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@livemore COMMUTE LESS & IMAGINE LIFE WITH MORE TIME TO LIVE

Leesburg’s Flower & Garden Festival Try Something New this SummerJoin a CSA! Clavate en un Carpool

A publication of the Dulles Area Transportation Association


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inside @livemore features Celebrate Historic Garden Week

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Robert Simon candlelight vigil, photo by Charlotte Geary. In our last edition, we failed to recognize the photographer of this Robert Simon Candlelight Vigil photo. Thank you to Charlotte Geary for allowing @livemore to publish your photo.

Leesburg’s 26th Annual Flower and Garden Festival

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Try Something New This Summer-Join a CSA!

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on the cover At the annual Reston Association Open House in the spring, DATA’s Director of Employer Outreach Lynn Bostain welcomes residents with the latest information on their many commuting choices. For the last several years, DATA has participated in this event which draws scores of Restonians eager to “live more.”

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@livemore

A child paints a flower at the Leesburg Flower and Garden Festival. See the story on page 8. Photo courtesy of the Festival.

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Bikesharing is Coming to Reston and Tysons

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An Innovative Approach to Learning How to Use Transit in Fairfax

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@livemoreVA livemorecommuteless www.livemore.us

Changing How Transportation Projects are Prioritized in VA

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Smart Cities-Is the Future Near?

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Spring into These Activities in March and April

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Ericka’s Corner: Clavate en un Carpool


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@livemore published by the Dulles Area Transportation Association

EDITORS Doug Pickford Aundrea Humphreys

From the CEO’s Desk

DESIGN Aundrea Humphreys ADVERTISING SALES Hugh Barton Barbara Barton Sabrina Sheth Kelly Woodward

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Got a story idea?

Email editor@livemore.us

For advertising info,

Isn’t Earth Day everyday? Think about it, without the “mothership” what exactly would we be celebrating– moon day? Ok, a little tongue-in-cheek motivation for everyone to really think about your personal impact on “mother earth,” every day, not just once a year. @livemore and the Dulles Area Transportation Association attempt to bring this focus to your everyday lives by educating you on the choices you have that can really make a difference not only in your quality of life, but also on the sustainability of our world habitat. In this edition of @livemore,

we highlight a number of festivals that are being held in correspondence to the area’s recognition of Earth Day, as well as the fledgling emergence of spring. We are also highlighting Historic Garden Week – one of the most popular and attended occasions in Virginia; learning more about Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) networks; and thinking about where to find your local farmers markets this spring. We are also providing you with some important information on changes that have been recently instituted by VDOT in how they rank and

prioritize road construction and improvement projects. As we all “emerge” from our Snowzilla/winter cocoons, there are many things we can do to prepare for spring and summer – we hope this edition gives you some “food” for thought, and provides some impetus for you to give Mother Earth a hug on her special day (which is everyday) by making one simple change in your life, once a week, that helps our environment. Take transit, carpool, telework, recycle more, plant a tree, etc. By doing so, we hope your actions also help you livemore and commute less!

hugh@livemore.us 703-370-3868 sabrina@livemore.us 734-649-3969 As Always – Best Regards

Contact DATA

@livemoreVA

Jim Larsen, Executive Director/CEO jlarsen@datatrans.org

Kelly Woodward, Director of Sales and Marketing kwoodward@datatrans.org

Lynn Bostain, Director of Employer Outreach lbostain@datatrans.org

4160 Pleasant Valley Road Burgess & Niple Building, Suite 200 Chantilly Virginia 20151-1226 Phone (703) 817-1307 Fax (866) 652-0847

James N. Larsen Executive Director/CEO Dulles Area Transportation Association

www.livemore.us


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Bikeshare is Coming to Reston and Tysons

Photos courtesy of Sam Kittner, Capital Bikeshare. On January 12th, the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors authorized expenditures of $1.6 million for the purchase of bikeshare equipment and implementation of the bikeshare program in Reston and Tysons. Bikeshare stations are projected to open in the fall of 2016. Bikeshare is a transportation system that allows individuals to check out a bike and ride short to moderate distances from station to station. A system

of bikeshare stations and bicycles are set up in an area to allow participants to travel between destinations that are generally further than walking, without driving. As a result, roadway congestion is reduced. In the Washington D.C. area, Capital Bikeshare is the existing bikeshare system that operates in Washington D.C., Arlington County, Alexandria, and Montgomery County. There are currently over 370 stations in the

Capital Bikeshare system in these jurisdictions. In 2014, the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments (MWCOG) awarded Fairfax County a Transportation and Land Use Connection grant to study the feasibility of launching a bikeshare system. The results of the study showed that bikeshare could succeed as a viable transportation option in Reston. •

The Reston Bikeshare

system will consist of 15 stations and 132 bicycles located between the WiehleReston East Metrorail Station and Reston Town Center area. Reston Bikeshare received grant funding from the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. • The Tysons Bikeshare system will consist of 11 stations and 80 bicycles located in Tysons to the east of Route 7, north of Route 123,

and south of the Dulles Toll Road. Tysons Partnership is providing a financial contribution of $110,000 towards capital cost of the Tysons system. The two Fairfax bikeshare initiatives should be fully operational by the Fall of 2016. For more information on Capital Bikeshare and how to become a member and/or how to use bikeshare, go to www.capitalbikeshare.com.

