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2 1 st A nnual L it e racy f o r A ll N o rth e ast P r e K – 8 L it e racy C o n f e r e nc e & R e a d in g R e c o v e ry I nstitut e

Literacy for All

21st Century Literacy Skills for the 21st Annual Conference

Featured Speakers Include: David Booth Kathy Collins Lori Jamison Brian Heinz Steven Layne Susan O’Leary Gay Su Pinnell Shane Templeton

n More

than 100 PreK–8 and Reading Recovery sessions

n NEW: Technology

Strand

n Middle

School Strand & PreK–K Strand

n MORE

In-depth (3-hour) sessions

n NEW: Discounts

for groups, loyal customers, and school leaders

n Administrators’

Strand with a Pre-Conference workshop for School Leaders by Irene Fountas

n Literacy

Strand

Coaching

Rhode Island Convention Center | Providence November 14–16, 2010 | Sunday–Tuesday Hosted by Lesley University in collaboration with the University of Connecticut, New York University, and the University of Maine

Register online and save $15! See inside for details or visit: www.regonline.com/lfa2010

sponsors and conference CommitTee

Thank you to our sponsors! Literacy for All is grateful to our corporate sponsors. Their assistance has been instrumental in providing resources to invite the world’s leading literacy experts to present at this event.

Thank you to the Conference Program Committee We would like to thank those who served on the 2010 Conference Program Committee.

Conference Program Chairs:

Tote Bag Sponsor

Margaret Crosby, Eva Konstantellou, and Diane Powell

Program Committee Members:

Speaker Sponsors Houghton Mifflin Harcourt School Publishers for sponsoring Dr. Shane Templeton Maupin House Publishing for sponsoring Dr. Nancy Boyles Pearson Curriculum Group for sponsoring Dr. Jeanne Paratore

Julie Barnhart-Francis Jodi Burroughs Donna Carey Chris Chase Barbara Collins Kerry Crosby Cathie Desjardins Lisa Fiore Linda Garbus Kristine Haveles-Pelletier Louise Law Susan Lynaugh Wendy Mattson Mary McMackin Kristina Seeley Barbara Steckel Erin Twombly

If you would like to serve on the 2011 Conference Program Committee, please e-mail Sharon Winston, Project Manager for Conferences and Events, at literacy@lesley.edu. The Committee will hold its first meeting at the 2010 Conference on Tuesday, November 16, 2010 at 7:30 am.

Table of Contents Conference Schedule Overview............................... 1 Conference Session Schedule.................................. 2 Literacy for All Overview......................................... 6 Conference Scholarships and Grants....................... 6 Keynote Speakers................................................... 7

Conference Schedule Overview Dynamic Structure With More Choices The Literacy for All Conference program committee has structured the schedule to give participants more options, including three-hour sessions on Monday and Tuesday and choices with regard to attending a keynote or a workshop in the same time block.

Sunday, November 14, 2010 10:00 am–11:00 am

Pre-Conference Registration

11:00 am–1:00 pm

Workshops begin

  1:00 pm–2:00 pm

Lunch on your own

  2:00 pm–4:00 pm

Workshops continue

Special Events and Features.................................. 12

  4:00 pm–6:00 pm

Early Conference Registration (for Monday)

Sue Hundley Memorial Fund................................. 12

Monday, November 15, 2010

Literacy Conference Featured Speakers................... 8 Reading Recovery Featured Speakers.................... 10

Pre-Conference Workshops................................... 13 Workshops (Literacy Conference & Reading Recovery Institute)............................... 15 Directions and Parking.......................................... 32 Hotel Information................................................. 33 Registration Information....................................... 33 RRCNA Membership............................................. 34 Registration Form................................................. 35

  7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:30 am–10:00 am

Session A: Keynote with David Booth (all participants)

10:00 am–6:00 pm

Exhibit Hall B open for business!

10:30 am–12:00 pm

Session B (90-minute breakout)

12:00 pm–1:30 pm

Lunch on your own; visit exhibits

  1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Session C (90-minute breakout) or

  1:30 pm–4:45 pm

In-depth Session C (3 hours)

  3:00 pm–3:30 pm

Visit exhibits

  3:30 pm–5:00 pm

Session D (90-minute breakout)

  5:00 pm–6:00 pm

Exhibit Fair

Tuesday, November 16, 2010   7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:00 am–1:00 pm

Exhibit Hall B open for business!

  8:30 am–10:00 am

Session E: Keynote with Steven Layne or

90-minute E Session

10:30 am–12:00 pm Session F: Reading Recovery Keynote with Susan O’Leary or Literacy Conference Session F (then select Session G) or

Handouts Available Online!

10:30 am–1:45 pm

Session F: In-depth Literacy Conference Session (3 hours)

Beginning October 22, 2010, handouts will

12:00 pm–1:00 pm

Lunch on own; visit exhibits

be available on the Lesley University website at

  1:00 pm–2:30 pm

Session G (90-minute breakout)

www.lesley.edu/literacyforall. Participants are responsible for downloading handouts for the sessions they are attending. Many presenters will not post their handouts online.

1

DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Pre-Conference workshops Sunday, November 14 11:00 am–4:00 pm H

PC-2: What Every School Leader Needs to Know about High Quality Literacy Teaching (K–6)

PC-3: Connecting the Dots: Linking Talking, Reading, and Writing to Promote Literacy Learning (K–3)

LCB-13: Supporting Deep Engagement with Texts through Rigorous Discussion (K–8)

LCB-14: Teacher Language: Key to Developing a Community of Learners (K–1)

LCB-15: Urban Literacy Coaches: What Does It Take to Make an Impact? (K–6)

H

MSB-1: Revolutionizing Vocabulary Learning and Instruction (4–8)

MSB-2: Just Plain Good Books for Middle School Students (5–8)

PC-4: Equipping Students to Make Purposeful Decisions as Writers (3–8)

H

RRB-1: Reading and Writing: Teaching for Reciprocal Gains (Repeat)

PC-5: The Writing Workshop: Answers to Teachers’ Most Common Questions (K–5)

H

RRB-2: The Value of Powerful Language Interactions in Reading Recovery Lessons

PC-6: Using Interactive Read Aloud to Support Reading and Writing Workshop in Middle School (6–8)

H

RRB-3: Discovering the Essence of Story Through Rich Book Introductions (Repeat)

H

PC-7: Contingent Teaching in Reading Recovery Lessons

RRB-4: Fostering Independence and “Agency” Throughout the Series of Lessons

Session A Monday, November 15 8:30 am–10:00 am

SESSION C Monday, November 15 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Keynote with David Booth (all Monday participants)

H

LCC-1: Marvelous Minilessons for Teaching Beginning Writing (K–3)

H

LCC-2: Picture Books as a Springboard to Literacy Activities (PreK–4)

H

LCC-3: Determining Essential Vocabulary (K–8) (Repeat)

Session B Monday, November 15 10:30 am–12:00 pm

2

LCB-12: Orchestrating Literacy: Music, Motivation, and Mastery (PreK)

PC-1: Reading Workshop Essentials and Best Practices: Teach Children to Read with Power, Intention, and Joy (K–2)

H

H

LCB-1: Inspiring Reluctant Writers in the Elementary Classroom (PreK–4)

H

LCB-2: Reading Images and Words to Make Meaning (1–6)

H

LCB-3: Differentiating Instruction with Guided Reading: Making the Most of the 18–Minute Lesson (K–3)

H

LCB-4: Dynamic Read Aloud Programs and Titles that Work (PreK–4)

H

LCB-5: Using Response to Intervention (RTI) to Support Struggling Readers (K–3)

LCB-6: Introduction to Reading Workshop: Structure and Rationales (3–6)

LCB-7: Response to Intervention: The Planning Process, Implementation, and Pitfalls (1–8)

LCB-8: Quality Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners (K–8)

LCB-9: Using Science Notebooks to Foster StudentLed Investigations (3–6)

LCB-10: Planning for Change: Creating Professional Learning Communities to Improve Writing (3–6)

LCB-11: All’s Well That Ends Well: Writing Satisfying Endings (K–6)

LCC-4: Nurture Young Authors with a Real Author’s Secrets (K–8)

LCC-5: Using Technology to Support Literacy with the K–6 Learner

LCC-6: The 6+1 Traits of Writing (3–6)

LCC-7: Guided Reading: Delving Deeper into Discussion (3–6)

LCC-8: Introduction to Writing Workshop: Structure and Rationales (3–6)

LCC-9: Supporting Literacy Coaches to Achieve School Improvement (K–8)

LCC-10: Tier 1, 2, and 3 Interventions in a K–4 School

LCC-11: Foundations in Literacy: Play and Learning to Write (PreK)

Session C In-Depth Monday, November 15 1:30 pm–4:45 pm H

LCC-15 In-depth: Acting on What We Know About Effective Instruction for Struggling Readers (K–5)

LCC-16 In-depth: Teaching that Makes a Difference in the Active Process of Comprehending during Leveled Literacy Intervention Lessons (K–2)

LCC-17 In-depth: The Power of Write Aloud (K–6)

H

RRC-2 In-depth: You could be right, you could be wrong but you’ve got to know for yourself

H

RRC-3 In-depth: When it is hard (for the teacher and student) to make progress in writing

Session D Monday, November 15 3:30 pm–5:00 pm H

LCD-1: Narrative Writing: The Opening Page (3–6)

H

LCD-2: Determining Essential Vocabulary (Repeat) (K–8)

H

LCD-3: Literate Beginnings: A Pre-kindergarten Continuum to Guide Teaching

H

LCD-4: Refining Reflective Practice Through Blogging: Being a Wide-Awake Educator in the Writing Workshop (3–6)

H

LCD-5: Exploring the Relationships among Phonics, Spelling, Reading, and Writing: The Continuing Case for Integration (PreK–2)

LCD-6: The Structure and Organization of Differentiating Small Group Reading Instruction (3–8) LCD-7: Reading Assessments: The Foundation for a Response To Intervention Model (1–8)

LCD-8: G.O.A.L.S.: Engaging Teachers and Students in Success! (K–8) LCD-9: Listening to Young Writers to Help the Writing Improve (K–2)

LCD-10: High Hopes: Turning a Vision for Literacy into a Reality (K–5)

LCD-11: Immersing Students in Quality Literature Through Literature Study and Readers Theater (3–6) LCD-12: Using The Continuum of Literacy Learning to Inform Guided Reading Teaching Decisions (K–2)

LCD-13: Best Practice Teaching For Adult Learners (K–8)

H

MSD-1: Making Meaning with Different Forms of Text (6–8)

LCC-13: Systems Thinking Tools for Literacy Instruction (3–8)

MSD-2: Releasing the Responsibility in Middle School Instruction (5–8)

LCC-14: Helping Students Understand and Love Words: Creating Strong, Engaged Spellers (1–3)

H

RRD-1: Discovering the Essence of Story Through Rich Book Introductions (Repeat)

MSC-1: Teaching that Sticks! (5–8)

H

RRC-1: Beyond the Words: Considering Nonverbal Communication in Reading Recovery Teaching

LCC-12: Linking Assessment and Student Learning: Lifting the Quality of Instruction (3–6)

Session F In-Depth Tuesday, November 16, 10:30 am–1:45 pm

Keynote with Steven L. Layne

H

LCF-15 In-depth: Launching RTI Comprehension Instruction with Shared Reading (2–8)

H

LCF-16 In-depth: Coaching with Humility and Intention (PreK–8)

H

MSF-2 In-depth: Writer’s Workshop in the Middle School Classroom: Training Students as Young Professional Writers (5–8)

LCE-1: Strategies to Engage Digital Natives in Reading and Writing (3–8) LCE-2: Effective Strategies to Develop and Strengthen Student Writing (3–8)

MSE-1: Teaching Vocabulary to Improve Comprehension (5–8)

H

RRE-1: Reading and Writing: Teaching for Reciprocal Gains (Repeat) RRE-2: Examining Literacy Processing Behaviors through Running Record Analyses (Repeat)

