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25 th Annual Literacy for All — Northeast PreK–8 Literacy Conference AND Reading Recovery Institute

Literacy foBirthday r All

RHODE ISLAND CONVENTION CENTER | PROVIDENCE NOVEMBER 2–4, 2014

Sneed Collard

25

th

Celebration

Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell

Keynote Cathy Toll

Betsy Kaye

Carl Anderson

Keynote

Keynote

Andy Hargreaves

Jack Gantos

Martha Horn

Jeff Anderson

2014 Highlights: • 100+ workshops in 11 strands • 25th Birthday Celebration • 3 Keynote and 23 Featured Speakers

Literacy for All Conference Strands: • Reading Recovery • Common Core State Standards • Administrators/School Leaders • PreK–K Literacy • Early Literacy (Grades K–2) • Intermediate Literacy (Grades 3–6) • Middle School Literacy (Grades 5–8)

• Technology and Literacy • Literacy Coaching • Children’s Literature and Authors • Grades PreK–8 Literacy

Ruth Culham

Jeff Wilhem

Some of our topics for this year: • Guided Reading • Deepening Reading Comprehension • Testing Genre • Using Digital Tools • Academic Vocabulary • Genre Study

• Linking Inquiry and Writing • Interactive Writing • Close Reading • Refining Teacher Language • Collaborative Coaching

• Writing About Reading • Nonfiction Mentor Texts • Digital Media and Writers’ Workshop • Assessing Writers • Teachers as Leaders • Implementing Comprehensive Literacy

Hosted by Lesley University in collaboration with University of Connecticut, New York University, and The University of Maine


Conference Schedule Thank you to our sponsors!

Sunday, November 2, 2014 4 Professional Development Hours* 10:00 am–11:00 am

Registration

11:00 am–1:00 pm Pre-Conference Workshops

Tote Bag Sponsor

Table of Contents Sponsors........................................................ 1 Conference Schedule.................................. 1–3 Conference Program Committee.................... 3

1:00 pm–2:00 pm

Lunch on your own

Keynote Speakers........................................... 4

2:00 pm–4:00 pm

Pre-Conference Workshops

Featured Speakers...................................... 4–5

4:00 pm–6:00 pm

Registration

Reading Recovery Featured Speakers............. 6 Workshops (Sunday).................................. 8–9

Speaker Sponsors

Sponsoring Nancy Boyles

Sponsoring Ruth Culham and Jeff Wilhelm

Follow Literacy for All on Social Media: facebook.com/ LesleyCenterRRLC @Lesleyctrrrlc conference hashtag: #lfa2014 Subscribe to our blog: lesleyuniversitycrrlc. wordpress.com/

Monday, November 3, 2014 6 Professional Development Hours* 7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

8:30 am–10:00 am

Keynote A

10:00 am–7:00 pm

Visit exhibits

10:30 am–12:00 pm

Session B

12:00 pm–1:30 pm

Lunch on your own/ Lesley Alumni luncheon

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Session C

1:30 pm–4:45 pm

Session C In-Depth

3:00 pm–3:30 pm

Visit exhibits

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

Session D

5:00 pm–7:00 pm

25th Birthday Celebration/ Exhibit Fair and Raffle

Workshops (Monday)............................. 10–20 Lesley University Alumni Luncheon.............. 17 25th Birthday Celebration/ Exhibit Fair and Book Signings..................... 20 Workshops (Tuesday)............................. 22–31 Travel Information........................................ 32 Funding and Scholarships............................ 33 2015 Call for Session Proposals................... 33 Registration and Discounts.......................... 34 Conference Policies...................................... 35 General Information..................................... 36

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 4.5 Professional Development Hours* 7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

7:30 am–2:30 pm

Visit exhibits

8:30 am–10:00 am

Session E: Keynote E or 90-Minute Session E

8:30 am–11:45 am

Session E In-Depth

10:15 am–11:45 am

Session F: Reading Recovery Keynote F or 90-Minute Session F

10:15 am–1:30 pm

Session F In-Depth

11:45 am–1:00 pm

Lunch on your own/ visit exhibits

1:00 pm–2:30 pm

Session G

Full workshop listings, descriptions, and all other conference details available at www.lesley.edu/literacyforall To register, visit www.regonline/lfa2014

*Turn in an objectives form (provided at conference) to receive a Certificate of Attendance at the conclusion of your stay that can earn you professional development points. 14.5 Professional Development Total Hours!

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall

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Conference Schedule Pre-Conference Workshops

LCB-14 Projecting a Unit of Study in the Primary Classroom (Grades PreK–K)............................................ 12

Sunday, November 2, 2014 11:00 am–4:00 pm

LCB-15 Improving Student Achievement and Elevating Teacher Expertise through Literacy Collaborative (Grades PreK–8).............................................................. 12

PC-1 Writing Right From the Start: Starting a Workshop on Day One and Maintaining It Through the Year (Grades K–2)..................................................................... 8

PC-2 From Reading Specialist to Literacy Coach: Examining Essential Shifts (Grades K–8)........................... 8

PC-3 Introduction to Readers’ Workshop: Building Students’ Processing Through Whole Group, Small Group, and Individual Instruction (Grades 3–8)................ 8

PC-4 Language Rich Literacy Beginnings: Expanding Children’s Language and Literacy Development in PreK and Kindergarten Classrooms (Grades PreK–K)................ 9

PC-5 Important Beginnings: Critical Aspects of Early Learning................................................................... 9

PC-6 Flexibility in Problem Solving: A Literacy Processing Perspective...................................... 9

Session A

RRB-1 Expanding High Frequency Word Knowledge in Higher Level Texts........................................................... 13 RRB-2 Making the Most of Opportunities: Selecting the Clearest, Easiest, Most Memorable Examples................. 13

RRB-3 Reading Continuous Texts, Whole Stories, and Information Books........................................................... 13

RRB-4 Refining Our Teacher Talk to Scaffold Learning... 13

Session C Monday, November 3, 2014 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Monday, November 3, 2014 8:30 am–10:00 am Keynote A Collective Responsibility For the Success of All Teachers and Students (Grades K–8)...................... 10

LCC-1 Invitational Grammar and Editing Instruction, Middle School Edition: Connecting Reading, Writing, and Mechanics (Grades 5–8)................................................. 14

LCC-2 Authors and Illustrators Matter (Grades K–2)................................................................... 14

Session B

LCC-3 Genre Study: An Inquiry Model For Learning How to Notice Types of Texts (Grades K–8)..................... 14

Monday, November 3, 2014 10:30 am–12:00 pm

LCC-4 Collective Responsibility in Business, Sports, and Education (Grades K–8).................................................. 14

LCC-5 Purposeful Talk: The Link Between Inquiry and Writing (PreK–K)............................................................. 14

LCB-1 Starting With a Stack: Exploring a Predictable Framework For Study in the Writing Workshop Through a Nonfiction Study (Grades K–2)....................... 10

LCC-6 “Do You Remember Me? Do You Know Who I Am?”: Conferring with Multilingual Writers (Grades K–5)......... 15

LCB-2 Common Core Canines: Great Dog Books to Use in K–8 Curricula (Grades K–8).................................. 10

LCB-3 Five Keys to Deepening Reading Comprehension in Struggling Readers (Grades 3–8)................................ 10

LCB-4 Collective Responsibility in Action (Grades K–8)................................................................... 11

LCB-5 (Re)Inventing Reading: Using Digital Tools in Our English Classrooms (Grades 6–8)............................. 11

LCB-6 What’s Math?: Developing Math Schema For the Primary Child (PreK–K)........................................ 11

LCC-11 Accurately Determining Acceleration: The Key to Effective Interventions (Grades K–2)............. 15

LCB-7 “I Got Angry Birds In My Story”: Multilingual Writers at Work (Grades K–2)...................... 11

LCC-12 “I Suck at Reading”: Rebuilding Confidence in the Disenchanted Reader (Grades 3–8)....................... 16

LCB-8 Reading Unbound: Let Them Read Trash! (Grades 3–8)................................................................... 11 LCB-9 Examining Explicit Teaching Demonstrations That Scaffold Student Learning (Grades 5–8).................. 11

LCB-10 Linking Phonemic Awareness to Authentic Texts in the K–2 Classroom (Grades K–2)................................ 12

LCB-11 Triangulated Literacy Coaching: Fostering the Teacher-Coach-Principal Relationship (Grades 3–6)........ 12

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LCB-16 Beyond Words and Smiles: The Power of Nonverbal Communication in Teaching and Learning (Grades K–6)................................................................... 13

LCB-12 Developing Minilessons Within the Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8).................................................. 12 LCB-13 Academic Vocabulary: Strategies For Active Learners in the Elementary Grades (Grades K–6)............ 12

Session C In-Depth Monday, November 3, 2014 1:30 pm–4:45 pm LCC-14 In-Depth Closer Reading in the Intermediate Grades: Better Prep, Smarter Lessons, Deeper Comprehension (Grades 3–8)......................................... 17 LCC-15 In-Depth Going Deeper in the Coaching Conversation (Grades PreK–8)........................ 17

LCC-16 In-Depth Writing About Reading: Deepening the Thinking (Grades 3–8)............................................... 17

LCC-17 In-Depth Triangulating Data to Find the Stories of Our Readers (Grades K–6).......................................... 17

Session D Monday, November 3, 2014 3:30 pm–5:00 pm LCD-1 Using Mentor Texts to Teach Students the Craft of Writing (Grades 3–8)................................................... 18

LCD-2 Revision Decisions: The Grammar of Informational and Explanatory Writing (Grades 6–8)............................ 18

LCD-3 Exploring the Frontier of Children’s Literature (Grades K–8)................................................................... 18

LCD-4 Using Mentor Texts to Teach the Craft of Writing (Grades K–2)...................................................... 18

LCD-5 Keeping Meaning at the Forefront of Book Introductions (Grades K–2)............................................. 18

LCD-6 Writing Together: What Digital Media Brings to Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8)................................................................... 18

LCD-7 Digital Tools For Digital Argument (Grades 6–8)................................................................... 18

LCD-8 Action Strategies For Deepening Comprehension (Grades 3–6)................................................................... 18

LCC-7 Teachers as Digital Writers (Grades PreK–8).............................................................. 15

LCC-8 The Many Lives of Any One Book (Grades K–8)... 15

LCD-9 Using Inquiry As a Tool For Continuous Improvement (Grades K–2)............................................. 19

LCC-9 Making Sense of the Testing Genre From Day One to the End of the Year (Grades 3–6)......................... 15

LCD-10 Promoting Children’s Social-Emotional Development through a Literacy Lens (Grades K–2)....... 19

LCC-10 Developing Lifelong Readers Through a Growth Mindset (Grades K–2)..................................................... 15

LCD-11 Author Interviews—Live Footage: Conferring With Young Writers (Grades K–2)............................................ 19

LCC-13 The Wonderful World of Workstations (Grades K–2)................................................................... 16

RRC-1 Change Over Time: Teaching For Efficient Visual Processing For Text Reading................................. 16

RRC-2 Making the Most of Opportunities: Selecting the Clearest, Easiest, Most Memorable Examples (Repeat).......................................................... 16

RRC-3 Refining Our Teacher Talk to Scaffold Learning (Repeat).......................................................................... 16

RRC-4 Fluency in the Reading Recovery Lesson: How to Observe It and Foster It...................................... 16

LCD-12 Idea Notebooks + Inquiry + Investigation = Wondering That Inspires Reading, Writing, and Thinking (Grades 3–6)................................................................... 19

LCD-13 Creating Book Murals Using Interactive Writing (Grades K–2)................................................................... 19

LCD-14 The Reality Is: Nonfiction Books Kids Will Want to Read (Grades 3–6)............................................. 19

RRD-1 Creating Independent and Strategic Writers....... 20

RRD-2 Reading Continuous Texts, Whole Stories, and Information Books (Repeat)............................................ 20

RRD-3 Just Known to Well Known During Roaming Around the Known.......................................................... 20

RRD-4 Teaching For Change Over Time: Fast Processing in Reading and Writing.......................... 20

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


Conference Schedule Session E

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 8:30 am–10:00 am Keynote E Literature: It’s All Personal (Grades PreK–8).............................................................. 22 LCE-1 Writing Together: What Digital Media Brings to Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8) (Repeat)..................................................... 22

LCF-15 Meeting the Needs of All Readers: Making Response to Intervention a Reality (Grades K–6) Clare Landrigan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers........... 26

LCF-16 Creating Meaningful Texts For Shared Reading (Grades PreK–2).............................................................. 27

LCF-17 Evaluating Reading Comprehension Through Writing: Assessment Through Reading-Writing Reciprocity (Grades 3–8)................................................. 27

LCE-2 Digital Tools For Digital Argument (Grades 6–8) (Repeat)..................................................... 22

LCE-3 Multi-Genre Projects (Grades 5–8)...................... 22 RRE-1 Creating Independent and Strategic Writers (Repeat).......................................................................... 22 RRE-2 Shifty Business: Supporting Processing at Key Transitions....................................................................... 22 RRE-3 The Power of Teacher Language in Shaping Student Learning............................................... 23

