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m a g a z i n e

M A G A Z I N E

Monterey Bay Spring 2012


the switch is n.

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content

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Shopping Green

19

Olive Oil

V o l u m e

1

spring

09

Vermiculture

20

Local Book Seller

N u m b e r

2 0 1 2

10

Marine Sanctuary

23

Smells Like Sunday

opinions and points of view expressed by the writers and advertisers are their

Publisher

Reed Silas Cripe Editor

own and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher. Living Green

Brigga Mosca

Magazine is not responsible for the accuracy of product listings and descriptions.

Design & Production

The publications assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts

Olivia Cajefe Trinidad

or artwork and reserves the right to accept or reject any editorial or advertising materials. Subscriptions are available at $15.00 per year. Send check or money order along with name and mailing address to the address below. Living Green Magazine invites you to offer comments for publication in our letter department. Please address all correspondence to: Editor, Living Green Magazine, PO Box 222697, Carmel, CA 93922. E-mail: info@livinggreenmagazine.com. We are online at www.livinggreenmontereycounty.com 831-238-3676.

Monte r e y •

2

Santa Cruz

Living Green

• S a n B e n i t o C o u nties

Spring 2012

Community Markets

24

Green Expo

C O N T R I B U T O R S

2

Living Green Magazine is published quarterly. All rights reserved. Statements,

17

Photographers

Kodiak Greenwood Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Brigga Mosca John Neidhart Keith Severson Kristen Weilenmann Back Cover Photography:

Kodiak Greenwood Map Art:

Dave Lott Cartoon:

Reed Cripe

Brigga Mosca

Webmaster:

Jim Pinckney

Joe Chabala

Writers

Les Cooper Oliver Cooper Cripe

Social Media:

Kristen Weilenmann


publisher yet healthy and delicious pasta dish. If you could use a laugh, take a look at our cartoon on page 26. As you journey through this issue I hope along the way you find interesting subjects, are entertained and also inspired to help make our world a greener one.

As an artist, I find the process of creating a painting much the same as creating elements for a magazine. Deciding on a subject, finding the right location, figuring out the best perspective and creating solid content (or composition), for starters. Next come the finer points of choosing technique, style and colors. Putting together a magazine over the course of a few months is to imagine the seemingly endless possibilities, recognizing and seizing opportunities, and pulling all the different elements together for a unique composition that will never be duplicated. Each time a book is put together, it is important that the reader is treated to something new from beginning to end. We always strive to share useful ideas in an entertaining and lighthearted way. In this edition of Living Green you will find ways to shop green, explore the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, learn something about olives and olive oil, where to find a great book or how to create a simple

Carmel River Lagoon, Reed Silas Cripe

Spring 2012

Living Green

3


Creating this bed for Esalen was one of our company’s proudest achievements. It was a labor of love and the end result is truly amazing. Brian Gingerich President, Monterey Mattress Company

Esalen’s design and management team wanted an organic and natural bed that would match the Institute’s vision of sustainable living as well as nurture guests during their transformational experiences at the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California. It was their vision that initiated a discussion with Brian Gingerich, owner of Monterey Mattress Company. Gingerich was determined to create a bed worthy of the famed Esalen Institute. The task became an obsession as each part of the bed was analyzed and reinvented. Materials selected had to be natural and organic (chemical -free) as well as provide their guests with a luxurious, and healing sleep experience worthy of Esalen Institute’s world renown reputation. Monterey Mattress Company secured certified, sustainable lumber, organic cotton ticking, and organic wool quilting, as well as the finest, organic, natural latex for this uniquely “green” and sustainable mattress line . The end result Monterey Mattress Company’s “Big Sur Organic Collection” featured at Esalen Institute and only available through Monterey Mattress Company— For more info on Esalen and their programs visit www.Esalen.org


Naturally Comfortable... Monterey Mattress Company featured in the LEED Certified Portola Hotel & Spa

The Portola Hotel and Spa is the first and only 4 Diamond, Silver LEED EB hotel in Monterey County. The hotel is one of three in California and six in the United States with this distinction.

Spa Portola Hotel & rey Mattresses te on M es ur at Fe

Monterey County’s Only 4-Diamond, Silver LEED EB Hotel Features Monterey Mattresses Monterey Mattress Company is proud to be included in Monterey County’s first and only 4-diamond, Silver LEED EB Hotel, their commitment to the environment was the perfect match for our green and affordable mattresses and bedding products.

