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Liusaidh Macdonald 2017 Architecture Portfolio University of Cambridge // BA (Architecture) University of Toronto // MArch Candidate


Liusaidh Macdonald

#1512, 200 Balliol Street, Toronto, M4S 1C6 e: liusaidh.macdonald@gmail.com m: +1 647 865 2192

EMPLOYMENT: Apr 2015 – Present

Office of Adrian Phiffer. Toronto - Designer. Architectural and urban design work for international competitions and invited competitions. Design and production of architectural models, presentation panels, images and drawings.

Apr 2015 – Present

The Flat Side of Design. Toronto – Visualisation Specialist. Clients: KPF, Janet Rosenburg and Studio, HTFC Planning & Design.

Jan 2017 – Present

University of Toronto – Teaching Assistant. ARC181H Technologies of Architecture, Landscape, Urbanism and Art 1

EDUCATION: 2014 Present

University of Toronto. Canada. MArch Candidate

2013

The University of Cambridge - Newnham College. U.K. BA (Hons) Architecture - 2.1

2010

Austin Friars St Monica’s School. U.K. A2 - Art (A*) (400/400), Physics (A), Economics (A) AS - Art (A), Physics (A), Economics (A), Mathematics (A), Business Studies (B) GCSE - 7A*s and 3As

AWARDS: 2016 2015 2015 2015

Imara Graduate Student Endowment Fund Award Europan 13 – Second Place, “The Ends of the City” in Nacka, Sweden with Office of Adrian Phiffer Adrian DiCastri Graduate Student Endowment Fund – for academic achievement in the design The Eberhard Zeidler Scholarship – for academic achievement in design in first year MArch

PUBLICATIONS: 2017 2016 2016 2016 2013 2013 2012

The Tower in the Hypostyle City. Johnston Marklee. Work featured, graphic design. The Ends of the City: Office of Adrian Phiffer. Europan 13 Sweden: Catalogue of Results. Work featured. Europan 13 Results: Adaptable City 2. Work featured. Named as a ‘Standout Student’ from the University of Cambridge by the ‘Architects’ Journal.’ University of Cambridge Department of Architecture Catalogue. Work featured. University of Cambridge Department of Architecture Catalogue. Work featured.


SOFTWARE: Rhino, AutoCAD, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Premiere Pro, Cinema 4D, Grasshopper, V-Ray and Office.

ACTIVITIES/INTERESTS: University of Toronto MSA Graphic Design Team University of Cambridge ARCSOC (Architecture Society) Member - Design and curation of the degree show exhibition and events Architecture Representative at Newnham College Access Events Cambridge University Gray’s Inn Association - Moot Judge


Contents

Academic:

Furniture Workshop

Untitled

The Nostalgia of the Infinite

Collect, Store & Display

Carnival

Fields and Walls

Malabo School

Professional:

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

The Tower in the Hypostyle City

The Garden of Earthly Delights

Possible Curatorial Strategies

scale NA

Allen Avenue (Superstudio)

Void3 Title: Warming Huts

The Ruins of Plovdiv

A Flood in Cambridge

Open Space for Citizens

Yusuhara Wooden Bridge Museum

Superflat

This year, the Warming Huts Competition begins its 7th iteration. Previous editions have brought forward a multitude of proposals that have stretched the idea of a “warming hut” to new limits, some unimaginable, some ridiculous. The best proposals seem to be those that have managed to condense into one object the right proportion of both form, or symbolism, and function, shelter.

is nothing more sheltering than your clothing; and that there is nothing more semiotic than a piece of text. We have imagined a huge piece of neon text saying “Warming Huts” sitting on top of a 12m tall pole. At the bottom of the pole a circular rack of felt cloaks are ready for visitors to dress up in order to shelter from the harsh winter. The color of the pole, and everything that’s structural and infrastructural has to be white, to blend into the winter. The sign and the shelters can be yellow, but may become any other contrasting color. The cloaks should be returned back to the original rack location. At the end of the festival, our aim is to have them distributed to people of need.

Joseph Beuys, Felt Suit, 1970

Manhattan’s architects perform “The Skyline of New York”, from Rem Koolhaas, Delirious New York, 1978

Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, Steven Izenour, Recommendation for a Monument, 1972

Warming Huts

Procedural Visualisations

Our proposal is an investigation into the timeless architectural dichotomy of form, or signage versus function.

We have started by radically challenging the idea of architecture as an outcome of boiling down many ingredients into one thing, and Scale//Strips decided to physically separate what During the festival, we hope to dot Objects are versus organised lines according to their Red River Mutual Trail with at is sign whatinto is function. Once the size.engaged The blue the barcelona in whale such anwith operation, it made pavilion. least 3 of these signs, and over 500 Citizens aretodwarfed bypart objects north; in the shelters. sense push each into to itsthe most south they bend over to peer at the smallest items. absolute form. We believe that there

Jetty Hostel

Non-Standard Seriality

Dace Road Nursery

ARCSOC Exhibition

Colour//Strips Objects are organised into lines according to their colour. A highly visual experience will excite both children and adults.

Beautiful Confusion 16

physical model tests

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The Ends of the City


1:200

1:100

1:500 1:400 Occupation

Edge Cubicle

1:500

Field 1:200

1:500

1:200

1:200

1:200

1:200

1:100

1:100

Edge Cubicle

Edge Cubicle

1:500

Field Field

Edge

Edge Cubicle

1:100

Edge

6

Edge

Office//Pocket//Interstitial

1:100

1:100

Office//Pocket//Interstitial

Field

Office//Pocket//Interstitial

Edge Office//Pocket//Interstitial

Field

Field Field

Edge

Edge

Rooms

Edge

Rooms

Rooms

Field 1:1000 Concept Crenelation//Control Layers

1:400 Occupation 1:500 Structural Walls

1:1000 Concept Crenelation//Control Layers

1:400 Occupation

1:1000 Concept Crenelation//Control Layers

1:400 Occupation

1:500 Structural Walls

1:500 Circulation Express//Local Lifts

1:200

Edge Rooms

1:1000 Concept Crenelation//Control Layers

1:500 Structural Walls

1:400 1:50 Occupation

1:50

1:500 Circulation Express//Local Lifts

1:500 Structural Walls

1:400 Occupation 1:50

1:500 Circulation Express//Local Lifts

1:500 Circulation Express//Local Lifts

1:200

1:200

1:200


The Tower in the Hypostyle City University of Toronto_2016 With Tutors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee

F

ive stacked volumes are used to create the coexistence of difference in the office tower through alternating control. Varying scales of crenellation move up the building to create the boundaries of three sizes of ambiguous interiors; rooms in the lowest level, pockets in the middle and cubicles on the highest floors. Two intermediary control layers anchor the crenelated levels, these act as a living experiment on Rem Koolhaas’ ideas of the typical plan.

generated a set of theoretical inquiries into the dissolution of boundaries; this trajectory is being countered by the opposite phenomenon of privatized, isolated programs. Rather than viewing such autonomous and detached monocultures as fissures within the inclusive mentality of globalization, the studio will embrace these organizational models as opportunities to promote another form of connectivity through the precise demarcation and delineation of borders.

From the lift doors in each volume, office workers are presented with five long views through the stacked lives of the tower. The tone of materiality creates coherence through the building; the highest and lowest levels use a thin, vertically laid grey brick, whilst the middle levels are concrete. The proportions of the massing were inspired by the proportions of difference and mass in Brancusi’s sculpture, Petite Pyramide.

The high-rise tower will be utilized as the primary building type to investigate the model of the detached city. Although assembly techniques in high-rises have been evolving steadily, the programmatic effects caused by economics, zoning regulations, cultural identities, and geographies has been developing in a state of flux. These two trajectories propagate two design predilections. The first adheres to the efficiencies gained from repetition and interchangeability. The second relies on the idiosyncrasies gained from simulation and dynamics. In seeking to explore a third, alternative model; the studio proposes the exacerbation of extrusion for the base, the shaft, and the capital - the traditional components the high-rise tower type and classical column, privileging the investment of design energy on the plan over the section.

Brief The studio will investigate the urban model of the detached, object-oriented city through the design of a highrise office tower based on the criteria the International Competition for a New Administration Building for the Chicago Tribune of 1922. While recent research in design has

The studio will begin by conducting research on the Chicago Competition of 1922, the Late Entries of 1980, as well as built and speculative precedents of tower types. With this initial research, each student will proceed to design an office building equivalent to the Tribune Tower to be situated collectively on a speculative site. Throughout the semester, the individual towers will be periodically reinserted into the site at different stages of development to inform the overall form of the Hypostyle City – a collective urban form of detached towers.

7


8


9


10

Constantin Brancusi, Petite Pyramide, 1950


11


12


13


14


The Nostalgia of the Infinite, Toronto University of Toronto_2015 With Prof. Adrian Phiffer

T

he monumentality and lonely desolation of the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant is strongly reminiscent of Giorgio de Chirico’s metaphysical paintings. In his artwork de Chirico juxtaposes small, light everyday objects next to monumental buildings rather than adding additional imposing structures. 15

I have approached the site using this methodology, I want these small, simply formed buildings to complement the existing R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant, and vice versa. They are primarily moveable structures, capable of creating an infinite set of arrangements, or compositions, across the site. The structures are a scenography which will activate the site with a moving backdrop for everything from stage shows and political debates to games of hide and seek. These are three possible arrangements of the buildings, arranged seasonally.