Advertising in @livemore Advertising in @livemore is an effective way to reach 20,000 readers who are looking for ways to enjoy life more. They are curious, open to new ideas, ready for something new. @livemore is published six times a year, and distributed in high-visibility sites in the Dulles area, including including Reston, Leesburg, Chantilly and Centreville. Distribution sites include public libraries, shops, office buildings,

and Live More newspaper boxes at Metro stations. Advertising is easy. An @livemore ad sales exec will walk you through the process. Don’t have in-house design capabilities? We can design an eye-catching ad for a modest fee. We make payment simple, too. We can email you an invoice for secure online payment or payment by check. For information contact sales@livemore.us.


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An Innovative Approach to Learning How to Use Transit in Fairfax What many may assume is the smallest hurdle that a resident or commuter must jump to use mass transit is often the most intimidating reason why people don’t use the region’s bus and METROrail systems. That hurdle is the sometimes daunting factor of how to physically use the payment systems, understand the schedules, and navigate between the systems. This intimidating factor is so great, that some residents/ commuters don’t even try transit. Unfortunately, for our growing elderly populations

and some underserved residents, the choice not to use transit is very isolating because they have no other transportation options. The Fairfax County Department of Transportation, in conjunction with the Fairfax Department of Neighborhood and Community Services, has developed an orientation program that uses a technologically innovative Connector bus to provide hands-on experience and information on how to use the region’s mass transit system. The bus, called MATT (Mobile Accessible Travel

Training), has been renovated and designed for training senior citizens to travel safely and independently on regional transit systems. According to the Fairfax County website, “County staff will coordinate ‘travel training’ trips in which seniors will travel by bus and rail transit to and from a destination of their choice. The travelers-in-training will identify a bus stop near their residence, learn to read bus schedules and route maps, learn how to pay the fare and how to signal the driver to stop, as well as other bus travel skills. The bus will

deliver seniors to a Metrorail station where they will learn how to determine the fare and purchase Metrorail fare cards, load SmarTrip cards, read the system map, and board the trains to travel by rail.” The MATT bus is a traveling classroom that is handicap and hearing impaired accessible and features “a special area in the rear for classroom-like instruction. The classroom area includes audio and video components that can play VCR tapes, DVDs and computer-driven programs that will be shown on three

LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) television screens, two of which are mounted on the ceiling of the bus.” Through the efforts of Supervisor Hudgins and the Fairfax County Department of Transportation, the bus was put into service in 2004. In the future, DATA intends to more closely coordinate some of its outreach activities with the MATT bus and the Department of Neighborhood and Community Services. Stay tuned for more information on these endeavors.

REAL STORIES FROM THE EXPRESS LANES

“I’ve shaved an hour off m y daily commute. It’s made me a better dad and a better husband.” - Donald B. Stafford, VA

Public school teacher Donald lives in Stafford and works in Falls Church. Before the Express Lanes, he says his commute was stressful and unpredictable. When Donald would slug on the HOV lanes, sometimes it took him an hour to get work. Since the Lanes opened, he still carpools, but now he is able to spend more time with those he loves.

See more real stories from the Lanes at ExpressLanes.com

Donald’s story was one of our winning entries in our “Express Lanes Love Story” promotion.


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Celebrate Historic Garden Week! BY KAREN CAUTHEN ELLSWORTH

From its inception nearly a century ago, the Garden Club of Virginia has highlighted policy issues directed at the environment and sustainability. Its 47 member clubs are comprised of more than 3,300 volunteers. They have long advocated to conserve natural resources, plant trees and promote environmentally sustainable gardening. The Garden Club of Virginia encourages the use of native plants. Gardeners everywhere know that setting plants in the proper location reduces maintenance and watering requirements, and eliminates or reduces the need for and use of commercial pesticides and fertilizers. A native landscape does not need to be mowed like a conventional lawn, reducing the demand for

non-renewable resources and improving water and air quality. Landscaping with wildflowers and grasses improves the ecosystem. Birds, butterflies, bees and other plants are attracted to these plants, enhancing biodiversity. “One has only to drive by a Kudzu infested roadside to understand how invasive plants rob native plants of their natural habitat,” notes Tuckie Westfall, Conservation Chairman of this statewide organization. Renowned for its popular Historic Garden Week, the nation’s only statewide house and garden tour, the Garden Club of Virginia celebrates the beauty of the land, conserves the gifts of nature and challenges future generations to build on this heritage. This fundraiser

began when a flower show organized by Garden Club of Virginia volunteers raised funds to save trees planted by Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. More than 80 years later, proceeds from local Historic Garden Week tours continue to fund the restoration and preservation of nearly 40 of the Commonwealth’s significant historic public gardens, two annual research fellowships, as well as a new initiative with Virginia’s state parks. This spring, there are four tours involving seven clubs in the Northern Virginia area alone. Old Town Alexandria – Saturday, April 23 Overlooking the Potomac River and within view of

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Magnolia, photo courtesy of the Garden Club of Virginia. our Nation’s Capital, Old Town was only the third city in the country to create a historic district to preserve its downtown. Today, it has 4,000 buildings with this designation. The leisurely walking tour includes five homes with small, urban gardens and admission to several nearby historic sites including the Carlyle House Historic Park. When British merchant John Carlyle completed his riverfront house in 1753, this was the grandest mansion in the new town of Alexandria. The Garden Club of Virginia restored the front landscape to the mid18th-century period using proceeds from past Historic Garden Week tours. “On the day of the tour, visitors can purchase herbs, native plants and crafts on the grounds of this landmark property,” says Catherine Thompson, one of the Chairmen for the Old Town Alexandria tour. “Mount Vernon brings plants from the estate gardens to sell and many of those are native Virginia species.” George Washington’s estate is also a restoration project of the Garden Club of Virginia.