Session G Tuesday, November 16 1:00 pm­–2:30 pm

H

RRE-3: Sealing the Deal

H

LCG-1: Exploring Literacy Instruction within the Content Areas (3–5)

H

RRE-4: From Roaming to Late in Lessons: DecisionMaking to Scaffold Fluent Reading

LCG-2: Interactive Writing: Powerful Learning for K, 1, and 2

H

Session F Tuesday, November 16 10:30 am–12:00 pm

H

H

LCF-1: Integrated Curriculum: Designing Instruction by Taking a Closer Look at the Language We Use (K–2) LCF-2: Genre Study: Helping Students Think, Talk, and Write About Texts (2–6) LCF-3: Smartboards, Wikis, and Blogs: Enhancing Literacy Learning (K–2)

LCG-4: Generative Instruction for Decoding and Comprehension (K–6)

Reading Recovery Keynote with Susan O’Leary

LCG-3: Words of Wonder: Exploring Art and Language to Empower Young Children (PreK–2)

LCG-5: Professional Writing Techniques to Use in the Classroom (3–8)

LCG-6: Reading is Comprehending: Comprehending is Reading! (K–2)

LCG-7: Designing Your Classroom for Effective Literacy Instruction (K–2)

LCG-8: Let’s Get It Write! (K–2)

LCG-9: Literacy in a Reggio Emilia Inspired Preschool: Engaging Families through “Learning Stories”

LCF-4: Fostering a Community of Thinkers Through Interactive Read Aloud (K–5)

LCF-5: Infusing Phonics Instruction throughout the Kindergarten Classroom

LCG-10: Long, Long Ago: A Genre Study of Traditional Literature (3–6)

LCG-11: Literacy Teaching with Emerging Technologies: Great Resources and Inspiring Examples (3–8)

H

MSG-1: Research, Reading, and Response Tools for Teachers (6–8)

MSG-2: Making Learning Visible: Seeing Students’ Assets (6–12)

LCF-6: Access to Print: Digital Strategies to Accommodate Struggling Readers (3–8) LCF-7: The Impact of a Literacy Team: Report Cards to Literacy Reports (K–8) LCF-8: Family Literacy Workshop During the Classroom Day (K–2)

LCF-9: Engaging Students in Rich Vocabulary Instruction to Enhance Comprehension (K–6)

LCF-10: Can lunch, books, parents, and great conversation increase comprehension skills? (2–6)

LCF-11: Dramatic Play: Real Life Literacy for Great Beginnings (PreK–K)

LCF-12: ABC and Picture Books to Support Scientific Process Skills (K–2)

LCF-13: Talking on Paper: A Step-by-Step Approach to Writing About Reading (3–6)

LCF-14: It’s Alive! Making Nonfiction Writing Come Alive (PreK–8)

H

MSF-1: Reading Response in the 21st Century (6–8)

Schedule Key: H

Featured

Administrators’ Strand

Grades K–8 Literacy

Children’s Literature & Authors

Grades K–2 Literacy

Grades K–6 Literacy

PreK–K Strand

Literacy Coaching

Grades 3–6 Literacy

Reading Recovery

Middle School Strand

Technology

Strand

Sunday, November 14, 2010 10:00 am–11:00 am

Pre-Conference Registration

11:00 am–1:00 pm

Workshops begin

  1:00 pm–2:00 pm

Lunch on your own

  2:00 pm–4:00 pm

Workshops continue

DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Session E Tuesday, November 16 8:30 am–10:00 am

  4:00 pm–6:00 pm Early Conference Registration (for Monday)

Monday, November 15, 2010   7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:30 am–10:00 am Session A: Keynote with David Booth (all participants) 10:00 am–6:00 pm

Exhibit Hall B open for business!

10:30 am–12:00 pm

Session B (90-minute breakout)

12:00 pm–1:30 pm

Lunch on your own; visit exhibits

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Session C (90-minute breakout)

1:30 pm–4:45 pm

In-depth Session C (3 hours)

3:00 pm–3:30 pm

Visit exhibits

or

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

Session D (90-minute breakout)

H

RRG-1: Examining Literacy Processing Behaviors through Running Record Analyses (Repeat)

5:00 pm–6:00 pm

Exhibit Fair

RRG-2: Teaching for Change in Writing One Child at a Time

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

RRG-3: The Role of Language in Selecting and Introducing New Texts

  7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:00 am–1:00 pm

Exhibit Hall B open for business!

  8:30 am–10:00 am Session E: Keynote with Steven Layne or 90-minute E Session 10:30 am–12:00 pm Session F: Reading Recovery Keynote with Susan O’Leary or Literacy Conference Session F (then select Session G) or 10:30 am–1:45 pm Session F: In-depth Literacy Conference Session 12:00 pm–1:00 pm

Lunch on own; visit exhibits

1:00 pm–2:30 pm

Session G (90-minute breakout)

3

Monday | SESSIONS A & B

Monday | SESSION B

OVERVIEW, Scholarships & Grants

Literacy for All Overview

Conference Scholarships and Grants

Pre-Conference Workshops Sunday, November 14, 2010

Funding

Participate in a four-hour intensive session with experts in the field of literacy learning. Pre-conference workshops are designed to improve and extend the quality of your teaching. Take the opportunity to learn valuable strategies and techniques to use in your classroom.

Funding for your conference participation may be available through Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Charter Schools Funding, and Parent-Teacher Organizations. Investigate these resources within your district and secure funding soon.

Literacy Conference with Middle School Strand, PreK–K Strand, In-depth Sessions and new Technology Strand!

Reading Recovery Travel Grants

Monday, November 15–Tuesday, November 16, 2010 Expand your learning and teaching skills by attending this two-day conference for literacy educators, PreK–8. Learn the best literacy practices from the finest trainers in the field. Return to the classroom with a better understanding of current research-based practices in education.

Reading Recovery Institute Monday, November 15–Tuesday, November 16, 2010 The Reading Recovery Institute is a two-day professional development event designed for Reading Recovery professionals. Sessions will strengthen and reinforce skills of Reading Recovery teaching. In-depth (three-hour) Reading Recovery sessions will be offered on Monday.

Bruce Larkin will award five hundred (500) travel grants each school year, up to a maximum of two hundred dollars ($200), to help offset expenses incurred by attending the Reading Recovery portion of the conference. Please visit www.wilbooks.com for an application. Click on the link for scholarships and grants.

Sue Hundley Memorial Fund Scholarship Scholarships are available for one Reading Recovery teacher and one classroom teacher to attend Literacy for All. The scholarships cover: • Two-day conference registration fee (Monday and Tuesday) • Two nights’ accommodations • Up to $100 for parking, food, and travel expenses (with submission of itemized, original receipts) We encourage you to apply! Please visit www.lesley.edu/ literacyforall for an application and guidelines. Click on the link for “funding.” See page 12 of this program for a profile of last year’s Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship winners.

Student Volunteers College students who volunteer on Monday have the opportunity to attend the conference for free on Tuesday. Tasks include collecting tickets for sessions, introducing and assisting speakers, and collecting evaluations from participants. Students must be matriculated in a fulltime accredited university degree program. Email literacy@lesley.edu for details.

Complimentary Registration for Presenters Submit a session proposal for the 2011 conference program and if your session is selected, you will receive a complimentary two-day 2011 conference registration. Visit our Web site, www.lesley.edu/ literacyforall to download a proposal form.

Questions? Contact the Literacy for All office:

617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu

www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 6

David Booth

Susan O’Leary Professor Emeritus, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, OISE University of Toronto

David Booth is Professor Emeritus at the University of Toronto and Literacy Chair at Nipissing University in Ontario. He is the author of many books for teachers and principals, including Reading Doesn’t Matter Anymore: A New Way to Look at Reading (Pembroke Publishers, 2007). He is a wellknown international speaker on literacy. Keynote A: Why is My iPhone Sitting on a Pile of Books? Sessions: LCB-2 and MSD-1

Steven L. Layne Author and Literacy Professor, Judson University, IL

Steven L. Layne serves as Professor of Literacy Education at Judson University in Elgin, IL, where he teaches courses in children’s and adolescent literature and directs the university’s Master of Education in Literacy program. He proudly identifies himself as a classroom teacher with fifteen years of experience in grades 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 8. Steven has received numerous awards from organizations including USA Today newspaper, NCTE, IRA, and ASCD. Most recently he received the Distinguished Alumni Award from Judson University and the Hall of Fame Award from the Illinois Reading Council. He is the author of twenty books for children and young adults as well as a new professional book for teachers entitled Igniting a Passion for Reading: Successful Strategies for Building Lifetime Readers (Stenhouse, 2009).

Author and Literacy Coach, Madison Metropolitan School District, WI

Susan O’Leary is the author of several books, including 5 Kids: Stories of Children Learning to Read (The Wright Group, 1997) and You Can Make a Difference: A Teacher’s Guide to Political Action (Heinemann, 1998). She was the literacy advisor to the Wisconsin Historical Society in its development of the fourth grade text, Wisconsin: Our State, Our Story, and co-authored the book’s teachers guides. The series won the 2009 Independent Press Book Award for best publication in education, academics, and teaching. Most recently, she has written on determining essential vocabulary in Achieving Literacy Success with English Language Learners: Insights, Assessment, and Instruction (Reading Recovery Council of North America, 2009), and on observation in the 25th Anniversary Issue of the Journal of Reading Recovery. Susan teaches at Edgewood College and for the Madison Metropolitan School District in Wisconsin.

keynote speakers

LITERACY FOR ALL KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Reading Recovery Keynote F: Change Over Time: What Marie Clay taught us in her writing and in her life Sessions: LCC-3 and LCD-2

Keynote E: Literacy Lessons for a Lifetime Sessions: LCB-4 and LCC-2

7

featured speakers

Literacy for All PreK-8 Literacy Conference FEATURED SPEAKERS Ruth Ayres

Kathy Collins

Writing Coach, Wawasee School District, IN

Literacy Consultant and Author, NH

Ruth Ayres spends her days helping students find big meaning in their everyday stories and encouraging teachers to reflect and refine the art of teaching. Beginning in 2000, her first years in education were spent teaching language arts to seventh graders. Ruth is the co-author of Two Writing Teachers, (http://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com), a blog devoted to Writing Workshop teaching. She is the co-author of Day by Day: Refining Writing Workshop Through 180 Days of Reflective Practice (Stenhouse, 2010). Sessions: LCB-1 and LCD-4

Lauren Benjamin

Kathy Collins presents at conferences and works in schools to support teachers in developing highquality, effective literacy instruction in the primary grades. She is the author of Reading for Real: Teach Students to Read With Power, Intention, and Joy in K–3 Classrooms (Stenhouse, 2008) and Growing Readers: Units of Study in the Primary Classroom (Stenhouse, 2004). She is the co-author with Lucy Calkins of Resources for Upper Grade Writing, a part of the Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3–5 series (Heinemann, 2006). Kathy has worked closely with the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University. She was a first grade teacher in Brooklyn, NY, and she is looking forward to returning to the classroom in the near future. Session: PC-1

Literacy Consultant, NY

Lauren Benjamin has taught at the Manhattan New School, P.S. 165, and at Dobbs Ferry School District in Westchester County. She has worked with various populations of students and taught primary and upper grades. Her classroom served as a lab where teachers and administrators from around the country could view elementary literacy instruction. She conducts workshops for in-service teachers, has led study groups, and has taught graduate level courses in literacy at Pace University, New York University, and Hunter College. Lauren has presented at many national and state level conferences. Along with Lisa Elias Moynihan, Lauren’s classroom was an integral part of two of Tony Stead’s videos on nonfiction literacy instruction entitled Time for Nonfiction and Bridges to Independence: Guided Reading with Nonfiction. Lauren co-authored an article with Lisa on the nonfiction Read Aloud that was published by School Talk in 2005. Lauren and Lisa are writing a book on content integration throughout the literacy block. Stenhouse is scheduled to publish the book in 2011. Sessions: LCF-1 and LCG-1