LCF-14 Fostering 21st Century Readers and Writers through Social Networking (Grades 3–8)............ 26

SESSION F In-Depth Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:15 am–1:30 pm

LCF-18 In-Depth Collaborative Coaching As Part of an Integrated Middle-Level Literacy Framework (Grades 3–6)................................................................... 27

LCF-19 In-Depth Unwrapping Rap: Unpacking Rap Lyrics to Increase Vocabulary Acquisition in Urban Youth (Grades 5–8)................................................................... 27

RRE-4 Roaming Around the Known: How to Follow the Child Without Getting Lost in the Woods.................. 23

Session E In-Depth

SESSION G

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 8:30 am–11:45 am

Tuesday, November 4, 2014 1:00 pm–2:30 pm

LCE-4 In-Depth What Principals and Literacy Leaders Need to Know About Teaching and Learning Writing (Grades K–8)................................................................... 23

Session F Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:15 am–11:45 am

LCG-1 Assessing Writers (Grades 3–8)................................................................... 29

LCG-2 Using Small-Group Read-Alouds to Support Young Readers (Grades K–2)........................................... 29

LCG-3 Today’s Journals Are Tomorrow’s Literature (Grades 3–8)................................................................... 29

LCG-4 Looking at Student Work: Letting Children Show Us What They Can Do, and What We Need to Help Them Learn Next (Grades K–1)................................................. 29

LCG-5 The iPad Meets Writers’ Workshop (Grades K–2)................................................................... 29

Reading Recovery Keynote F Teaching in the Moment.......................................................................... 24

LCF-1 Conferring with Student Writers (Grades K–2)..... 24

LCF-2 Invitational Grammar and Editing Instruction, Middle School Edition: Connecting Reading, Writing, and Mechanics (Grades 5–8) (Repeat)............................ 24

LCF-3 Keeping Meaning at the Forefront of Book Introductions (Grades K–2) (Repeat)............................... 24

LCF-4 Read a Classic, Write a Classic: From “Wild Things” to “Rotten Ralph” (Grades PreK–6)......... 24

LCF-5 Listening the Story Out: Children Show Us How to Help Them Compose (Grades K–1).................................. 25

LCF-6 Purposeful Talk: The Link Between Inquiry and Writing (PreK–K) (Repeat)............................................... 25

LCF-7 “I Got Angry Birds In My Story”: Multilingual Writers at Work (Grades K–2) (Repeat)........................... 25

LCF-8 Coaching For Initiatives: RTI and the Common Core (Grades PreK–8)...................................................... 25

LCG-12 Interactive Writing: Empowering Our Youngest Writers As They Take Control of Their Literacy Learning (PreK–K).......................................................................... 30

LCF-9 Writing Matters: Learning From and With Mentor Authors (Grades K–5)...................................................... 25

LCG-13 Writing About Reading: Considering Different Options to Deepen Comprehension (Grades 3–6)........... 31

LCG-6 Systemic Change: A Literacy Journey in Rural Maine (Grades K–8)............................................... 29

LCG-7 Guided Reading From A–D: Building Solid Foundations in a Kindergarten Classroom (Grade K)....... 30

LCG-8 Bring Churchill’s and Lincoln’s Outrageous Oratory Skills Into Your Classroom (Grades 5–8)............. 30

LCG-9 The 24/7 Literacy Classroom (Grades 5–8).......... 30 LCG-10 Literacy Through Song: Writing, Extending, and Developing Songs to Support Early Literacy Development (Grades PreK–K).............................................................. 30

LCG-11 Teaching Effective Writing Minilessons Through Mentor Texts and Explicit Modeling (Grades 3–6)........... 30

LCF-10 Meeting the Individual Needs of Readers Through Small-Group Instruction (Grades K–6)............... 25

LCG-14 Implementing Comprehensive Literacy (Grades K–2)................................................................... 31

LCF-11 Best Nonfiction Literature (Grades K–2)............ 26

LCF-12 Using Word Sorting to Develop Flexible Word Solvers (Grades K–2)....................................................... 26

RRG-1 Change Over Time: Teaching For Efficient Visual Processing For Text Reading (Repeat).............................. 31

LCF-13 Vocabulicious 101: Robust Instructional Strategies For Assiduous Teachers (Grades 3–6).............. 26

RRG-2 The Power of Teacher Language in Shaping Student Learning (Repeat).............................................. 31

RRG-3 Your Child is Roaming... Are You?....................... 31

Schedule Key: Featured Administrators/School Leaders Children’s Literature and Authors Common Core State Standards Early Literacy (K–2) Grades PreK–8 Literacy Intermediate Literacy (3–6) Literacy Coaching Middle School Literacy (5–8) PreK–K Literacy Reading Recovery Technology and Literacy

Thank You to the Conference Program Committee Conference Program ChairS Cindy Downend Jill Eurich Eva Konstantellou Program Committee MemberS Marcia Boody Laurel Burns Mary Ann Cappiello Sue Cusack Erika Thulin Dawes Alice Ensley Julie Francis Beth Herman-Davis Patricia Kinsella Clare Landrigan Yvonne Liu-Constant Janet Looney Russell McCaslin Kelly McDermott Tammy Mulligan Kris Pelletier Lizette Suxo Ali Dutson Maureen Wiklund

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall

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Speakers

Keynote Speakers Jack Gantos Jack Gantos is the author of over forty books for children including the Rotten Ralph picture books, Joey Pigza novels, and many more. He taught at Emerson College, where he developed the Master’s Degree in Children’s Literature, Writing, and Publishing. He now spends his time writing and is an active speaker at book and literacy conferences, schools, and libraries. His works have received numerous honors including the Newbery Award, Scott O’Dell Award, Printz Honor, National Book Award Finalist honor, and the NCTE/Alan Award. Sessions: Keynote E, LCF-4, LCG-3

Andrew Hargreaves Andrew Hargreaves is the Thomas More Brennan Chair in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College. His books have received many outstanding writing awards and have been translated into multiple languages. His most recent books are Professional Capital: Transforming Teaching in Every School and The Global Fourth Way: The Quest for Educational Excellence. His current research is on high-performing schools and school systems, and on whole school changes that benefit students with special educational needs. Sessions: Keynote A, LCB-4, LCC-4

Betsy Kaye Betsy Kaye has been involved in Reading Recovery since she trained as a teacher in 1988. She enjoys working with the North American Trainer’s Group and International Reading Recovery Trainers Organization colleagues on projects which support teachers’ professional learning. She served as a reviewer for the recent edition of An Observation Survey of Early Literacy Achievement and co-authored an article with Janice Van Dyke about interpreting Running Records. She is currently the editor of the Teaching section of The Journal of Reading Recovery. Sessions: Reading Recovery Keynote F, RRB-4, RRC-3

Featured Speakers Carl Anderson Carl Anderson works with teachers, coaches, and principals in schools around the world. At the beginning of his career, he taught elementary and middle school students in the Bronx, Kentucky, and Illinois. He then worked for the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, where he was Lead Staff Developer. Carl is the author of Heinemann publications How’s It Going: A Practical Guide to Conferring with Student Writers, Assessing Writers, and Strategic Writing Conferences Grades 3–6 Sessions: LCD-1, LCF-1, LCG-1

Jeff Anderson Jeff Anderson is the author of four books including Mechanically Inclined, Everyday Editing, and 10 Things Every Writer Needs to Know. He has published many articles, most recently the lead article on writing in ASCD’s Educational Leadership. He lives in San Antonio, Texas. Sessions: LCC-1, LCD-2, LCF-2

Nancy Boyles Dr. Nancy Boyles was a classroom teacher for many years and is now Professor Emerita from Southern Connecticut State University where she was Graduate Reading Program Coordinator. She currently consults with districts, providing workshops, developing curriculums, and modeling best practices in classrooms. Nancy is the author of seven books including her most recent book on close reading published by Corwin Literacy in 2014. Nancy’s participation is sponsored by Corwin Literacy. Session: LCC-14 In-Depth

Lisa Cleaveland Lisa Cleaveland is the co-author with Katie Wood Ray of About the Authors, Writing Workshop with our Youngest Writers and the DVD The Teaching Behind About the Authors. Lisa has been a teacher for 23 years and was the 2002 recipient of the prestigious NCTE/Donald H. Graves Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Writing. Many teachers from all over the United States have come to visit writing workshops in her kindergarten and first-grade classrooms. Sessions: PC-1, LCB-1, LCC-2

Sneed Collard Sneed Collard is the author of more than 65 award-winning nonfiction books for young people, including Animal Dads and Sneed B. Collard III’s Most Fun Book Ever About Lizards. He is also the author of seven acclaimed novels including the thriller Double Eagle, the Slate Stephens Mysteries series, and his newest mystery, Dog 4491. He makes his home in Missoula, Montana and travels widely to speak to students, teachers, and other educators. Sessions: LCB-2, LCD-3

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For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


Speakers

Ruth Culham

Sue Kempton

Ruth Culham is a recognized expert in the traits of writing field and the author of over 40 best-selling Scholastic and IRA teaching books and resources on the traits of writing. Her book Traits Writing: The Complete Writing Program for Grades K–8 (2012) is the culmination of 40 years of educational experience, research, practice, and passion. Ruth’s participation is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc. Sessions: LCD-4, LCE-4 In-Depth

Susan Kempton is a 30-year professional in the area of early childhood literacy, with kindergarten being her focus and passion. She is the author of The Literate Kindergarten and Let’s Find Out!: Building Content Knowledge with Young Children. She has worked closely with the Denver-based Public Education and Business Coalition as a staff developer, hosting local and national teaching labs in her classroom. In addition, she is a nationally-known consultant and keynote speaker. Sessions: LCB-6, LCC-5, LCF-6

Kathleen Fay Kathleen Fay has over 20 years of experience working as a classroom teacher, Reading Recovery teacher, and most recently as a Literacy Collaborative Coach at Title I schools. She is the coauthor of Becoming One Community: Reading and Writing with English Language Learners. She is currently the Primary Literacy Collaborative District Trainer for Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia. Sessions: LCD-5, LCF-3, LCG-2

Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell Irene Fountas directs the Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative at Lesley University. The Center provides literacy professional development for PreK–8 teachers, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader training, and training in the Literacy Collaborative model. She has been a classroom teacher, language arts specialist, and consultant in school districts. Gay Su Pinnell is Professor Emerita at The Ohio State University. Her work focuses on children’s literacy education and ways to support teachers of reading, writing, and language arts. Irene and Gay have published several books together with Heinemann, including Genre Study: Teaching With Fiction and Nonfiction Books and Literacy Beginnings: A Prekindergarten Handbook. Sessions: PC-2, LCB-3, LCC-3

Martha Horn Martha Horn is an Associate Professor of Education at Rhode Island College, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate methods courses in writing and reading. She is also a literacy consultant who designs and leads classroom-based inservice in the teaching of writing for teachers and administrators. She co-authored the book Talking, Drawing, Writing: Lessons for Our Youngest Writers with Mary Ellen Giacobbe. Sessions: LCF-5, LCG-4

Sara Kajder Sara Kajder is an English teacher, published author, university faculty member, and consultant who received the first-ever National Technology Fellowship in English/Language Arts. An internationally-known speaker, she is also the author of Bringing the Outside In, The Tech Savvy English Classroom, and the 2012 Britton Awardwinning Adolescents’ Digital Literacies: Learning Alongside Our Students.

Tasha Tropp Laman Tasha Tropp Laman is an Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina. Tasha has taught grades K–5 in multilingual settings in New Mexico, Belize, Indiana, and now South Carolina. She is the author of From Ideas to Words: Writing Strategies for English Language Learners. Sessions: LCB-7, LCC-6, LCF-7

Cathy Toll Cathy Toll supports teacher learning by guiding educational coaches, professional learning teams, and administrative leaders. She has been a consultant, keynote speaker, and workshop leader throughout the United States, Australia, and Canada, as well as a teacher, a reading specialist, a school principal, a university faculty member, an educational coach, and more. She has published widely for teacher leaders, including five books for literacy coaches and a book on Learnership for principals and teacher leaders. Sessions: LCC-15 In-Depth, LCF-8

Kristen Hawley Turner Kristen Hawley Turner is an associate professor of English education and contemporary literacies at Fordham University in New York City. Her research focuses on the intersections between technology and literacy. She works with teachers across content areas to implement effective literacy instruction and to incorporate technology in meaningful ways. She is a Teacher Consultant for the National Writing Project and the director of the Fordham Digital Literacies Collaborative. Sessions: LCC-7, LCD-7, LCE-2

Jeff Wilhelm Dr. Jeff Wilhelm is a professor of English Education at Boise State University. He is the founding director of the Maine Writing Project and the Boise State Writing Project, and has authored or co-authored 30 texts about literacy teaching and learning. He has also won the NCTE Promising Research Award for You Gotta BE the Book, and the Russell Award for Distinguished Research for Reading Don’t Fix No Chevys. Jeff’s participation is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc. Sessions: LCB-8, LCD-8

Sessions: LCB-5, LCD-6, LCE-1

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall

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SUNDAY  Pre-Conference Workshops Speakers

Reading Recovery Featured Speakers C. C. Bates C. C. Bates, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of literacy education and director of the Clemson University Reading Recovery University Training Center. Her work has been published in The Reading Teacher, Young Children, the Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, and The Journal of Reading Recovery. Sessions: RRB-1, RRD-1, RRE-1

Mary Anne Doyle Mary Anne Doyle is the director of the Reading-Language Arts Center at the University of Connecticut and director of Connecticut’s Reading Recovery Project. She chairs the Executive Board of the International Reading Recovery Trainers Organization and the Research Committee of the North American Trainers Organization. Sessions: RRC-1, RRG-1

Sue Duncan Sue Duncan is a Director of the Reading Recovery Program at Georgia State University. She was a teacher and principal throughout New Zealand before training as a Reading Recovery Tutor in 1985, then becoming a Reading Recovery Trainer in 1989. She has since worked in New Zealand, England, Canada, and the USA. Sue is also the only trained Facilitator for the First Chance program in the US, and is a university trainer for the Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy. Sessions: PC-5, RRB-2, RRC-2

Mary Fried Mary Fried is a Trainer at The Ohio State University Reading Recovery Center. She has been actively engaged in teaching, presenting, conducting research, and writing about Reading Recovery for over 30 years. She and her colleagues at Ohio State have focused their research on analyzing Running Records, teaching literacy lessons to intervention specialists, and working with students and teachers in ELL programs.