Winchester – Saturday, April 23 and Sunday, April 24 Going out of town, this rural tour showcases four estates dating from 1782 to 1993. “Visitors might not realize that their ticket purchase helps to preserve and restore historic gardens in the immediate area. Take a side trip to the State Arboretum of Virginia and experience one of the nearby gardens that Historic Garden Week has helped to sustain and grow,” explains Anne Buettner, one of the Tour Chairmen for the Winchester-Clarke County tour. The 175-acre Historic Blandy Experimental Farm at the State Arboretum is in nearby Boyce. It contains over 5,000 woody trees and shrubs from around the world. A property of the University of Virginia since 1926, it is currently operated under its department of Environmental Services. Stone walls along Dogwood Lane that once led to the manor house of the original farm were rebuilt in 2004 by the Garden Club of Virginia using proceeds from past tours. Walking trails wind through the property,


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Swallowtail, photo courtesy of Rendy Adams. including the Native Plant Trail where visitors will see early blooming spring ephemeral wildflowers like bloodroot, bluebells and trillium. These harbingers of spring are followed by violet, wild geranium, wild blue phlox and mayapple. Middleburg – Sunday, April 24 and Monday, April 25 Nestled against the backdrop of the Blue Ridge Mountains, this tour features four estates all located within the 18,000-acre Crooked Run Rural Historic District just to the west of Middleburg. “Thanks to the stewardship of local land owners, thousands of acres are protected by privately held conservation easements providing for lasting enjoyment of our architecture and rural beauty,” notes June Hambrick, President of the Leesburg Garden Club and Tour Chairman for the Middleburg tour. “Visitors and residents alike rejoice at the sight of stone walls, grazing horses and cows, century old oaks, rock roads and homes of our Founders here, all within 50 minutes of the Capital beltway,” she points out. GCV members are

very active in communitybased environmental groups working with the citizens to conserve land, protect air and water quality and restore wildlife natural habitat. “These efforts are crucial to maintaining a cherished way of life in this part of Virginia,” notes Sally Fletcher, Historic Garden Week District Chairman in Northern Virginia. Falls Church – Arlington – Tuesday, April 26 Back inside the Beltway, Falls Church is a small city, two miles square. Full of history and charming urban gardens, Arlington borders Falls Church on the east. Featured gardens on this Historic Garden Week tour include four 100-year-old holly trees, mature boxwoods delineating garden rooms, an herb garden and a garden of Victorian era plants. Landscaping choices have meaningful effects on local populations of birds and the insects. Situated in a 38acre wooded stream valley, Gulf Branch Natural Area in Arlington preserves and protects wildlife habitat. This suburban park is a sanctuary for a surprising number of

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plant and animal species and is a nearby attraction for gardening enthusiasts. On tour day, a naturalist will be available to talk with visitors about bees, one of our local pollinators, and they can experience the observation beehive. Without native plants our native bees could not survive. Many people don’t realize that honey bees are not native to America; they came with the European colonists and then quickly spread over the continent. “The best way to protect our bee population is to educate people, which is what we are doing by promoting the Gulf Branch Nature Center,” explains Tricia Goins, Tour Chairman for the Arlington/ Falls Church tour. “We want to encourage people to plant native plants to help our population of bees. The Gulf Branch Nature Center provides a beautiful, natural, green space – a place where our neighbors can learn how to create one in their own gardens.” In his book Garden Tourism, Richard W. Benfield notes, “More people travel to gardens in America than visit Disneyland and Disneyworld

combined.” Approximately 30,000 people will visit sites across Virginia over eight consecutive days this April. Clearly, gardens are important and provide a unique educational opportunity for organizations like the Garden Club of Virginia to educate the public on the value of native plants and beneficial horticulture. While the primary motivation for attending Historic Garden Week is typically to enjoy the spectacular private homes and gardens that are open exclusively in support of its mission, there are additional benefits. “We estimate that over 2,000 flower arrangements will be created to decorate homes

featured on Historic Garden Week this spring. Using native and seasonal flowers is a point of pride for our club members since most of the plant materials come directly from their personal gardens,” explains Meg Clement, this year’s State Chairman. “Our arrangers also participate in flower shows around the state so they bring a lot of experience and knowledge to the process.” Visit www.vagardenweek. org for a complete tour schedule, to purchase tickets and for details regarding itineraries and Garden Club of Virginia current restoration sites. Karen Cauthen Ellsworth is the Director of Historic Garden Week.


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Changing How Transportation Projects Are Prioritized in Virginia BY ANDREW G. BEACHER, P.E.

Have you ever wondered if there is a better, more transparent way to fund transportation projects in Virginia? Your state representatives have, and, as a result, the Commonwealth has embarked on a groundbreaking new effort to change the way it allocates funding for transportation projects. In 2014, Governor McAuliffe signed into law the legislation known as House Bill 2 (HB2) which creates a framework by which proposed transportation projects are rated according to their potential benefits. This information can then be considered by the Commonwealth Trans!Chart

The HB2 Process Under HB2, Regional

Entities (such as Metropolitan Planning Organizations), Localities (Counties, Cities and Towns), and Public Transit Agencies are eligible to submit candidate projects in accordance with certain criteria (outlined below). It is noted that while the Metropolitan Planning Organization for Northern Virginia is the National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board, which resides at the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments, for HB2 purposes, the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority has assumed this role. See Chart A. All projects submitted

A

Project Type

!

portation Board (CTB) in its selection of which projects to fund. With the passing of this new legislation, the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) and the Department of Rail and Public Transportation (DRPT), under the leadership of Virginia’s Office of the Secretary of Transportation, have worked to implement HB2, using the framework established under the new law to develop a process by which potential projects may be vetted and scored, and ultimately considered for funding.