Irene Fountas Professor, Lesley University, MA

Irene Fountas directs a comprehensive school reform project in the School of Education at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA. She has been a classroom teacher, language arts specialist, and consultant in school districts across the nation and abroad and has received numerous awards for her contributions to literacy. Irene and co-author Gay Su Pinnell have published several books, including Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency: Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Reading (Grades K–8) (Heinemann, 2006) and The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades K–8: Behaviors and Understandings to Notice, Teach, and Support (Heinemann, 2007). Sessions: PC-2, LCD-3, and LCF-2

Brian Heinz Children’s Author and Writing Consultant, NY

Nancy Boyles Professor of Reading, Southern Connecticut State University

Nancy Boyles was a classroom teacher for 25 years and is currently Professor of Reading and Graduate Reading Program Coordinator at Southern Connecticut State University. Her areas of research and special interest include comprehension strategy instruction, teaching students to respond to open-ended comprehension questions, literacy coaching, Shared and Guided Reading instruction that meets the challenges of RTI Tier 1 standards, and author’s craft. She is the author of five books, all published by Maupin House Publishing: Teaching Written Response to Text: Constructing Quality Answers to Open-ended Comprehension Questions (2001); Constructing Meaning through Kid-Friendly Comprehension Strategy Instruction (2004); Hands-On Literacy Coaching (2007); That’s a GREAT Answer! Teaching Literature Response to K–3, ELL, and Struggling Readers (2007); and Launching RTI Comprehension Instruction with Shared Reading: 40 Model Lessons for Intermediate Readers (2009). Session: LCF-15 In-depth (3-hour session)

8

Brian Heinz has taught writing from the elementary level to the university level at both SUNY Stony Brook and Hofstra University. An award-winning educator, he is the critically acclaimed author of such books as The Wolves (Dial, 1996); Nanuk: Lord of the Ice (Ballyhoo Books, 2005); The Monsters’ Test (Millbrook Press, 1996); Kayuktuk: An Arctic Quest (Chronicle Books, 1996); Butternut Hollow Pond (First Avenue Editions, 2005); and Cheyenne Medicine Hat (Creative Editions, 2006). He works in both fiction and nonfiction, in verse and in prose, and his books often reflect the adventure and majesty of the natural world. He is a popular speaker on the craft of writing at schools and professional conferences. Sessions: LCD-1 and MSF-2 In-depth (3-hour session)

Kristin Rainville

Educational Consultant, Toronto, Canada

Assistant Professor of Literacy, Manhattanville College, NY

Lori Jamison is an educational consultant whose work on best practices in literacy instruction is recognized across North America. She is a former classroom teacher, K–12 Literacy Consultant, and Reading Assessment Specialist. Lori has written five professional books as well as many journal articles, teaching guides, and other materials for teachers. Lori is one of the few classroom practitioners to have served on the International Reading Association (IRA) Board of Directors. She continues to be a passionate advocate for children, teachers, and literacy. Sessions: LCB-3 and LCC-1

Donalyn Miller Sixth Grade Language Arts and Social Studies Teacher, Trinity Meadows Intermediate School, TX

Kristin Rainville is a full-time faculty member in the Department of Literacy at Manhattanville College in New York and teaches courses in K–12 literacy. Kristin also serves as a liaison at Jefferson Elementary School, one of Manhattanville’s Professional Development Schools, where she teaches field based literacy courses, works with student teachers, and provides professional development to faculty. Kristin worked as an Instructor at Teachers College, Columbia University, and as a coordinator for the New Jersey Department of Education’s Office of Early Literacy (which developed the state’s Reading Coach Program). Her research focuses on teacher education, both pre-service and in-service, primarily focusing on the work of literacy coaches. She has presented her research with literacy coaches at state, national, and international conferences. Kristin coauthored an article in The Reading Teacher entitled “Situated Identities: Power and Positioning in the Work of a Literacy Coach.”

Donalyn Miller’s staff development presentations, articles, and book, The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child (Jossey-Bass, 2009) describe her successful methods for inspiring and motivating students to read. Donalyn currently writes a blog, The Book Whisperer, for the website teachermagazine.org.

Session: LCF-16 In-depth (3-hour session)

Sessions: MSF-1 and MSG-1

Stacey Shubitz is a literacy consultant who taught fourth and fifth grades at P.S. 171 in East Harlem, NY and at The Learning Community in Central Falls, RI. She is also Kappa Delta Pi Teacher of Honor. Stacey has presented at state and national conferences, primarily about the ways teachers engage students by being writers themselves. She has published articles in Instructor Magazine, Responsive Classroom Newsletter, and Statement. She co-authored DEAL WITH IT! Powerful Words from Smart, Young Women (Xlibris Press, 2007), which she wrote with her former students. Stacey blogs at Two Writing Teachers (http://twowritingteachers. wordpress.com)—a blog devoted to the teaching of Writing Workshop. She is the co-author of Day by Day: Refining Writing Workshop Through 180 Days of Reflective Practice (Stenhouse, 2010).

Jeanne Paratore Professor of Education, Boston University, MA

Jeanne Paratore is Professor of Education and Coordinator of the Reading Education and Literacy and Language Education Programs at Boston University. Her research interests focus on the literacy experiences of learners who struggle and she has published numerous books and articles documenting the types of instructional interactions that result in higher levels of achievement for children and adults at risk. She is co-curriculum director of the Emmy award-winning children’s television series, Between the Lions. She is also principal investigator on a funded study of the effects of a family literacy intervention on the literacy and language performance of children in pre-kindergarten to second grade. Jeanne is a frequent speaker on literacy instruction and has presented at local, national, and international conferences as well as in school districts throughout the United States. Sessions: LCC-15 In-depth (3-hour session)

Gay Su Pinnell Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University

Gay Su Pinnell is a professor in the School of Teaching and Learning at The Ohio State University. Her professional work focuses on literacy education of children and ways to support teachers of reading, writing, and language arts. She has written many articles and has received several prestigious awards for her work. She has co-authored numerous books and articles related to language and literacy teaching with Irene Fountas. Their latest publications are the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System, Grades K–8 and The Continuum of Literacy, Grades K–8: Behaviors and Understandings to Notice, Teach, and Support (Heinemann, 2007).

featured speakers

Lori Jamison

Stacey Shubitz Literacy Specialist, PA

Sessions: LCB-1 and LCD-4

Shane Templeton Foundation Professor of Literacy Studies, University of Nevada, Reno

A former classroom teacher at the primary and secondary levels, Shane Templeton’s research has focused on developmental word knowledge in elementary, middle, and high school students. He is widely published in a number of research and practitioner journals and is co-author of Words Their Way: Word Study for Phonics, Vocabulary, and Spelling Instruction (Prentice Hall, 2007); Vocabulary Their Way: Word Study with Middle and Secondary Students (Prentice Hall, 2009); and Words Their Way with English Learners: Word Study for Spelling, Phonics, and Vocabulary Instruction (Prentice Hall, 2006). His other books include Teaching the Integrated Language Arts (Houghton Mifflin, 1997) and Children’s Literacy: Contexts for Meaningful Learning (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1995). Since 1987, Shane has been a member of the Usage Panel of the American Heritage Dictionary. He is an educational consultant on The American Heritage Children’s Dictionary and wrote the foreword to the recently published Curious George’s Dictionary (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2008). Sessions: MSB-1 and LCD-5

Sessions: LCD-3 and LCF-2

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featured speakers

READING RECOVERY FEATURED SPEAKERS Ann Ballantyne

Sue Duncan

Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University

Director of Reading Recovery, Early Childhood Department, Georgia State University

Ann Ballantyne is an experienced Reading Recovery practitioner who has trained as a teacher, teacher leader, and trainer in her home country of New Zealand. She spent a year as a teacher leader in Maine in 1994–5 and over the past 10 years has worked at university training sites in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, and New Zealand. She is currently the director of the Reading Recovery Project at New York University.

Sue Duncan taught as a primary teacher and solecharge principal in a number of different areas in New Zealand before training as a Reading Recovery tutor in Auckland in 1985. She became a Trainer in 1989 and has since worked in New Zealand, England, Canada, and the United States. In 2007–2008, Sue trained as a Facilitator for the First Chance program. Sessions: RRC-2 In-depth (3-hour session) and RRE-3

Sessions: RRB-1 and RRE-1

Eva Konstantellou

Mary Anne Doyle Trainer and Professor of Education, University of Connecticut

Mary Anne Doyle is Director of the ReadingLanguage Arts Center at the University of Connecticut and she is Director of Connecticut’s Reading Recovery Project. Her experience includes positions as an elementary classroom teacher and a reading consultant. Mary Anne completed her master’s and Ph.D. degrees at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and she completed training as a Reading Recovery Trainer of Teacher Leaders at The Ohio State University. She has presented at international and national conferences as well as regional, state, and local programs. Her research interests include early literacy development and reading-writing connections. Her related, co-edited text is Reading/ Writing Connections: Learning from Research (International Reading Association, 1992). She is a co-author of the International Reading Association’s “Annual Summary of Investigations Relating to Reading.” Mary Anne has served the Reading Recovery Council of North America as President (1999-2000), executive officer (1998–2001), and as chair of the Publications Committee (1994–1999). She is an editor of the Journal of Reading Recovery. She also chairs the Executive Board of the International Reading Recovery Trainers’ Organization. Sessions: RRE-2 and RRG-1

Reading Recovery Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Eva Konstantellou is an Associate Professor and a Reading Recovery Trainer at the Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative in the School of Education at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA. Her research interests include language learning, teachers’ learning and professional development, and critical pedagogy. She currently serves as Teaching Section Editor for the Journal of Reading Recovery. Session: RRB-2

Mary K. Lose Associate Professor and Director of the Reading Recovery Center of Michigan, Oakland University

Mary K. Lose’s research interests focus on early intervention policies and initiatives, teachers’ professional development, and contingent teaching. Mary has published articles in the Journal of Reading Recovery, The Clearinghouse, and Teaching PreK–8. In 2006 she co-authored an article on Response to Intervention (RTI) that appeared in Reading Research Quarterly and has additional articles on RTI in the November 2007 issue of The Reading Teacher and the January/February 2008 issue of Principal. A 2002 Fellow of the Marie Clay Literacy Trust, she studied literacy teaching and learning in New Zealand schools. She finds working with teachers and their students among the most interesting and rewarding work of all. Sessions: PC-7, LCB-5, and RRC-1

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Mary Rosser

Associate Professor, College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University

Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine

Emily Rodgers is an Associate Professor and a Reading Recovery Trainer in the College of Education and Human Ecology at The Ohio State University. She has worked in schools as a reading specialist and a special education teacher. Her research focuses on the professional development of teachers and scaffolding literacy learning, particularly for young children having great difficulty learning to read and write. Sessions: RRC-3 In-depth (3-hour session) and RRE-4

Mary Rosser is the Director of the University Training Center for Reading Recovery and Coordinator of Literacy Professional Development Programs at the University of Maine. She was the State Trainer for Reading Recovery and lecturer in the School of Cultural and Language Studies at the Queensland University of Technology in Australia. Mary’s areas of expertise are language education, curriculum development, and early literacy intervention. She has worked at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of education and has extensive international experience as a literacy consultant and popular conference presenter. Mary’s research interests focus on analysis of pedagogy with particular attention to teacher/student interactions that promote powerful learning.

| SESSION B Monday speakers featured

Emily Rodgers

Sessions: RRB-3 and RRD-1

“This was my first time attending and it was a great experience. Providence was a great place to visit and easy to get around. I really appreciated the

variety in session topics and that upper grades were greatly considered within the presentations I attended. The

descriptions of the sessions I attended matched the presentations themselves precisely. The presenters did a great job of accomplishing that. I also

appreciated the variety in presenters... staff developers, renowned authors, LC consultants, etc.”