Eva Konstantellou Eva Konstantellou is an Associate Professor and a Reading Recovery Trainer at the Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative. For the past fifteen years she has overseen the implementation of Reading Recovery in teacher training sites in MA, NH, RI, VT, in the OCM BOCES site in NY, and the Prince William County Schools site in VA. She enjoys the intellectual challenge of working closely with teacher leaders in support of the learning of teachers and students. Her research interests include language learning, literacy coaching, and critical pedagogy. Session: RRC-4

Mary Rosser Mary Rosser is the director of the University Training Center for Reading Recovery and coordinator of Literacy Professional Development Programs at the University of Maine. Mary’s areas of expertise are language education, curriculum development, and early literacy intervention. Her research interests focus on analysis of pedagogy with attention to teacher/student interactions that promote powerful learning. Sessions: RRE-3, RRG-2

Jim Schnug Jim Schnug is starting his second year as a trainer with the New York University’s Reading Recovery Center. He was first trained as a Reading Recovery teacher and teacher leader in 1987 and ran Ohio’s Ashland University/Mansfield City School site in the early 1990’s. He was a tenured professor, Early Childhood department chair, and assistant dean for graduate studies at Ashland University before leaving to become the project administrator for the i3 Grant, Reading Recovery: Scaling Up What Works. Sessions: RRD-3, RRG-3

Sessions: PC-6, RRB-3, RRD-2

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For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


SUNDAY  

Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-Conference Workshops Sunday, November 2, 2014 11:00 am–4:00 pm (lunch break: 1:00 pm–2:00 pm) PC-1 Featured

Session Writing Right From the Start: Starting a Workshop on Day One and Maintaining It Through the Year (Grades K–2)

PC-3 Concurrent Session Introduction to Readers’ Workshop: Building Students’ Processing Through Whole Group, Small Group, and Individual Instruction (Grades 3–8)

Lisa Cleaveland, Author, NC

Jill Eurich, Assistant Director, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA

Since there are no developmental prerequisites for book making, writing workshops can begin on the first day of school. Using both videos and photographs showing the first day of writing workshop in a primary classroom, we will use this session to highlight the key instructional decisions one teacher made in launching her students into the work of writing workshop on the first day of school. PC-2 Featured

Session From Reading Specialist to Literacy Coach: Examining Essential Shifts (Grades K–8)

Irene Fountas, Author and Professor, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA

Kerry Crosby, Adjunct Faculty, Lesley University, MA Heather Morris, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Faculty, Lesley University, MA

Every part of the readers’ workshop is designed to help students build their reading process. The different elements include book talks, reading minilessons, independent reading, reading conferences, guided reading, literature study, and writing about reading. We will discuss each of these within the context of building a community of readers in a workshop setting. Given the timing of this session, we will be providing an introduction to each of these elements and how they fit into a whole workshop. Required Text: Please bring The Continuum of Literacy Learning Grades PreK–8 by Fountas and Pinnell (Heinemann) to this session.

Gay Su Pinnell, Author and Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

In many school districts across the nation, reading teachers are spending increasing amounts of time in the role of coach to support the professional learning of peers and improve whole school achievement. What will it take to grow professionally, from previously providing direct service to students, to supporting collegial learning? Topics in this institute will include: re-envisioning your role, building relationships with colleagues, anticipating challenges, using language that fosters teacher reflection and teamwork, developing systematic observation skills, identifying essential areas of new learning, helping colleagues re-envision their roles as team members, and working with your school principal to improve student achievement and meet the Common Core State Standards.

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For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


SUNDAY  

Pre-Conference Workshops

PC-4 Concurrent Session Language Rich Literacy Beginnings: Expanding Children’s Language and Literacy Development in PreK and Kindergarten Classrooms (Grades PreK–K) Cindy Downend, Assistant Director, Primary Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA Patti Leary, Literacy Coach, Sandwich Public Schools, MA

Language is the foundation for all learning. In this session, you will explore rich language environments where oral language is used to support and promote accelerated literacy learning in reading and writing with young students. You will gain practical ideas for expanding children’s vocabulary, understanding of language structures, and the use of language as a tool for learning. Required Text: Please bring Literacy Beginnings (Heinemann) by Fountas and Pinnell to use during this session.

Reading Recovery PC-5 Featured

Session Important Beginnings: Critical Aspects of Early Learning Sue Duncan, Reading Recovery Trainer, Georgia State University, GA

Critical aspects of early learning are the building blocks of later efficient processing in reading. We will explore some of these critical aspects of early learning and the teaching and analysis that is needed. Some video clips will be used to enable participants to discuss, analyze, and reflect. This session is recommended for in-training and newly trained Reading Recovery teachers.

Reading Recovery PC-6 Featured

Session Flexibility in Problem Solving: A Literacy Processing Perspective Mary Fried, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH

“I went back to my kindergarten classroom and made changes immediately that have proved FANTASTIC! The kids are learning in a way they love and I am teaching using new and exciting techniques that make both me and my principal happy.”

What is “flexibility” from the perspective of Literacy Processing? Why do beginning readers need to learn to be flexible problem solvers as they read and write continuous texts? These questions will be addressed as we work together to think about and analyze teaching that will promote flexibility in beginning readers’ attempts to solve unfamiliar words as they read and write stories and messages.

—Megan St. Pierre Classroom Teacher, Grades K–2

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall

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monday  

Sessions A–D

Session A

Session B

Monday, November 3, 2014 8:30 am–10:00 am

Monday, November 3, 2014 10:30 am–12:00 pm

Keynote Session Collective Responsibility For the Success of All Teachers and Students (Grades K–8) Andrew Hargreaves, Thomas More Brennan Chair of Education, Boston College, MA

This keynote presents the case for putting collective professional responsibility before bureaucratic accountability for student success, and provides compelling evidence from the United States and around the world on how student learning improves when teachers work with teachers, and schools assist other schools.

LCB-1 Featured Session Starting With a Stack: Exploring a Predictable Framework For Study in the Writing Workshop Through a Nonfiction Study (Grades K–2) Lisa Cleaveland, Author, NC

During the year, every unit of study follows a predictable pattern. Studies begin with reading immersion from a stack of picture books selected by the teacher, gathered by either genre or craft. The study then zooms in for a closer look at particular books in the stack, and children begin trying the work of the study in their own writing and illustrations. Over time, children come to recognize this predictable framework for the study and the way of thinking about writing it represents. In this session we will use photographs, videos, and children’s work samples to give an overview of this predictable framework in action. LCB-2 Featured

“This is the conference I try to attend every year. It never disappoints!” —Lynn Holcomb, Elementary Supervisor

Session Common Core Canines: Great Dog Books to Use in K–8 Curricula (Grades K–8) Sneed Collard, Children’s Author, MT

Woof woof! Noted children’s author Sneed B. Collard (Shep, The Governor’s Dog is Missing, Cartwheel) tours his favorite dog books with an eye toward the Common Core State Standards. For two titles, he will present complete step-by-step Common Core lesson guides, and provide additional materials to get educators up and teaching in a hurry. Special treats for the brightest members of the pack! LCB-3 Featured Session Five Keys to Deepening Reading Comprehension in Struggling Readers (Grades 3–8) Irene Fountas, Author and Professor, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA Gay Su Pinnell, Author and Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

Learn about five instructional scaffolds that support student understanding of texts as they prepare to read, process the text, and reflect on readings through talking and writing. Five keys will include: noticing how the information in a text is organized, highlighting/note-taking/marking in a text, using context to understand new words, using connectives to understand longer sentences, and noticing and talking about essential elements in fiction and nonfiction texts.

10 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


monday  

Sessions A–D

LCB-4 Featured

Session Collective Responsibility in Action (Grades K–8)

LCB-7 Featured Session “I Got Angry Birds In My Story”: Multilingual Writers at Work (Grades K–2)

Andrew Hargreaves, Thomas More Brennan Chair of Education, Boston College, MA

Tasha Tropp Laman, Associate Professor, Instruction and Teacher Education, University of South Carolina, SC

This session will extend the general theme of Andrew’s keynote address to problems of practice such as data teams, the engagement of teacher unions in leadership and change, and ways of schools working together. How do you combine good data with good judgment? How do unions become dynamic leaders of positive change for students, as well as opponents of unwanted or undesirable changes? And how do schools lift up each other rather than trying to improve performance at each other’s expense? This session will be especially valuable for leaders of all kinds and at all levels, including coaches and mentors, teacher leaders, staff developers, and school principals.

This presentation shines a light on the possibilities and potential of adapting instruction within writing workshop to support English Language Learners. In this session, Tasha will share writing strategies for, and writing samples from, K–2 multilingual classrooms where teachers implemented writing workshop with their multilingual student populations. Findings suggest that multilingual children drew upon popular cultural resources such as Angry Birds™ to forge literate identities amongst their peers, wrote more text within the workshop framework and disrupted deficit perspectives regarding what multilingual children could do in writing, created a curricular space where students exhibited academic agency, and began to explore multilingual possibilities for the texts they created.

LCB-5 Featured Session (Re)Inventing Reading: Using Digital Tools in Our English Classrooms (Grades 6–8) Sara Kajder, English Faculty, Shady Side Academy Middle School, PA

What it means to read, and the strategies we use for constructing and sharing our meaning, have been dramatically impacted by newer literacies and technologies. Some of these shifts have quickly moved into our classrooms, while others require more examination and questioning— asking us to reexamine our pedagogies and our practices as readers. During the session, we will discuss ways of rethinking and connecting our readers’ workshops, cultivating digital libraries, leveraging e-readers and mobile tools, annotating and sharing digital texts, and evaluating multimodal tools which are changing how we teach and work alongside student readers. Emphasis will not be on tools but on the literacy practices that they open. LCB-6 Featured

Session What’s Math?: Developing Math Schema For the Primary Child (Grades PreK–K) Sue Kempton, Primary Educator/Consultant, Wonder Discover Feel Educational Consulting, CO

Literacy in the context of math is an often-overlooked area of integration in early childhood curriculum. Incorporating math concepts in the literacy process can produce added math comprehension and enhance math concepts. Oral language, vocabulary, critical reasoning, problem solving, and writing are at the heart of this session, which will broaden your awareness of how these math skills are integrated into literacy.

LCB-8 Featured

Session Reading Unbound: Let Them Read Trash! (Grades 3–8) Jeff Wilhelm, Professor of English Education, Boise State University, ID

This interactive workshop will review a study about how passionate adolescent readers of non-traditional texts (such as fantasy, dystopian, horror, graphic novels, manga, and video game novels) engage with such texts. We will explore the pleasures, satisfactions, and uses readers have for such texts, and the implications for psychological development, reading, and learning inside and outside of school. Implications for instruction, reading programs, libraries, and parents will be shared. This workshop is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc. LCB-9 Concurrent

Session Examining Explicit Teaching Demonstrations That Scaffold Student Learning (Grades 5–8) Marcia Nye Boody, Literacy Coach Trainer, University of Maine, ME

Dorn and Soffos suggest that minilessons provide a language model for arousing a reader’s attention via a cognitive apprenticeship, whereby a more knowledgeable language user mentors learners. In this session, you will explore how middle school teachers support students in the writing workshop by using the minilessons as an explicit demonstration that scaffolds student learning.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 11


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Sessions A–D

Session B (continued) Monday, November 3, 2014 10:30 am–12:00 pm LCB-10 Concurrent Session Linking Phonemic Awareness to Authentic Texts in the K–2 Classroom (Grades K–2)

LCB-13 Concurrent Session Academic Vocabulary: Strategies For Active Learners in the Elementary Grades (Grades K–6)

Christina Cooney, Literacy Specialist, Wellesley Public Schools, MA

Laura Harper, Associate Professor of Early Childhood Education, Salve Regina University, RI

Sara Bartelloni, Kindergarten Teacher, Wellesley Public Schools, MA

Phonemic skills are imperative for young children to gain before unlocking the written code of reading. Several decades of research have shown how beneficial and necessary these skills are in leading a child to literacy. In this workshop, we will provide a research-based foundation for phonemic awareness. Christina and Sara will help you extend your knowledge of how to connect discrete phonemic skills to authentic texts through interactive read-alouds, shared reading, and guided reading. LCB-11 Concurrent

Session Triangulated Literacy Coaching: Fostering the Teacher-Coach-Principal Relationship (Grades 3–6) Jennifer Felt, Literacy Coach, Oxford Hills School District, ME Margaret Emery, Principal, Oxford Hills School District, ME Haley Saurman, Classroom Teacher, Oxford Hills School District, ME

Relationships are the foundation of successful literacy coaching; however, for student progress to be accelerated and continual, it’s imperative that the teacher-coach-principal relationship is strong and maintained. In this session, you will learn ways to develop and strengthen the relationship of key stakeholders in your school through a systematic coaching model. We will provide examples of scheduling, data collection, and staff development, which has led to seamless coaching experiences and increased student achievement. LCB-12 Concurrent

Session Developing Minilessons Within the Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8) Ali Finley, Literacy Coach, Dalton City Schools, GA Angela McCaslin, Dalton City Schools, GA

This introductory session will provide participants with the basics of a writing workshop framework with a focus on minilessons. You will learn how to create purposeful minilessons that will guide your instruction based on students’ needs. Through the use of student writing, you will have the opportunity to identify your students’ needs and develop minilessons to support them in writing.