Setting the Standard for Affordable, Luxurious Mattresses

Monterey Mattress has been manufacturing only the highest quality mattresses at factory direct prices for over 25 years. Our beds are also in over 100 other fine hotels and resorts throughout Monterey County and beyond. If you’ve stayed in a Monterey area hotel, chances are you’ve already slept on a Monterey Mattress.

Highest Quality, Sensibly Sustainable, Factory Direct Pricing

Our mattresses are made with the highest quality materials and are available with natural, organic1, chemical-free, and sustainable features. Our factory direct pricing saves you thousands of dollars compared to similar “Brand” name mattresses in the market.

Monterey Mattress Launches Luxury Bedding Line

The perfect companion to our mattresses is our new line of luxurious bedding products. Choose from a selection of comforters; duvets; fitted and flat sheets; mattress toppers; pillow cases; and pillows, all made with the finest craftsmanship and finest quality natural materials. High-quality natural cotton, double-stitched seams, and high thread counts just begin to tell the story of our new bedding line. Of course, all products meet or beat Oeko-tex certified standards.

Stop by today—for the rest of your life!

Monterey Mattress Company

1714 Contra Costa, Sand City, CA 93955 • Toll-Free 866-997-2632

www.MontereyMattress.com 1. Featured in our Organic Natural Touch line.


by Kristen Weilenmann

B

eing green is no longer a lifestyle reserved solely for tree huggers and Prius drivers. By now, the receding polar ice caps are common knowledge and most people are aware of the effect pollutants have on our atmosphere and water systems. The difficulty, though, is that these issues can seem like far-away, unsolvable problems. But, as extreme weather and natural disasters strike around the world, the overall impact of climate change is becoming more apparent and the time to act in favor of the planet has come. A simple way to advocate for Mother Earth is to practice green shopping habits. Shopping with the global environment in mind is a simple act that can have a huge impact on the planet, especially as more people commit to being green. Start with small, no-brainer tactics—for instance, buying environmentally friendly detergents and hygiene products, or using reusable shopping bags at the grocery store—to make the lifestyle change feel more manageable. Once in the habit of buying eco-friendly products, knowledgeable shoppers can truly make a difference by making thoughtful purchases. It can be tricky to shop green when companies market their products as such even if that doesn’t paint an accurate picture. In other words, just because a product is organic doesn’t mean it didn’t leave a trail of harmful footprints in its wake on the way to your home. Shipping organic products by plane or diesel truck unleashes damaging greenhouse gasses along the way, negatively impacting the planet. To avoid this marketing trap, look

carefully at a product’s packaging and travel itinerary. Packaging can make or break a product’s “greenness.” Take tea bags as an example: eliminating the tag, string, and staple from each bag helps some companies keep millions of pounds of unnecessary waste out of landfills. You can contribute to a healthier planet by supporting companies that take matters like this into account. Also, look for products made of recycled materials— especially goods such as notebooks, gift-wrap, or anything else that utilizes partially or totally recycled paper, wood, or plastic products. Most companies are quick to indicate that the product or its packaging is recycled or green, but there is currently no industry standard that clearly dictates what “green” really means. As a result, it is important for consumers to learn how to compare which types of packaging materials are more Earth-friendly and which companies make an effort to reduce the amount of packaging they employ. Major purchases like cars and houses provide another opportunity for green shopping. In today’s world, it’s not just expensive to get poor gas mileage; it’s environmentally irresponsible. In your home, EnergyStar approved appliances can help reduce the amount of electricity and water used by your household. Your home can also be outfitted with green materials, such as recycled wood flooring. Making purchasing decisions with the environment in mind takes practice, but in the end, shopping green should become a priority just as shopping frugally has in the current economy.