—Jaclyn M. Gangloff, K-4 ELA Resource Teacher, Fayetteville-Manlius Schools Manlius, NY

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SPECIAL EVENTS AND FEATURES, AND sue hundley memorial fund

Book Signings

Sue Hundley Memorial Fund

Notable authors will sign their books during lunch and the Exhibit Fair on Monday evening. All book signings will take place in the Rhode Island Convention Center Exhibit Hall B. Bring your own books or purchase books from the exhibitors.

Sue Hundley, a Reading Recovery Teacher Leader and a Literacy Collaborative Trainer at Lesley University, was completely dedicated to her teaching and to her students. She was also a person who cared deeply about her professional growth. Following her death from cancer in May 2000, a memorial fund was established in her name at Lesley University. The fund was created to provide teacher scholarships, promote the development of literacy materials in primary classrooms, and initiate partnerships with schools to support young readers and writers. Please consider making a donation in her name to support teachers and schools. Donations to the fund can be made through your registration form or the online registration system.

Rob Buyea will sign his new novel, Because of Mr. Terupt (Delacorte Books for Young Readers, October 2010), during lunch on Monday, November 15, from 12:00 pm–12:45 pm. Brian Heinz will sign his books on Monday, November 15 from 5:15 pm–6:00 pm during the Exhibit Fair (after his 3:30 pm–5:00 pm workshop). Brian Heinz’s titles include: • Butternut Hollow Pond (First Avenue Editions, 2005) • Cheyenne Medicine Hat (Creative Editions, 2006) • Kayuktuk: An Arctic Quest (Chronicle Books, 1996) • Nanuk: Lord of the Ice (Ballyhoo Books, 2005) • The Monsters’ Test (Millbrook Press, 1996) • The Wolves (Dial, 1996) Steven L. Layne will sign his books on Monday, November 15 during the Exhibit Fair (5:00 pm–6:00 pm) and during lunch on Tuesday, November 16 (12:00 pm–12:45 pm). Steven L. Layne’s titles include: • Mergers (Pelican Publishing, 2007) • Number 1 Teacher: A School Counting Book (Sleeping Bear Press, 2008) • P is For Princess: A Royal Alphabet (Sleeping Bear Press, 2007) • Teachers’ Night Before Halloween (Pelican Publishing, 2008) • This Side of Paradise (Pelican Publishing, 2005)

Exhibit Fair Monday, November 15, 2010 5:00 pm–6:00 pm The Exhibit Fair provides participants with time to view and purchase from the large selection of children’s books and educational resources from the nation’s leading publishers. The Exhibit Fair concludes with a free raffle prize give-away. Participants can pick up their free raffle ticket at the Exhibit Hall B entrance.

Free Gift Receive a free gift at the conference by registering for RRCNA membership. To register for membership, check off the membership box on the registration form and include in your payment the membership fee of $60 ($40 for in-training and $125 for supporting members). Your free gift will be waiting for you at the conference.

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2009 Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship Winners: John Willett and Robin Gordon John Willett is a Reading Recovery and Title I teacher at the Benjamin Banneker Charter School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. At the 2009 Literacy for All conference, John focused on expanding his knowledge regarding phonological awareness and teaching students with language differences. Robin Gordon is a third grade teacher at the Woodland Elementary School in Southwick, Massachusetts. At the 2009 Literacy for All Conference, Robin focused on learning about the management aspect of a reading and writing workshop to help her maximize the support she gives students on an individual level.

The Literacy for All Conference awards two Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarships each year, one to a Reading Recovery teacher and one to a classroom teacher. See page 6 of this brochure for details. We encourage conference participants to apply!

Choose one of the following four-hour workshops designed to improve and extend the quality of your teaching.

PC-3

Connecting the Dots: Linking Talking, Reading, and Writing to Promote Literacy Learning (Grades K–3) Cindy Downend, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA Kathy Ha, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

F e at u r e d S e ssio n s

“A complex network of language acquisition underwrites so much of a child’s future education” (Clay, 2004). Using the professional text When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works by Pinnell and Fountas (Heinemann, 2008), participants will explore how language may be expanded as children read, write, and talk. The text When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works is required for this pre-conference session.

PC-1

PC-4

Reading Workshop Essentials and Best Practices: Teach Children to Read with Power, Intention, and Joy (Grades K–2)

Equipping Students to Make Purposeful Decisions as Writers (Grades 3–8)

Kathy Collins, Literacy Consultant and Author, NH

Jodi Burroughs, Intermediate District Trainer, Literacy Collaborative, Atlantic City Public Schools, NJ

K–8 Pre-Conference Workshops

Kathy will share ideas for ensuring that children’s reading experiences and learning opportunities are maximized during Reading Workshop. She will help teachers envision a joyful yet rigorous Reading Workshop in which all readers can grow. Kathy will suggest ways to implement the research on best practices for whole class instruction and reading conferences, and she will provide time for teachers to talk and work together and reflect on their own practice. PC-2

What Every School Leader Needs to Know about High Quality Literacy Teaching (Grades K–6) Irene Fountas, Professor, Lesley University, MA

This popular topic has been the title of a weeklong seminar for administrators at Lesley University. Irene will help you think about essential elements to look for in elementary classrooms and in literacy teaching. Topics will include assessment, what to look for in instructional practices such as Guided Reading and Interactive Read Aloud, what to look for in high quality text resources, as well as how to support teacher development when some teachers find change difficult. The session will include a brief introduction to the promising role of coaches. Participants should bring a copy of The Continuum of Literacy Learning, K–8: Behaviors and Understandings to Notice, Teach, and Support by Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell (Heinemann, 2007) to use in the session.

Jill Eurich, Assistant Director, Intermediate/Middle Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA

Helen Sisk, Intermediate District Trainer, Literacy Collaborative, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

sunday | pre-conference workshops

Pre-Conference Workshops Sunday, November 14, 2010 11:00 am–4:00 pm

What does it mean to be purposeful as a writer? We will explore that question and how teachers can empower students to craft writing based on the writer’s purpose. We will discuss ways to develop writing instruction that is grounded in being responsive to students’ needs and address not only what craft techniques we want students to learn, but also help them consider when its use is effective. PC-5

The Writing Workshop: Answers to Teachers’ Most Common Questions (Grades K–5) Leah Mermelstein, Author and Literacy Consultant, Read-Write-Connect, INC., NJ

Leah Mermelstein will offer solutions to some of the most common problems teachers face when conducting a Writing Workshop in their classrooms. Topics that will be addressed throughout the day include: the characteristics of a Writing Workshop; what a teacher should do at the start of the year to ensure a successful Writing Workshop; helping children choose good topics; what to do with “slow starters”; getting students to embrace revision and editing; ensuring that minilessons stick; establishing classroom management so teachers can confer with their students; and ensuring that conferences stick. Leah will provide participants with concrete solutions to each of these areas in the form of daily rituals, teaching ideas, and quick tips. Ample time will be given for participants to reflect upon current teaching practices, as well as discuss other problems they may be facing when trying to implement a Writing Workshop.

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sunday | pre-conference workshops 14

Middle School Pre-Conference Workshop

Reading Recovery Pre-Conference Workshop

PC-6

Using Interactive Read Aloud to Support Reading and Writing Workshop in Middle School (Grades 6–8) Toni Czekanski, Intermediate/Middle Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA Sarah Foleno, Middle School Literacy Coordinator, Cambridge Public Schools, MA

We will consider the important elements of Interactive Read Aloud in grades six through eight. We will discuss: rationale for Interactive Read Aloud; text selection; planning opening moves and intentional teaching; thinking within, beyond, and about the text; and using Interactive Read Aloud to plan reading and writing minilessons. Participants must bring Fountas and Pinnell’s The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades K–8: Behaviors and Understandings to Notice, Teach, and Support (Heinemann, 2007) and Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency: Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Reading, K–8 (Heinemann, 2006), as well as a text they might use for an Interactive Read Aloud (picture book, poem, or short story).

F E AT URE D s e ssio n PC-7

Contingent Teaching in Reading Recovery Lessons Mary K. Lose, Associate Professor, Department of Reading and Language Arts and Director of the Reading Recovery Center of Michigan, Oakland University, MI

This session will explore how skilled teachers nurture the development of student competencies in reading and writing. Participants will examine teachers’ contingent responding that builds on student strengths and supports strategic activity. The reciprocal links between reading and writing are analyzed in an independent problem-solving process of activities within the Reading Recovery lesson. Video clips and lesson transcripts are used as illustrations.

LCB-3

Session A Keynote: Why is My iPhone Sitting on a Pile of Books?

Lori Jamison, Educational Consultant, Toronto, Canada

David Booth, Professor Emeritus, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, OISE University of Toronto, Canada

How will we prepare today’s students for a literacy world encompassing text forms that have not been invented yet? Come find out during this keynote address with David Booth.

Session B Monday, November 15, 2010 10:30 am–12:00 pm

Differentiating Instruction with Guided Reading: Making the Most of the 18-Minute Lesson (Grades K–3) Guided Reading is one of the most important tools we have for meeting the needs of students at all stages of development. Find out how Guided Reading can be used to impact the three key areas of differentiated curriculum: content, process, and product. This session will present a multi-stage lesson plan that goes back into the text for comprehension work, word study, and interactive writing. You will pick up a collection of teaching tools, including word study manipulatives to sticky note toolkits. LCB-4

Dynamic Read Aloud Programs and Titles that Work (Grades PreK–4) Steven L. Layne, Professor of Literacy Education, Judson University, IL

F E AT URE D S e ssio n s

Award-winning educator and writer Steven L. Layne is passionate about reading aloud to kids of all ages. He will highlight some of the “titles that do the trick” for even the most reluctant readers and offer practical suggestions for implementing a Read Aloud program designed to make your students readers for life.

LCB-1

LCB-5

PreK–8 Literacy Conference

Inspiring Reluctant Writers in the Elementary Classroom (Grades PreK–4)

Using Response to Intervention (RTI) to Support Struggling Readers (Grades K–3)

Ruth Ayres, Writing Coach, Wawasee School District, IN

Mary K. Lose, Associate Professor, Department of Reading and Language Arts and Director of the Reading Recovery Center of Michigan, Oakland University, MI

Stacey Shubitz, Literacy Specialist, PA

Ruth and Stacey will share ways they have motivated reluctant writers by incorporating their own writing as mentor texts in elementary school classrooms. Tap into the power of technology to use your writing to teach students, even those who claim they hate to write. LCB-2

Monday | SESSIONS A & B

SESSION A Monday, November 15, 2010 8:30 AM–10:00 AM

Foundational to a successful RTI approach is emphasis on early versus later intervention delivered by skilled responsive teachers who focus on child abilities as the starting point for instruction. Recommendations are presented to administrators in support of evidence-based RTI approaches that have benefits for children, teachers, and schools. This session is also appropriate for Reading Recovery educators.

Reading Images and Words to Make Meaning (Grades 1–6)

LCB-6

David Booth, Professor Emeritus, Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, OISE University of Toronto

Introduction to Reading Workshop: Structure and Rationales (Grades 3–6)

Words and images are represented in graphic texts both in print and on screen. We need to assist our students in interpreting graphic texts so they are incorporating all signs and symbols as proficient readers. We will also discuss readers as writers, constructing graphic texts using technology, computer programs that support visual composition, Bitstrips, and more.

Mechelle Abney, Intermediate/Middle Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

This session is designed for teachers who want to begin a Reading Workshop in their classroom. Topics will include independent reading, planning minilessons, conferring with readers, written response to reading, and conducting group share.

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Monday | SESSION B

Session B Monday, November 15, 2010 10:30 am–12:00 pm

LCB-10

PreK–8 Literacy Conference

Erica Denman, Literacy Consultant, NY

Response to Intervention: The Planning Process, Implementation, and Pitfalls (Grades 1–8)

Many challenges arise when moving a school or district toward implementing Writing Workshop. Erica will share strategies for cultivating a professional learning environment. She will also share tools for assessing and differentiating professional learning. Participants will leave with ideas about how to strengthen the teaching of writing.