Regional Entity (MPOs/PDCs)

Locality* (Counties/Cities/Towns)

Corridor of Statewide Significance

Yes

Yes, with a resolution of support from relevant regional entity

Yes, with a resolution of support from relevant regional entity

Regional Network

Yes

Yes

Yes, with a resolution of support from relevant entity

Urban Development Area

No

Yes

No

*Localities are also eligible to submit projects addressing a safety need identified inVTrans2040.

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Public Transit Agencies

must pass through an initial screening which is tied directly to the Commonwealth’s statewide long-range transportation plan, VTrans2040. VTrans2040 examines Virginia’s transportation needs in four categories: 1) Corridors of Statewide Significance (CoSSs), which represent the interregional travel market (examples of CoSSs in Northern Virginia include Interstate 66, Route 29, Interstate 95, and the North-South Corridor in Loudoun and Prince William Counties); 2) Regional Networks, which represent the intraregional travel market (in Northern Virginia, the designated regional network includes all roads within the boundaries of the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority, which includes Loudoun, Prince William, Fairfax and Arlington Counties, as well as the independent cities of Alexandria, Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas and Manassas Park); 3) Urban Development Areas (UDAs), which represent local activity centers (such as Tysons Corner); and 4) Safety. For HB2, each candidate project must meet a VTrans need in at least one of these

categories in order to be scored. If a project is screened out, it will not proceed to scoring, and therefore would not be eligible for HB2 funds. Once a project has been screened in, it is scored across five factor areas: congestion mitigation, economic development, accessibility, safety and environmental quality, plus one additional factor area, the land use factor, for areas over 200,000 in population, such as Northern Virginia. Within each factor area, there are anywhere from one to three measures that have been identified to calculate a project’s overall score. These measures were chosen with the goal that they: 1) analyze what matters to people and have meaningful impact; 2) ensure fair and accurate benefit-cost analyses; 3) are both transparent and understandable; 4) work for both urban and rural areas; 5) work for all modes of transportation, and 6) minimize overlap between measures. The measures for each of the factor areas are displayed in Chart B. Upon calculation of the factor scores, one of four weighting frameworks is applied to the scores to reflect the different characteristics


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! Chart B !

Factor Area

Congestion

Economic Development

Accessibility

Safety

Environmental Quality

Land Use

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Measure(s)

Percentage of Score

Decrease in person hours of delay in corridor

50%

Increase in the peak-period person throughput in the corridor

50%

Project consistency with regional and local economic development plans and policies

60%

Project potential to enhance access to critical intermodal locations, interregional freight movement and/or freight intensive industries

20%

Improvement in travel time reliability

20%

Increase in the cumulative access to jobs accessible within 45 minutes in a region (60 minutes for transit)

60%

Increase in the cumulative job accessibility for disadvantaged populations within 45 minutes (60 minutes for transit)

20%

Increase in the access to travel options in a corridor

20%

Reduction in the number of fatalities and severe injuries

50%

Reduction in the rate of fatalities and severe injuries per 100 million vehicle miles traveled

50%

Degree to which a project is likely to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gas emissions

50%

Potential of a project to minimize impact on natural and cultural resources

50%

Degree to which a project will support mixed use development, in-fill development and corridor access management policies

100%

of the diverse regions of the Commonwealth. In urban areas, such as Northern Virginia, congestion mitigation is weighted the highest, while in other portions of the Commonwealth, congestion is weighted lower, with other factors such as accessibility or safety receiving higher percentages. The four weighting frameworks, as adopted by the Commonwealth Transportation Board, are illustrated in the following table, with Northern Virginia falling into Category A: See Chart C. Finally, the summation of the weighted factor scores for each of the factor areas is used to determine the overall project score, which is then compared to both the overall project cost, as well as the HB2 cost (in other words, the amount of funds being requested through HB2) to determine the project’s relative benefits versus costs. Inaugural Round and Next Steps Earlier this year, after soliciting

Note: For HB2, individual measure scores for each project are relative to the project demonstrating the most benefit for that particular measure. The project with the highest benefit will receive a score of 100. Another project with half the benefits would receive a score of 50, and so on. Once measure scores have been calculated, each measure score is then weighted by its measure percentage. Factor areas with multiple measures will be summed to determine raw factor scores.

feedback from around the state, the Commonwealth rolled out the HB2 implementation process to jurisdictions, regional entities and transit agencies, and established a timeline for application submissions. The inaugural application period closed on September 30, 2015, with over 300 applications received (46 in Northern Virginia alone). Initial screening, validation and scoring have since been completed, and results were presented to the CTB at their January, 2016 workshop. Projects will be considered by the CTB over the next several months, and ultimately, their selections for funding will be incorporated into the Commonwealth’s SixYear Improvement Plan (SYIP), scheduled to be finalized in June, 2016. For more information on House Bill 2, including scoring results, please visit the official website Andrew at: www.virginiahb2.org. Beacher is Assistant Transportation Planning Director for VDOT – Northern Virginia District.