16

View from Lake Ontario. Waterside Summer Arrangement.


17

Kit of Parts Physical Model.


1.

18

2.

4.

6.

3.

5.5.


7.

1. Swimming in the Pool. Waterside Summer Arrangement. 2. Looking out from the Small Exhibition Space. Waterside Summer Arrangement. 3. Entering the Tower. Waterside Summer Arrangement. 4. Relaxing in the Steam Room. Waterside Summer Arrangement. 5. Heading towards shelter. Clustered Winter Arrangement. 6. Activating the street. Queen Street Elevation, facing South. 1:500. Streetside Spring/Autumn Arrangement. 7. Activating the Boardroom Facade. Waterside Summer Arrangement.

19


Large Exhibition Space

Lecture Hall

Office

Boardroom

20

Archive

Small Exhibition Space

Pool and Changing Rooms

Lobby and Library

Lobby, Library, Archive and Small Exhibition Space (Summer)

Steam Room


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22

Clustered Winter Arrangement.

Streetside Spring/Autumn Arrangement.


23

Waterside Summer Arrangement.


VOID

NIGHT

FIELDS

WATER

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT RAIN WATER RECYCLED FOR GREY WATER USE ON SITE

NIGHT

VOID

VOID

ALUMINIUM CAPPING PIECE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE SLOPED TIMBER MEMBER RIGID INSULATION STEEL L SECTION SUPPORT

WATER

FIELDS

SEDUM PLANTING TOPSOIL 100MM FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE CUP LAYER (DRAINS THROUGH WALL DETAIL) WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 2% SLOPED RIGID INSULATION, MIN 200MM VAPOUR BARRIER PLYWOOD 10MM STEEL DECK 38MM SECONDARY STEEL W SECTION BEAM 360MM DUCTWORK, MAX 260MM DIAMETER DROPPED GYPSUM T BAR CEILING, HANGERS 600 C/C

GRAVEL STEEL DIVIDER FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE CUP LAYER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 2% SLOPED RIGID INSULATION, MIN 200MM VAPOUR BARRIER PLYWOOD 10MM STEEL DECK 38MM SECONDARY STEEL W SECTION BEAM 360MM STEEL C SECTION 360MM (BOLTED TO SECONDARY BEAM) STEEL FRAMEWORK (WITH SPRAY FOAM INSULATION) WATERPROOF MEMBRANE PANELISED SOFFIT CLADDING SYSTEM

PRIMARY STEEL W SECTION BEAM 460MM (WELDED TO SECONDARY BEAMS) CAPPING PLATE CONCRETE LOAD BEARING WALL 400MM

NIGHT

WATER

LIGHT

STREET

DOMED SKYLIGHT

STORM WATER RETEN

GREEN ROOF AND DRAINAGE CUP LAYER

COURTYARD ALUMINUM SCUPPER

METAL GRATE ON CONCRETE DRAINAGE TROUGH

ALUMINIUM CAPPING PIECE ALUMINUM SCUPPER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE RIGID INSULATION VAPOUR BARRIER STEEL L SECTION SUPPORT L BRACKET FOR HANGING GLAZING PANELS ALUMINIUM ROOFING SURFACE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 150MM RIGID POLYISOCYANURATE INSULATION VAPOUR BARRIER 3/4” PLYWOOD 38MM METAL DECK BEAM AND GIRDER STRUCTURAL FRAMING

FIELDS

ALUMINIUM CAPPING PIECE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE SLOPED TIMBER MEMBER RIGID INSULATION STEEL L SECTION SUPPORT

SEDUM PLANTING TOPSOIL 100MM FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE CUP LAYER (DRAINS THROUGH WALL DETAIL) WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 2% SLOPED RIGID INSULATION, MIN 200MM VAPOUR BARRIER

GRAVEL STEEL DIVIDER FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE CUP LAYER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 2% SLOPED RIGID INSULATION, MIN 200MM VAPOUR BARRIER PLYWOOD 10MM STEEL DECK 38MM SECONDARY STEEL W SECTION BEAM 360MM STEEL C SECTION 360MM (BOLTED TO SECONDARY BEAM) STEEL FRAMEWORK (WITH SPRAY FOAM INSULATION) WATERPROOF MEMBRANE PANELISED SOFFIT CLADDING SYSTEM

PRIMARY STEEL W SECTION BEAM 460MM (WELDED TO SECONDARY BEAMS) CAPPING PLATE CONCRETE LOAD BEARING WALL 400MM

PLAN DETAIL OF WALL INTERSECTING PLENUM SPACE1.20

DOMED SKYLIGHT

PRIMARY ENCLOSURE LAMINATED GLASS DOUBLE GLAZED WALL, 5M PLYWOOD 10MM STEEL DECK 38MM GLASS STRUCTURAL FIN 360MM SECONDARY STEEL W SECTION BEAM 360MM DUCTWORK, MAX 260MM DIAMETER PRESSURISED PLENUM SPACE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL DROPPED GYPSUM T BAR CEILING, HANGERS 600 C/C SECONDARY ENCLOSURE SINGLE GLAZED WALL, 5M

FIELDS

LIGHT

VOID

LIGHT

NIGHT

STREET

WATER

AIR

SPACE

ALUMINIUM CAPPING PIECE ALUMINUM SCUPPER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE RIGID INSULATION VAPOUR BARRIER STEEL L SECTION SUPPORT L BRACKET FOR HANGING GLAZING PANELS ALUMINIUM ROOFING SURFACE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 150MM RIGID POLYISOCYANURATE INSULATION VAPOUR BARRIER 3/4” PLYWOOD 38MM METAL DECK BEAM AND GIRDER STRUCTURAL FRAMING

PLAN DETAIL OF WALL INTERSECTING PLENUM SPACE1.20

R DETAIL 1:10 PRIMARY ENCLOSURE LAMINATED GLASS DOUBLE GLAZED WALL, 5M GLASS STRUCTURAL FIN 360MM PRESSURISED PLENUM SPACE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SECONDARY ENCLOSURE SINGLE GLAZED WALL, 5M

POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR SURFACE UNDERFLOOR RADIANT HEATING SAND, CEMENT, SCREED 60MM

CERAMIC PATIO TILE GRAVEL FILL SAND

METAL GRATE PRECAST CONCRETE DRAINAGE TROUGH DRAINAGE PIPE WITH FILTER CONNECTED TO STORM WATER MANAGEMENT TANK POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR SURFACE UNDERFLOOR RADIANT HEATING SAND, CEMENT, SCREED 60MM

GRAVEL CONCEALED PERFORATED DRAINAGE PIPE

ROOF AND SCUPPER DETAIL 1:10

GRAVEL CONCEALED PERFORATED DRAINAGE PIPE

DETAIL OF INTERIOR WALL AND ROOF INTERSECTION 1.10

DETAIL OF INTERIOR WALL AND ROOF INTERSECTION 1.10

O TILE DETAIL 1:10

VOID

RIGID INSULATION, 125MM WATERPROOF MEMBRANE VAPOUR BARRIER IN SITU CONCRETE 175MM FINISHED CONCRETE WALL SURFACE

STREET

AIR

STREET

SPACE

FIELDS

NIGHT

WATER

AIR

SPACE

3.

LIGHT

1.

RIGID INSULATION, 125MM WATERPROOF MEMBRANE VAPOUR BARRIER IN SITU CONCRETE 175MM FINISHED CONCRETE WALL SURFACE

CERAMIC PATIO TILE GRAVEL FILL SAND

FULL SECTIONAL DETAIL 1.20

FULL SECTION DETAIL 1:20 (COURTYARD) FINISHED CONCRETE FLOOR SURFACE IN SITU CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 280MM VAPOUR BARRIER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE RIGID INSULATION 100MM SAND 50MM HARDCORE 150MM

DETAIL 1:10

2.

PLAN DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL GLAZING FIN INTERSECTION 1.1

3.

METAL GRATE PRECAST CONCRETE DRAINAGE TROUGH DRAINAGE PIPE WITH FILTER CONNECTED TO STORM WATER MANAGEMENT TANK

24 FIELDS AND WALLS FIELDS AND WALLS

FIELDS AND WALLS

COURTYARD SEAT AND PATIO TILE DETAIL 1:10

FULL SECTIONAL DETAIL 1.20 FINISHED CONCRETE FLOOR SURFACE IN SITU CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 280MM VAPOUR BARRIER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE RIGID INSULATION 100MM SAND 50MM HARDCORE 150MM

PLAN DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL GLAZING FIN INTERSECTION 1.1

CURVING WALLS IN DUPONT STATION 1. 2. 3.

As an emblem of an agency aiming to be environmentally conscious, the new TTC Museum outside Eglinton West Station is iconographic both formally and ecologically. The subway station and the transit museum are a pair, sited amongst open fields. Curving walls, inspired by the TTC’s aesthetic, guide visitors through a matrix of greenery and exhibition space, where glimpses of nature advances and recedes. The curves create structural stability and curate spaces for individual programs using the language of the TTC. Sited between downtown Toronto and the tip of Allen Road, the walls are oriented north/south to accentuate this long axial quality. They behave as a filter, or sieve, between Eglinton and the ravine behind.