James Cline, Educational Consultant, IN

LCB-11

Response to Intervention is a well-recognized collaboration between special and general education, however, there are very few federal guidelines. Attend this open discussion session and learn about the history of RTI and how differently it is being implemented across the country. Learn about successes and pitfalls.

All’s Well That Ends Well: Writing Satisfying Endings (Grades K–6)

LCB-7

LCB-8

Quality Literacy Instruction for English Language Learners (Grades K–8) Nancy Cloud, Professor, M.Ed. in TESL, Program Coordinator, Rhode Island College, RI

This session will highlight the similarities and differences in teaching reading and writing to English language learners (ELLs) as opposed to native speakers of English. Drawing from seminal research on literacy and ELLs, Nancy will discuss the role of the native language in teaching reading and writing in English, how to match literacy instruction to the stage of proficiency of the learner, and how to teach literacy skills in a new language in meaningful ways. Learn the information needed to plan quality literacy instruction and the characteristics of texts that make them ideal for second language learners, as well as how to extend learning to the home and community when another language is spoken in the home. A sample design for a 90-minute literacy block for ELLs will be shared. LCB-9

Using Science Notebooks to Foster Student-Led Investigations (Grades 3–6) Kelly Corbett, Third Grade Teacher, Needham Public Schools, MA Mary Rizzuto, Elementary Science Curriculum Specialist and Science Center Manager, Needham Public Schools, MA

Participants will examine the role science notebooks can play in the development of a student’s critical thinking skills and scientific content knowledge. Through active inquiry-based tasks, the viewing of video case studies, and the examination of authentic student notebooks, participants will parallel the sequence of inquiry-based investigations and science notebook entries that foster curiosity and individual student questions. Collectively we will identify strategies that support the development of literacy skills. Students use their science notebook entries as an authentic tool to build on their own understanding of electricity as they choose, plan, and implement an investigation based on their own curiosities.

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Planning for Change: Creating Professional Learning Communities to Improve Writing (Grades 3–6)

Constance Foland, Literacy Consultant, Independent Readers and Writers, NY

We all know a good ending when we read one, but how do we teach kids to write one? Participants will learn how to identify different kinds of endings used in picture books and how to teach students to write endings that feel natural and satisfy the reader. LCB-12

Orchestrating Literacy: Music, Motivation, and Mastery (PreK) Rebecca Iskric, Teacher, Conservatory Lab Charter School, MA

Children delight in discovering they can create music–patterns, rhythm, and notes that contribute to a greater whole. This same understanding can be brought to bear in terms of children’s developing awareness of language and print. Participants will experience the joy of powerful learning moments. In this hands-on session, participants will actively engage in constructing an understanding of literacy techniques while exploring different resources and materials for an early childhood classroom setting. LCB-13

Supporting Deep Engagement with Texts through Rigorous Discussion (Grades K–8) Curt Dudley-Marling, Professor, Lynch School of Education, Boston College, MA

Discussion has long played a prominent role in language arts classrooms. A substantial body of research indicates that discussion enables students to draw on their language and experiences to make sense of texts and other learning experiences. The evidence indicates, however, that classroom discussions often fail to engage students in rigorous thinking about texts. This session will utilize video excerpts from discussions in K–12 classrooms, audience participation in discussion, and presentation to illustrate an approach to discussion that has been shown to engage students, including struggling readers and second language learners, in rigorous thinking about challenging texts. This approach to discussion can be used with fiction and nonfiction texts and has been shown to improve student performance on measures of reading comprehension.

Teacher Language: Key to Developing a Community of Learners (Grades K–1) Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist, Manchester, NH Nia Steinbach, Kindergarten Teacher, Pembroke, NH

Learn how you can build a community of learners by choosing words carefully and at the same time support language learning and independence in young readers and writers in the classroom.

F E AT URE D S e ssio n s RRB-1

Reading and Writing: Teaching for Reciprocal Gains Ann Ballantyne, Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University, NY

LCB-15

Urban Literacy Coaches: What Does It Take to Make an Impact? (Grades K–6) Barbara Steckel, Assistant Professor, Division of Language and Literacy, Lesley University, MA

This session, based on the presenter’s research involving practices of literacy coaches in Massachusetts and New York, will examine the ways coaching can live up to its great potential as a vehicle for teacher development. The presenter will discuss the administrative support coaches need to enable their work and to facilitate positive change in schools. The focal point of this workshop will be not only the coaching practices that seemed to have the most impact on instruction and student learning, but most essentially, on the administrative management and organizational decisions of school principals that enabled the success of some of the coaches in the study. Through meaningful conversation and the examination of case studies, workshop participants will be encouraged to think deeply about the organizational, management, and cultural foundations that need to be established for coaching to have a positive impact within their own settings.

Middle School Strand B Sessions F E AT URE D S e ssio n MSB-1

Revolutionizing Vocabulary Learning and Instruction (Grades 4–8) Shane Templeton, Foundation Professor of Literacy Studies, University of Nevada, Reno, NV

We will explore the foundation of generative vocabulary instruction that underlies native-speaking and English-learning students’ reading and writing across all subject matter domains in grades 4-8. We will address research-based strategies for selecting words, teaching academic vocabulary, and teaching the process of how Greek and Latin word parts combine. Sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt School Publishers. MSB-2

Just Plain Good Books for Middle School Students (Grades 5–8) Barbara Scotto, Adjunct Instructor, Simmons College, MA

How can busy teachers discover and incorporate the best new literature for children and young adults into their lessons? This workshop will highlight new books in a variety of genres for literature discussion, picture books for older readers that are especially useful in reinforcing reading strategies, and interesting new works that can be used as mentor texts in Writing Workshop.

Explore how to teach for accelerated progress in reading and writing by attending to the common elements: increasing control over ideas and story meaning, language structure, vocabulary growth, letter-sound linking, and speedy pickup of visual information. (Repeated: RRE-1)

Monday | SESSION B

Reading Recovery Institute B Sessions

LCB-14

RRB-2

The Value of Powerful Language Interactions in Reading Recovery Lessons Eva Konstantellou, Reading Recovery Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Language interactions during Reading Recovery lessons build upon, extend, and shape our students’ language competencies. This session will explore how meaningful conversations and the teacher’s use of language during the reading and writing of continuous texts foster the construction of a strong literacy processing system in young learners. Lesson records and videotaped examples from Reading Recovery lessons will highlight the relationship between language, conversation, and thought, and will help us reflect on the power of language in facilitating our students’ accelerated progress. Please bring your copies of Marie M. Clay’s Literacy Lessons: Designed for Individuals, Part One and Part Two (Heinemann, 2005). RRB-3

Discovering the Essence of Story Through Rich Book Introductions Mary Rosser, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME

Storybooks are places where children weave together the threads of information and experiences they draw upon to make sense of their world and to create meaning from texts. Participants will analyze and discuss videos of child/teacher interactions demonstrating rich book introductions. (Repeated: RRD-1) RRB-4

Fostering Independence and “Agency” Throughout the Series of Lessons Debbie Clemence, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cape Cod Reading Recovery Site, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional School District, MA

Teachers will work together to investigate ways to ensure that students develop independence, “agency”, and confidence throughout the series of lessons as they construct an effective self-extending processing system in reading and writing. In addition to Marie Clay’s work, other resources referenced will be Teaching Struggling Readers: How to Use Brain-based Research to Maximize Learning by Carol Lyons (Heinemann, 2003) and Choice Words by Peter Johnston (Stenhouse, 2004). Attendees are asked to bring Marie M. Clay’s Literacy Lessons: Designed for Individuals, Part One and Part Two (Heinemann, 2005).

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Monday | SESSION C

Session C Monday, November 15, 2010 Conference participants may select a 90-minute C Session (1:30 pm–3:00 pm) then attend a D Session from 3:30 pm­­–5:00 pm or select an In-depth C session (1:30­pm–4:45 pm with a 15-minute break).

Session C Monday, November 15, 2010 1:30 pm–3:00 pm PreK–8 Literacy Conference F E AT URE D S e ssio n s LCC-1

Marvelous Minilessons for Teaching Beginning Writing (Grades K–3) Lori Jamison, Educational Consultant, Toronto, Canada

You will examine actual student writing samples and discuss developmentally appropriate instruction for students at all stages. We will look at building independence through the Writing Workshop and how to use Modeled, Shared, and Interactive Writing instruction. Lori will share dozens of practical writing activities, tools, and literature links you will be able to adapt to a range of ages and stages in your classroom tomorrow. LCC-2

Picture Books as a Springboard to Literacy Activities (Grades PreK–4) Steven L. Layne, Professor of Literacy Education, Judson University, IL

Picture books are a valuable resource for scaffolding literacy activities at any grade level, and Steven can show you how to make it happen! This session promotes practical ideas using picture books as a vehicle for expanding students’ reading and writing experiences. Participants should come prepared for a lively and engaging session full of great ideas for the classroom. LCC-3

Determining Essential Vocabulary (Grades K–8) Susan O’Leary, Author and Literacy Coach, Madison Metropolitan School District, WI

Fluent use of content-area vocabulary impacts all students’ learning. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the theory of teaching vocabulary, real-world examples of students making learning their own, and a framework for whole-school curriculum mapping. This workshop is suitable for classroom teachers, support teachers, and curriculum specialists. (Repeated: LCD-2)

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LCC-4

Nurture Young Authors with a Real Author’s Secrets (Grades K–8) Rob Buyea, Teacher and Author, Northfield Mount Hermon School, MA

Hear from former elementary school teacher and newly published children’s author, Rob Buyea, as he talks about the countless lessons he has learned about the writing process that can immediately impact your writing classroom and teaching. How can teachers help students move beyond simply planning for their story once to planning for their writing on a daily basis, so they are productive writers every day? How can teachers help students become better at revising? How should drafting look in the classroom? How do we incorporate storytelling, teacher conferences, and peer conferences? What are the tools a writer has to work with and how does a writer recognize strengths? How should we address grammar? These questions will be addressed as Rob connects his classroom experiences with his work as an author and makes practical suggestions for teachers that can be implemented immediately. LCC-5

Using Technology to Support Literacy with the K–6 Learner Susan Cardoza, K–4 Reading Specialist, Tiverton Public Schools, RI Fran Blaess, Principal, Tiverton Public Schools, RI

Are you interested in learning more about resources that are available on the web to motivate and support your reluctant readers and writers? Have you been too busy to search for and review websites and software that can address the needs of your students? This workshop will present a variety of web resources, as well as some software, that can support students’ literacy skills at school and at home. You will also learn about how to start your own website and blog, and how you can use them to facilitate parental involvement. LCC-6

The 6+1 Traits of Writing (Grades 3–6) Gina Castaldo, Literacy Consultant, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, NY

The 6+1 Traits of Writing model is a successful tool that helps teachers assess student writing and create powerful instruction to support the qualities of writing. Participants will get an overview of each trait, view and discuss samples of student work, gain practice and understanding of scoring each trait, and examine children’s picture books as tools for crafting effective minilessons. LCC-7

Guided Reading: Delving Deeper into Discussion (Grades 3–6) Kerry Crosby, Literacy Consultant and Adjunct Faculty, Lesley University, MA

Effective Guided Reading lessons strike a delicate balance between explicit teaching and authentic response. How do we focus our readers in developing their processing of text while leaving enough room for them to have a genuine response to their reading? Using videos and transcripts of Guided Reading lessons, we will focus on the discussion part of a Guided Reading lesson and examine how teachers’ language can affect the way readers think about a text after they have read it. We will look closely at how we can use language to get readers to delve deeper into text, provide evidence for their thinking, increase their processing abilities, and still maintain the integrity of authentic response.