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by Oliver Cooper Cripe

For much of the 17th and 18th centuries, the

consumption of red earth worms exclusively consisted of using the famed “red wigglers” as fishing bait. Even when the idea of using these mighty Annelids (the phylum of most common worms) as a workforce for tilling soil was introduced, most farmers balked at the idea. Most people had strong doubts about both the idea and the initial promoters of the method, even going as far to say that the worms did more harm than good. It wasn’t

clippings and other naturally-derived products. This “food” combined with a substrate of dirt allows worms to work their magic. This process is so remarkable because of the fact that we, as humans, are simply harnessing the symbiotic relationship that the natural world and

e r u t l u Vermic

until the Charles Darwin performed a long term study of worms’ role as soil’s largest benefactor that farmers began to believe the theory. Dr. George Oliver of Texas was the first farmer to put Darwin’s study to the test, placing so much faith in the concept that he quit his medical practice in order to devote and practice his new endeavor on his family farm in Ohio. This 160 acre farm was the first true “vermi-farm” with noticeable results. Soon after inoculating his fields with millions of red wigglers, he noticed immediate results in the fertility and overall quality of his soil and began to share his findings with other farmers. These trials were initially only performed with the typical red wiggler, as the industry progressed, it was discovered that many other species implement the same means to provide similar ends. Modern day vermicomposting is accomplished by “feeding” earthworms a mixture of organic materials such as fruit/ vegetable scraps, egg shells, grains, leaves/grass

earthworms have been using for centuries. After digesting the natural debris in the soil or compost added by people, the earthworms expel what is known as worm manure or worm humus. This excretion is loaded with the concentrated, water-soluble nutrients of the debris that the worms consumed, turning the previously mentioned substrate and compost in to a powerful fertilizer and soil conditioner. From its humble beginnings on a small farm in Ohio, vermiculture has grown to be a multi-million dollar industry, and rightly so. Home-kits are available at a minimal cost and “composting arenas” can be made at home for even less money. The worms themselves reproduce and only represent an initial fee and the price of feeding them only requires the saving of food scraps you would normally throw away. This practice represents a truly cyclical recycling system, using products that originate naturally on this earth and utilizing a creature’s natural process to repurpose said products in to a strong and organic fertilizer. Leave it up to nature to create such a powerful, useful and lasting relationship.

Spring 2012

Living Green

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Stretching more than 250 miles from Marin to Cambria, the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary is our nation’s largest. It encompasses over 6,000 square miles, making it larger than Yosemite National Park.

by John Neidhart

Monterey Bay national marine sanctuary


Spring 2012 Living Green

11

he Sanctuary was created in 1992 with conservation and education being the two top priorities. Governed by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Association, the MBNMS was deemed to be one of our nation’s most diverse habitats, a large range of different ecosystems makes it a valuable resource for ocean health on the central coast as well as a great spot for research and exploration. Thoroughly examined by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, the sanctuary provides both MBARI and the NOAA with a wealth of material to not only assist in conservation, but to offer a strong protected region to learn more about its assortment of habitats. It has worldwide acclaim and attraction by way of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, garnishing over 1.7 million visitors each year. This facility, started by the Packard Foundation serves a purpose for community outreach as well as a showcase for the sanctuary’s wealth of biodiversity Considered to be one of the most productive and diverse marine ecosystems, the MBNMS is often likened to the grasslands of Africa due to its high levels of productivity and biodiversity. Playing home to over 30 marine mammals, 94 seabirds, and 345 varieties of fish is no easy task, but the MBNMS’ various environments are well suited to the success of these organisms. One of the sanctuary’s most valued creature and quite possibly its largest success story is that of the Sea Otter. Driven to the point of extinction by fur traders by the early 1900’s, the Sea Otter was thought to be one of the world’s lost creatures. It wasn’t until 1938 that a large raft of otters was spotted off the Big Sur coast. Since then, the sanctuary has helped the otter make a slow but definite recovery in the wild, protecting the presence of quite possibly the cutest marine mammal for years to come. One of the sanctuary’s most prized habitats is the massive kelp forests, these enormous stands of giant underwater “trees” provide a habitat for not only the Sea Otter, but for hundreds of other creatures living in symbiotic harmony. Our nation’s largest kelp forest resides in this MBNMS; these ancient forests are the epitome of the extensive production and diversity in the sanctuary. These giants reach to a depth of just under 30 meters and provide a refuge for creatures big and small. Beyond featuring an immense underwater forest, our marine sanctuary also provides one of the great hidden depths of our nation’s coastline. With its deepest canyon reaching just over two miles, new discoveries are made regularly within these depths. Space may be our true final frontier, but on earth, this is as close as it gets. This sanctuary and its showcase aquarium is traveled to and studied by millions of visitors, scientists and locals every year. Being that the main hub of research and display is focused on the Monterey Peninsula, having a resource vast in both size and exploration so close to home is truly a blessing.