10 Examples of Projects Submitted in Northern Virginia for Inaugural Round of HB2 Route 7 Widening (Phase I), Fairfax County I-66/Route 28 Interchange Improvements, Fairfax County VRE Gainesville-Haymarket Extension, Northern Virginia Transportation Commission

Chart C Factor

Transform66 Outside the Beltway, Northern Virginia Transportation Authority

Congestion Economic Accessibility Safety Environmental Land Mitigation Development Quality Use

Traffic Adaptive Signal Control, City of Alexandria Pedestrian Crossings, City of Falls Church

Category A

45%

5%

15%

5%

10%

20%

Category B

15%

20%

25%

20%

10%

10%

Route 234 Bypass at Dumfries/PWP/Brentsville Rd Interchange, Prince William County

Category C

15%

25%

25%

25%

10%

-

Route 1/Jeff Davis Widening from Cardinal/Neabsco to Rte 234, Prince William County

Category D

10%

35%

15%

30%

10%

-

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ART Service Restructuring and Expansion, County of Arlington TDM Strategies Serving the I-66 Corridor, County of Arlington

(Full list of 46 projects can be reviewed at www.livemore.us)


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Leesburg’s 26th Annual Flower & Garden Festival, April 16th and 17th

Photos courtesy of the Leesburg Flower and GarndenFestival. Historic Leesburg will once again be in full bloom as lush landscapes and gorgeous gardens fill the streets. On April 16 and 17 over 120 vendors will be on display featuring landscape designs, gardening supplies, outdoor living items, plants, flowers, herbs and so much more! Stroll through the streets and take in the sights and sounds of springtime. Whether it’s gathering ideas for your new outdoor patio, stocking up on gardening supplies, or searching for a perfect gift for the avid gardener in your life, this event will have something for everyone! The event runs from 10:00am – 6:00pm on Saturday and 10:00am- 5:00pm on Sunday. Festival goers can take a break from exploring the treasures vendors have to offer by stepping inside

the Beer and Wine Garden located on the Town Green. Here, they can relax and sample ice cold brews and wines from around Loudoun County and beyond. The Flower and Garden Festival will also host two entertainment stages. The Main Stage, located on the Loudoun County Courthouse grounds, will feature acoustic performers all day on Saturday and Sunday. The music kicks off on Saturday with local favorite, Gary Smallwood. This is a great place to sit under a tree, take in the tunes, and savor a tasty treat from one of the many food vendors onsite. The second stage is all about our younger festival attendees and is located in the Children’s Area. The Children’s Stage will feature

interactive, live entertainment all day Saturday and Sunday afternoon. In addition to the entertainment, children can paint large wooden animal cut outs, create a garden marker, or participate in one of the other crafts available in this area. While at the festival, visitors can vote for their favorite landscape display in the People’s Choice Landscape Competition. Ballots can be picked up at the entrance booths or at the Gazebo. Completed ballots should be placed in the birdhouse at the Gazebo by noon on Sunday so that the winner can be announced that afternoon. The Flower and Garden Festival is Leesburg’s unofficial start to the spring season, so be sure to join your friends and neighbors

for the award winning “Best Community Event”; it’s an annual event and a perennial experience! There is a $3 suggested donation per person. Donations can be made at the festival entrance booths. To see photos from the festivities, check out the event Facebook page at www.facebook.com/

DON’T TEXT & DRIVE

IT’S THE LAW!

flowerandgarden. For more information about this event, call Ida Lee Park Recreation Center at 703-777-1368 or visit www.flowerandgarden. org. While at the festival, be sure to visit the historic shops and restaurants. A shop directory can be found at http://downtownleesburgva. com/.


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Smart Cities – Is The Future Near? leverage their data to develop new capabilities. Collaborations across communities are likewise indispensable for replicating what works in new places.

Ever wonder what the city of the future may look like? Do you think it looks something like Los Angeles in the movie Blade Runner, with 10,000 foot buildings and cars and vehicles flying through the air? Perhaps, but many urban planners and the Obama administration, have a more innovative view of what America’s urban landscapes may look like, and they have proposed investing millions of dollars in making this work – it is called the Smart Cities Initiative. In a September 2015 press release the Obama administration announced “a new ‘Smart Cities’ Initiative that will invest over $160 million in federal research and leverage more than 25 new technology collaborations to help local communities tackle key challenges such as reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.” The heart of the initiative lies in the key strategies that the administration would like to focus on in the coming years. These include:

• Creating test beds for “Internet of Things” applications and developing new multi-sector collaborative models: Technological advancements and the diminishing cost of IT infrastructure have created the potential for an “Internet of Things,” a ubiquitous network of connected devices, smart sensors, and big data analytics. The United States has the opportunity to be a global leader in this field, and cities represent strong potential test beds for development and deployment of Internet of Things applications. Successfully deploying these and other new approaches often depend on new regional collaborations among a diverse array of public and private actors, including industry, academia, and various public entities. • Collaborating with the civic tech movement and forging intercity collaborations: There is a growing community of individuals, entrepreneurs, and nonprofits interested in harnessing IT to tackle local problems and work directly with city governments. These efforts can help cities

• Leveraging existing Federal activity: From research on sensor networks and cybersecurity to investments in broadband infrastructure and intelligent transportation systems, the Federal government has an existing portfolio of activities that can provide a strong foundation for a Smart Cities effort. • Pursuing international collaboration: Fifty-four percent of the world’s population lives in urban areas. Continued population growth and urbanization will add 2.5 billion people to the world’s urban population by 2050. The associated climate and resource challenges demand innovative approaches. Products and services associated with this market present a significant export opportunity for the U.S., since almost 90 percent of this increase will occur in Africa and Asia. Complementing this effort, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology is examining how a variety of technologies can enhance the future of cities and the quality of life for urban residents. The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program is also announcing the release of a new framework to help

coordinate Federal agency investments and outside collaborations that will guide foundational research and accelerate the transition into scalable and replicable Smart City approaches. While Ballston, Clarendon, Falls Church, Tysons, Reston and Dulles Corridor are not classified as a “city,” this corridor represents more office space and density than all but a handful of “cities” in the United States. Should this corridor be eligible as a consolidated activity corridor for inclusion in

these programs, or will this initiative simply focus on the historic “urban” areas? Other “surburban” cities most of which represent high technology corridors and bio-tech concentrations that would lend themselves to moving this initiative forward quickly - are probably asking similar questions. @livemore is interested in your opinions on the Smart Cities initiative and how Northern Virginia may fit into the larger scheme of this program. Contact us at: editor@livemore.us.