FIELDS

8. AIR EXHAUST

ROOF TERRACE GREEN ROOF DRAINED TO COURTYARD

ROOF PLAN 1.250

LIGHT

STREET

1.250 AXONOMETRIC - MECHANICAL VENTILATION SYSTEM 1. FRESH AIR INTAKE LEADING TO AHU Fields 2. PRIMARY AIR PLENUM ZONE ACTS AS A DUCT AROUND THE BUILDING CEILING DUCTWORK PULLS FRESH AIR FROM THE PLENUM INTO THE BUILDINGto the rear, which mediates between the housing and the museum. To offset the reduction of the park, the rooftop space is primarily The museum preserves a portion3.4.of theLEVELexisting neighbourhood park space LOW LEVEL AIR SUPPLY VENTS planted with sedum, with two non-permeable spaces that drain stormwater runoff into two courtyards. This feeds water tanks below the park, which collect the rainwater and supply greywater to the museum and 5. STALE AIR IS TAKEN FROM CEILING LEVEL INTO DUCTWORK 6. RETURN AIR SUCKED THROUGH CEILING DUCTS irrigate the park. The courtyards contain a serviceberry tree each. This native tree blossoms with white flowers in spring, and produces an edible berry in the summer. 7. AIR SENT TO ERV

AIR

SPACE

7.

Walls The load bearing concrete walls are the primary structural component of the building, they bend to create pockets of space in the building and allow visitors to move fluidly through the floor plan as they might in a TTC station. These walls curve sectionally to join seamlessly with the floor and ceiling planes as TTC architecture curves. There are a number of phenomenological possibilities as to the texture of the walls, RAIN WATER RECYCLED GREY WATERin USE ON SITEpanels. The single element of the walls could have a multiplicity of texture. depending upon the formwork, which we FOR have tested plaster

STORM WATER MANAGEMENT

6.

The exterior glass wall is doubled to create a pressurised plenum space for environmental control and ventilation. Fresh air is pumped from the rear of the building, away from Eglinton Avenue, into this space. This is then moved through the ceiling and down the concrete walls to feed subtle, low level air supply slots throughout the building. The perimeter glass wall provides ample natural light, additional skylights give key areas of program visible hierarchy. The installation of a curtain into the plenum space provides an element of control for daylighting conditions in the museum and an additional filter element between the fields and the walls.

FULL SECTION DETAIL 1:20 (COURTYARD)

DRAINAGE TROUGH DETAIL 1:10

3.

3.

5. STORM WATER RETENTION TANK 10,000 GALLLON

GREEN ROOF AND DRAINAGE CUP LAYER

2.

3.

2.

3. 5. 4.

4.

1.

3.

COURTYARD ALUMINUM SCUPPER

7.

METAL GRATE ON CONCRETE DRAINAGE TROUGH 1.

AHU

6.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

STREET

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

R/A

AUDITORIUM AUDITORIUM BREAKOUT SPACE W/C STORAGE RESEARCH SPACE MECHANICAL ROOM STAFF ROOM

BASEMENT PLAN 1.250

R/A

R/A

R/A

AHU

AHU Heat ERV Pump

SUMMER ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY

AHU

Heat ERV Pump

Heat ERV Pump

AIR

SPRING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY

SPACE

WINTER ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

1.1000 SITE PLAN

AXIAL RELATIONSHIP WITH ALLEN ROAD

SITE PLAN 1.1000 SITE PLAN 1.1000

14. 13.

7. 6. 2.

3. 1. 10. 1.

9. 3. 4.

11.

9.

13.

8.

15.

2.

3.

3.

5.

16.

12.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

PERMANENT EXHIBITION TEMPORARY EXHIBITION PROJECTION ROOM LOBBY BOOKSHOP CAFE KITCHEN MEETING SPACE W/C OFFICE LIBRARY/STUDY CENTRE

1. 2. 3.

ROOF TERRACE GREEN ROOF DRAINED TO COURTYARD

ROOF PLAN 1.250

AIR


Fields and Walls, Toronto

University of Toronto_2016 With Prof. Steven Fong and Allison Home-Douglas

A

s an emblem of an agency aiming to be environmentally conscious, the new TTC Museum outside Eglinton West Station is iconographic both formally and ecologically. The subway station and the transit museum are a pair, sited amongst open fields. Curving walls, inspired by the TTC’s aesthetic, guide visitors through a matrix of greenery and exhibition space, where glimpses of nature advances and recedes. The curves create structural stability and curate spaces for individual programs using the language of the TTC. Sited between downtown Toronto and the tip of Allen Road, the walls are oriented north/south to accentuate this long axial quality. They behave as a filter, or sieve, between Eglinton and the ravine behind. Fields The museum preserves a portion of the existing neighbourhood park space to the rear, which mediates between the housing and the museum. To offset the reduction of the park, the rooftop space is primarily planted with sedum, with two non-permeable spaces that drain stormwater runoff into two courtyards. These contain a serviceberry tree each. Walls The load bearing concrete walls are the primary structural component of the building, they bend to create pockets of space in the building and allow visitors

to move fluidly through the floor plan as they might in a TTC station. These walls curve sectionally to join seamlessly with the floor and ceiling planes as TTC architecture curves. There are a number of phenomenological possibilities as to the texture of the walls, depending upon the formwork, which we have tested in plaster panels. The single element of the walls could have a multiplicity of texture.

25


NIGHT

WATER

LIGHT

LIGHT

NIGHT AIR

STREET

VOID

WATER SPACE

26

AIR

SPACE

FIELDS

LIGHT

The subway station and the transit museum act as a pair, sited amongst open fields. STREET AIR

SPACE


27


28

Sited between downtown Toronto and the tip of Allen Road, the walls are oriented to accentuate this axial quality. They behave as a filter, between Eglinton and the ravine behind.


14. 13.

7. 6. 2.

10. 1.

9. 3. 4.

11.

9.

13.

8.

15. 3.

5.

29

16.

12.

Curving walls, inspired by the TTC’s aesthetic, guide visitors through a matrix of greenery and exhibition space, where glimpses of nature advances and recedes. 1. Permanent Exhibition 2. Temporary Exhibition 3. Projection Room 4. Lobby 5. Bookshop 6. Cafe

7. Kitchen 8. Meeting Space 9. W/C 10. Office 11. Library/Study Centre 12. Neighbourhood Park 13. Courtyard 14. Entry Plaza 15. Outdoor Event Space 16. Playground


Allen Avenue (Superstudio), Toronto University of Toronto_2015 With Prof. Adrian Phiffer, Prof. Drew Adams Part 1. With Rachel Salmela, Hannah Soules and Rotem Yaniv

Urban sutures are used to heal the divide created by the Allen Road. The highway is raised to become a surface street. Existing urban conditions are

30

amplified in order to densify the area whilst retaining the local identity. Open spaces are intensified to emphasize the experience of local neighbourhoods

along the Allen Road.


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32


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Void3, Siteless

University of Toronto_2014 With Prof. Shane Williamson

A

n object is placed between two generic buildings. Three voids inside this object intersect to create two paths and a lightwell. The remaining poche is used to create unexpected exhibition spaces. This project plays with the experience of contrast. It blockades the street with a surprisingly slender form,

forcing passers-by to circulate around the base of the structure. Internally, one passageway is steep, narrow and enclosed; the other is gently sloping, wide and open. A gallery space on the rooftop level allows large works of art to be hung in the adjacent slot. These can be viewed from both the balcony and the passageways. This object appears solid and unyielding from one side,

yet legible and open on the other. The lightwell pierces the base of the object, allowing passers-by to look straight through the thin structure; finally they will understand the spatial interplay within.

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1/4� - 1’ Sectititititi


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The Ruins of Plovdiv, Bulgaria University of Toronto_2014 With Prof. Shane Williamson

1

36

. A canopy with structural rigidity achieved through folding. A combination of alternating curved and straight folds makes a strong thin shelled structure. The voids between these shapes direct light into the canopy and direct views from the inside of the canopy. The experience of being inside the structure differs greatly depending on which way the visitor is facing, one end is dominated by the curved folds, the other by angular ones, and the

transverse direction opens and closes depending on which way you look. 2. The canopy is stacked to create a multi-story gallery and cafe space over the Roman Forum of Plovdiv, Bulgaria. The voids in the canopy are widened in the floor plate to create a series of glass lips which separate the gallery spaces; these allow the ruins to receive natural daylighting and direct views between the gallery and forum, and vice versa.

The axis of the main forum’s street is maintained by folding down one of the modules into a staircase connecting the city, the gallery, the ruin and the plaza in one sequence. The form is oriented to align with the Roman urban axes below, however the entrance forms a facade parallel to the modern street.


1.

2. 37

3.

5.

4.

1. Levels of Opacity through the Glass Lips. 2. Structural Folding. 3. Contrasting Geometries. 4. Roman Ruin/Urban Ruin. 5. Descent into the Ruin. Model Photograph.