Meghan Fowler, Early Childhood Education Student, Salve Regina University, RI Samantha Stratford, Early Childhood Education Student, Salve Regina University, RI

The Common Core State Standards require that we emphasize vocabulary instruction for all students, including English Language Learners and struggling readers. In this interactive session, we will focus on the importance of fostering vocabulary knowledge through authentic learning activities designed to personalize vocabulary instruction for children. You will be provided with an array of hands-on vocabulary strategies for building content-specific and tier 2 vocabulary that can be applied across the curriculum for learners of all ages. LCB-14 Concurrent Session Projecting a Unit of Study in the Primary Classroom (Grades PreK–K) Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist Grades K–5, Manchester Public Schools, NH

In this presentation, we will focus on the rationale and process behind projecting a unit of study with preschool and kindergarten students. Kristine will provide a detailed account of how an illustration study unfolded in two classrooms. Video footage and students’ work will be shared to provide a clear vision of the entire process. This session will be informative for new teachers and experienced teachers interested in implementing units of study in their classrooms. LCB-15 Concurrent

Session Improving Student Achievement and Elevating Teacher Expertise through Literacy Collaborative (Grades PreK–8) Jess Sherman, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA Heather Morris, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Learn about a partnership between your school or district to implement a powerful, research-based comprehensive model of authentic literacy that demonstrated 32% improvement in student achievement in three years. Establish coherent instruction through the teamwork of classroom teachers, specialists, content area teachers, the principals, and the training of literacy coaches.

12 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


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Sessions A–D

LCB-16 Concurrent Session Beyond Words and Smiles: The Power of Nonverbal Communication in Teaching and Learning (Grades K–6) Lori Taylor, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, University of Maine, ME

Everything a teacher says and does impacts student learning. Participants will explore ways in which nonverbal teacher moves can differentiate instruction, foster independence, increase motivation, and improve student outcomes.

Reading Recovery RRB-1 Featured

Session Expanding High Frequency Word Knowledge in Higher Level Texts

C.C. Bates, Reading Recovery Trainer/Assistant Professor of Literacy, Clemson University, SC

Known words allow children to make generative connections that encourage flexibility and provide support in higher-level texts. This session explores the expansion of children’s high frequency word knowledge beyond early level texts, and how word automaticity supports literacy development.

Reading Recovery RRB-2 Featured Session Making the Most of Opportunities: Selecting the Clearest, Easiest, Most Memorable Examples

Reading Recovery RRB-3 Featured

Session Reading Continuous Texts, Whole Stories, and Information Books

Mary Fried, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH

Marie Clay stresses the importance of young children learning to read and write using continuous texts and the teacher’s responsibility for the selection of the books. This session helps teachers explore how book selection and the introduction of the new book can not only inspire learning but also reveal specific teaching issues that may be interfering with learning. Recommended Reading: Chapter 3, Section 9 “Reading Books” found in Marie Clay’s Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Part 2

Reading Recovery RRB-4 Featured

Session Refining Our Teacher Talk to Scaffold Learning

Betsy Kaye, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader and Trainer Emerita, Little Rock School District, AR

In Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Part Two, Marie Clay states: “Structuring the task so the child succeeds is masterful.” However, choosing the most helpful prompts and the right type of support is challenging. Learn how to keep your language precise and concise while shifting your level of support as children’s competencies grow.

Sue Duncan, Reading Recovery Trainer, Georgia State University, GA

Explore the idea of noticing and capitalizing on what the child can do to extend the processing system, using examples, running records, and videos.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 13


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Sessions A–D

Session C Monday, November 3, 2014 1:30 pm–3:00 pm or 1:30 pm–4:45 pm Select one of these options for Session C: 1) 90-minute C session (1:30 pm–3:00 pm), then attend a D session (3:30 pm–5:00 pm) 2) In-Depth C session (1:30 pm–4:45 pm) Please note: If you attend the In-Depth C session, you will not attend a D session at 3:30 pm.

LCC-1 Featured

Session Invitational Grammar and Editing Instruction, Middle School Edition: Connecting Reading, Writing, and Mechanics (Grades 5–8) Jeff Anderson, Writer / Staff Developer, Write Guy, LLC, TX

Invite students into the conventions of language with mentor texts and other low-threat, high-payoff strategies. Steeped in the research of Writing Next, Jeff will share what worked with his students when he moved from editing practice to editing instruction. Make grammar instruction an inviting, dynamic concept with editing invitations from Jeff’s books, Everyday Editing and Mechanically Inclined. LCC-2 Featured

Session Authors and Illustrators Matter (Grades K–2) Lisa Cleaveland, Author, NC

During the school year, we read many books by different authors and illustrators to our students. We have author studies, grow to love books by certain authors, and even grow to recognize specific illustrators’ work. In this session, we will visit the talk that surrounds the classroom about authors and illustrators who make books like us! Authors and illustrators are real people who write like us. This is the type of talk we need during the school day that carries over to home. Learn how to get to know and talk about bookmakers!

LCC-3 Featured

Session Genre Study: An Inquiry Model For Learning How to Notice Types of Texts (Grades K–8) Irene Fountas, Author and Professor, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA Gay Su Pinnell, Author and Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

Through a series of in-classroom video clips, learn how to engage your students in a six-step inquiry process for learning how to notice the characteristics of each genre. The process begins with a text set of interactive read-aloud texts and culminates in a series of minilessons that dig deep into key understandings of each genre. Students develop a way of thinking about texts and evidence and will be able to demonstrate their competencies well on assessments of standards. LCC-4 Featured

Session Collective Responsibility in Business, Sports, and Education (Grades K–8) Andrew Hargreaves, Thomas More Brennan Chair of Education, Boston College, MA

This session will concentrate on Andrew Hargreaves’s newly-released book on uplifting leadership in business, sports, and education. In it, he will help teachers and leaders to consider the characteristics that high performers in education share with their colleagues in other sectors, in terms of factors such as the nature of their goals and visions; the pathways of change that they choose; the connections between short-term and long-term results; and whether teams push or pull each other in the constant quest for improvement. LCC-5 Featured

Session Purposeful Talk: The Link Between Inquiry and Writing (Grades PreK–K)

Sue Kempton, Primary Educator/Consultant, Wonder Discover Feel Educational Consulting, CO

In this session we will investigate the connection between the use of inquiry and writing experience in the young child. Effective teachers enter into inquiries with children, presenting windows into their thinking and passion and informing next steps in instruction for concept and language development. This rich experience becomes grist for the morning message, children’s writing, and their nonfiction stories. Recommended Texts: The Literate Kindergarten (Heinemann) and Let’s Find Out!: Building Content Knowledge for Young Children (Stenhouse)

14 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


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Sessions A–D

LCC-6 Featured

Session “Do You Remember Me? Do You Know Who I Am?”: Conferring with Multilingual Writers (Grades K–5) Tasha Tropp Laman, Associate Professor, Instruction and Teacher Education, University of South Carolina, SC

In this session, you will learn effective strategies for conferring with multilingual children no matter where they are in their English language development. Tasha will share conferring strategies and writing samples from K–5 multilingual classrooms where monolingual teachers implemented writers’ workshop with their multilingual students. LCC-7 Featured

Session Teachers as Digital Writers (Grades PreK–8)

LCC-9 Concurrent Session Making Sense of the Testing Genre From Day One to the End of the Year (Grades 3–6) Julie Foggo, English Language Arts Content Specialist Teacher, Ministry of Education, Bermuda

High-stakes tests are here to stay and we need to find ways to authentically prepare our students for them throughout the school year. We will spend time unlocking the mystery of tests. We will examine the demands put on our students and plan a unit of study that will help them develop a deeper understanding of what’s expected of them. Let’s not allow these tests to control our teaching and learning lives. LCC-10 Concurrent Session Developing Lifelong Readers Through a Growth Mindset (Grades K–2) Courtney A. Nemeth, Primary Teacher, Nantucket Lighthouse School, MA

Kristen Hawley Turner, Associate Professor of Education, Fordham University, NY

This workshop focuses on what it means to teach writing when we engage as writers ourselves. We will reflect on the possibilities that digital technologies open to us as writers, and explore possibilities for our own writing. Required Materials: Please bring a personal device with wi-fi capability (smartphone, tablet, laptop) to this session. LCC-8 Concurrent Session The Many Lives of Any One Book (Grades K–8) Mary Ann Cappiello, Associate Professor, Lesley University, MA Katherine Cunningham, Assistant Professor, Manhattanville College, NY Erika Dawes, Associate Professor, Lesley University, MA Grace Enriquez, Assistant Professor, Lesley University, MA

This session provides an overview for teachers of the many different roles that well-written, engaging children’s books of all genres can play in language arts and the content areas. Drawing from our work on the Classroom Bookshelf blog, we will discuss ways of using books for content connections, reading process, author’s craft, critical literacy, genre and literary elements, and visual literacy.

When thinking about reading instruction, there is a missing piece to the puzzle that can help students reach their potential. In this session you will explore the Growth Mindset and how it relates to developing a lifelong love for reading. We will define Mindset, discuss important research, and learn strategies to apply in the elementary classroom. LCC-11 Concurrent Session Accurately Determining Acceleration: The Key to Effective Interventions (Grades K–2) Robert Pottle, Literacy Coach and Children’s Author, ME

We know that acceleration is the goal of reading interventions. What we are less certain of is how to accurately measure acceleration. Too many schools are attempting to measure acceleration in incorrect ways. This leads to reducing the level of intervention for a reader who is already falling further behind. This session will demonstrate how to measure acceleration accurately and how to use this calculation to design and monitor the most efficient and effective interventions.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 15


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Sessions A–D

Session C (continued) Monday, November 3, 2014 1:30 pm–3:00 pm or 1:30 pm–4:45 pm LCC-12 Concurrent Session “I Suck at Reading”: Rebuilding Confidence in the Disenchanted Reader (Grades 3–8) Justin Stygles, ELA/Humanities Teacher, Author, Oxford Hills School District, ME

In the age of data-based decision making, many intermediate and middle level students have quit on themselves and reading because of an onslaught of data collection and well-intended intervention initiatives. Recognizing the disenchanted reader, and rebuilding confidence before middle school, is vital to academic success. Through stories (PowerPoint, video, and student work) of two disenchanted or “shamed” readers, you will explore strategies and interaction techniques that reinvigorated readers who once believed they “sucked at reading.” LCC-13 Concurrent

Session The Wonderful World of Workstations (Grades K–2) Suzy Thomas, First Grade Teacher, Dalton Public Schools, GA

This session is for classroom teachers who need some refreshers in the area of workstations. Examples from Suzy’s first grade class will be presented.

Reading Recovery RRC-1 Featured

Session Change Over Time: Teaching For Efficient Visual Processing For Text Reading Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut, CT

This session explores the acquisition of efficient visual processing for text reading by Reading Recovery children over time. Discussion includes a review of literacy processing theory and related instructional procedures.

Reading Recovery RRC-2 Featured

Session Making the Most of Opportunities: Selecting the Clearest, Easiest, Most Memorable Examples (Repeat) Sue Duncan, Reading Recovery Trainer, Georgia State University, GA

Explore the idea of noticing and capitalizing on what the child can do to extend the processing system, using examples, running records, and videos.

Reading Recovery RRC-3 Featured Session Refining Our Teacher Talk to Scaffold Learning (Repeat)

Betsy Kaye, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader and Trainer Emeritus, Little Rock School District, AR

In Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Part Two, Marie Clay states: “Structuring the task so the child succeeds is masterful.” However, choosing the most helpful prompts and the right type of support is challenging. Learn how to keep your language precise and concise while shifting your level of support as children’s competencies grow.