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Try Something New This Summer - Join A CSA! As the sun stays with us a little longer and days are warmer, many of us can’t help but think of summer cookouts and the good food that accompanies them. One way to take full advantage of those perfectly sun-ripened tomatoes, sweet corn and crisp greens is to join a CSA (community supported agriculture). A CSA provides “city-folk” with direct access to food produced by local farmers. Basically, CSA shareholders pay for a “share” of vegetables for a set number of months (usually by season). This cost allows the farmer to plan for the season, repair equipment, purchase seed, etc. In exchange, each week shareholders receive a box of locally farmed, seasonal vegetables. Many CSAs also offer options to purchase locally produced meat, cheese, eggs, flowers, breads, and other goodies! Each CSA is a little

different, but there is usually a “host site” (this can be an individual’s home, a school, farmer’s market, etc.). This is where the vegetable boxes are dropped off by a CSA representative and picked up by CSA participants. Your CSA will work with you to find a host site that is closest to your home to facilitate pick-up. Alternatively, many farms offer CSA share pickup at the farm itself. Most CSAs also have different sized “shares” – full, half and even quarter shares – depending on how many individuals you are feeding and your budget. Another option is to split the share with another individual or family if smaller shares are not an option. Why would I participate in a CSA when I can just go to the grocery store? The produce is fresh. The typical American meal travels

1,500 miles before it is consumed. That lettuce you just purchased was picked and stored up to 4 weeks ago. And how about that tomato? In the U.S., tomatoes can be picked and stored for up to 6 weeks. In order to transport our produce long distances, it is often picked while still unripe and then gassed to “ripen” it after transport. Am I making you hungry? Conversely, the vegetables you are getting through your CSA have been picked the week you receive your box. Yum! CSAs are more sustainable. Remember that 1,500-mile road trip your veggies took to get to your plate? That trip contributes to your food’s carbon footprint. Vegetables from your CSA box generally come from farms within 100 miles of its drop-off point. Additionally, CSA vegetables are seasonal, meaning that you are not going to get a

tomato in January. Vegetable production accounts for a large percentage of a vegetable’s carbon footprint – think of the energy needed to heat and light a tomato hothouse. By eating local and seasonal, you are cutting down on both transport and production emissions. Bonus: Your support also helps to keep the farmer’s small business sustainable! It expands your palette. Garlicky scapes, Jerusalem artichokes, and stinging nettles – oh my! While CSA boxes include common seasonal vegetables – tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes, etc., if you are lucky, you will get a few surprises. Initially, it may feel a little bit like playing Iron Chef each week, but most CSAs give you a list of what to expect in your box a few days before pick-up, which helps with planning - some CSAs even provide recipe ideas! As a five-year CSA veteran (with kids), I have found that it has really pushed my family to incorporate vegetables into our meals that I would never have considered – with (mostly) very positive results. It’s an opportunity to meet new people. Since most

CSAs have a central pick-up point, it is not uncommon to meet participating neighbors at these pick-up points. The question, “What do you usually do with all of these turnips?” is an easy conversation starter and you may find that you have a lot more in common than a turnip problem! Our gracious CSA host has also held potlucks for our CSA group and put those who are interested on a listserv where we can exchange emails regarding vegetable storage, recipes and food swaps. Are you sold? Interested in trying a CSA this summer? Here are a few that cater to those living in Northern Virginia: Blenheim Organic Gardens Washington’s Birthplace, Va. Lawrence and Becky Latane 804-224-7039 lwlatane@sylvaninfo.net www.localharvest.org/csa/ M12666 $580 (farm pickup), $600 (Fredericksburg or King George pickup), $635 (Falls Church pickup), midMay through November, every other week. Certified organic. Pickup locations: Falls


MARCH/APRIL 2016 Church, Fredericksburg, King George Pickup at the farm: Yes Fair Oaks Farm Aldie, Va. Mollie Madison 571-257-4243 locallygrownva@gmail.com www.fairoaksfarmva.com $495 full share, 16 weeks; or flexible CSABucks program in which members choose produce, meat, eggs, flowers and more for pickup at farm shop Pickup locations: Alexandria, Arlington, Chantilly, the District Pickup at the farm: Yes Great Country Farms Bluemont, Va. Mark Dewey 540-554-2073 csa@greatcountryfarms.com www.greatcountryfarms.com $499-$649 (depending on pickup or delivery site), 20 weeks; delivery to homes or businesses in Northern Virginia. Pickup locations: Aldie, Arlington, Ashburn, Chantilly, Fairfax, Herndon, Lansdowne, Leesburg, Sterling, Vienna Pickup at the farm: Yes Lancaster Farm Fresh Cooperative Leola, Pa. CSA department 717-656-3533, ext. 2 csa@lancasterfarmfresh.com www.lancasterfarmfresh.com $599-$825 vegetable share, 26-week summer season; fall and winter seasons available; chicken, meat, fruit, flower, herb, bread, cheese and egg shares available. Cooperative of about 100 farmers. Pickup locations: Arlington, Baltimore, Bethesda, Chevy Chase, Columbia,