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Jetty Hostel

University of Cambridge_2012-2013 With Tutors Mark Tuff Jonathan Hendry

T

he Ferry and the Fort: A small stream drains the land adjacent to it; creating the only traversable ground in the marshland south of the fort. This stream will be extended around the fort to create an invisible boundary, not deterring visitors from the fort, as the existing fence does. A formal route is placed along the traversable land, culminating in a jetty. This jetty engages with the existing Windermere Ferry route, which will bring groups of up to 100 visitors to the fort from larger tourist centres on the lake. A wall is built alongside the walkway, acting as a datum to the landscape. A more subtle route is constructed between Waterhead and Loughrigg Fell, passing through Borran’s Field and along the shores of Lake Windermere. This lets walkers ascend this popular

fell without walking along busy roads, but rather by continuing the Lakeland tradition of travelling alongside the water’s edge. An outpost is placed on the knuckle between the two routes, holding tourist information and artefacts excavated from the fort. Jetty Hostel: In both 2008 and 2009 floodwaters submerged the entirety of Borran’s Field. Jetty Hostel is adapted to these conditions; at times it may become an island or be completely landlocked, nonetheless it remains operational. The experience of living along the jetty will change substantially with the moving water levels. The walkway is informed by Kampong Phluk (Cambodia) and Howburn Farm (Cumbria), both of which have an unusual relationship between absolute

privacy and public space, and a spinal arrangement. The rooms can be fully opened to become an extension of the public space, where occupants can eat a barbecue or sit in deckchairs on the walkway as the ferry passengers pass by. Alternatively, the rooms can be completely closed, to become an opaque box with only a window to the unspoilt landscape. 39


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Larch walls will weather to a grey tone, emphasising the effects of the harsh conditions outside, and the shelter offered within.


41

The Tower: The communal areas are inside the tower building, whose proportions are informed by the Cumbrian Pele Towers. This building is more formal than the bedrooms in order to be recognisably a communal area. Local green slate is used as an aggregate in the concrete floor and the protective skirting boards inside the rooms.


Borran’s Field is situated on the most northerly tip of Lake Windermere, England’s largest lake. The site contains two marshes, a Roman fort, a set of rocky outcrops and a barn. This is the only building in the site, it is made from green slate using traditional building techniques.

42

The site is enclosed by a traditional slate wall. Beyond this lies Borran’s Road, linking Ambleside to Waterhead, but isolating the site. In order to travel between the town and the site, visitors currently pass through Borran’s Park. This park feels like an urban, municipal park, at odds with the landscape, however, it is popular with the locals. The other side of the site is enclosed by a meadow, leading to the River Brathay, which feeds the lake.


43


The Single Rooms: In order to best cater for the tough usage these rooms will receive, and to emphasise the relationship with the jetty, the floor material from the street continues internally. The concrete with green slate aggregate makes a durable floor which can withstand muddy boots, wet clothing and heavy scuffing. The material continues upwards, protecting the base of the walls. The aggregate is a waste product of local slate mines, sourced specifically from Honister Slate Mine. Above this skirting board is the unweathered larch cladding, in contrast to the weathered exterior. This will make the interior seem much more cosy and the exterior will express the harshness of the environment. This cladding will continue onto the ceiling of the room, however a Herdwick wool rug will hang over the bed. This rug will soften the acoustic properties and make the room feel more comfortable. Importantly however, it will remain out of reach and away from dirty footwear with the intention of keeping it clean and undamaged.

44


The family rooms, intended to house a couple with children, contain a double bedroom, a bunk bedroom and a bathroom each. The rooms have internal folding doorways, which enable the space to function as one room, useful to keep an eye on the children during the evenings. Alternatively, for a couple without children the internal sliding door would be locked, creating one double room and one bunk room, to be used by other guests. The divide of public and private is equally as strong in these rooms as in the single rooms. The glazed rear facade takes advantage of the untraversable marsh behind, giving the private bedrooms a strong connection to the surrounding landscape. In contrast, the other facade, with the large folding doors, has a seamless connection with the communal street.

Privacy Strategy: The bedrooms are arranged along a linear walkway, creating a tension between the public and the private. The rooms have the ability to be an open ‘lake hut’, seamlessly connected to the communal street by opening the large folding doors. Conversely, the rooms can become completely closed boxes, sheltering the visitor from potentially harsh weather conditions after a long day in the Lake District in absolute privacy. The sliding door has an inset, a smaller door, which may be used to enter the room in bad weather, or during winter when it may not be desirable to slide open such a large door.

Larch Cladding, Concrete with Green Slate Aggregate, Herdwick Wool Rug.

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Making and Exchange: Dace Road Nursery University of Cambridge_2011 With Tutors Stephen Smith and Bobby Open

A

nursery is at the confluence of two London communities, that of industrial Hackney Wick and the 100,000 strong new Olympic Park development. Locally grown plants will be purchased by the future residents of the Olympic Park, these plants will give

them a connection to the heritage of the quickly developing Hackney Wick area.

by a funicular system running along the Dace Road Staircase to the upper level greenhouse where they will be hung for display.

In this nursery, plants are delivered to the Dace Road level, at the foot of the stairs. The plants are then transferred

Making and Exchange: Furniture Workshop

University of Cambridge_2012 With Tutors Stephen Smith and Bobby Open

A

furniture workshop lies along the Hertford Union Canal, teaching the residents of the new Olympic Park Community to make traditional wooden furniture. When approaching the workshop, the journey from raw material to finished product will be emphasised through the long horizontal windows, which also reflect the canal. Internally, these windows will give stunning views towards the changing Olympic Site and good lighting conditions for people using the workshops. The workshop spaces are connected by a series of wide archways, which aid the

movement of bulky materials; a large amount of storage is situated alongside them. The concrete workshops are both durable and spacious. Timber library and classroom spaces are situated upstairs; these have internal windows to the workshop areas in order to facilitate teaching.

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48

The Greenhouse Shop - View to the Greenway from the Nursery.


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Greenway Level Plan - The Greenhouse Shop.


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Classrooms overlook the main workshop space.


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Approach from the Olympic Park.


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Collect, Store & Display

University of Cambridge_2010-2011 With Tutors: Julika Gittner, Freddie Phillipson, Pippa Nissen, Ingrid Schroder

C

ollect

A device for monitoring the movements of water. The drawings produced give an accurate depiction of the sites. Mill Pond shows a violent result as there is a punting station and a drop in the riverbed, conversely, Garret Hostel Bridge is a quieter stretch of the river. Large abnormalities in the drawings describe events closer to the device; the Jesus Lock drawing describes a swan brushing past the device and a canoe hit the device at Magdalene Bridge.

Store

Display

An alternative take on the issue of archiving the objects created in ‘Collect’. Hidden below Hobson’s Passage, Cambridge, is an archive created with an extension of the alley’s complex drain network. Six large downspouts will be extended to bring the movements of water into the archive itself. A wall of corrugated iron will corrode as the water moves down these downspouts, along the archive and into the water table.

A design for a theatre and museum in Dalston, London. Designed to be a new type of cultural venue, this building is both a platform and a repository for local life and culture. The building will join a large number of theatres, small galleries and music venues in Dalston, questioning the ways in which a movement is exhibited and objects are performed.

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Monitoring and recording indigenous movement found during derive. The River Cam.


Victorian white brick terraces collide with a community garden and a green route in Dalston.

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Malabo School, Zambia

University of Cambridge_2013 With Prof. Michael Ramage, Ewa Hazla, Alex Robinson, Sohanna Srinivasan, Selina Tan

A 56

project done with the University of Cambridge’s Engineering Department to design a school capable of withstanding regular flooding in Zambia. UNICEF has identified one school as a priority to be improved, which annually closes for six months due to flooding, after which it needs extensive repair work. It should last for five years and adhere to UNICEF’s ‘Child Friendly Schools Manual’. This circular school will float in flood season and the children will arrive in

boats. In the dry season it will ‘land’. It can be built by local people using local and sustainable materials and construction methods, so that it can be repaired easily. Entrance to the rooms is gained via the playground, which forms the core of the building, a shaded area around it can be used in especially hot conditions. A girls bathroom and classroom, will critically improve female attendance rates. The classrooms will be well lit with daylight and will have brightly

coloured walls, promoting ‘more joyful learning.’ The small health centre we have included will improve sanitation in the community and will store basic medicines. An auditorium provides a platform for the local community to meet and for student organisations to form.

A Flood in Cambridge, Cambridge

University of Cambridge_2013 Design Charette with Prof. Spencer De Grey, Stephen Messiah and Andrew Percival


A

a severe flood in Cambridge isolates the college courts and traps students in their accommodation. The proposed short term scenario deals with getting food and transport to trapped students. This would be achieved using the existing punt system, where

the punts would behave like a mobile market. In the long term, canals would be dug into selected streets to form a network which connects to the River Cam. Hubs in this canal system are positioned in popular meeting places. The canals run past the colleges and finally connect to an attenuation lake

south of Cambridge, to prevent further flooding. Vegetation will be grown along these canals, as many students have no access to a garden. This vegetation will be used to grow fresh produce.

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Yusuhara Wooden Bridge Museum University of Toronto_2015 With Prof. Adrian Phiffer

Precedent Study. Kengo Kuma & Associates, Kochi Prefecture, Japan, 2011.

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Procedural Visualisations

University of Toronto_2015 With Prof. Benjamin Dillenburger and Herman Borrego

Animated visual representation of Kraftwerk’s ‘Telephone Call,’ procedural city block and procedurally modelled dome model.