Reading Recovery RRC-4 Featured Session Fluency in the Reading Recovery Lesson: How to Observe It and Foster It Eva Konstantellou, Reading Recovery Trainer, Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA

This session presents an in-depth exploration of the concept of fluency, its various components, and its role in building an efficient processing system in reading and writing. We will look at evidence of fluency in students’ reading and writing across the Reading Recovery lesson, discuss how we can teach for it in the 30-minute lesson, and what changes we expect to see in children’s fluent responding over time. This session is appropriate for new Reading Recovery teachers and for more experienced teachers who would like to revisit this topic. Required Texts: Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Part One and Part Two (Heinemann). You will also be asked to read two articles, which can be downloaded from the conference handout page.

16 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


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Sessions A–D

Session C In-Depth Monday, November 3, 2014 1:30 pm–4:45 pm (with a 15-minute break) LCC-14 In-Depth Featured Session Closer Reading in the Intermediate Grades: Better Prep, Smarter Lessons, Deeper Comprehension (Grades 3–8) Nancy Boyles, Professor Emerita, Southern Connecticut State University and Independent Literacy Consultant, CT

What is close reading and how is it different from other reading that students do in the classroom? How can close readers become independent readers? In this workshop you will learn practical strategies for before, during, and after reading that increase focus on what the author is saying, why the author is saying it, and how the author plays with language to impact meaning. Your handouts will include a list of questions aligned to College and Career Readiness Standards and other classroom-ready charts, planning templates, sample lessons, and follow-up collaborative tasks aimed at deeper comprehension. This workshop is sponsored by Corwin Literacy. LCC-15 In-Depth Featured Session Going Deeper in the Coaching Conversation (Grades PreK–8)

Cathy Toll, Consultant, Partnering to Learn, WI

The coaching conversation is essential to effective literacy coaching. This lively and interactive session will provide practices and perspectives to make your coaching conversations successful, including starting out, the problemsolving cycle, communication strategies, goal setting, following through on actions, data use, the teacher’s role, and working with hesitant colleagues.

LCC-16 In-Depth Concurrent Session Writing About Reading: Deepening the Thinking (Grades 3–8) Elizabeth DeHaven, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA Helen Sisk, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Writing about reading deepens students’ comprehension of text. In this session, you will learn how to engage students in meaningful reflection about their reading and use short written responses as a foundation for expanding content, articulation, and reflection. Minilessons will be crafted, creating scaffolds that develop sophisticated and complex student reactions to reading through writing. LCC-17 In-Depth Concurrent Session Triangulating Data to Find the Stories of Our Readers (Grades K–6) Tammy Mulligan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA Clare Landrigan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA

How can we analyze data on a day-to-day basis and still have time to teach? This interactive session focuses on making data analysis manageable and purposeful. We will share strategies for analyzing multiple assessments to determine a reader’s strengths and learning goals. We will use displays to jump-start the triangulation process, and will share ideas for collecting classroom data as we teach. Finally, we will discuss ways to help students collect and analyze their own data.

Lesley University Alumni And Friends Luncheon at the Literacy for All Conference The Lesley University Alumni Association invites graduates of Lesley University to a special lunch at the Literacy for All Conference. Monday, November 3, 2014 | 12:00 pm–1:30 pm Rotunda Room, Rhode Island Convention Center

Please respond by October 21, 2014 to Pattyanne Lyons at 617.349.8178 or plyons4@lesley.edu

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 17


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Sessions A–D

Session D Monday, November 3, 2014 3:30 pm–5:00 pm LCD-1 Featured Session Using Mentor Texts to Teach Students the Craft of Writing (Grades 3–8) Carl Anderson, Author and Literacy Consultant, NY

In this session, Carl will show teachers how to analyze mentor texts for multiple teaching points, and also how to use mentor texts as a teaching tool in minilessons and writing conferences. LCD-2 Featured Session Revision Decisions: The Grammar of Informational and Explanatory Writing (Grades 6–8) Jeff Anderson, Writer / Staff Developer, Write Guy, LLC, TX

Every day, writers are called to inform and explain. What are the grammatical patterns of power that writers use? Come explore grammar as a tool for revising, expanding, clarifying explanation and information, using sentence combining, conversation, and practical application, as well as other strategies found in Jeff’s latest book, Revision Decisions. LCD-3 Featured

Session Exploring the Frontier of Children’s Literature (Grades K–8) Sneed Collard, Children’s Author, MT

Sneed B. Collard, winner of the 2006 Washington Post Children’s Book Guild Award for Nonfiction, shares an entertaining journey through his life and adventures as an author. He gives the inside scoop on some of his most popular books and describes the changing face of children’s publishing. He will highlight titles from his new publishing venture, Bucking Horse Books, and discuss other exciting trends in children’s publishing. LCD-4 Featured

Session Using Mentor Texts to Teach the Craft of Writing (Grades K–2)

Ruth Culham, Author/Consultant, The Culham Writing Company, OR

Learn how mentor texts can be used to teach writing and reading in this hands-on and highly engaging session that features new picture books and resources. This workshop is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc.

LCD-5 Featured Session Keeping Meaning at the Forefront of Book Introductions (Grades K–2)

Kathleen Fay, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

In order for children to progress as readers who solve words, read fluently, and detect and correct errors, students need to learn to construct meaning. Figuring out what a text is really about is essential in order to prepare a child for a successful guided reading lesson. This workshop will teach you how to analyze texts as a first step in guiding children to use the deeper meanings to process the text. LCD-6 Featured Session Writing Together: What Digital Media Brings to Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8) Sara Kajder, English Faculty, Shady Side Academy Middle School, PA

Digital tools and media provide teacher-writers with opportunities to expand audience, open what “counts” as valued communication in our Language Arts and English classrooms, and challenge students to grow as writers across modes and media. Come and explore pedagogy and examples coming out of one learning community of writers. LCD-7 Featured

Session Digital Tools For Digital Argument (Grades 6–8) Kristen Hawley Turner, Associate Professor of Education, Fordham University, NY

This workshop will ask participants to look carefully at the Common Core State Standards that call for students to develop opinions and support claims with evidence. We will consider how digital tools and digital tasks can help to develop these skills. LCD-8 Featured Session Action Strategies For Deepening Comprehension (Grades 3–6)

Jeff Wilhelm, Professor of English Education, Boise State University, ID

Participants in this interactive workshop will experience how to use action strategies and drama-in-education techniques to engage and assist readers to use sophisticated comprehension strategies like seeing complex implied relationships to make inferences, and understanding main idea/authorial generalizations, and assist writers to develop knowledge of purpose, planning, and forming/shaping their ideas. A variety of creative techniques like forum drama, four corners, hotseating, radio show, and tableaux will be highlighted in the context of a story drama. This workshop is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc.

18 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


monday  

Sessions A–D

LCD-9 Concurrent Session Using Inquiry As a Tool For Continuous Improvement (Grades K–2) Alice L. Ensley, Primary District Trainer for Literacy Collaborative, Dalton Public Schools, GA

In this session, we will explore a model that can be used to help schools or districts monitor and improve their literacy implementation. You will learn how to propose a hypothesis, gather soft and hard data to examine the hypothesis, set goals based on this data, and design and implement a plan for meeting these goals. We will use an actual case study from a Literacy Collaborative school district as a model for this session. You will have time to explore the needs of your school or district, and receive feedback about the kinds of data you could collect to begin your own inquiry study. LCD-10 Concurrent Session Promoting Children’s Social-Emotional Development through a Literacy Lens (Grades K–2) Lisa Fiore, Professor of Early Childhood Education, Lesley University, MA

Promoting children’s social and emotional development is critical for their success as engaged literacy learners and citizens inside and outside the classroom. In this session, you will learn about ways to incorporate meaningful activities and materials into their respective contexts, and explore concepts and strategies that will enhance the learning environment. Communicating the importance of social-emotional learning experiences to families and community members will also be addressed.

Session Author Interviews—​Live Footage: Conferring With Young Writers (Grades K–2)

LCD-12 Concurrent Session Idea Notebooks + Inquiry + Investigation = Wondering That Inspires Reading, Writing, and Thinking (Grades 3–6) JoEllen McCarthy, Regional Staff Developer, Always Learning, NY Erica Pecorale, Professor, Long Island University, NY

Teachers and students need to be navigators of an abundance of information, resources, and tools. Building a culture of inquiry and investigation in classrooms requires active engagement in learning. Because of the vast amount of materials and genres, it is an exciting time in education to take advantage of the possibilities available to students as they learn to explore informational texts and develop their own research processes. You will explore mentor texts and digital tools like Wonderopolis. Minilessons and student work will also be shared that demonstrate opportunities for students to explore the connections between reading and writing, thus making the research process more transparent and transferrable. LCD-13 Concurrent Session Creating Book Murals Using Interactive Writing (Grades K–2) Katie O’Leary, Inclusion Teacher (K–Grade 1 Loop), Boston Public Schools, MA

In this session, we will explore the process of creating collaborative book murals with primary students. After falling in love with a story, students analyze the story elements, design a mural layout, create art, and compose the text through interactive writing to convey a story in a book mural. An emphasis will be on the role interactive writing plays in this process.

LCD-11 Concurrent

Teresa Hensley, Primary Literacy Coach, Whitfield County Schools, GA

Conferring is the heartbeat of the writer’s workshop. In this session you will discover how powerful and defining these moments can be, and how conferring can impact a writer’s growth over time. You will see video clips of conferences and interviews with young writers, teachers, and parents in order to analyze your own approach to conferencing.

LCD-14 Concurrent Session The Reality Is: Nonfiction Books Kids Will Want to Read (Grades 3–6) Susannah Richards, Associate Professor of Education, Reading and Language Arts Program, Eastern Connecticut State University, CT

With the increased attention to reading and writing expository text in the Common Core State Standards, it is imperative that teachers and students be able to engage with high-quality informational texts. This session will help you explore a diverse variety of recently published nonfiction texts that you will be able to use to ignite readers to create meaning. We will also share an extensive booklist and suggestions on how to use the titles in the curriculum.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 19


monday  

Sessions A–D

Session D (continued) Monday, November 3, 2014 3:30 pm–5:00 pm Reading Recovery RRD-1 Featured

Session Creating Independent and Strategic Writers

C.C. Bates, Reading Recovery Trainer/Assistant Professor of Literacy, Clemson University, SC

This session explores the writing component of the Reading Recovery lesson and the ways in which teachers can support children during and across their lesson series.

Reading Recovery RRD-3 Featured

Session Just Known to Well Known During Roaming Around the Known

James Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University, NY

During Roaming Around the Known, the Observation Survey Summary and the teacher’s ongoing observations will reveal what the child can control as a reader and writer. Using Marie Clay’s scale of knowing, this interactive session will focus on promoting fluency and flexibility on a range of “known.”

Reading Recovery RRD-2 Featured

Session Reading Continuous Texts, Whole Stories, and Information Books (Repeat) Mary Fried, Reading Recovery Trainer, The Ohio State University, OH

Marie Clay stresses the importance of young children learning to read and write using continuous texts and the teacher’s responsibility for the selection of the books. This session helps teachers explore how book selection and the introduction of the new book can not only inspire learning, but also reveal specific teaching issues that may be interfering with learning. Recommended Reading: Chapter 3, Section 9 “Reading Books” found in Marie Clay’s Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Part 2

Birthday 25 th

Celebration

& EXHIBIT FAIR

Monday, November 3, 2014 Ballroom A, 5th level of the Rhode Island Convention Center Birthday Celebration/Exhibit Fair: 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Raffle: 5:45 pm–7:00 pm

Exhibitors:

RRD-4 Concurrent

Session Teaching For Change Over Time: Fast Processing in Reading and Writing Kelly McDermott, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Boston Public Schools, MA

In order for student learning to accelerate, we as Reading Recovery teachers must constantly think about change over time. In order to facilitate independent action, our teaching needs to facilitate fast processing in both reading and writing. In this session we will analyze records, dig into Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals and think about planning deliberately for secure, fast, and habituated strategic activity in both reading and writing.

Join us

at our exhibit fair to celebrate the Literacy for All Conference’s 25th Birthday! During the fair you can: • G  et a book signed by an award-winning author. Bring your own books or purchase them from • Enter our free raffle to win one of the the exhibitors. many prizes donated by exhibitors. • V  iew and purchase from a wide selection of best-selling educational resources from leading publishers.

Book Signing Authors: Jack Gantos, author of over forty books for children including the award-winning Joey Pigza novels, and the bestselling Rotten Ralph picture books. Sneed Collard, author of over 65 award-winning books for young people including the award-winning Animal Dads and The Prairie Builders.

Abrams Learning Trends | Lakeshore Learning Materials | Reading Reading Books, LLC | National Network of Libraries of Medicine Blueberry Hill Books, Inc. | National Geographic Learning | B. Lothrop Books | Short Tales Press | Capstone Classroom | Heinemann Publishing For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall Houghton Mifflin Harcourt | Hameray Publishing Group, Inc. | Resources for Reading | And more to come!