Damascus, the District, Fairfax, Falls Church, Frederick, Gaithersburg, Great Falls, Herndon, Kensington, Leesburg, Montgomery County, Olney, Potomac, Reisterstown, Rockville, Silver Spring, Springfield, Takoma Park, University Park, Vienna Pickup at the farm: No Polyface Farm Swoope, Va. Sheri Salatin 540-885-3590 farmchick@polyfaceyum. com www.polyfaceyum.com Pay-as-you-go buying club for meat (beef, chicken, turkey and pork) and eggs; monthly March through November. Delivery. Pickup locations: Alexandria, Annapolis, Arlington, Ashburn, Centreville, Fairfax, Falls Church, Kensington, Laurel, Leesburg, Manassas, Occoquan, Potomac, Reston, Silver Spring, Springfield, Takoma Park Pickup at the farm: Yes Potomac Vegetable Farm Vienna, Va., and Purcellville, Va. Hana Newcomb 703-759-2119 hana@ potomacvegetablefarms.com www. potomacvegetablefarms.com $368 mini share, $528 regular share, $688 robust share, 16-week summer season; $184 mini share, $264 regular share, $344 robust share, 8-week fall season; egg, flower, herb, chicken, and bread shares available. Pickup locations: Alexandria, Arlington, Burke, Falls Church, Fairfax, Herndon, Reston,

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Springfield Pickup at the farm: Yes

Pickup locations: Arlington, Ashburn, Centreville, the District, Hamilton, Leesburg, Vienna Pickup at the farm: Yes

Spring House Farm Lovettsvile, Va. 703-999-6636 info@springhouse.farm www.springhouse.farm

Willowsford Farm Ashburn, Va. Michael Snow 571-297-6900 info@willowsfordfarm.com www.willowsfordfarm.com

$220-$672 for threemonth, meat-only shares (biweekly delivery).

$729 large share, $513 small share, 27 weeks; vegetable, egg, prepared food items, flower, chicken, milk and other shares available, as well as weekly pre-orders for all farm stand items. Additional delivery sites may be available. Pickup locations: Aldie, Ashburn Pickup at the farm: Yes

ART AT THE MILL APRIL 23 - MAY 8, 2016

Burwell-Morgan Mill Millwood, VA Historic Burwell-Morgan Mill welcomes spring with the return of Art at the Mill. Come view and purchase artwork from some of the region's most talented artists. Clarke County Historical Association and Wells Fargo Advisors would like to honor all the moms on Mothers Day. All moms get free admission to Art at the Mill Sunday, May 8th!

Monday–Thursday 12–5 Friday and Saturday 10–5 • Sunday 12–5 Admission $5 • Seniors $3 • 12 and under free.

540-955-2600

www.clarkehistory.org

SAVE THE DATE ▪ Thursday April 28, 2016 30th Anniversary Celebration and Awards Ceremony

Join your fellow members, elected officials and transportation leaders at the Hilton Washington Dulles Airport Hotel to celebrate DATA’s 30th year of improving mobility in the Greater Dulles area. Invited speakers: Hon. Terry McAuliffe Governor - Commonwealth of Virginia

Hon. Aubrey Layne Secretary of Transportation - Commonwealth of Virginia

For further information and sponsorship opportunities, e-mail kwoodward@datatrans.org


MARCH/APRIL 2016

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Spring Into These Activities This March and April! Had enough of Snowzilla by now? Ready to get outdoors more often? Perhaps get rid of some cabin fever? Fortunately, with Earth Day and spring just around the corner, there are numerous opportunities to visit and participate in some local festivals. Below is a sampling of some in our region. Go ahead, get out there and live a little more!

4th Annual Grow Your Health Festival

March 5, Fairfax High School, 3501 Rebel Run, Fairfax, Virginia 22030. 9:00 am – 5:30 pm. A project of the Northern Virginia Whole-Food Nutrition Meetup Group, the festival presents 60 exhibitors plus learning opportunities and more for home gardening, sourcing organic and local food, and nutrition and wellness for adults and children. Classes and talks on gardening, nutrition and wellness will be offered through the day in the exhibit hall of farmers, food artisans, gardening services, and wellness products and services. The classes will empower festival attendees to start gardens, source better quality food, and learn holistic techniques to achieve better health. In the Food & Farming section of the exhibit hall, attendees will be able to meet farmers who sell direct to consumers and deliver weekly to convenient drop sites throughout Northern Virginia, and shop in the festival’s 2016 Pre-Season Farmers Market. The Grow Your Health Festival will also present the Northern Virginia debut of the documentary film Growing Cities. A family-friendly event, the Grow Your Health Festival offers several hours of supervised, ageappropriate activities for children, including gardening classes, kids’ yoga, indoor recess and quiet floor play. All activities, classes, and the film are included in the admission price – $10 online/$15 at the door; free for children 16 and under.

Organic, non-GMO snacks and lunch will be available for purchase. “We’re very pleased that our fourth annual Grow Your Health Festival has grown to a larger venue with many more exhibitors and offerings than ever,” according to Jack Moore, leader of the Northern Virginia Whole-Food Nutrition Meetup Group. “This event is important for learning of the benefits of local, organic, foods, and for the contributions we’re able to make to foster the whole-food perspective on good nutrition.” Proceeds from the Grow Your Health Festival will benefit the Weston A. Price Foundation and local non-profits that share the festival’s mission. Get tickets and details for the 4th annual Grow Your Health Gardening, Local Foods & Wellness Festival at www.GrowYourHealthNoVa. com and follow on Facebook: GrowYourHealthFestival for more information and healthy tips.