Non-Standard Seriality University of Toronto_2015 With Prof. Brady Peters

Re-interpreting the moth through variability and repetition using parametric design software and rapid

prototyping techniques. Insect

Collection

and

Modelling

Structure, Skin, and Volume; The moth’s decaying corpse is pierced by the fragments of its fallen wings.

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ARCSOC Exhibitions 2011-13, London University of Cambridge_2011-13 With ARCSOC

A

RCSOC Exhibition 2011: The Old Dairy, Bloomsbury, London. Curation and design of Year 1 exhibition space. ARCSOC Exhibition 2012: The Farmiloe Building, Mitcham, London. Curation of Year 2 exhibition space.

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ARCSOC Exhibition 2013: TESTBED 1, Battersea - London. Design, curation and build of the exhibition space. “Standout Students: For resolved projects, the students of Y3S3, who investigated

building within the landscape with a series of well-resolved proposals for a site in Ambleside, get my vote. They share a number of different material approaches to the site, from Andrew Percival’s riff on Hardwick Hall to Rachael Roberts’ much more heavy, elemental approach, through to Liusaidh Macdonald’s light ‘Jetty Hostel’. In A Word: Tight” James Pallister, AJ Publications editor Architects’ Journal - The UK’s

bestselling magazine.

weekly

25/07/13 Volume 238

architecture


Untitled

2010 Oils on Canvas Paper

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Carnival, Sari Myeon, South Korea 10th Korean Rural Architecture Competition_Competition Entry Office of Adrian Phiffer_2015 With Adrian Phiffer, Dimitrios Karopoulos

T

he Carnival needs a route and many participants. A Carnival is a public celebration and parade combining elements of circus, masks, and public street parties. If one is to understand it not only as a temporary ludic event, but also as a way of organizing disparate parts that otherwise would never come together, the Carnival could be a fascinating planning and architecture design concept. Despite its sheer ordinariness, the immense advantage of considering SariMyeon as the site for the 10th Korean Rural Architecture Competition is that there are two sites. This configuration opens up the potential for establishing a route in-between the two proposals that could become a vector for activating a larger zone of Sari-Myeon. The new Junior and Senior Centers need to do more work for Sari-Myeon than just simply becoming futile attractions, they must resurrect an idea of village life. Our project starts from this premise. Rural Renaissance: The traditional village was a place where people bonded through group labour. The connection to the land was vital, it sustained the community both physically and spiritually. Confucianist values encouraged people to make their community interdependent, with a respect for harmony and nature. Villagers aided their neighbours with physical tasks and would later socialise freely on each others’ patios, eating and drinking into the night. Village elders held a role in the fate of the village, this local control gave a sense of identity

and pride to the community. Social tensions were also processed internally through ‘Talchum’, traditional masked dances, which often had a political or social message. These ideas are not merely nostalgic. The themes in Talchum are as relevant today as they were a century ago. Mythical creatures eat mischievous civil servants and by the end of the play the audience fully engages with the actors, the analogy for daily life is incorporated into the village itself. These dances are given a venue in the Sari-Myeon Junior Centre, the colourful, musical displays will engage the local children with their traditional roots. The multipurpose rooms in the Senior Centre can be used by the elders to hold local council meetings, an important function to increase local pride. The Senior Centre is designed to allow the historical practices of communal working, cooking and eating in a setting that is feasible for modern life. Seniors can farm fresh fruit and vegetables in the community farm, and they may attend cooking classes, a current craze in Korea, in the community kitchen. Finally, villagers can of course eat and drink the fruits of their labour on a communal terrace, a typology expanded from the traditional Korean house. These programs enhance the intergenerational centre, connect with local traditions and of course have an open relationship with the landscape, which is of course vital in rural communities. The Farm and the Theater: From a programmatic point of view, our proposal aims to revive the values of traditional

South Korean villages which decayed following the Saemaul Movement, namely the communal life with all its benefits. Therefore, the Senior Center is programmed to promote activities such as working the land together, cooking and eating together, as well as providing large spaces, such as the circular structure, for town gatherings. The Junior Center program is organized around the concept of performances, the configuration reflects that of a traditional dwelling. Spaces at the ground floor level can open into the courtyard to allow for large performances. We propose a reintroduction of traditional masked dramas where the social problems of the village are addressed in a caricature manner that allows for a communal exposure.

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The The The Garden Garden Garden ofofof Earthly Earthly Earthly Delights Delights Delights Process Process Process Iterations Iterations Iterations

I

I I

II II II

III III III

IV IVIV

V VV

III IVVI VIVI

IV VVII VIIVII

V VIIIVIII VIII

IX IXIX

X XX

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II III

This This This is aiswork is a work a work of many ofof many many parts, parts, parts, each each each with with its with its own its own own TheThe dual The dual dual nature nature nature of our ofof our proposal our proposal proposal is to is is instruct toto instruct instruct work work work of Hieronymus ofof Hieronymus Hieronymus Bosch Bosch Bosch notnot tonot deem toto deem deem it: The it: it: The TheRooms Rooms Rooms - architecture - architecture - architecture figures: figures: figures: life.life. We life. We would We would would likelike to like propose toto propose propose forfor Suncheon for Suncheon Suncheon ArtArtArt andand delight and delight delight through through through thethe interplay the interplay interplay of site ofof site and site and and Garden Garden Garden of Earthly ofof Earthly Earthly Delights. Delights. Delights. ForFor the For the architectural the architectural architectural elements elements elements ourour method our method method is is is Platform Platform Platform a garden. a garden. a garden. architecture. architecture. architecture. as as follows: as follows: follows: wewe will we will break will break break thethe program the program program intointo its into itsits It isItfair is It is fair tofair say toto say that say that the that the work the work work finds finds finds method method method in in in Open Open Open space space space - landscape - landscape - landscape figures: figures: figures: smallest smallest smallest possible possible possible parts. parts. parts. WeWe do We do not do not strive not strive strive to toto A garden, AA garden, garden, in this in in this case, this case, case, is not is is not anot park. a park. a park. TheThe park The park park is is is intuition. intuition. intuition. By By this By this we this we mean we mean mean an an exercise an exercise exercise in the in in the the OurOur approach Our approach approach likely likely likely stems stems stems from from from a simple a simple a simple satisfy satisfy satisfy by by way by way of way aoflarge, of a large, a large, all-encompassing all-encompassing all-encompassing linked linked linked to the toto the idea the idea of idea un-interrupted ofof un-interrupted un-interrupted open open open space. space. space. arrangement arrangement arrangement of building ofof building building andand site. and site. P’ungsu site. P’ungsu P’ungsu observation, observation, observation, thatthat of that Suncheon’s ofof Suncheon’s Suncheon’s majestic majestic majestic architecture. architecture. architecture. Each Each Each component component component implies implies implies a room a room a room In opposition, InIn opposition, opposition, butbut still but still of still the ofof the open the open open space space space type, type, type,being being being thethe Korean the Korean Korean model, model, model, wewe take we take take from from from thisthis the this the thegeographical geographical geographical features, features, features, andand tangential and tangential tangential lack lack of lack ofof of well-defined ofof well-defined well-defined function. function. function. Tiny Tiny architectural Tiny architectural architectural thethe garden the garden garden happens happens happens through through through thethe interplay the interplay interplay of ofof importance importance importance of juxtaposition, ofof juxtaposition, juxtaposition, proximity proximity proximity andand and urban urban urban green green green space. space. space. This This This is quite is is quite quite evident evident evident in in in moments moments moments appear appear appear on on the on the site the site in site ainmanner in a manner a manner numerous numerous numerous objects objects objects in ainwell-defined in a well-defined a well-defined area. area. area. OurOur Our boundary. boundary. boundary. While While While wewe have we have have found found found an an ‘appropriate’ an ‘appropriate’ ‘appropriate’ thethe old the old part old part of part the ofof the city, the city, where city, where where thethe competition the competition competitionthatthat would that would would allow allow allow forfor resilience. for resilience. resilience. They They They sit sitsit project project project considers considers considers open open open space space space andand built and built built form form form location location location forfor every for every every part, part, part, each each each oneone undergoes one undergoes undergoes sitesite issite positioned. is is positioned. positioned. TheThe city’s The city’s city’s dense dense dense urban urban urban independently, independently, independently, butbut come but come come together together together to form toto form form as as equivalents. as equivalents. equivalents. Suncheon Suncheon Suncheon ArtArt Platform Art Platform Platform is not is is not not continuous continuous continuous transformation. transformation. transformation. fabric fabric fabric sweeps sweeps sweeps from from from oneone mountain one mountain mountain to the toto the other, the other, other,instances instances instances of passage, ofof passage, passage, courtyard, courtyard, courtyard, edge. edge. edge. TheThe The to be toto be a be building, a building, a building, or aorset or a set aofset buildings, ofof buildings, buildings, butbut the but the the leaving leaving leaving little little little room room room forfor breath. for breath. breath. intention intention intention is to is is form toto form form archipelagos archipelagos archipelagos on on the on the site the site site sitesite itself. site itself. itself. Lastly, Lastly, Lastly, regarding regarding regarding thethe title... the title... title... thethe project the project project holds holds holds with with different with different different spatial spatial spatial roles. roles. roles. tootoo many too many many fantastical fantastical fantastical resemblances resemblances resemblances to the toto the the