LCC-12

Introduction to Writing Workshop: Structure and Rationales (Grades 3–6)

Linking Assessment and Student Learning: Lifting the Quality of Instruction (Grades 3–6)

Margaret Crosby, Intermediate/Middle Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

LCC-9

Supporting Literacy Coaches to Achieve School Improvement (Grades K–8) Peg Giordano, District Literacy Coach, Bristol Public Schools, CT

How can you effectively support literacy coaching? Participants will explore different ways to achieve the maximum potential from jobembedded professional development. Topics will include leading the coaching initiative, prioritizing coaching needs, collaborating with your coach, and scheduling. LCC-10

Tier 1, 2, and 3 Interventions in a K–4 School Maureen Ross Hickey, Literacy Specialist, Farmington Public Schools, CT

This workshop examines how to manage Tier 1, 2, and 3 interventions in an elementary school. This session will look at the types of interventions that are appropriate at each tier and how to schedule, monitor, and train for them. In the world of RTI we have to organize and implement interventions at all three levels, monitor them, reorganize them, and present the data in an organized manner so it can be understood and used for decision-making. Participants will walk away with concrete ideas to plan and implement interventions in their schools. LCC-11

Foundations in Literacy: Play and Learning to Write (PreK) Kathleen Kerzner, Principal, Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf, NY Jill Luztker, Speech Therapist, Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf, NY Nicole Petrella, Teacher, Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf, NY

Understanding a preschooler’s story is often difficult, but more so when a preschooler is deaf or hard of hearing and has limited control and understanding of language. As listeners we are often confused by their story, causing us to create a story we think they are trying to tell. When we do this, are we helping them to develop their use and understanding of oral language or are we shutting it down? This session will demonstrate how play can build an understanding of oral language and a sense of story that will lead to emergent writing. The presenters will demonstrate instructional strategies, share informal assessments, and use students’ work samples as teaching tools. Participants will experience the power of storytelling and its direct relationship to emergent writing; observe the role of play in storytelling and emergent writing; experience strategies used with preschoolers that develop the oral language necessary to tell and write a story using play as the instructional vehicle; and participate in the informal assessment techniques applied during a preschool Writing Workshop period.

Tammy Mulligan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA Clare Landrigan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA

Learn systems for analyzing informal literacy assessments (e.g. conference notes, student book logs and/or student reading notebook entries) to inform classroom instruction. The presenters will discuss effective ways to support colleagues as they analyze their own data and construct classroom lessons. We will also discuss strategies for planning and running study groups and coaching sessions. This workshop will feature videotaped sessions of colleagues working together to plan thoughtprovoking lessons for their students.

| SESSION C

This session is designed for teachers who want to learn how to build a community of learners and begin a Writing Workshop in their classroom. Topics will include immersing children in different types of writing, planning minilessons, conferring with writers, and conducting group share.

Monday

LCC-8

LCC-13

Systems Thinking Tools for Literacy Instruction (Grades 3–8) Tara Nattrass, Literacy Facilitator, Ritenour School District, MO Jeanne Fruge Rodriguez, Instructional Coach, Yes Prep Public Schools, TX

How can we take our students to deeper levels of thinking when composing reading responses? How can we help students articulate connections between literary elements? Systems thinking tools provide students with visual representations of patterns, trends, and relationships. These tools provide teachers and students the opportunity to use thought processes to deepen understanding. Learn how to use Behavior Over Time (BOT) graphs to deconstruct text, explore interrelationships, and engage in character analysis. Participants will delve into texts, work with the presenters and each other to create BOT graphs, and analyze student work samples in this interactive workshop. LCC-14

Helping Students Understand and Love Words: Creating Strong, Engaged Spellers (Grades 1–3) Jessica Weremchuk, Third Grade Teacher, Farmington Public Schools, CT

Spelling can be a huge hurdle for many students–even for some adults! Participants will learn strategies for teaching word study in ways that will help students understand and consistently apply spelling skills in their daily writing. Students will remain engaged and generate a love for words that will last a lifetime!

NOTE: See page 20 for In-depth LCC sessions starting at 1:30 pm.

19

Monday

Session C Monday, November 15, 2010 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

| SESSION C

NOTE: LCC-13, Systems Thinking Tools for Literacy Instruction, on page 19 is also geared for grades 3–8.

Middle School Strand C Session PreK–8 Literacy Conference Session C In-depth

MSC-1

F E AT URE D S E S S I O N

Teaching that Sticks! (Grades 5–8)

LCC-15 In-depth

Karen Caine, Literacy Consultant and Author, NJ

Do you ever feel like you are teaching the same material over and over in your Writing Workshop? Teachers will learn strategies to help students internalize and use what they have already learned in writing. Teachers will learn how to help students assess their writing, combat predictable problems, and write with the qualities of good writing in mind. Teachers will learn how to help students create personal resource binders to help them do their best writing.

Reading Recovery Institute C Session F E AT URE D S e ssio n RRC-1

Beyond the Words: Considering Nonverbal Communication in Reading Recovery Teaching Mary K. Lose, Associate Professor, Department of Reading and Language Arts and Director of the Reading Recovery Center of Michigan, Oakland University, MI

This session will examine the role of nonverbal communication and its relationship to verbal communication in early literacy contexts with reference to Marie M. Clay’s work in Reading Recovery. Elements of nonverbal communication are illustrated utilizing video examples and transcripts of child-teacher interactions within select lesson activities with an analysis of their relevance for the particular child’s learning. Recommendations are presented to teachers pertaining to the impact nonverbal communication may have on the efficiency and effectiveness of their interactions with children.

NOTE: See listings at right for In-depth RRC sessions starting at 1:30 pm.

20

Session C: In-depth Sessions Monday, November 15, 2010 1:30 pm–4:45 pm (with a 15-minute break)

Acting on What We Know about Effective Instruction for Struggling Readers (Grades K–5) Jeanne Paratore, Professor of Education, Boston University, MA

For children who struggle in learning to read and write, early intervention has long been understood to be of critical importance. Research indicates practices that have proven successful for children who struggle in the later grades are unified by some long-held principles about effective teaching­–instruction is intense, explicit, strategic, and supported by knowledgeable teachers; curriculum is challenging and interesting; student engagement is high, as are expectations for learning. Beyond these general descriptors, however, studies indicate substantial differences in how these principles are assembled by individual teachers and teacher-researchers. The differences may be as important as the similarities, for they remind us there are multiple pathways to success for struggling readers. This presentation focuses on the instructional qualities that support the learning success of struggling readers and writers. Jeanne will use excerpts from a video library of authentic, unscripted classroom literacy lessons showing teachers and students engaged in research-based reading practices to support discussion among session participants. Sponsored by Pearson Curriculum Group. LCC-16 In-depth

Teaching that Makes a Difference in the Active Process of Comprehending during Leveled Literacy Intervention Lessons (Grades K–2) Linda Garbus, Education Consultant, Lesley University, MA Diane Powell, Assistant Director of Primary Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA

This session is designed to support trained Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) teachers. Comprehending is strengthened and expanded by children’s abilities to talk about and write or draw about their reading. Although the lesson framework supports this work, there is evidence that we, as teachers of the struggling students, need to think more deeply about how to best support them in these important areas. The introduction, the discussion, and the preparation for writing about reading will all be discussed. The text When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works by Fountas & Pinnell (Heinemann, 2008) is required for the session.

The Power of Write Aloud (Grades K–6) Leah Mermelstein, Author and Literacy Consultant, Read-Write-Connect, INC., NJ

Reading Recovery Institute Session C In-depth F E AT URE D S e ssio n s RRC-2 In-depth

You could be right, you could be wrong but you’ve got to know for yourself

PreK–8 Literacy Conference D Sessions F E AT URE D S e ssio n s LCD-1

Narrative Writing: The Opening Page (Grades 3–6) Brian Heinz, Children’s Author and Writing Consultant, NY

Powerful tips, techniques, strategies, and exercises in a variety of formats allow students to create dramatic, sensory-rich opening pages that grab the reader. Examine the four key elements of “story” to reveal character, plot, and setting, and to evoke emotional tone. Specifics on dialogue, precision language, sensory detail, writing noun/verb rich, and “Show, Don’t Tell” will be covered. Learn eye-opening models for revision and editing. Bring a pencil! Resource handouts will be included for all attendees.

Sue Duncan, Reading Recovery Trainer, Georgia State University, GA

LCD-2

This in-depth session will focus on the development of monitoring in reading from the very beginning and how this changes over time. Video clips will be used to explore different aspects of monitoring.

Susan O’Leary, Author and Literacy Coach, Madison Metropolitan School District, WI

RRC-3 In-depth

When it is hard (for the teacher and student) to make progress in writing Emily Rodgers, Associate Professor, The Ohio State University, OH

The presenter will share a case study of one student who became hard for her to teach in writing. She will share how she analyzed her teaching and the student’s learning over time to support shifts in the student’s processing. Participants will develop personal plans of action for analyzing and shifting teaching to lift processing in writing.

| SESSIONS C & D

Leah will set the stage by defining what it means to be an independent writer and then show you how the components of balanced writing can help all kids write with greater independence. The rest of the session will put a spotlight on one single component: The Write Aloud. You will leave this workshop with a greater understanding of what Write Aloud is and the different ways you can use this powerful component with whole groups, small groups, and individuals. Special attention will be paid to connecting reading and writing, as well as how to use this information with English language learners.

Session D Monday, November 15, 2010 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

Monday

LCC-17 In-depth

Determining Essential Vocabulary (Grades K–8) Fluent use of content-area vocabulary impacts all students’ learning. Participants will leave with a deeper understanding of the theory of teaching vocabulary, real-world examples of students making learning their own, and a framework for whole-school curriculum mapping. This workshop is suitable for classroom teachers, support teachers, and curriculum specialists. (Repeated: LCC-3) LCD-3

Literate Beginnings: A Pre-kindergarten Continuum to Guide Teaching Gay Su Pinnell, Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH Irene Fountas, Professor, Lesley University, MA

“This was one of the best conferences I have attended. The presenters were all very knowledgeable and it was

very well organized. I felt it was a very

Learn about today’s pre-kindergarten classroom that supports the young child’s entry to literacy with literacy-oriented play, multiple language opportunities, opportunities to develop print awareness, and successful engagement with reading and writing. The presenters will address key competencies that ensure children enter kindergarten with confidence in using language and understanding many purposes of literacy in their lives.

valuable experience.” —Lisa Johnson, Principal, Greece School District Rochester, NY

21

Monday | SESSION D

Session D Monday, November 15, 2010 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

LCD-6

PreK–8 Literacy Conference D Sessions

Margaret Berges, Title I Teacher, Randolph Public Schools, MA

F E AT URE D S e ssio n s LCD-4

Refining Reflective Practice Through Blogging: Being a Wide-Awake Educator in the Writing Workshop (Grades 3–6)

Heather Ott, Title I Teacher, Randolph Public Schools, MA

Participants will learn the basics of modifying a Reading Workshop model to fit small group instruction. The workshop will consist of six parts: creating units of study, teaching minilessons, individualizing reading material, conducting effective conferences with readers, organization, and effectiveness. LCD-7

Stacey Shubitz, Literacy Specialist, PA

Reading Assessments: The Foundation for a Response To Intervention Model (Grades 1–8)

Ruth Ayres, Writing Coach, Wawasee School District, IN

James Cline, Educational Consultant, IN

Reflective practice helps educators teach in authentic ways. The presenters will discuss the importance of reflective practice within the context of 21st century literacy skills, consider ways to sharpen teaching in one of seven key areas, and help teachers develop a plan of action to begin their online journey in depending on reflective practice to make informed teaching decisions. The presenters have taught Writing Workshop in urban schools and in rural districts. They live 565 miles apart, but reflect on their teaching practice at Two Writing Teachers, a blog they started three-and-a-half years ago, which can be found at http://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com. One of the purposes of Two Writing Teachers is to reflect on the art of teaching writing in an open forum. The presenters will lead participants in a challenge to put reflective practice in action. They will encourage participants to consider a plan of action to make reflective practice a cornerstone in their professional lives through the use of an online medium, such as a blog.