20

Reading Recovery


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

Session E Tuesday, November 4, 2014 8:30 am–10:00 am or 8:30 am­–11:45 am Select one of these options for Session E: 1) Keynote E or 90-minute E session (8:30 am–10:00 am), then choose an F session (10:15 am–11:45 am)

LCE-3 Concurrent Session Multi-Genre Projects (Grades 5–8)

2) In-Depth E session (8:30 am–11:45 am)

Kim Swiney, 7th Grade Literacy/Social Studies Teacher, Dalton Public Schools, GA

Please note: If you attend the In-Depth E session, you will not attend an F session at 10:15 am.

Julie Stokes, Literacy Coordinator, Dalton Public Schools, GA

Keynote Session Literature: It’s All Personal (Grades PreK–8) Jack Gantos, Author, MA

From reading to writing, circle Jack’s thematic world from Rotten Ralph to Jack Henry and Joey Pigza to the Newbery Medal winning Dead End in Norvelt to his young adult memoir, Hole In My Life. Join him as he circumnavigates his own literary journey and makes connections between books and readers.

LCE-1 Featured Session Writing Together: What Digital Media Brings to Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8) (Repeat) Sara Kajder, English Faculty, Shady Side Academy Middle School, PA

Digital tools and media provide teacher-writers with opportunities to expand audience, open what “counts” as valued communication in our Language Arts and English classrooms, and challenge students to grow as writers across modes and media. Come explore pedagogy and examples coming out of one learning community of writers. LCE-2 Featured

Session Digital Tools For Digital Argument (Grades 6–8) (Repeat)

Participants will learn about multi-genre projects and how to engage their learners in reading and writing across multiple genres around a topic. Kim and Julie will share how this looks in a literacy context as well as a literacy/ social studies (humanities) context. These projects are novel based and leave students begging to do more reading and writing on their own.

Reading Recovery RRE-1 Featured

Session Creating Independent and Strategic Writers (Repeat)

C.C. Bates, Reading Recovery Trainer/Assistant Professor of Literacy, Clemson University, SC

This session explores the writing component of the Reading Recovery lesson and the ways in which teachers can support children during and across their lesson series.

Reading Recovery RRE-2 Concurrent

Session Shifty Business: Supporting Processing at Key Transitions Michael Buonaiuto, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cambridge Public Schools, MA

Progress in Reading Recovery necessitates helping students move from their “old” ways of processing text to something more complex. Certain shifts in processing can be high hurdles unless we support students by explicit, powerful teaching. First, we will look at key changes in processing as students move through their series of Reading Recovery lessons. We’ll then consider the shift from word-by-word to phrased reading, the move from using first letters to using more visual information, and more.

Kristen Hawley Turner, Associate Professor of Education, Fordham University, NY

This workshop will ask participants to look carefully at the Common Core State Standards that call for students to develop opinions and support claims with evidence. We will consider how digital tools and digital tasks can help to develop these skills.

22 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


tuesday  

Sessions E–G Session E In-Depth Tuesday, November 4, 2014 8:30 am–11:45 am (with a 15-minute break) LCE-4 In-Depth Featured

Reading Recovery RRE-3 Featured

Session The Power of Teacher Language in Shaping Student Learning

Mary Rosser, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME

This presentation explores the link between the language teachers use during instructional decision making, and the resultant wide or narrow spaces that are created for student learning. Video clips of teaching-learning episodes will be used to identify the impact of precision teaching on powerful student literacy learning.

Reading Recovery RRE-4 Concurrent

Session Roaming Around the Known: How to Follow the Child Without Getting Lost in the Woods

Session What Principals and Literacy Leaders Need to Know About Teaching and Learning Writing (Grades K–8) Ruth Culham, Author/Consultant, The Culham Writing Company, OR

As we enter the era of the Common Core State Standards, writing has never been more important. Teachers are hungry for leadership and support in making their writing classrooms places where important learning takes place every single day. In order to provide this support, principals and literacy leaders need an understanding of the best writing practices so they can be active participants in discussions about how to improve writing instruction. This workshop will address the four Ws—Writing Process, Writing Traits, Writing Modes, and Writing Workshop—and how to organize the school year around them. It will provide hands-on experiences with tools to use in collaboration with teachers that promote discussion, track improvement, provide feedback, and inspire the changes that the Common Core State Standards are challenging educators to meet in today’s writing classrooms. This workshop is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc.

Laurel Dickey, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Collaborative for Educational Services, MA

All Reading Recovery teachers should anticipate the first ten days of teaching sessions with joy and excitement. This session will help you reflect on your practice and find ways to ensure this mindset is present. We will explore the guidelines that Marie Clay provides, as well as discuss practical applications of these guidelines. The foundation provided during Roaming Around the Known sessions is critical for ensuring future accelerated progress for each individual child.

“YES! As a classroom teacher, I feel reborn, validated, and so much more knowledgeable as to the “how” I can provide an enriching literacy program throughout my day, which spans across the numerous subjects we teach.” —Trudy Amodeo, Reading/Literacy Specialist

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 23


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

Session F Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:15 am–11:45 am or 10:15 am–1:30 pm Select one of these options for Session F: 1) Reading Recovery Keynote F or 90-minute F session (10:15 am–11:45 am), then choose a G session (1:00 pm–2:30 pm) 2) In-Depth F session (10:15 am–1:30 pm) Please note: If you attend the In-Depth F session, you will not attend a G session at 1:00 pm.

LCF-2 Featured Session Invitational Grammar and Editing Instruction, Middle School Edition: Connecting Reading, Writing, and Mechanics (Grades 5–8) (Repeat) Jeff Anderson, Writer / Staff Developer, Write Guy, LLC, TX

Reading Recovery Keynote Session Teaching in the Moment Betsy Kaye, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader and Trainer Emeritus, Little Rock School District, AR

Reading Recovery teachers make moment-by-moment teaching decisions while considering the strengths and learning history of each child. Through stories of individual learners you will explore factors contributing to skilled teaching and discover how to capture powerful teaching opportunities in Reading Recovery lessons.

LCF-1 Featured Session Conferring with Student Writers (Grades K–2)

Carl Anderson, Author and Literacy Consultant, NY

In this session, Carl will explain the nuts and bolts of having effective writing conferences with students. He will discuss the foundational principles of conferring with students and offer practical advice about the teacher’s role in conferences. Carl will show videos of his conferences with students so you can get a clear image of what effective conferring looks and sounds like.

Invite students into the conventions of language with mentor texts and other low-threat, high-payoff strategies. Steeped in the research of Writing Next, Jeff will share what worked with his students when he moved from editing practice to editing instruction. Make grammar instruction an inviting, dynamic concept with editing invitations from Jeff’s books, Everyday Editing and Mechanically Inclined. LCF-3 Featured

Session Keeping Meaning at the Forefront of Book Introductions (Grades K–2) (Repeat) Kathleen Fay, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

In order for children to progress as readers who solve words, read fluently, and detect and correct errors, students need to learn to construct meaning. Figuring out what a text is really about is essential in order to prepare a child for a successful guided reading lesson. This workshop will teach you how to analyze texts as a first step in guiding children to use the deeper meanings to process the text. LCF-4 Featured

Session Read a Classic, Write a Classic: From “Wild Things” to “Rotten Ralph” (Grades PreK–6)

Jack Gantos, Author, MA

All good writing begins with good reading, so let’s take a look at classic picture books and find out not only what makes a good book a classic, but also how to teach, organize, and write the future classics in the classroom.

24 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

LCF-5 Featured Session Listening the Story Out: Children Show Us How to Help Them Compose (Grades K–1) Martha Horn, Associate Professor of Education/Consultant: The Teaching of Writing, Rhode Island College, RI

What does it mean to listen to young writers? How do we listen well? What do we do with what we hear (and understand)? These are questions we will explore in this session, which is focused on kindergarten and first-grade writers. LCF-6 Featured Session Purposeful Talk: The Link Between Inquiry and Writing (Grades PreK–K) (Repeat)

LCF-8 Featured Session Coaching For Initiatives: RTI and the Common Core (Grades PreK–8)

Cathy Toll, Consultant, Partnering to Learn, WI

Literacy coaches are often involved in their schools’ implementation of Response To Intervention and the Common Core State Standards. This session will provide guidance on how to support teachers in developing not only practices, but also understandings and perspectives that will make RTI and the Common Core a success. Strategies will be provided and roles for coaches will be discussed. LCF-9 Concurrent Session Writing Matters: Learning From and With Mentor Authors (Grades K–5)

Sue Kempton, Primary Educator/Consultant, Wonder Discover Feel Educational Consulting, CO

Peter Catalanotto, Author / Illustrator, Simon & Schuster, NY

In this session we will investigate the connection between the use of inquiry and writing experience in the young child. Effective teachers enter into inquiries with children, presenting windows into their thinking and passion and informing next steps in instruction for concept and language development. This rich experience becomes grist for the morning message, children’s writing, and their nonfiction stories.

“Mentor texts are more than just craft coaches for writers—they can also offer inspiration and life lessons.” —Georgia Heard

Recommended Text: The Literate Kindergarten (Heinemann) and Let’s Find Out!: Building Content Knowledge for Young Children (Stenhouse) LCF-7 Featured

Session “I Got Angry Birds In My Story”: Multilingual Writers at Work (Grades K–2) (Repeat) Tasha Tropp Laman, Associate Professor, Instruction and Teacher Education, University of South Carolina, SC

This presentation shines a light on the possibilities and potential of adapting instruction within writing workshop to support English Language Learners. In this session, Tasha will share writing strategies for and writing samples from K–2 multilingual classrooms where teachers implemented writing workshop with their multilingual student populations. Findings suggest that multilingual children drew upon popular cultural resources such as Angry Birds™ to forge literate identities amongst their peers, wrote more text within the workshop framework and disrupted deficit perspectives regarding what multilingual children could do in writing, created a curricular space where students exhibited academic agency, and began to explore multilingual possibilities for the texts they created.

JoEllen McCarthy, Regional Staff Developer, Always Learning, NY

Fluency, volume, stamina, and writing from the heart matters. Mentor author and illustrator Peter Catalanotto and literacy coach JoEllen McCarthy will share ways to help students write with V.I.S.I.O.N. Participants will explore craft lessons for voice, inspiration, student goals, inquiry studies, observations, and plan next steps to help all writers grow. Young writers learn from explicit instruction, modeling and emulating what they see strong writers do. Studying these authors will inspire creativity as well as support narrative, information, and opinion writing. LCF-10 Concurrent

Session Meeting the Individual Needs of Readers Through Small-Group Instruction (Grades K–6) Kerry Crosby, Adjunct Faculty, Lesley University, MA Jenny Bender, Literacy Consultant, MA Kathie Bredin, Fourth Grade Teacher, Jackson Street School, MA Jen Reed, Kindergarten Teacher, Northampton Public Schools, MA

Through video spanning kindergarten to grade 4, we introduce three types of small-group instruction in reading: Shared Reading, Guided Inquiry, and Student-Selected Reading Seminars, to add to your repertoire of differentiated instruction. We will discuss how close observation of reading behaviors informs our use of these different types of instruction, and give you the opportunity to discuss how they might look in your own classrooms.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 25


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

Session F (continued) Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:15 am–11:45 am or 10:15 am–1:30 pm LCF-11 Concurrent Session Best Nonfiction Literature (Grades K–2) Catherine Desjardins, Reading Specialist/Reading Recovery Teacher, Peabody Public Schools, MA Julie Connors, Grade 1 Teacher, Peabody Public Schools, MA Nicole Daly, Kindergarten Teacher, Peabody Public Schools, MA Julie Murray, Grade 2 Teacher, Peabody Public Schools, MA

Children come to us with a natural sense of wonder and curiosity. Which texts will help keep beginning readers engaged as they take on increasingly complex information? We’ll look at the best nonfiction literature for Read-alouds, “Look-ats,” and Leveled Readers, as well as effective strategies for integrating them into classroom practice.

LCF-14 Concurrent Session Fostering 21st Century Readers and Writers through Social Networking (Grades 3–8) Katharine Hale, 5th Grade Classroom Teacher, Arlington Public Schools, VA

Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest are all part of our daily lives as a way for us to connect with others. For our students, social networking can be a powerful way to practice reading and writing skills in an authentic way. This workshop will look at social networking platforms that students can use safely. We will also explore lessons and strategies of how social networking can be easily folded into the literacy classroom.

Session Using Word Sorting to Develop Flexible Word Solvers (Grades K–2)

Session Meeting the Needs of All Readers: Making Response to Intervention a Reality (Grades K–6)

Alice L. Ensley, Primary District Trainer for Literacy Collaborative, Dalton Public Schools, GA

Clare Landrigan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA

LCF-12 Concurrent

Sanjuana Rodriguez, Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA

In this session, you will explore a model of word sorting that encourages students to think about words in flexible ways through meaning, sound, and visual features. You will learn how to design sorts that allow students to discover spelling principles. A plan for integrating this work into a nine-week Buddy Study cycle will be shared, as well as actual lessons. You will also learn how to differentiate this work so that all learners are successful. LCF-13 Concurrent

Session Vocabulicious 101: Robust Instructional Strategies For Assiduous Teachers (Grades 3–6)

LCF-15 Concurrent

Tammy Mulligan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA Tom Morris, Principal, Franklin Public Schools, MA Jodi Fortuna, Assistant Superintendent, Hudson Public Schools, MA Marcia Uretsky, Principal, Newton Public Schools, MA

Very few people disagree with the premise of Response to Intervention, but how do we make it work effectively in schools? Join our roundtable discussion as several administrators and staff developers share the nuts and bolts of how they make RTI a reality. Hear ways different schools create effective schedules and coordinate instruction between classrooms and interventionists. Learn more about designing small-group and individualized lessons, monitoring student progress, and enhancing professional learning.