VIIVIII

VIII IX

IX X

ure of of ourHieronymus proposal is Bosch to instruct work not to deem work it: of The Hieronymus not to deem it: The Rooms Bosch - architecture figures: Rooms - architecture figures: hrough interplay of site and Gardenthe of Earthly Delights. Garden of Earthly Delights. For the architectural elements our method For the isarchitectural elements our method is as follows: we will break the programas into follows: its we will break the program into its ayOpen that space the work - landscape finds method figures: in Open space - smallest landscape figures:parts. We do not strive possible smallest to possible parts. We do not strive to this mean an exercise infrom the a simple Ourwe approach likely stems Our approachsatisfy likely stems simple by wayfrom of a alarge, all-encompassing satisfy by way of a large, all-encompassing t observation, of building and site. P’ungsu that of Suncheon’s majestic observation, that of Suncheon’s majestic impliesarchitecture. architecture. Each component a room Each component implies a room rean model, wefeatures, take from this the geographical and tangential geographical lack of features, and tangential of well-defined function. lack Tiny of architectural of well-defined function. Tiny architectural ofurban juxtaposition, proximity green space. This isand quite evident urban in green space. Thisappear is quiteonevident inin a manner moments the site moments appear on the site in a manner hile found an ‘appropriate’ the we oldhave part of the city, where the competition the old part ofthat thewould city, where allowthe for competition resilience. They sit that would allow for resilience. They sit every part, each oneThe undergoes site is positioned. city’s dense urban site is positioned. The city’s dense urban independently, but come together to form independently, but come together to form ransformation. fabric sweeps from one mountain to fabric the other, sweepsinstances from oneof mountain the other, edge. passage,tocourtyard, instances The of passage, courtyard, edge. The leaving little room for breath. leaving little room for breath. intention is to form archipelagos on the intention site is to form archipelagos on the site ding the title... the project holds with different spatial roles. with different spatial roles. ntastical resemblances to the

SiteSite Plan Site Plan Plan

View View from View from above from above above

X


The Garden of Earthly Delights, South Korea Suncheon Art Platform_Competition Entry Office of Adrian Phiffer_2016 With Adrian Phiffer, Trenton Thompson

T

his is a work of many parts, each with its own life. We would like to propose for Suncheon Art Platform a garden. A garden, in this case, is not a park. The park is linked to the idea of uninterrupted open space. In opposition, but still of the open space type, the garden happens through the interplay of numerous objects in a well-defined area. Our project considers open space and built form as equivalents. Suncheon Art Platform is not to be a building, or a set of buildings, but the site itself. The dual nature of our proposal is to instruct and delight through the interplay of site and architecture. It is fair to say that the work finds method in intuition. By this we mean an exercise in the arrangement of building and site. P’ungsu being the Korean model, we take from this the importance of juxtaposition, proximity and boundary. While we have found an ‘appropriate’ location for every part, each one undergoes continuous transformation. Lastly, regarding the title... the project holds too many fantastical resemblances to the work of Hieronymus Bosch not to deem it: The Garden of Earthly Delights.

Open space - landscape figures Our approach likely stems from a simple observation, that of Suncheon’s majestic geographical features, and tangential lack of urban green space. This is quite evident in the old part of the city, where the competition site is positioned. The city’s dense urban fabric sweeps from one mountain to the other, leaving little room for breath. Rooms - architecture figures For the architectural elements our method is as follows: we will break the program into its smallest possible parts. We do not strive to satisfy by way of a large, all-encompassing architecture. Each component implies a room of well-defined function. Tiny architectural moments appear on the site in a manner that would allow for resilience. They sit independently, but come together to form instances of passage, courtyard, edge. The intention is to form archipelagos on the site with different spatial roles.

69


6.

9.

10.

from the west end of the site; 4. View looking Street with Visitor Centre at the end; 7. View m the back of the site; 10. A Heart in the sky.

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77

6.

5. 10.


Elevation Concept

Elevation Concept

Scale Comparison

Scale Comparison

scale 1/5,000

2004

scale 1/5,000

2012

2016 2004

177 m

Sejong Timeline

source: Google Earth

2012

State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg 66,848 sqm

642 m

642 m

2014

State Hermitage Museum, Louvre St. Petersburg Museum, Paris 66,848 sqm 60,600 sqm

We are astonished with the speed at which Sejong, the Administrative City, has been taking shape. Since 2007, Sejong has developed with an ambition that seems to surpass similar efforts such as Brasilia, Chandigarh, or other Middle Eastern endeavours. Along with speed, there seems to be a certain precision in the execution of the city that is difficult to achieve when considering contemporary urban planning. For us, these characteristics of Sejong, the Administrative City, are something to embrace and match. How can the National Museum Complex be built at the same speed and with the same precision as its host context? Can we dare to image that the full National Museum Complex will be built in less than year? Concepta Diagram

Metropolitan Louvre Museum Museum, of Art, Paris New Yok 58,820 60,600sqm sqm

177 m

National Metropolitan Museum Museum Complex,ofSejong Art, New Yok 190,000 58,820 sqm sqm

National Museum Complex, Sejong 190,000 sqm

Concept Ground Floor Collage

Concept Collages / Drawings / Text

scale NA

scale 1/5,000

We are just trying to catch up with the speed at which Sejong, the New Administrative City, happens. There is something thrilling about it. It feels like a gentle ro more to it: the excitement of many different museums being so close together. On these grounds there are no doubts: the National Museum Complex should be museum is reduced to a single space and spewed amongst the site. So too are its contents. Thus all objects, including comforts lie on a level playing field. Art a

3 digital heritage nationalnational digital heritage museummuseum

10

Instead, boundary is subjectively expressed by the extents of the objects. Or perhaps the shift in texture (floor, fence, rail, wall). We wonder briefly of the negotia photocopier next to the T-Rex display... This museum district is the height of Sejong’s frenzied world. The scenes and acoustics remind us of the stampede scen

mediummedium size museum size museum

Materiality

natural natural history museum history museum small size small museum size museum nationalnational childrenchildren museummuseum

78

10

The architecture is of flat nature - column supports with a floor slab. We imagine the roof to be semi-transparent, a glowing light from/ Text above. Radically different f Concept Collages / Drawings horizon. Its compression and repetitive elements speak to an immersive infinity. We oppose compartmentalization. Even the delivery bays scale NA are housed amongst Elevation Concept

comfortscomforts and amenities and amenities

central operation central operation center center

mediummedium size museum size museum small size museum small size museum

Elevation Concept

mediummedium size museum size museum lots lots 2014parkingparking nationalnational design museum design museum

2016

Sejong Timeline

nationalnational archivesarchives museummuseum

source: Google Earth

central storehouse central storehouse

We are astonished with the speed at which Sejong, the Administrative City, has been taking shape. Since 2007, Sejong has developed with an ambition that seems to surpass similar efforts such as architecture city museum nationalnational architecture and cityand Brasilia, Chandigarh, or museum other Middle Eastern endeavours. Along with speed, there seems to be a certain precision in the execution of the city that is difficult to achieve when considering contemporary urban planning. For us, these characteristics of Sejong, the Administrative City, are something to embrace and match. How can the National Museum Complex be built at the same speed and with the same precision as its host context? Can we dare to image that the full National Museum Complex will be built in less than a year? For the National Museum Complex, we would like to propose one building; one space large enough to host all museums at once. Our proposal consolidates the museums into a whole, instead of different buildings. It creates opportunity for multiple paths, manifold interpretations and cross-curatorial exhibits within a single entity.

Possible Curatorial Strategies

Possible Curatorial Strategies

scale NA

scale NA

Possible Curatorial

3

Variable Arrangements

5

Po

Possible Curatorial Strategies

scale NA

Possible Curatorial Strategies

scale NA

Variable Arrangements

We imagine the roof to be semi-transparent, a glowing light from above. Tantalizing silhouettes of the objects will be visible through the translucent skin from the outside.

Concept Ground Floor Collage

We are just trying to catch up with the speed at which Sejong, the New Administrative City, happens. There is something thrilling about it. It feels like a gentle roller-coaster. And then, there is something more to it: the excitement of many different museums being so close together. On these grounds there are no doubts: the National Museum Complex should be one building. There will be no phases. Each museum is reduced to a single space and spewed amongst the site. So too are its contents. Thus all objects, including comforts lie on a level playing field. Art and the everyday are dispersed.

Variable Arrangements

Concept Ground Floor Collage

The architecture is of flat nature - column supports with a floor slab. We imagine the roof to be semi-transparent, a glowing light from above. Radically different from its towering context, this district plays to horizon. Its compression and repetitive elements speak to an immersive infinity. We oppose compartmentalization. Even the delivery bays are housed amongst parkland and waffle stands. Instead, boundary is subjectively expressed by the extents of the objects. Or perhaps the shift in texture (floor, fence, rail, wall). We wonder briefly of the negotiations between each player, dreaming of the Wedistrict are just to catch up with frenzied the speed at which the New Administrative happens. There is something thrilling it. Itspectacle. feels like a gentle roller-coaster. And then, there is something photocopier next to the T-Rex display... This museum is trying the height of Sejong’s world. The Sejong, scenes and acoustics remind usCity, of the stampede scene from Jumanji - theabout ultimate more to it: the excitement of many different museums being so close together. On these grounds there are no doubts: the National Museum Complex should be one building. There will be no phases. Each Programmatic Plans scale 1/5,000 museum is reduced to a single space and spewed amongst the site. So too are its contents. Thus all objects, including comforts lie on a level playing field.6Art and the everyday are dispersed.