16th Annual Jewish Film Festival

April 7 – 17, Angelika Film Center, Mosaic District; 2911 District Ave, Fairfax, VA 22031; Phone: 571- 512-3301. The 16th annual Northern Virginia Jewish Film Festival, powered by the Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia, will screen 10-12 contemporary Jewishthemed and/or Israeli-made feature films that explore identity and place in the world. Festival home from April 7-17, 2016 is Angelika Film Center and Café at Mosaic. Specific line up of films will be released in February and can be found at the website at www.jccnv.org/filmfestival/northern-virginia-jewishfilm-festival.

Leesburg Flower and Garden Festival

April 16 – 17, Downtown Leesburg, Virginia. Contact: Ida Lee Park Recreation Center at 703-7771368 or visit www.flowerandgarden. org.

Historic Leesburg will once again be in full bloom as lush landscapes and gorgeous gardens fill the streets. On April 16 and 17 over 120 vendors will be on display featuring landscape designs, gardening supplies, outdoor living items, plants, flowers, herbs and so much more! Stroll through the streets and take in the sights and sounds of springtime. Whether it’s gathering ideas for your new outdoor patio, stocking up on gardening supplies, or searching for a perfect gift for the avid gardener in your life, this event will have something for everyone! The event runs from 10:00am – 6:00pm on Saturday and 10:00am- 5:00pm on Sunday. Festival goers can take a break from exploring the treasures vendors have to offer by stepping inside the Beer and Wine Garden located on the Town Green. Here, they can relax and sample ice cold brews and wines from around Loudoun County and beyond. The Flower and Garden Festival will also host two entertainment stages. The Main Stage, located on the Loudoun County Courthouse grounds, will feature acoustic performers all day on Saturday and Sunday. The music kicks off on Saturday with local favorite, Gary Smallwood. This is a great place to sit under a tree, take in the tunes, and savor a tasty treat from one of the many food vendors onsite. The second stage is all about our younger festival attendees and is located in the Children’s Area. The Children’s stage will feature interactive, live entertainment all day Saturday and Sunday afternoon. In addition to the entertainment, children can paint large wooden animal cut outs, create a garden marker, or participate in one of the other crafts available in this area.

89th Annual Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival

April 22 – May 1, 2016. 135 North Cameron Street, Winchester, VA 22601; Phone: 540-662-3863

The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival, a six-day festival held annually in Winchester, Virginia, is known for its many guest celebrities and events. The festival was first held Saturday, May 3, 1924, and was originally celebrated as a one-day event (although not held in 19421945 due to World War II). Features include a Grand Feature Parade, Firefighters’ Parade (first held on Thursday, April 18, 1929), a carnival and midway, luncheons, races, walks, dances, and concerts, as well as a field show competition which formerly gave out the Queen’s Cup trophy to the winner, starting with the original Queen, Elizabeth Steck.

Springfest Fairfax April 30, 2016, Lorton Workhouse Arts Center, 9518 Workhouse Way, Lorton, VA 22079; Phone: 703-3245471. Clean Fairfax produces SpringFest with partners Fairfax County Park Authority and The Workhouse Arts Center in Lorton, VA! SpringFest Fairfax grows every year and we hope you’ll celebrate with us on Saturday April 30, 2016. This year we welcome FCPA Healthy Strides Expo–workshops, vendors and activities to help us be healthier and happier. Healthy People-Healthy Earth! Stay tuned for more details. This is Fairfax County’s official Earth Day and Arbor Day event.


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Ericka’s Corner

Jump in a Pool–It’s Easy! For some, forming and sustaining a carpool seems like second nature, but for many, it might seem like a nebulous idea that can be daunting to get off the ground. The truth is, carpools can be as simple or as complicated as we make them, but I’m here to keep them from becoming the latter!

And you don’t even need to know how to swim...

There are several ways to form carpools, but I usually get involved when people sign up for ridesharing at onsite events. Once I have information about their commute – where it originates and ends, what time they usually work and whether they prefer to drive or ride, I drive use ride-matching software

like the Commuter Connections (commuterconnections.org) database to find the right match. We then set up a meeting with the potential carpoolers to work out details about things like pick-ups and drop-offs and how gas expenses and tolls will be shared. You can DIY-carpool or you can

let me do the heavy lifting. It’s what I’m here for. Reach out to schedule a ridematching event at your workplace or send me your info so I can start matching you to carpoolers nearby. For more information, contact Ericka Amador at 703.817.1307, ext. 6 or e-mail eamador@datatrans.org.

base de datos Commuter Connections (commuterconnections.org), para encontrar la combinación correcta. Luego, establecemos una reunión con los participantes de carpool potenciales para averiguar detalles como donde y cuando recoger a los pasajeros y bajadas. También pueden comentar sobre como los gastos de gasolina y peajes serán compartidos.

Usted puede formar su propio carpool o puede confiar en mi para hacer el trabajo pesado. Para eso estoy aquí. Por favor, contácteme con toda confianza para programar un evento de carpool en su lugar de trabajo o enviéme su información por email para poder empezar a buscar a carpoolers cerca de usted.

Clávate en un Carpool Para algunos, la formación y el mantenimiento de un viaje compartido (carpool) puede sentirse natural, pero para muchos, puede parecer una idea nebulosa que puede ser intimidante. La verdad es, formar carpool puede ser tan simple o tan complicado como lo hacemos, pero estoy aquí para evitar que sea complicado! Hay varias formas en que se puede

participar, pero la forma en que estoy más comúnmente involucrada es cuando las personas se inscriben para carpool en eventos en el sitio de trabajo. Una vez que tengo la información sobre sus viajes como donde se originan y terminan, a qué hora regularmente trabajan y si prefieren conducir o viajar, uso software de “ridematching,” como la

@livemore March/April 2016  

@livemore is a bi-monthly publication that helps you get your time back by helping free you of the single-car commute.

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