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Weather

A handful of brief rain showers passed over Navassa between March 25th and 31th. Temperature ranged from 25-27 °C and wind was typically 5-10 kts with occasional gusts up to 22 kts during the squalls. Currents surrounding the island were extremely strong at times and caution should be exercised for marine activities during operations. Currents were especially strong at the Northwest and Southwest tips of the island, and were subject to change without warning. Access

The island is bordered entirely by limestone cliffs reaching 20 meters or more. These steep cliffs are undercut by crashing waves; make it impossible to access the island by boat in most locations (Fig 5). The North face of the island consists of a gradual slope leading to intertidal benches but is also difficult to access due submerged shallow rocks and no safe harbor in which to tie up a boat. The top of the island is a flat plateau and can be accessed in select areas by helicopter.

Figure 5: Steep undercut cliffs make boat access to Navassa impossible in most places. Access is limited to Lulu Bay, a small recession in the cliffs on the Southwest side of Navassa. There is a small rock platform where humans could leap from boat to shore if correctly timed with the swell. The island’s terrain is rugged and the lack of a natural and permanent freshwater source (Proctor 1959) and other natural resources make it uninhabitable by humans. There are no beaches and the surrounding water is very deep, averaging 36 meters in depth directly around the island perimeter.

Profile for Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation

Global Reef Expedition Final Report: Navassa  

In March 2012, the Global Reef Expedition set out to survey the health and resiliency of coral reefs surrounding Navassa Island, a small uni...

Global Reef Expedition Final Report: Navassa  

In March 2012, the Global Reef Expedition set out to survey the health and resiliency of coral reefs surrounding Navassa Island, a small uni...

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