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KodiaK Greenwood Photography

Kodiak Greenwood 831.238.2786 kodiak@kodiakgreenwood.com


Polly Aiello Jill Franklin

Peggy Olsen

Heidi Hybl Oliver Cooper Cripe

Melissa Bispo

Allyson Sanburn Malek Brigga Mosca

Reed Silas Cripe

Birds of a Feather

A fun evening with an important mission, the Bird House Benefit held at the River Inn in Big Sur boasted dozens of artistic, fanciful one-of-a-kind bird houses created by both local professional artists and school children from Captain Cooper Elementary School. Live and silent auctions brought enthusiastic bidding for the eclectic bird house creations and made for a fun evening and a successful fundraiser for Big Sur’s Health Center. Spring 2012

Living Green

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with NEW LEAF COMMUNITY MARKETS

happy girl kitchen co. is your Local Food Event Center! Our cozy Cafe offers breakfast & lunch everyday, plus a great coffee bar.

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Our Shop stocks our working Cannery's provender, and local honey. Our space is available to rent for private parties, classroom use, or commercial food production. Our Kitchen is the classroom for hands-on learning. We teach home canning workshops in season so you can preserve local fruits and vegetables to eat all year. Learn to preserve pickles, fruit jams & tomatoes!

Largest selection of Local and

Come learn fermenting, baking & cheese making!

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Community Markets by Brigga Mosca

I

f you are looking for the freshest, best quality foods you can find outside your own garden, look no further than your local community market. Locally owned and operated grocers bring locally-grown produce, bakery items and a multitude of delicious prepared foods to its customers. What is so good about this concept is: freshness, flavor, nutrition, air quality and economics. The less transportation involved, for instance, the less fuel emissions in our air and the less vitamins and flavor lost in the food itself. Speaking of flavor, local products have the luxury of being picked at their peak of perfection rather than too soon to accommodate shipping and storage times. Buying products from local farmers and producers keeps the dollars flowing locally for a better economy. It’s just more fun to eat with the seasons, too. Two long time local markets are serving their respective communities very well by offering the freshest, most wholesome foods to be found in your own neighborhood. New Leaf Markets, based in Santa Cruz, focuses on innovation, offering a great selection of local and organic food and

community giving. For over 25 years owners Scott Roseman and Rex Stewart have guided the enterprise to embrace these basic values while expanding into cooking and wellness classes and boasting a great website that includes information about health and wellness, beauty, genetics, food and more. Visit at newleaf.com. Proprietor Charlie Higuera of Grove Market in Pacific Grove and now Carmel Valley Market in the village has served customers since 1969 with a full service meat and deli counter. They feature organic, seasonal fruit and vegetables from local farms, local bakeries, and a unique selection of interesting local gourmet products. Visit their website for menu ideas and to see new products at www.grovemarketpg.com. Community markets are here to serve local customers and to support local producers. They give back to their communities in so many ways. They provide us the freshest, most nutritious, interesting and closest-tohomemade than you can find in the big box stores. The experience of shopping these stores is more relaxed and more personal, too. And, it just feels good to know that you are aligning yourself with more ethical standards when you buy local.

Spring 2012

Living Green

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Providing you with fresh Produce from Local Farms since 1969. Full service meat & deli counter with fresh cut meats, Steaks, BBQ ribs, Kabobs, Roasted Chickens, Stuffed pork chops, Stuffed Bell peppers & homemade salads. All prepared fresh & cut daily.

“We’re truly committed to our customer’s health and quality of life.” Organic Herbs Extensive Selection of Vitamin & Mineral Supplements Natural Weight Loss and Anti-Aging Products Homeopathic Remedies Therapeutic Essential Oils Senior & Military Discounts!

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www.grovemarketpg.com

Visit us at our new location in the Holman Building. 542 Lighthouse Avenue, Pacific Grove 831-372-6625

H For those of you who love olives and olive oil, a visit to Coeur d’Olives™ and Mediterraneo tasting room and retail store is not to be missed. Here you will find gourmet olive products, extra virgin olive oil, aged balsamic vinegars, rubs, spices, salad dressings and flavored sea salts alongside a fine selection of stuffed olives and tapenades.