Concept Ground Floor Collage

The architecture is of flat nature - column supports with a floor slab. We imagine the roof to be semi-transparent, a glowing light from above. Radically different from its towering context, this district plays to horizon. Its compression and repetitive elements speak to an immersive infinity. We oppose compartmentalization. Even the delivery bays are housed amongst parkland and waffle stands.

Variable Arrangements

s like a gentle roller-coaster. And then, there is something mplex should be one building. There will be no phases. Each aying field. Art and the everyday are dispersed.

Instead, boundary is subjectively expressed by the extents of the objects. Or perhaps the shift in texture (floor, fence, rail, wall). We wonder briefly of the negotiations between each player, dreaming of the We frenzied are just trying catch up with speed atremind whichus Sejong, New Administrative City, happens. There spectacle. is something thrilling about it. It feels photocopier next to the T-Rex display... This museum district is the height of Sejong’s world.toThe scenes andthe acoustics of the the stampede scene from Jumanji - the ultimate more to it: the excitement of many different museums being so close together. On these grounds there are no doubts: the National Museum Com 6 museum is reduced to a single space and spewed amongst the site. So too are its contents. Thus all objects, including comforts lie on a level pl

The architecture is of flat nature - column supports with a floor slab. We imagine the roof to be semi-transparent, a glowing light from above. Ra horizon. Its compression and repetitive elements speak to an immersive infinity. We oppose compartmentalization. Even the delivery bays are h

Instead, boundary is subjectively expressed by the extents of the objects. Or perhaps the shift in texture (floor, fence, rail, wall). We wonder brie photocopier next to the T-Rex display... This museum district is the height of Sejong’s frenzied world. The scenes and acoustics remind us of the

source: Kunsthalle, OMA

dically different from its towering context, this district plays to oused amongst parkland and waffle stands. Ground Floor

Basement

Mixed The museum in its most exaggerated form. All objects, including comforts lie on a level playing field. Art and the everyday are dispersed. The photocopier next to the t-rex display ...

source: Laban Centre, Herzog & de Meuron

national children museum central storehouse central operation center Programmatic national archives museum Plans scale 1/5,000 national design museum

Institution//Blobs Institution//Blobs Individual museums organised into separate Individual zones. museums organised into separate zones. national architecture and city This gives amuseum centralised zone for each This program gives awith centralised zone for each program with national digital heritage museum natural history museum all interactions only at the edges. Enthusiasts all interactions can only at the edges. Enthusiasts can medium size museum medium size museum isolate objects of interest. isolate objects of interest. medium size museum

Preferred Curatorial Strategy

scale NA

Morphology//Blobs Morphology//Blobs Objects are organised into groups according Objects are to their organised into groups according to their shape. This allows for unexpected adjacencies, shape. Thisaallows for unexpected adjacencies, a Scale//Strips Scale//Strips bubble car beside the planetarium. bubble car beside the planetarium. Objects are organised into lines according Objects are to their organised into lines according to their

size. The blue whale with the barcelona size. The pavilion. blue whale with the barcelona pavilion. Citizens are dwarfed by objects to Citizens the north; are in dwarfed the by objects to the north; in the south they bend over to peer at thesouth smallest theyitems. bend over to peer at the smallest items. 15 15

Colour//Strips Colour//Strips Objects are organised into lines according Objects are to their organised into lines according colour. A highly visual experience will colour. excite A highly both visual experience will exci children and adults. children and adults.

efly of the negotiations between each player, dreaming of the r-coaster. And then, there is something e scene will from - the Each ultimate spectacle. nestampede building. There beJumanji no phases. Institution//Blobs Institution//Blobs Morphology//Blobs Morphology//Blobs the Individual everyday are dispersed. 6 Objects are organised museums organised into separate zones. Individual museums organised into separate Objectszones. are organised into groups according to their into groups according to their small size museum small size museum comforts and amenities cores

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10m

Scale//Strips Scale//Strips Colour//Strips Objects are organised into lines according to their Objects are organised into lines according to Objects their are organised into lines according to their Objects are or size. The blue whale with the barcelona pavilion. size. The blue whale with the barcelona pavilion. colour. A highly visual experience will excite both colour. A high are dwarfed by objects to the north;ainCitizens theshape. areThis dwarfed byfor objects to the north; in the a children and adults. This gives a centralised zone for each program shape.Citizens This withallows for unexpected adjacencies, allows unexpected adjacencies, south they bend over to peer at the smallest items. south they bend over to peer at the smallest items. all interactions only at the edges. Enthusiastsbubble can car beside the planetarium. bubble car beside the planetarium. 4.5m

This gives a centralised zone for each program with all interactions only at the edges. Enthusiasts can isolate objects of interest. Ground Floor

Basement

isolate objects of interest.

m its towering context, this district plays to arkland and waffle stands. national children museum central storehouse central operation center national archives museum national design museum national architecture and city museum national digital heritage museum natural history museum medium size museum

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Open Space for Citizens, Sejong, South Korea National Museum Complex Master Plan of Administrative City, Korea_Competition Entry Office of Adrian Phiffer_2016 With Adrian Phiffer, Trenton Thompson

this district shall contain instances of: the generic the repeated the logical the scientific the surreal the measured the uncontrolled the utopic the monumental the immediate the exaggerated the optimistic odd proximites the delirious excitement

T

his maniacal district is one of haste. Haste implies an urgency in movement and action. Let us not waste time...Hurry, populate the site and bring on the crowds! On these grounds there are no doubts. Each museum is reduced to a single space and spewed amongst the site. So too are its contents. Thus all objects, including comforts lie on a level playing field. Art and the everyday are dispersed. The architecture is of flat nature column supports with a floor slab. We imagine the roof to be semitransparent, a glowing light from above. Radically different from its towering context, this district plays to horizon. Its compression and repetitive elements speak to an immersive infinity. We oppose compartmentalization. Even the delivery bays are housed amongst parkland and waffle stands. Instead, boundary is subjectively expressed by the extents of the objects. Or perhaps the shift in texture (floor, fence, rail, wall). We wonder briefly of the negotiations between each player, dreaming of the photocopier next to the T-Rex display... This museum district is the height of Sejong’s frenzied world. The scenes and

acoustics remind us of the stampede scene from Jumanji - the ultimate spectacle.

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1. Institution//Blobs Individual museums organised into separate zones. This gives a centralised zone for each program with all interactions only at the edges. Enthusiasts can isolate objects of interest. 2. Morphology//Blobs Objects are organised into groups according to their shape. This allows for unexpected adjacencies, a bubble car beside the planetarium. 1.

2.

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3. Scale//Strips Objects are organised into lines according to their size. The blue whale with the Barcelona Pavilion. Citizens are dwarfed by objects to the north; in the south they bend over to peer at the smallest items. 4. Colour//Strips Objects are organised into lines according to their colour. A highly visual experience will excite both children and adults. 5. Mixed The museum in its most exaggerated form. All objects, including comforts lie on a level playing field. Art and the everyday are dispersed. The photocopier next to the t-rex display...

3.

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Superflat, Berlin

The Museum of the 20th Century_Competition Entry Office of Adrian Phiffer_2016 With Adrian Phiffer, Dimitrios Karopoulos, Trenton Thompson

F

aced by the presence of iconic neighbours, the addition of the Neue Nationalgalerie appears to be a project over-determined by its context. Superflat proposes to build a distinct architecture and landscape without overwhelming the established architectural and urban context. The new exhibition architecture and plaza choreograph existing spaces and views

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while confidently joining the ensemble of architectural monuments initiated by Scharoun and Mies van der Rohe. Coordinating with the existing adjacent architecture, the addition creates a fourth facade for the central open space, redefining a collection of outdoor rooms. The eastern faรงade of the new building boldly reaffirms Potsdamer Strasse as an urban street. Viewed

from the existing podium of the Neue NationalGalerie, the razor edge of the new architecture effaces itself, allowing unobstructed views of the Philharmonie and the square.


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Warming Huts, Winnipeg

Warming Hut v.2016_Competition Entry Office of Adrian Phiffer_2015 With Adrian Phiffer, Dimitrios Karopoulos

T

his year, the Warming Huts Competition begins its 7th iteration. Previous editions have brought forward a multitude of proposals that have stretched the idea of a “warming hut” to new limits, some unimaginable, some ridiculous. Our proposal is an investigation into the timeless architectural dichotomy of form, or signage versus function. We have started by radically challenging the idea of architecture as an outcome of boiling down many ingredients into one thing, and decided to physically separate what is sign versus what is function. Once engaged in such an operation, it made sense to push each part into its most absolute form. We believe that there is nothing more sheltering than your clothing; and that

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ming Huts h iteration. e brought proposals idea of a mits, some ulous. The those that se into one on of both d function,

gation into dichotomy function.