Pauletta Francis, K–5 Literacy Coach, Ministry of Education, Bermuda

Looking up words in the dictionary, using written context to figure out word meaning, and engaging in unplanned vocabulary teaching. Do you use these ubiquitous practices to teach vocabulary? Would you like to utilize robust instructional strategies? In this interactive, hands-on introductory session, we will explore many strategies you can take back to your classroom to expand the repertoires of your students and improve their comprehension skills.

26 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


tuesday  

Sessions E–G Session F In-Depth Tuesday, November 4, 2014 10:15 am–1:30 pm (with a 15-minute break)

LCF-16 Concurrent Session Creating Meaningful Texts For Shared Reading (Grades PreK–2) Jess Sherman, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

When it comes to creating exciting texts for shared reading, a little bit of technology goes a long way. An LCD projector or a SMART board and programs like PowerPoint or Keynote can become tools for easily creating meaningful, personal shared reading texts to use in your classroom and to send home with students. In this constructive session, you will use The Continuum of Literacy Learning to explore the power of shared reading and to guide your creation of a personalized, electronic shared reading text to use with your students. Required Materials: Prior to the session, you will need to load up your laptop or tablet with PowerPoint or Keynote, and plenty of photos that would be interesting to the students in your classroom (ie: field trips, classroom pets, recess, literacy center photos).

LCF-18 In-Depth Concurrent Session Collaborative Coaching As Part of an Integrated Middle-Level Literacy Framework (Grades 3–6) Marcia Nye Boody, Literacy Coach Trainer, University of Maine, ME

Lyons and Pinnell (2001) state that, “learning involves conversation structured around the development of new knowledge and skills.” You will view conversations with a literacy coach, an intermediate level teacher, and students discussing the influence of Word Study, Writing Workshop, and Reading Workshop where vocabulary is echoed across the literacy block. You will analyze and reflect on the role of collaboration, teaching, learning, and instructional decision-making.

Required Text: The Continuum of Literacy Learning Grades PreK–2 (Heinemann) by Fountas and Pinnell

Session Unwrapping Rap: Unpacking Rap Lyrics to Increase Vocabulary Acquisition in Urban Youth (Grades 5–8)

LCF-17 Concurrent

Rachel Slaughter, Director of Program Design and Assessment, Eastern University Academy Charter High School, PA

Justin Stygles, ELA/Humanities Teacher, Author, Oxford Hills School District, ME

Education expert Jean Gross says that teens use about 800 of their possible 40,000-word vocabulary. Texting and internet obsession is robbing American youths of academic language. During this session, you will learn how to use mainstream rap lyrics in the classroom to motivate your students to increase their vocabulary. After this session, we guarantee you will see Kanye West and other mainstream rap idols in a whole new light.

Session Evaluating Reading Comprehension Through Writing: Assessment Through Reading-Writing Reciprocity (Grades 3–8)

LCF-19 In-Depth Concurrent

Jennifer Felt, Literacy Coach, Oxford Hills School District, ME

Assessing reading comprehension through writing (reading-writing reciprocity) provides a unique understanding of the intermediate reader. Demonstrating reading comprehension, writers should maintain particular elements of a book when writing an alternate chapter or epilogue. For opinion pieces, students should validate a theme or author’s point of view using text evidence. In this session, we will set a context for the narrative and opinion writing assignments, and you will evaluate two writing assignments using each assignment’s learning goals and rubric.

“Keep up the great work! This is the best conference in the East. I come back to school full of ideas to share and revitalized.” —Ann Mueller, Reading/Literacy Specialist

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 27


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

Session G Tuesday, November 4, 2014 1:00 pm–2:30 pm LCG-1 Featured Session Assessing Writers (Grades 3–8)

Carl Anderson, Author and Literacy Consultant, NY

This session will offer practical suggestions for assessing young writers in ways that will help teachers know what to teach them in minilessons and writing conferences. Carl will help you analyze student work through multiple lenses, and see what next steps students will need. As part of this session, participants will be looking at and discussing many samples of student writing. LCG-2 Featured Session Using Small-Group Read-Alouds to Support Young Readers (Grades K–2)

LCG-4 Featured Session Looking at Student Work: Letting Children Show Us What They Can Do, and What We Need to Help Them Learn Next (Grades K–1) Martha Horn, Associate Professor of Education/Consultant: The Teaching of Writing, Rhode Island College, RI

What do you see when you look at children’s writing? How do you articulate what you see in terms that reveal what children can do and need to learn next? What simple system for documentation helps you to keep track? In this session, we will address these questions by looking at student work, discussing what we see, and considering possible next teaching. LCG-5 Concurrent

Session The iPad Meets Writers’ Workshop (Grades K–2)

Kathleen Fay, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

Christine Baldiga, Instructional Coach, Medway Public Schools, MA

Many students come to us with minimal experiences with text. While supporting their letter recognition and phonemic awareness will support them as literacy learners, we must go beyond that to help them experience what reading is really about: constructing and expanding meaning from text. Come learn more about how to engage students and foster their enjoyment of reading with small-group read-alouds. This practice develops meaning-making and builds oral language skills for all students, especially English Language Learners.

In this session you will discover how the writing instruction can be enriched through the use of a few iPads and one free app while engaging a classroom of young authors in prewriting, differentiating, and publishing activities. This session will guide you through a process of discovering the app and practicing the skills necessary to implement the ideas into your own classroom.

LCG-3 Featured

Session Today’s Journals Are Tomorrow’s Literature (Grades 3–8)

Paula Johnson, Technology Integration Specialist, Medway Public Schools, MA

Required Materials: Teachers need to bring an iPad and download the free app, Educreations, prior to attending. LCG-6 Concurrent

Session Systemic Change: A Literacy Journey in Rural Maine (Grades K–8) Kelly Burns, PreK–8 Literacy Coach, Regional School District #19, ME

Jack Gantos, Author, MA

Join Jack as he takes you from his childhood journals to the writing of the “Jack Henry” series of autobiographical stories. If he can do it, you can do it, and so can your students. Find out how to get started, and how to succeed.

Mary Graybill, Classroom Teacher, Regional School District #19, ME Jan Morse, Director of Instructional Improvement, Regional School District #19, ME Jane Stork, Principal, Regional School District #19, ME

Systemic change occurs when all stakeholders are committed to student learning, student achievement, best practices in Tier 1, and professional growth. We will highlight the benefits of whole-school collaboration, instructional coaching, common language, and common practices. We will discuss and explore our literacy journey within the Maine Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy, and each presenter will discuss her role in supporting and sustaining systemic change. Small group activities, video clips, and discussions will be used to engage participants.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 29


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

Session G (continued) Tuesday, November 4, 2014 1:00 pm–2:30 pm LCG-7 Concurrent Session Guided Reading From A–D: Building Solid Foundations in a Kindergarten Classroom (Grade K) Laurel Burns, Mentor Teacher, Ministry of Education, Bermuda

LCG-10 Concurrent Session Literacy Through Song: Writing, Extending, and Developing Songs to Support Early Literacy Development (Grades PreK–K)

Kindergarteners have a multitude of language learning and reading behaviors to gain control of in their first year, but what matters most? Together, we will carefully explore text levels A–D, determine what matters most for our youngest readers and look at how to support them through effective guided reading lessons. By establishing strong early reading behaviors, readers will begin to develop a self-extending system that leads to continuous reading success.

Heidi Given, Kindergarten Teacher, Fayerweather Street School, MA

Recommended Text: A copy of The Continuum for Literacy Learning by Fountas and Pinnell would be helpful in this session.

LCG-11 Concurrent Session Teaching Effective Writing Minilessons Through Mentor Texts and Explicit Modeling (Grades 3–6)

LCG-8 Concurrent Session Bring Churchill’s and Lincoln’s Outrageous Oratory Skills Into Your Classroom (Grades 5–8) Barbara Connery, Literacy Specialist, Regional School District #6, CT

This workshop is based on James C. Hume’s book, Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln. You will discover the presence, poise, and power of Churchill’s speeches and examine the strength of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Transforming speeches into poetry is the key! Mr. Hume is a professional speech writer, responsible for writing speeches for five American presidents. His work is easily translated for the classroom, making reading and writing speeches more meaningful and memorable.

Young children easily focus on and engage with music and songs. In this session, you will learn how to use songs, song charts, and song writing to teach a love of language, phonemic awareness, word play, and early literacy skills to preschool and kindergarten children. You will learn new songs and practice creating verses and songs to engage young children.

Charisa Lowe, Literacy Content Specialist Teacher and District Trainer, Ministry of Education, Bermuda

Let’s dig into teaching effective minilessons that will engage your students and help them discover crafting strategies that will enhance their writing! We will take on the role of a writer and experience a variety of writing minilessons as students would in the classroom. This will help us gain a deeper understanding of what our student writers experience, as well as help us unwrap what makes an effective writing minilesson. You will walk away understanding the importance of mentor texts, explicit modeling, and guided practice.

Mitch Doxsee, Literacy Teacher, Dalton Public Schools, GA

LCG-12 Concurrent Session Interactive Writing: Empowering Our Youngest Writers As They Take Control of Their Literacy Learning (Grades PreK–K)

Marc Hefner, Literacy Teacher, Dalton Public Schools, GA

Jana Pitcher, Preschool Administrator, Ministry of Education, Bermuda

Julie Stokes, Literacy Coach, Dalton Public Schools, GA

Marie Clay states, “A class environment which creates the assumption that children will write will have writers.” Interactive writing in the PreK classroom provides opportunity to explore language and its representation in written form. Providing this precise layer of support empowers our youngest writers as they begin to tackle the complex challenge that is the writing process.

LCG-9 Concurrent

Session The 24/7 Literacy Classroom (Grades 5–8)

This interactive session shares how middle school teachers are creating a platform for students to share book talks, recommend books, and participate in online book clubs. We will also show how students move through the writing process, beyond the walls of their classroom.

30 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


tuesday  

Sessions E–G

LCG-13 Concurrent Session Writing About Reading: Considering Different Options to Deepen Comprehension (Grades 3–6) Gail Smith, Literacy Content Specialist Teacher, Ministry of Education, Bermuda

Teachers everywhere share a common goal for their students—​increased comprehension. One way to facilitate this deepening understanding is through writing about reading in authentic, meaningful ways. In this session, we will consider options that will encourage our students to think about their reading on many different levels. We will also explore ways to assess their written responses and analyze student thinking. LCG-14 Concurrent Session Implementing Comprehensive Literacy (Grades K–2) Wendy Vaulton, Senior Researcher, Lesley University, MA Carolynne Beless, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Dennis-Yarmouth Public Schools, MA Michael Buonaiuto, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cambridge Public Schools, MA Kevin Depin, Principal, Dennis-Yarmouth Public Schools, MA

Developing and implementing a comprehensive literacy plan can be challenging. This panel discussion will explore the factors associated with successful implementation of comprehensive literacy, paying special attention to the role of interventions in creating success for all students.

Reading Recovery RRG-2 Featured Session The Power of Teacher Language in Shaping Student Learning (Repeat) Mary Rosser, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME

This presentation explores the link between the language teachers use during instructional decision-making and the resultant wide or narrow spaces that are created for student learning. Video clips of teaching-learning episodes will be used to identify the impact of precision teaching on powerful student literacy learning.

Reading Recovery RRG-3 Featured Session Your Child is Roaming . . . Are You?

James Schnug, Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University, NY

The first ten lessons of any child’s Reading Recovery program set the stage for accelerative progress. This interactive session will position the importance of “discovery” during Roaming Around the Known and how the teacher can make it easy to roam.

Reading Recovery RRG-1 Featured

Session Change Over Time: Teaching For Efficient Visual Processing For Text Reading (Repeat) Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut, CT

This session explores the acquisition of efficient visual processing for text reading by Reading Recovery children over time. Discussion includes a review of literacy processing theory and related instructional procedures.

“I found each session I attended to be very informative and highly invigorating! I thoroughly enjoyed collaborating with educators from across the US and Europe! I was also impressed that each session I attended allowed time for teachers to share their thoughts, ideas, and concerns!” —Kerri Pakalnis, Classroom Teacher, Grade 4

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 31


Travel Information Location

Hotel Accommodations

Rhode Island Convention Center 1 Sabin Street, Providence, RI 02903 401.458.6000 | www.riconvention.com

• D  iscounted guest room blocks are available at the hotels listed below. Indicate you are with the Lesley University Literacy for All Conference to get the special rates.

Directions

• A  ll hotel reservations can be booked online. Visit www.lesley.edu/literacy-for-all-conference/hotels to find links for each hotel.