Response to Intervention (RTI) is gaining acceptance as an effective collaboration between special and general education. Learn how three types of reading assessments can be used within a tiered RTI model to make informed instructional decisions for your struggling readers.

LCD-5

Exploring the Relationships among Phonics, Spelling, Reading, and Writing: The Continuing Case for Integration (Grades PreK–2) Shane Templeton, Foundation Professor of Literacy Studies, University of Nevada, Reno, NV

In recent years the teaching of specific skills has been based on a “standard protocol” type of instructional model rather than a developmental model. We will review the characteristics of a developmental model of literacy and its implications for integrated literacy instruction. This workshop is suitable for primary teachers, literacy coaches, resource/special educators, and administrators. Sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt School Publishers.

22

The Structure and Organization of Differentiating Small Group Reading Instruction (Grades 3–8)

LCD-8

G.O.A.L.S.: Engaging Teachers and Students in Success! (Grades K–8) Linda Hatfield, Director of Literacy, Middletown City Schools, NY Kelly Deyo, Literacy Coach, Middletown City Schools, NY Irina Deputron, Literacy Coach, Middletown City Schools, NY Christine Gilpatrick, Literacy Coach, Middletown City Schools, NY

Generating Opportunities for Active Literacy Success (GOALS) is a district- and school-based model that incorporates a comprehensive literacy framework and tools for engaging teachers in analyzing student data and developing and reflecting on appropriate literacy instruction for all students. The presenters will focus on teacher leadership and coaching strategies. They will share successes and challenges at the building and classroom levels. Teachers, coaches, and administrators who participate in the session will work together in small groups to plan ways they may adapt the tools for use in their own classrooms and schools. LCD-9

Listening to Young Writers to Help the Writing Improve (Grades K–2) Martha Horn, Professor of Elementary Education, Rhode Island College, RI

Helping our students grow as writers begins with listening. In this session, we will examine the talk and listening between young writers and teachers throughout the writing time. We will consider what is going on in the teacher’s head in making decisions about when to speak, when not to, and what to say to student writers to help the writing improve. We will discuss how to balance the space for talk while focusing on moving the writer forward.

High Hopes: Turning a Vision for Literacy into a Reality (Grades K–5) Jean Ann Hunt, Educational Consultant and Associate Professor, Saranac Central Schools/SUNY Plattsburgh, NY Brad Ott, Principal, Saranac Central Schools, NY

Morrisonville Elementary School is one of 13 schools in New York serving as an Effective Practice Mentor School having been validated in three instructional areas: Literacy, Special Education, and Positive Behavioral Intervention Systems (PBIS). Join these presenters for a conversation about the school’s journey to intertwine all three areas by making a commitment to implement a balanced literacy approach in all K–5 classrooms. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss the challenges of whole school change including how to engage all faculty and staff, how to bridge schisms between special education and general education, what to do when not all teachers see themselves as teachers of literacy, as well as raise issues they may be facing in their own school settings. LCD-11

Immersing Students in Quality Literature Through Literature Study and Readers Theater (Grades 3–6) Kristie Miner, Intermediate Literacy Coordinator, Whitney Point Central Schools, NY

This session will focus on one teacher’s process of combining literature study and Readers Theater as a way of immersing students in quality literature. Participants will follow this teacher’s journey from beginning to end. The presenter will share video clips of students’ performances and reflection on the process. LCD-12

Using The Continuum of Literacy Learning to Inform Guided Reading Teaching Decisions (Grades K–2) Alice Sasso, Literacy Consultant, Stonington, CT

The Continuum of Literacy Learning is a powerful teaching tool to use during Guided Reading. This session will examine ways of using The Continuum to select texts and plan, teach, and reflect on Guided Reading lessons across levels A-Z. Please bring a copy of The Continuum of Literacy Learning (K–2 or K–8) by Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell (Heinemann, 2007) to this workshop. LCD-13

Best Practice Teaching For Adult Learners (Grades K–8) Kristina Seeley, Literacy Consultant, Literacy Success, LLC, NY

Teachers need the same support we have come to learn our students need in “Best Practice” teaching, such as choices about their work, voice in the decision-making process, small pieces of learning at a time, immediate application, follow-up for reflection, time to talk with colleagues and problem solve, clear and specific goals, and accountability. It takes a unique person to lead colleagues to look within themselves effectively and to reflect on their craft as a teacher. Each school and each teacher has its own unique challenges and we must be able to work with different personalities and situations, bringing them together to work toward a common vision. Kristina will draw upon her eight years as a literacy coach to discuss this challenging work. The workshop content can be adapted for anyone working with adult learners.

Middle School Strand D Sessions NOTE: LCD-6 on page 22, The Structure and Organization of Differentiating Small Group Reading Instruction, is geared for grades 3–8 (intermediate and middle school). F E AT URE D S e ssio n MSD-1

Making Meaning with Different Forms of Text (Grades 6–8)

Monday | SESSION D

LCD-10

David Booth, Professor Emeritus, Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, OISE University of Toronto

Educators need to work toward deep understanding of the text forms in print and on screen, and in different subject contexts to build a literate citizenry. Learn how in this interactive workshop for middle school educators. MSD-2

Releasing the Responsibility in Middle School Instruction (Grades 5–8) Doreen Saccomano, Reading Specialist, Briarcliff Union Free School District, NY

This session will help teachers utilize the Gradual Release of Responsibility model as they plan reading instruction for the middle school student. Teachers will plan instruction that involves the Conditions of Learning as they teach “to” the students, work “with” them, and finally have the students work “by” themselves demonstrating their new learning. Participants will learn the theory behind this model, practice developing their own guided instruction lesson, and share their new learning with each other. The presenter will share examples of teachers working with different content area subjects and student work samples.

Reading Recovery Institute D Session F E AT URE D S e ssio n RRD-1

Discovering the Essence of Story Through Rich Book Introductions Mary Rosser, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine, ME

Storybooks are places where children weave together the threads of information and experiences they draw upon to make sense of their world and to create meaning from texts. Analyze and discuss videos of child/teacher interactions demonstrating rich book introductions. (Repeated: RRB-3)

23

TUESday | SESSION E

Session E Tuesday, November 16, 2010 8:30 am–10:00 am Participants may attend Keynote E with Steven L. Layne or a 90-minute E Session.

Session E Keynote Literacy Lessons for a Lifetime (Grades PreK–8) Steven L. Layne, Author and Professor, Judson University, IL

In this inspirational keynote address, Steven L. Layne will share from personal experiences and those of his family, friends, and colleagues about the sometimes humorous yet always powerful role that literacy plays in all of our lives, while outlining four key components of strong literacy instruction. The audience will leave refreshed and ready to practice special magic with students once again.

PreK–8 Literacy Conference E Sessions LCE-1

Strategies to Engage Digital Natives in Reading and Writing (Grades 3–8) Sue Cusack, Project Director and Instructor, Lesley University, MA

Ever wondered if technology can help students become more engaged in reading and writing? You will not have to wonder any more as we run headlong into a digital playground of resources. From the ubiquitous technologies of the digital native (iPod, blogs, and vlogs) to the generic resources in schools (Word, PowerPoint, and Inspiration), we will explore the innovative ways technology can help transform your teaching of reading and writing and encourage greater student participation in their own learning. LCE-2

Effective Strategies to Develop and Strengthen Student Writing (Grades 3–8) Marti Schwartz, ELA Teacher, Blackstone Academy Charter School, RI

A workshop of strategies to engage student writers, differentiate writing activities, and develop the skills and habits all writers need to succeed. Participants will engage in writing activities that can easily be implemented in any classroom setting.

24

Middle School Strand E Session NOTE: LCE-1, Strategies to Engage Digital Natives in Reading and Writing, and LCE-2, Effective Strategies to Develop and Strengthen Student Writing, at left, are also geared for grades 3–8 (intermediate and middle school). MSE-1

Teaching Vocabulary to Improve Comprehension (Grades 5–8) Mary E. Curtis, Director, Center for Special Education, Lesley University, MA

Providing vocabulary instruction is one of the most significant ways teachers can improve students’ reading and listening comprehension. It can also be one of the most challenging tasks for teachers to do well. This workshop will describe some activities for developing vocabulary through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Guiding principles for effective vocabulary instruction will also be discussed.

F E AT URE D S e ssio n S RRE-1

Reading and Writing: Teaching for Reciprocal Gains Ann Ballantyne, Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University, NY

Explore how to teach for accelerated progress in reading and writing by attending to the common elements: increasing control over ideas and story meaning, language structure, vocabulary growth, letter-sound linking, and speedy pickup of visual information. (Repeated: RRB-1)

“There were 6 other teachers from

my district and we are all at different points in our careers. We all felt

we got something useful for our

teaching this year!” —Tarynn Yokomizo, Reading Recovery Teacher/Reading Specialist, West Windsor-Plainsboro School District, NJ

TUESday | SESSIONs e & f

Reading Recovery Institute E Sessions

RRE-2

Examining Literacy Processing Behaviors through Running Record Analyses Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut, CT

This interactive session for Reading Recovery teachers reviews in-depth analyses of Running Records and examines student examples. Discussion will focus on describing literacy processing behaviors, inferring the student’s strategic processing, and using Running Records to inform instruction. (Repeated: RRG-1) RRE-3

Sealing the Deal Sue Duncan, Reading Recovery Trainer, Georgia State University, GA

This session will use video analysis to explore the kind of processing systems that need to be in place for children to have their programs discontinued successfully. RRE-4

From Roaming to Late in Lessons: Decision-Making to Scaffold Fluent Reading Emily Rodgers, Associate Professor, The Ohio State University, OH

Fluent reading is critical for reading development. The presenter will share examples from one case study of her teaching decisions to scaffold one student’s fluent reading over time. Topics include: assessing fluent reading, text selection, moving up a gradient of text levels, and teaching decisions.

Session F Tuesday, November 16, 2010 For Session F, participants select one of these options: • Reading Recovery Keynote with Susan O’Leary (10:30 am–12:00 pm) • A 90-minute Session F (10:30 am–12:00 pm) • An In-depth Session F (10:30 am–1:45 pm) Participants who attend the Keynote or a 90-minute F Session (10:30 am–12:00 pm) may select a G Session from 1:00 pm–2:30 pm. Those who attend an In-Depth Session F from 10:30 am–1:45 pm will finish their professional development at 1:45 pm. There will be a 15-minute break during the In-Depth Session. Participants may grab lunch when the session concludes at 1:45 pm.

Reading Recovery Keynote F Change Over Time: What Marie Clay taught us in her writing and in her life Susan O’Leary, Author and Literacy Coach, Madison Metropolitan School District, WI

Marie Clay remains a mentor to us not only for her writing and Reading Recovery, but for the ways she continued to consider what it is to learn, to teach, and to perceive. Beginning with Change Over Time in Children’s Literacy Development (Heinemann, 2001), Susan will explore the ways Marie Clay’s writing and example can touch all teachers’ teaching and stance in their world.

“I’ve been attending this conference for the last 15 years and I truly believe

that it is one of the best opportunities for professional development offered

to teachers. I always walk away with something new that I learn to bring back to my classroom.”—Lori DeSimone, Kindergarten Teacher, Lincoln School Department, Lincoln, RI

25

TUESday | SESSION F

Session F Tuesday, November 16, 2010 10:30 am–12:00 pm PreK–8 Literacy Conference F Sessions

“I look forward to attending the

conference every year. The range of

session topics offered differs from year to year. Literacy for All continues to

F E AT URE D S e ssio n s

enhance my instructional practices.”