The Skyline of New York”, New York, 1978

We have imagined a huge piece of neon text saying “Warming Huts” sitting on top of a 12m tall pole. At the bottom of the pole a circular rack of felt cloaks are ready for visitors to dress up in order to shelter from the harsh winter. The color of the pole, and everything that’s structural and infrastructural has to be white, to blend into the winter. The sign and the shelters can be yellow, but may become any other contrasting color. The cloaks should be returned back to the original rack location. At the end of the festival, our aim is to have them distributed to people of need.

Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, Steven Izenour, Recommendation for a Monument, 1972

radically rchitecture down many hing, and arate what ction. Once on, it made to its most e that there

The Skyline of New York”, New York, 1978

is nothing more sheltering than your clothing; and that there is nothing more semiotic than a piece of text.

During the festival, we hope to dot the Red River Mutual Trail with at least 3 of these signs, and over 500 shelters.

Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, Steven Izenour, Recommendation for a Monument, 1972

there is nothing more semiotic than a piece of text. We have imagined a huge piece of neon text saying “Warming Huts” sitting on top of a 12m tall pole. At the bottom of the pole a circular rack of felt cloaks are ready for visitors to dress up in order to shelter from the harsh winter. The colour of the pole, and everything that’s structural and infrastructural has to be white, to blend into the winter. The sign and the shelters can be yellow, but may become any other contrasting colour. The cloaks should be returned back to the original rack location. At the end of the festival, our aim is to have them Warming Huts distributed to people ofTitle: need. Title: Warming Huts

Manhattan’s architects perform “The Skyline of New York”, from Rem Koolhaas, Delirious New York, 1978

WH123456879

Title: Warming Huts

WH123456879

During the festival, we hope to dot the Red River Mutual Trail with at least 3 of these signs, and over 500 shelters.

Title: Warming Huts

This year, the Warming Huts Competition begins its 7th iteration. Previous editions have brought forward a multitude of proposals that have stretched the idea of a “warming hut” to new limits, some unimaginable, some ridiculous. The best proposals seem to be those that have managed to condense into one object the right proportion of both form, or symbolism, and function, shelter. Our proposal is an investigation into the timeless architectural dichotomy of form, or signage versus function.

Joseph Beuys, Felt Suit, 1970

Title: Warming Huts

We have started by radically challenging the idea of architecture as an outcome of boiling down many ingredients into one thing, and decided to physically separate what Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, is sign versus what is function. Once Steven Izenour, Recommendation for a engaged in such an operation, it made Monument, 1972 sense to push each part into its most absolute form. We believe that there

is nothing more sheltering than your clothing; and that there is nothing more semiotic than a piece of text.

We have imagined a huge piece of neon text saying “Warming Huts” sitting on top of a 12m tall pole. At the bottom of the pole a circular rack of felt cloaks are ready for visitors to dress up in order to shelter from the harsh winter. The color of the pole, and everything that’s structural and infrastructural has to be white, to blend into the winter. The sign and the shelters can be yellow, but may become any other contrasting color. The cloaks should be returned back to the original rack location. At the end of the festival, our aim is to have them distributed to people of need. During the festival, we hope to dot the Red River Mutual Trail with at least 3 of these signs, and over 500 shelters.

Joseph Beuys, Felt Suit, 1970

WH123456879

Manhattan’s architects perform “The Skyline of New York”, from Rem Koolhaas, Delirious New York, 1978

Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, Steven Izenour, Recommendation for a Monument, 1972

Above: Warming Hut, Process Making / Cut Patt felt piece cut with scisors Bellow: Warming Hut, Model 1:1

Above: Warming Hut, Process Making / Cut Pattern, 1m x 1m wool felt piece cut with scisors Bellow: Warming Hut, Model 1:1

Title: Warming Huts

WH123456879 LED Housing

Signage Frame

WH123456879 Above: Warming Hut, Process Making / Cut Pattern, 1m x 1m wool felt piece cut with scisors Bellow: Warming Hut, Model 1:1

Painted Timber Pole

Clear Membrane

In case of precipitations, in the most mundane manner, the rack of clocks can be covered with a sheet of transparent plastic.

In case of precipitations, in the most mundane manner, the rack of clocks can be covered with a sheet of transparent plastic. Cloaks

In case of precipitations, in the most mundane manner, the rack of c In case of precipitations, in the most mundane manner, the rack of clocks can be covered with a sheet of transparent plastic. Painted Timber Frame

Title: Warming Huts

covered with a sheet of transparent plastic.

Electrical Housing Steel Pile page -2-

page -1-

Pa

Above: Warming Hut, Process Making / Cut Pattern, 1m x 1m wool felt piece cut with scisors Bellow: Warming Hut, Model 1:1

page -2page -1-

page -1-

In case of precipitations, in the most mundane manner, the rack of clocks can be covered with a sheet of transparent plastic.

Above: Warming Hut, Process Making / Cut Pattern, 1m x 1m wool felt piece cut with scisors Bellow: Warming Hut, Model 1:1

page -2-


Skyline of New York�, York, 1978

age -1-

Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, Steven Izenour, Recommendation for a Monument, 1972

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Beautiful Confusion, Coachella

Coachella Festival Installation Proposal Office of Adrian Phiffer_2016 With Adrian Phiffer, Saarinen Balagengatharadilak, Dimitrios Karopoulos, Trenton Thompson

B

eautiful Confusion was Fellini’s working title for 8 1/2. Naturally this translates toward a desire to conceive an object that refuses qualification. Made of gold-washed cars the pavilion is a demolition derby - a smash’em and crash’em totem of crude and unapologetic insides. All while under the desert sun, the unresolved image of this petrified heap will linger with the occupant forever.

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collage

physical model Office of Adrian Phiffer

physical model tests

Saarinen Balagengatharadilak Dimitrios Karopoulos Liusaidh Macdonald Adrian Phiffer

physical model

interior experience

coachella sunset

physical model tests


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physical model tests


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The Ends of the City, Sweden

Europan 13: Nacka, Sweden_Second Prize Office of Adrian Phiffer_2015 With Adrian Phiffer, Dimitrios Karopoulos

T

he contemporary town is not one but many places. It is a complex, manylayered, multifarious structure, made up of complementary and interconnected ideas, concepts, and systems. O M Ungers (1999)

ground and takes it as a theme. Each plateau seems to dictate what it should hold above it. This understanding of the site forms the basis for a design made up of solitary urban moments that vary in type.

Introduction Whilst many contemporary urban themes converge on the Nacka site: how to build the post-oil city, how to build the edge of the city, how to re-adapt industrial sites into domesticated urban areas, how to plan a highly adaptable city, and so on; our proposal brings into light an almost forgotten aspect of urban planning: the resilience of urban form in time.

Urban Planning The diversity of building types deployed on the site becomes a strategy in itself on addressing the requirements for adaptability for unpredictable futures. While determined by their relationship with the plateaus they occupy, they vary considerably in scale. The larger buildings proposed here are flexible in their nature. Conceived mainly for residential occupancy, their ground floors allow for multiple uses, while the overall dimensions are generic enough to permit re-adaptation from housing to labour or public uses. The small buildings presented in the plan are either conceived as suburbia type housing or as tiny sheds with public and commercial use. They accept their ephemeral character and the fact that they can be easily replaced. From an architectural point of view, beyond the use of arcades, there is no fixed form or vocabulary. The matrix of open spaces is made up of well-established types: the plaza, the street, the courtyard, the backyard, the arcade, the boardwalk. One out of norm space is a landscape corridor composed as a collage of typologies ranging from keeping current

The Site Despite the magnificent industrial presence on the Nacka site, we have decided not to fall in love with it. Nacka seems to be the type of site where any existing condition can be a solid point of departure in the design process. More than anything, the white tanks are extremely tempting. They are beautiful, yet useless when one has to imagine a city. We prefer to start our project from the most basic condition of the site – the ground. Stripped of any built form, the site presents itself in a “naked” position revealing a complex collection of plateaus where different urban realities can be imagined. The proposed plan accepts the fragmented nature of the

ground conditions with industrial pipes and rocky cliffs to grounds where children can safely play or bathe. Jante’s Law “There’s only one law in Sweden that matters, and that’s the mythical Law of Jante, which promotes the idea that being average is the most desirable of personal qualities. It is also a cherished stereotype that Swedes are sticklers for scientific accuracy.” James Savage, 2007 The composition of non-residential program is based upon the Jantelagen. Statistics based upon the average Swedish household, the Johanssons (who own a silver year 2000 Volvo), were used to determine the required facilities.

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Total Gross Floor Area Residential Non-Residential

Phasing Plans.

181,482 m2 157,110 m2 24,372 m2

Road Network Plan and Arcades Plan.

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The Plateaus: 1. Skönviksvägen Street 2. Entry Plaza 3. Market Plaza 4. Square Castles 5. Open Courtyard 6. Suburbia 7. Village 8. Landscape Corridor 9. Boardwalk 10. Arcades


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Liusaidh Macdonald - Architecture Portfolio  

University of Toronto, Daniels Faculty of Architecture MArch. University of Cambridge BA.

Liusaidh Macdonald - Architecture Portfolio  

University of Toronto, Daniels Faculty of Architecture MArch. University of Cambridge BA.

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