLUME EXLOSION

The tower serves as a multifunctional projection room that may be used for classes, the exhibition, etc. Formally, it serves as a prominent endpoint to the linearly wrapping circulation. 41

perspective A

The proposal is programmatically layered by Exhibition, plaza-level, and Academic. The Exhibition layer has an open floorplan with radial circulation, and the Academic layer as a finite, wrapping circulation.


THE PROJECTION TOWER

PERSPECTIVE A: Interior view of the transluscent glass tower.

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+ Level 1 Floor Plan

perspective B

Site Plan

The plaza level of the proposed addition has very little programmed space. Rather, the surfaces of the buliding will be used for projections, creating a cinema park as an extension of Syracuse’s Urban Video project. Terraced seating and landscaped benches suppliment the park.


Perspective B:

THE APPROACH

Approach from the adjacent parking lot.

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THE CANTILEVER

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perspective C


PERSPECTIVE C: Plaza view of the floating object and cantilevered joint.

The edge, joint, object sequence create the illusion of a floating box that acts as a beacon and provides a variety of inhabital spatial moments.

Longitudinal Section A

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1:20 SITE MODEL

NORTH-NORTHEAST FACING

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Everson

Museum Cinema

Park


The scale of the new Everson Cinema Park is designed to fit within the architectural scale of the plaza, as well as the city. The new edge, as provided by the proposal, creates a special relationship to the street, and a new spatial relationship between the existing and new.

Site Roof Plan

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Level 0

Below-grade exhibition hall, auditorium spaces and workshop wing.

Level 1

Plaza-level entry into the Everson Cinema Park addition.

Level 0

Below-grade exhibition hall, auditorium spaces and workshop wing.


Lobby Exhibition Bookstore Storage Workshops Classrooms Administration Auditorium CafĂŠ/Bar

Longitudinal Section B

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1:20 SITE MODEL

SOUTHEAST FACING

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Overall, these “micro-cuts� that influenced the form of the proposal create inhabital voids, as well as spatial relationships between the exterior and interior--thereby resulting in an architectural intervention that addresses the relationship between the city and the user to the building. e l i z a b e t h

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Value and Form Personal Artwork

Developed over the course of my education, the following examples of sketches explore value and form.

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Mirror

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2008-2012

B.A. Architecture, Clemson University Minor: Modern Languages (Spanish) President’s List for cumulative 4.00 grade point average Placed 1st out of 2,242 students in my graduating class (May 2012) Member of: National Society of Collegiate Scholars (NSCS) AIAS, Clemson University Chapter Mentor for “AIAS Mentoring Program” Volunteer Photoshop workshop leader

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Masters of Architecture, Syracuse University First year graduate student; one term completed Current grade point average: 3.80

2012-2013

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Watershed Studio Architecture; White River Junction, VT. July-August 2010 Intern: marketing Projects, renovation planning River Valley Club; Lebanon, NH. June 2012+ Front Desk Attendant: customer service Research Intern for Associate Professor Mark Linder; Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY. August 2012-May 2013 Fall Project: scripting images into a slideshow format using Processing for an exhibition at McGIll Unversity 57

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S k i l l s

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Software: Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Google Sketchup Rhinoceros Auto Cad V-Ray Podium Microsoft Office Processing Other: Spanish-Speaking: To suppliment my minor in Spanish,

I spent four months of study abroad in Spain and other additional independent travels in Europe and South America.

Hand Sketching Hand Drafting Physical Modeling HTML Graphic and Oral Presentation Customer Service: Multi-tasking, Team collaboration, Monetary transactions 58


Top 6 Placement for Academic Portfolio:

Fall 2011 “Dichotomy.”

Academic Portfolio I created during my 4th year of study. The portfolio received “Top 6” placement. Approximately half of the 4th year architecture students participated.

Spring 2012

SC Chapter AIA Award This award is given to a fourth year undergraduate student in architecture who has been selected by the faculty for his or her academic achievement, highest quality of design ability, professional promise, and service.

Spring 2012

Faculty Scholarship Award Established at Clemson University in 1959, this award is made annually by the faculty of Clemson University to the member(s) of the graduating class who has the highest scholastic achievement.

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c o n t a c t Elizabeth L. Cooney 803.448.9222 ecooney@clemson.edu

.current.address. 150 Henry Street, Apt 326 A Syracuse, NY 13210 .alternative.address. 122 Anderson Hill Road Enfield, NH 03748

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Elizabeth Cooney: Design Portfolio  

This is an updated version of the previous portfolio I created during my senior year of undergraduate Architecture education.

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