By Car Print directions from our website: www.lesley.edu/literacy-for-all-conference/directions

By Train • Amtrak: 800.US.RAIL | www.amtrak.com

• M  ake your reservation early, as rooms may fill before the cut-off date. • If the blocks are full, keep calling! Rooms are re-released into the block due to cancellations. • All room rates are subject to change.

• MBTA: 800.393.6100 | www.mbta.com

• Hotel rates DO NOT include discounted parking or a 12–13% sales tax.

By Air

The Omni Providence

• T .F. Green Airport (8 miles from downtown Providence): 888.268.7222 | www.pvdairport.com

By Bus • B  onanza Bus: 800.556.3815 or 401.454.8800 www.bonanzabus.com • Peter Pan: 800.343.9999 | www.peterpanbus.com • G  reyhound: 800.231.2222 or 401.751.8800 www.greyhound.com • R  .I. Public Transit Authority: 401.781.9400 or 888.331.7500 | www.ripta.con

Parking

Attached to the Convention Center One Exchange Street, Providence, R.I. 02903 | 800.843.6664 • Rate: $170/night for single/double, plus parking; $25 additional person charge ($5 of the room rate will offset the cost of the conference) • Parking: $28/night for guests • Cut-Off Date: October 2, 2014

Providence Biltmore Hotel Across the street from the Convention Center Kennedy Plaza, Providence, R.I. 02903 | 800.294.7709 • Rate: $149/night for Junior Suite/Two California Kings, single/ double, plus parking

Rhode Island Convention Center North Garage

• Parking: $28/night for guests; $16 for non-registered guests to attend a function during the day

Event Rate*: $12/day | $18/overnight stay

• Cut-Off Date: October 17, 2014

Providence Place Mall

Providence Courtyard by Marriott

Rates*: 0–5 hrs: $2 | 5–8 hrs: $10 | 8–20 hrs: $20 20–24 hrs: $25

Across the street from the Convention Center 32 Exchange Terrace at Memorial Boulevard, Providence, R.I. 02903 | 888.887.7955

Any longer than 24 hours is $25 plus additional hours at the above hourly rates. www.providenceplace.com *Please note all parking fees subject to change without notice.

Hotel Parking See next section “Hotel Accommodations” for details on hotel parking.

• Rate: $149/night for single/double, plus parking; $15/day rollaway charge for extra guest ($5 of the room rate will offset the cost of the conference)

• P  arking: $26/night | $10/vehicle for conference attendees, until 5:00 pm (additional fees apply after 5:00 pm) • Cut-Off Date: October 4, 2014

Hilton Providence Five-minute walk from the Convention Center 21 Atwells Avenue, Providence, R.I. 02903 | 800.445.8667 • Rate: $149/night for single/double, plus parking; $25 extra per additional person over 18 • Parking: $28/night for valet | $25/night for self-parking • Cut-Off Date: October 3, 2014

32 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


Scholarship and Funding Scholarship

Funding Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship

Sue Hundley, a Reading Recovery Teacher Leader and a Literacy Collaborative Trainer at Lesley University, was dedicated to her teaching and her students and she cared deeply about her own professional growth. Following her death from cancer in May 2000, a memorial fund was established in her name at Lesley University. The fund supports young readers and writers by providing teacher scholarships for professional development and by assisting with the development of literacy materials in classrooms. Please consider a donation in Sue’s name. Donations make it possible for two teachers to attend the Literacy for All Conference each year. Donations to the fund can be made through your conference registration form.

Applying For a Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship

Reading Recovery Travel Grants • B  ruce Larkin awards 500 grants each school year, up to $200 each, for travel expenses incurred by attending the Reading Recovery portion of the Literacy for All Conference • Application: www.wilbooks.com/travel-grant

Student Volunteers • G  raduate students who volunteer on Monday can attend the conference for free on Tuesday • S tudents must be enrolled in a full-time, accredited university degree program

Additional Funding Funding may be available through Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Charter Schools Funding, and Parent-Teacher Organizations.

Scholarships are available for one Reading Recovery teacher and one classroom teacher, and cover: • Two-day conference registration (Monday and Tuesday) • Two nights’ accommodations • Up to $100 for expenses • Application: www.lesley.edu/literacy-for-all-conference/fundingand-scholarships/

2013 Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship Winners: Janet Berthiaume, Reading/ Literacy Specialist, Winchester School District, NH

CALL FOR SESSION PROPOSALS Submit a concurrent session proposal for the 2015 Literacy for All Conference and if your session is selected, you can attend the Literacy for All Conference on Monday and Tuesday for free. We are seeking proposals in these areas:

Janet was able to return from the Literacy for All Conference and Left to right: Cindy Downend, Lesley University; Janet share the information she learned Berthiaume; Cheryl Hodaba; with other teachers in her school. and Jill Eurich, Lesley University “I wish everyone could have attended the conference because nothing has a stronger impact than listening to the motivational experts speak in person. Now that I have opened a door, I hope that my coworkers will continue to use me as a resource. I feel that winning this scholarship has somehow made me a more credible reading teacher.”

• Reading Recovery • Common Core State Standards • Administrators/School Leaders • Classroom Literacy (PreK–K, K–2, 3–6, 5–8) • Technology and Literacy • Literacy Coaching • Children’s Literature and Authors

Cheryl Hodaba, Former Literacy Coach In-Training, Arlington Central School District, NY

The 2015 Literacy for All Conference proposal form is available on the Literacy for All Conference website:

Cheryl returned from the conference and prepared to teach several in-service classes using the knowledge she gained at the Literacy for All Conference. “Thank you again for the wonderful opportunity you gave me. It really did revolutionize my thinking and inspire me to be a better teacher.”

www.lesley.edu/literacy-for-all-conference/proposals Please contact the Literacy for All Conference office if you have any questions by phone at

617.349.8402 or by email at literacy@lesley.edu. One free registration per session for the lead presenter only. Proposals are due December 1, 2014. Each session proposal is reviewed by the Conference Program Committee. Applicants will be notified by March 2015.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 33


Registration and Discounts Registration

How To Register

Fees*

Online Registration

• $395 Package Deal (3 days)

• www.regonline.com/lfa2014

• $375 Sunday Plus One Day (Monday or Tuesday)

• Y  ou must have your session selections ready when you begin the online registration process. To view sessions, please visit www.lesley.edu/literacy-for-all-conference/workshops/

• $295 Full Conference (Monday and Tuesday) • $210 Monday Only or Tuesday Only • $175 Pre-Conference Workshop *Registration fees do not include meals, parking, or materials. Registrations cannot be shared.

• C  redit cards, purchase orders, and checks accepted (have credit card or PO number ready)

Paper Registration • $15 charge for mailed-in registration forms

Discounts Discounts (other than the Lesley Alumni discount) cannot be combined. Learn how to register for and receive the discounts below at www.lesley.edu/literacy-for-all-conference/registration.

• C  omplete and return the registration form (available on our website) with payment • S end PO or check with registration form, or call with credit card number

At the Conference • Group Discount: Send 10 people from your school district for two or three days and send an 11th person for free. (11th free registration based on registration of least value.) • Loyalty Reward: If you attended the Literacy for All conference in 2012 and 2013, you can receive an additional $15 off any registration type for the 2014 conference. (Discount will be applied once your attendee status has been verified.) • P  rincipal/Assistant Principal Discount: Send three people from your school to the conference for two or three days, and your principal, assistant principal, or other administrator from the same school may attend for half price. (All registration types eligible for discount.)

• Go to Help Desk on the fourth floor to select sessions and pay • Payment required at time of registration • All sessions are subject to availability

Please Note: • Registrations will not be taken over the phone or email • Payment must be sent within ten business days of registering • D  o not write credit card numbers on the paper form. Register online or call the conference number with your credit card number

• L esley University Alumni Discount: If you graduated from any degree program from Lesley University, you may receive a discount of $10 off a one-day registration, $20 off a twoday registration, or $30 off a three-day registration. (Discount applied upon verification of your alumna/alumnus status.)

34 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


Conference Policies Payment, Refund, and Cancellation/Substitution Policy

Videoconferencing and Audiotaping Policy

• S ubmission of the paper or online registration form is a commitment to pay the conference fees if the event is held, regardless of weather conditions.

It is not permissible, under any circumstances, for conference attendees to use Skype or any other technology (i.e. FaceTime or Blackboard) for the purpose of transmitting a workshop presentation, keynote address, or any other conference event to individuals who are not in attendance at the event. Videotaping or audiotaping of workshop sessions, keynotes, or other conference events is also strictly prohibited.

• If paying with a purchase order, please be sure to obtain permission from the school district to register. • If the school district does not approve the purchase order, the attendee will be responsible for the conference fees. • N  o-shows will be invoiced and subject to collection for the full amount. • U  npaid registrations will necessitate barring registration for future trainings sponsored by Lesley University. • A  refund, minus a $50 fee, will be granted if we receive a written request to cancel by Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. • R  efunds will not be issued after Oct. 1, 2014; however, substitutions for the conference may be made at any time. • P lease notify the conference office in writing in advance if you are sending a substitute. • S ubstitutes should not register online; the conference team will register all substitutions.

Attendance Policy We will issue a certificate of attendance to each participant at the conclusion of the Literacy for All Conference. In order to receive your certificate, you must submit a completed one-page objectives form that we will provide to all participants in their conference tote bag. • A  ny participant who leaves the conference early will receive a reduced number of attendance hours on their certificate of attendance. • W  e are unable to mail certificates of attendance following the conference, so be sure you pick up your certificate before you leave. You may need this certificate of attendance for recertification or other purposes, so we recommend you keep it in a safe place. • If you misplace your certificate of attendance at a later date, please note that to obtain a new one will cost you $25. We will reissue a new certificate of attendance upon confirmation that we have received your completed objectives form at the conclusion of the event (by November 4, 2014, 3:00 pm) and have received payment of $25.

“This was a very educational and invigorating conference for me! I feel so energized and excited about returning to the classroom next year! I think this is a conference for every teacher in America to attend because it provides so much vital information to help educators improve the status of literacy in our world. I was very honored to be a part of this conference and look forward to attending next year!” —Kerri Pakalnis, Classroom Teacher, Grade 4

• W  e cannot email certificates of attendance. If we do not have your objectives form on file, we will be unable to issue you a new certificate of attendance.

For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 35


General Information Volunteering

Internet Availability

Volunteer for a chance to win a pack of leveled books. Easy volunteer duties include collecting tickets and introducing speakers at individual sessions. You will only be assigned to volunteer for a session you are already attending. To volunteer, please check “yes” to volunteering as you complete your online registration.

The Rhode Island Convention Center will be offering complimentary basic Wi-Fi throughout the entire convention center (all public spaces, meeting rooms, and exhibit halls).

RRCNA Membership

We will be moving to online evaluations for the 2014 Literacy for All Conference. Attendees will receive an email shortly after the conference asking you to complete a short online evaluation form. Tracking worksheets will be provided in all conference bags to allow you to record notes about all sessions you attend.

Reading Recovery Council of North America (RRCNA) is an association of Reading Recovery professionals and partners. Membership benefits include subscriptions to the newsletter and journal, a logo lapel pin, and a membership certificate.

Session Evaluations

Free Gift For Literacy for All Conference Attendees Conference attendees that sign up for a membership to RRCNA will receive a free gift. Add a membership to your registration and the fee will be included in your total registration cost. Your free gift will be available when you arrive at the conference.

Membership Fees • New or Renewal: $65 • Reading Recovery Teachers-in-Training: $40 • S upporting: $130 (includes recognition in Council Connections newsletter) To check the status of your membership, contact RRCNA at 614.310.7323.

“As a classroom teacher for 23 years, I felt born again. It appears that this is commonly geared toward reading specialists. I feel that since the reading specialists spend (in my district) 40 minutes a day with a small population, but I spend over 6 hours a day with the entire population (including their few) I benefitted tremendously to receive such strong literacy training during the conference.” —Trudy Amodeo, Reading/Literacy Specialist

36 For more info: 617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu | www.lesley.edu/literacyforall


Literacy for All Conference

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage

Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street

PAID

Cambridge, MA 02138

Boston, MA Permit No. 20

25 th Annual Literacy for All — Northeast PreK–8 Literacy Conference AND Reading Recovery Institute

Literacy foBirthday r All

RHODE ISLAND CONVENTION CENTER | PROVIDENCE NOVEMBER 2–4, 2014

25

th

Celebration

Keynote Speakers Jack Gantos | Andy Hargreaves | Betsy Kaye

Featured Speakers Carl Anderson | Jeff Anderson | Nancy Boyles Lisa Cleaveland | Sneed Collard | Ruth Culham Kathleen Fay | Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell Martha Horn | Sara Kajder | Sue Kempton Tasha Tropp Laman | Cathy Toll Kristen Hawley Turner | Jeff Wilhem

Reading Recovery Experts C.C. Bates | Mary Anne Doyle | Sue Duncan Mary Fried | Eva Konstantellou | Mary Rosser Jim Schnug

2014 Highlights: • 100+ workshops in 11 strands • 25th Birthday Celebration • 3 Keynote and 23 Featured Speakers


2014 Literacy for All Conference Brochure