Come and see where these heavenly comestibles are created and enjoy a sample of these hand crafted products. We offer a 15% discount on Saturdays! Open 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 1143 Echo Avenue (in back of building), Seaside (831) 393-1075 www.coeurdolives.com


by Les Cooper

O

Olive Trees, Olives and Olive Oil

lives are versatile in many ways, including: wood from the trees for utensils and bowls, lamp oil, make-up removal, skin and hair moisturizer, religious anointing oil, olives for eating, and edible oil. There are only two grades of olive oil for eating; extra virgin and virgin. Extra virgin and virgin grades are determined by chemical analysis. If the oleic acid content is below 1%, it is extra virgin. If the acid is above 1%, then it is considered virgin. The differences between the two are flavor and health benefits. The extra virgin is the best flavor and the most healthful. The attributes of extra virgin are; a “pepper” finish as it passes from the cheeks and down the throat, a flavor that tastes “grassy” and “fruity” Virgin oil does not have these rich flavors. Extra virgin oil has health benefits that the virgin oil doesn’t. For example, the “pepper” finish is from polyphenols from early harvest olives, pressing within 24 hours after picking. Polyphenols are antioxidants that lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol. It also contains Vitamin E that is excellent for the skin.

The olive has been one of most famous and historical sacred fruits in the three major religious groups - Christian, Muslim and Jewish for thousands of years. Spring 2012

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I

Local Book Sellers by Kristen Weilenmann

n an age when ‘electronic’ is exalted, there is something bookworms can do to stimulate the local economy and help reduce their negative environmental impact: buy books from local sellers. True, e-books are readily available online, typically cost less than their print-version counterparts, and reduce paper waste. But e-books are only one small facet of huge companies that do more harm to the environment than good. That’s where local booksellers come in as an excellent alternative. Going beyond the satisfying feeling of turning each page, readers can feel better about their purchases knowing that they are doing their part to help, economically and environmentally. According to the IndieBound Campaign (www.indiebound. org), a subset of the American Booksellers Association—an organization that encourages local book-buying—an extra $25 per $100 spent stays within the local community where a book was purchased from a local seller, as opposed to a national chain or global Internet giant. That’s a profound figure: 68 of your 100 hard-earned dollars are cycled back into the community in which you live, meaning your friends and neighbors reap the benefits. The cycle is perpetuated by the fact that local business are more than twice as likely to donate to charity, in which case your cash is truly circulating through your community to help a variety of industries flourish. In terms of environmental impact, buying books locally is a no brainer. Not only are vast amounts of transportation and packaging resources saved by purchasing from local vendors, but

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Living Green

Spring 2012

less paper waste is produced by booksellers who stock appropriately-sized inventories, saving countless unsold copies from seeing the inside of a landfill. Cynthia Fernandes and Paul Fridlund, a couple who collaboratively operates Pilgrim’s Way—the first-ever green-certified business in downtown Carmel, and the only bookstore (www. pilgrimsway.com)—confirm and embody the many advantages of local bookshops. “Shopping local is a great solution because it’s a green model,” Cynthia said. “We custom-support special requests and can get an order here in two days—sometimes the next day—so we don’t have books sitting on the shelves forever.” This just-in-time ordering system, as she aptly called it, simultaneously reduces waste and provides stellar customer service, a win-win situation for any business. Pilgrim’s Way also exemplifies the community connection. The shop supports local education and historical organizations, which customers are also able to support, in turn, by shopping there. No matter how cheap e-books may be, international chains simply can’t compete when it comes to positively contributing to the well being of your family, your community, or your planet. “Remember the human connection,” Cynthia said. “These are your neighbors, the people who are going to be around for your kids.” In opting to buy your next read from a local bookseller, you are able to reduce your carbon footprint and support your community all at once—now, and for years to come.


Books New & Used Books eBooks & Direct-to-Home Shipping Special Orders Local Artist Cards & Gifts Newspapers & Magazines

As Carmel-by-the-Sea’s FIRST Green Certified Business we support green businesses, green business practices and local resources for products and services.

