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ANEW MODELFORHABITATFORHUMANITY

as t udyofas s embl ybymeansoff r amewor k

under gr aduat et hes i ss t udy Dav i dP .Pol l ar d2003


A New Model for Habitat for Humanity a study of assembly by means of framework

An undergraduate thesis study by David Parke Pollard May, 2003 Advisors: Steven Thompson Hunter Pittman Jay Stoeckel


contents

introduction

7

project

9

assembly

31

credits

43

bibliography

45


6


introduction In the New River Valley, Habitat for Humanity exists with the mission to provide simple, decent housing to families in need. This mission is accomplished by volunteers acting as carpenters with little to no construction experience. To address this issue, designs and construction methods are chosen in order to cover any marks of trade. The intricate framing systems of the building are covered by vinyl siding        Sadly, all trademarks are erased from the exposure of the house.

This project proposes a different approach to the design and construction methods of a Habitat for Humanity house.

A new framing system is developed to expose the implicit lines of the building. The same off-the-shelf products used in all other Habitat houses are rearranged and assembled in a comprehensive system that reveals the trademarks of the volunteers.             the interior and exterior spaces of the house. As a result the placement of every part reveals its relationship to the whole. Suddenly the relationship of a single nail to the whole of the building is exposed. To address the issue of building construction, this proposal includes the use of repetitious systems of assembly. The systems are explained through detailed instruction sheets handed out the volunteers by the site supervisor. The result of this proposal is a building with a high level of craft revealed in its details. The mark of the volunteers and the designer are             

7


project The building is a small two-bedroom house located in Bluff City, just outside of the town of Pearisburg, in southwestern Virginia. The construction materials are limited to offthe-shelf products such as concrete block, dimensional lumber, sheet metal, concrete, and corrugated steel. The form of the building evolves as different construction systems frame each other. Block walls frame post and beam assemblies, which in turn frame wall systems. Window and door openings begin to be framed by these interesecting systems. The plan is nine-square, with all the servant spaces occurring in the western third. The entrance and exit happens in the third between the served and servant spaces. The southwestern quadrant of the building is the front entrance. This space is left unenclosed but covered. Here the vertical circulation occurs through an intricate framing system. Southern sunlight enters the house through this framework further exposing the frame through shadow.

9


below south-north site section


12


top left   

front entry rear entry utility mechanical stair

A B C D E

bathroom bedroom bedroom

F G H

bottom left   

stair entry kitchen

A B C

living dining

D E

13


14


below view of post assembly left framing sketch far left view of east facade lower left sketch of post assembly

15


16


right perspective of east wall below view from inside bedroom left wall panel plan detail left below view of wall panel from outside

17


below view from mountains

18


19


20


left perspective of approach to entrance below view through kitchen

21


left view through living room above roof system sketch top right view of roof

22

bottomright sketch of gutter detail


23


24


left north elevation from alleyway


below perspective view from alleyway previous pages perspective view of stair corner

28


29


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assembly To maintain a high level of craft in the builidng, it is critical for the volunteers to have an understanding of the whole of the assembly of parts. The proposal is for a series of assembly sheets to be developed and given to the volunteers. Each sheet is broken into a structure that demonstates the relationship of each part to the whole building. Each major phase has a master sheet that relates it to the whole building. Each master sheet is then broken down into smaller sheets revealing the assembly of each piece.

following pages master assembly phases left Habitat for Humanity volunteers assembling a house in Giles County, Virginia 31


1. block assembly

32

2. post assembly


3.   

33


4.  

34

5. wall panel assembly


6. ceiling frame assembly

35


7. roof frame assembly

36

8. stair assembly


9. roof assembly

37


40


above bolt assemblies top left exploded hangar assembly bottom left hangar-to-block assembly

41


credits project/document David Parke Pollard advisors Steven Thompson Hunter Pittman Jay Stoeckel studio colleagues Scott Gruver Christopher Lawton Andrew McClure Edward Pillsbury Matthew Thackray Daniel Villa

design/production tools digital photography Nikon D100 computer renderings AutoCAD 2002 digital image editing Adobe Photoshop 7.0 document layout Adobe Pagemaker 7.0 typeset Century Gothic printed Virginia Polytechnic and State University, May 2003

43


bibliography

Davis, Sam. The Architectrure of Affordable Housing. University of California Press, Ltd. London. 1995. Emery, Alden Hayes. Geology of the Pearisburg Region. 1923. Glassie, Henry. Folk Housing in Middle Virginia. University of Tennessee Press. Knoxville. 1975 Gusler, Mary Ann. Folk Housing in Patrick County, Virginia. 1973. Haase, Ronald. Classic Cracker. Pineapple Press, Inc. Sarasota, Florida. 1992. Dean, Andrea Oppenheimer, and Timothy Hursley. Rural Studio: Samuel Mockbee and an Architecture of Decency. Princeton Architectural Press. New York. 2002. Jensen, Richard. Clark and Menefee. Princeton Architectural Press. New York. 2000. Walker, Lester. A Little House of My Own: 47 Grand Designs for 47 Tiny Houses. The Overlook Press. New York. 1987. Wrenn, Tony P. and Mulloy, Elizabeth D. America’s Forgotten Architecture. National Trust for Historic Preservation. Washington, D.C. 1976. Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, Inc. Venturi Scott Brown & Associates: On Houses and Housing. St. Martin’s Press. New York. 1992.

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Undergraduate Thesis