Weekly Author Readings Book Clubs & Workshops Beer & Wine Coffee Drinks Hours: Mon-Thurs 9am-9pm, Fri & Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 9am-8pm

A I T/ C  B

Or shop online at: www.capitolabookcafe.com

Locally owned and operated since 1969! Each book title personally selected. Custom orders welcome. Delivery in 1-5 days. Reading Group discounts. Local deliveries. Complementary gift wrap.

Visit

info@theWorksPG.com 667 Lighthouse Ave. Pacific Grove, CA (831) 372-2242

Rain Water Catchment system Locally grown miniature potted gardens Exquisite selection of garden statues & decor

a bookstore and garden for the adventurous at heart! 1475 41st Avenue, Capitola, CA 95010 Next to 41st Ave. Cinema 831.462.4415

Dolores between 5th & 6th Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA 93921 phone 831.624.4955 | toll free 800.549.9922 pilgrimsway.com | pilgrim@pilgrimsway.com


Good Green Fun

Photography by Jim Pinckney

The Big Sur Chanterelle Cook-Off & Festival was a wonderful tasting and sharing of local chefs’ and vintners’ incredible offerings. The local wild mushroom, the Chanterelle, served as the inspiration for menus along with their wine pairings. Accompanying the gastronomic delights was an art and fashion show at The Gallery at Ventana followed by an all-Chanterelle dinner menu with wine pairings at The Restaurant at Ventana.


Smells Like Sunday By Keith Severson

O

live oil, that wonderfully delicious, versatile and multi-functional amber-hued liquid that is so ubiquitous to everyday cooking. Going back to our childhood, Olive Oil was just Popeye’s main squeeze. It may have been in Mom’s kitchen, but she did not fret as to its origin, nor did she care how the pressing was conducted. Now this divine nectar is used in almost all dishes, from mains to desserts, savory to sweet, salads and soups and even in soaps and cosmetics. How to determine the best olive oil? Consider three basic characteristics to tasting; bitterness, fruitiness and pungency. Bitterness is a key indicator since olives are naturally bitter. Fruitiness is where you might find a unique and individual style, and pungency will be the kick at the back of the throat. How many coughs the oil induces is a viable determinant. Look for descriptors just as you do in wine--adjectives that come to mind are, fruity, buttery, peppery, smoky, and leather. In the end it comes down to what you like, what price range you can afford, and how you are going to use the oil. One of my favorite ways to highlight a good olive oil is with a simple pasta recipe.

Ingredients 1 pound good quality dried spaghetti 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil 3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes, plus more if desired 1/4 cup chopped Italian flat-leaf parsley Directions In a large pot, bring 6 quarts salted water to a boil. Add pasta and cook al dente, about 6 to 8 minutes. Drain pasta in a colander, reserving 2 tablespoons of the pasta water. The reserved pasta water will help create the sauce. Do not rinse pasta with water -- you want to retain the pasta’s natural starches so that the sauce will stick. In a large saute pan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and saute until light brown and fragrant. It’s important not to burn the garlic or it will become bitter. Add red pepper flakes and saute for 1 minute. Add reserved pasta water and stir to combine. Place spaghetti into the pan and mix well. Remove pan from heat and top with fresh herbs, grated cheese and fresh ground coarse black pepper. This makes an excellent side dish for something spectacular. I like it next to Saltimbocca.

Keith Severson is the author of It Smells Like Sunday, founder of www.smellslikesunday. com and host of It Smells Like Sunday, a food talk radio show heard every Saturday on KYAA AM 1200. You can contact him at keith@smellslikesunday.com .

Spring 2012

Living Green

23


“We’re here for the Green Expo!” 24

Living Green

Spring 2012


Monterey Bay’s newest classical station! e! v i en L

r o t . s u i z a L @k

g

KAZU CLASSICAL delivers classical radio 24 hours a day, 7 days a week broadcast digitally and online at kazu.org. Our classical broadcast is conveniently accessible online by clicking the “Listen Live” button on the homepage, or by tuning an HD Digital Radio to KAZU HD 2. However you choose to listen, we welcome you and hope you enjoy Monterey’s newest classical music station.


Kodiac Photo

Photo by Kodiak Greenwood

Living Green Monterey County Spring 2012  

2012 Spring Edition of Living Green Monterey County, covering all things green in the area

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