LCF-1

—Cheryl Salomao, First Grade Teacher, Hampshire Regional

Integrated Curriculum: Designing Instruction by Taking a Closer Look at the Language We Use (Grades K–2) Lauren Benjamin, Literacy Consultant, NY

The language we use to deliver instruction is just as important as the texts we choose. From the impromptu tap on the shoulder to the orchestrated class discussion, we need to be aware of what we are saying or asking of our students. Participants will consider how language shapes our instruction and how it affects the learning that is taking place in an integrated curriculum. We will examine: talk of an integrated curriculum; process questions; knowledge questions; interpretive questions; and circular questions. LCF-2

Genre Study: Helping Students Think, Talk, and Write About Texts (Grades 2–6) Irene Fountas, Professor, Lesley University, MA Gay Su Pinnell, Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University, OH

The presenters will address key elements of different types of texts and how to help students learn how to think about them as readers and writers. Topics will include book talk, literature discussion, writing about reading, and minilessons that promote understanding of various genres. LCF-3

Smartboards, Wikis, and Blogs: Enhancing Literacy Learning (Grades K–2) Jenny Amendolare, Literacy Coordinator, Mineola Public Schools, NY Cindy Downend, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Using technology in the literacy classroom can be both exciting and somewhat daunting for primary teachers. We will share ideas for integrating various uses of technology to support young readers, writers, and speakers. The presenters will share ideas for using blogs and wikis to foster the home-to-school connection.

School District, Southampton, MA LCF-4

Fostering a Community of Thinkers Through Interactive Read Aloud (Grades K–5) Veronica Beaudoin, Literacy Coach, Bristol Public Schools, CT Peg Giordano, District Literacy Coach, Bristol Public Schools, CT

Teachers will develop a deeper understanding of how Interactive Read Aloud is a crucial component in a comprehensive literacy framework. With the ever-increasing demands for differentiation in the classroom, Interactive Read Aloud is one way to support the development of oral language as well as effectively build students’ ability to think about and beyond the text. We will be referring to Fountas and Pinnell’s The Continuum of Literacy Learning K–8 (Heinemann, 2007); Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency (Heinemann, 2006); and Guiding Readers and Writers (Heinemann, 2001). If you have any of these three texts it would be helpful if you brought them to the workshop. LCF-5

Infusing Phonics Instruction throughout the Kindergarten Classroom Michelle Witman-Blumenfeld, Consultant and Literacy Coach, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, NY

This interactive workshop will help participants to gain further understanding of why phonics instruction is an essential part of the kindergarten classroom. Participants will explore how implicit and explicit phonics instruction can meet the needs of all learners in the kindergarten classroom. The workshop will walk participants through the components of a balanced literacy framework, providing techniques and tools that can be immediately infused into any classroom setting. LCF-6

Access to Print: Digital Strategies to Accommodate Struggling Readers (Grades 3–8) Sue Cusack, Project Director and Instructor, Lesley University, MA

There are several digital strategies that general and special educators should know to ensure that students with print-based disabilities and low-level literacy skills have equitable access to print. This session will explore online resources such as eBook, audio books, free text-to-speech tools, and audio book players. We will sort out resources and tools that are free to students that have qualified print-based disabilities under IDEA. We will discuss ways to support students who do not qualify but are no less in need of this kind of access and support.

26

LCF-11

The Impact of a Literacy Team: Report Cards to Literacy Reports (Grades K–8)

Dramatic Play: Real Life Literacy for Great Beginnings (PreK–K)

Ali Dutson, Intermediate Literacy Coordinator and Fifth Grade Teacher, Mission Grammar School, MA

Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Implementation Specialist, Manchester, NH

Catherine Desroche, Primary Literacy Coordinator and K–2 Teacher, Mission Grammar School, MA Maura Bradley, Principal, Mission Grammar School, MA

Participants will look at specific positive outcomes of an effective literacy team. In this session, two teachers and the principal from Mission Grammar School will focus on the impact of an effective literacy team and share examples of structure, meeting style, and whole school approach. They will discuss team development and completion of the Annual Literacy Report, as well as how they worked as a literacy team to guide standards based report card development. Report card samples and process will be shared with participants. LCF-8

Family Literacy Workshop During the Classroom Day (Grades K–2) Deborah Felix, Kindergarten Teacher, Amherst Public School District, MA

Learn how to incorporate real life literacy as young children engage in reading, writing, and thinking in a variety of dramatic play environments. LCF-12

ABC and Picture Books to Support Scientific Process Skills (Grades K–2) Mary Rizzuto, Elementary Science Curriculum Specialist and Science Center Manager, Needham Public Schools, MA

TUESday | SESSION F

LCF-7

Participants will examine ways teachers can use ABC and picture books to support the development of scientific process skills in the early elementary grades. Through active investigation, participants will examine these text structures and the possibilities they offer for science learning. We will spend time identifying specific scientific process skills, discussing their importance in building future knowledge, and learning strategies for using literacy to integrate these skills into the curriculum. Ideas and activities presented in this session can immediately be implemented within the classroom curriculum.

This workshop addresses the importance of establishing a connection early in the school year among the teacher, classroom literacy learning, and the role of the parent in their child’s literacy development. Teachers will learn how to organize a literacy workshop that includes parents and students during the regular classroom day. With guidance from the teacher, parents are able to implement literacy strategies taught in the workshop through participating in literacy centers with their child. LCF-9

Engaging Students in Rich Vocabulary Instruction to Enhance Comprehension (Grades K–6) Victoria Mejia, Literacy Coach, Central Islip School District, NY Michelle Corcione, Literacy Coach, Central Islip School District, NY

Based on research by Isabel Beck and Margaret McKeown, direct vocabulary instruction increases vocabulary learning and comprehension. This session will demonstrate how to implement a vocabulary program that indicates specific words to teach, strategies to teach them, and activities that will provide students with ownership of these words. Engaging students in rich vocabulary instruction promotes active thinking and comprehension. LCF-10

Can lunch, books, parents, and great conversation increase comprehension skills? (Grades 2–6) Bonny Myers, Third Grade Teacher, Farmington Public Schools, CT

This session will focus on how parents and children use Nancy Boyles’ reading strategies to communicate about reading. Parents and students often have meals together at school to discuss a book they all have read. Parents and children must come prepared with Post–it notes in the books ready to discuss. Bonny will show teachers how they can arrange these events around breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Several genres and themes of books are used to promote conversation to increase comprehension. These events also help parents understand how their children learn to comprehend reading.

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TUESday | SESSION F

LCF-13

Talking on Paper: A Step-by-Step Approach to Writing About Reading (Grades 3-6) Abigail Staab, Third Grade Teacher, Carthage Central School District, NY Ganell Tremont, Literacy Coach and Third Grade Teacher, Carthage Central School District, NY

The majority of our students do not know how to write quality responses about their reading in a way that shows comprehension of the text. This workshop will take you through a step-by-step process, each step building on the one before, to get students to “talk on paper”. This approach scaffolds students as they go from writing one-sentence responses about their reading to writing a one-page response in letter format that includes details and evidence from the story to support their thinking about the text. Each step is so gradual that students easily build on prior learning and they are motivated to keep moving through the process. All students experience success at every step. We will also explore the importance of Interactive Read Alouds and Shared Writing experiences in this process. LCF-14

It’s Alive! Making Nonfiction Writing Come Alive (Grades PreK–8) Steve Swinburne, Children’s Book Author, VT

Through a PowerPoint presentation, humor, and story telling, veteran nonfiction author Steve Swinburne will take teachers, librarians, and educators on a tour of his nonfiction books from the original idea and blank page through the stages of first drafts to revising, editing, illustrating and finally, the printed book. Steve will review his rules for making nonfiction writing come alive, which will help you ignite a passion for nonfiction in your students. He will highlight the use of strong verbs and interesting details, writing a strong lead, the power of revision and the fun of research. Steve will include personal history and anecdotes about how he came to “the writing life” and will conclude with a performance of his Ocean Soup poems.

Middle School Strand F Session NOTE: See page 29 for an In-depth Middle School F Session (MSF–2). NOTE: LCF-6, Access to Print: Digital Strategies to Accommodate Struggling Readers, on page 26 is designed for grades 3–8. F E AT URE D S e ssio n MSF-1

Reading Response in the 21st Century (Grades 6-8) Donalyn Miller, Teacher and Author, TX

Increasingly, readers take to the Internet when responding to the books they read. Using free sites and authentic models, Donalyn Miller, The Book Whisperer, will introduce reading response activities that motivate and engage young readers and incorporate technology skills.

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Session F In-depth Tuesday, November 16, 2010 10:30 am–1:45 pm (with a 15-minute break) PreK–8 Literacy Conference Session F In-depth F E AT URE D S e ssio n s LCF-15 In-depth

Launching RTI Comprehension Instruction with Shared Reading (Grades 2–8) Nancy Boyles, Professor of Reading, Southern Connecticut State University, CT

Participants will design a quick and easy pacing guide for grade-level comprehension objectives, learn strategies to teach objectives such as summarizing and making connections, identify the components of an explicit comprehension lesson that meets the rigorous requirements of RTI Tier I Instruction, and create their own model lesson matched to a focused objective. Handouts will include classroom-ready planning templates, sample lesson plans, and a bibliography of texts matched to 40 different comprehension objectives. This workshop is suitable for classroom teachers, reading specialists, literacy coaches, ESL teachers, and special education teachers. Sponsored by Maupin House Publishing. LCF-16 In-depth

Coaching with Humility and Intention (PreK–8) Kristin Rainville, Assistant Professor of Literacy, Manhattanville College, NY

This in-depth session will engage coaches with strategies for coaching with humility, compassion, and intention. Working from an inquiry stance, we will explore the complexities of coaching and more specifically, the process of change. We will reflect on our language as coaches and how it has a deep impact on our relationships and work.

“This conference is always a kickstart

to my professional development efforts. The learning I do and the connections I make with world-class thinkers last throughout the year and beyond.”

—Michael Clarke, Wappingers Central School District, NY

F E AT URE D s e ssio n MSF-2 In-depth

Writer’s Workshop in the Middle School Classroom: Training Students as Young Professional Writers (Grades 5–8)

Session G Tuesday, November 16, 2010 1:00 pm–2:30 pm Participants who attended the Reading Recovery Keynote with Susan O’Leary or a 90-minute Session F in the previous time block (10:30 am–12:00 pm) may select a Session G from 1:00 pm–2:30 pm. Those who attended an In-depth Session F (10:30 am–1:45 pm) will conclude their professional development at 1:45 pm.

Brian Heinz, Children’s Author and Writing Consultant, NY

This workshop contains powerful instructional strategies and motivating products to transform the middle school classroom into bubbling cauldrons of creativity and to boost writing skills to sophisticated levels. With transparencies, charts, models, and exercises, participants will see how students can grasp and apply the secrets of professional writers. This workshop is for teachers who are serious about their personal growth as writers and that of their students. There will be a great emphasis on the revision process. An extensive resource packet will be provided.

PreK–8 Literacy Conference G Sessions

TUESDAY | SESSIONs F & G

Middle School Strand Session F In-depth

F E AT URE D s e ssio n LCG-1

Exploring Literacy Instruction within the Content Areas (Grades 3–5) Lauren Benjamin, Literacy Consultant, NY

Participants will investigate and identify ways to match the teaching of reading, writing, and content areas in a manner that teaches the writer, the reader, and the researcher—not simply the book, the topic, or the written piece. We will identify ways teachers can use the workshop setting as a vehicle to deliver content instruction while addressing the needs of readers and writers, thus maintaining the integrity of the workshop. Participants will also examine the integration of content into Guided Reading, Shared Reading, and Read Alouds. LCG-2

Interactive Writing: Powerful Learning for K, 1, and 2 Laurel Burns, Literacy Coordinator, Bermuda

We will examine how Interactive Writing supports development of the writing process across grade levels for our youngest learners. Discussion will focus on establishing routines for engagement and determining teaching points for instruction. LCG-3

Words of Wonder: Exploring Art and Language to Empower Young Children (Grades PreK–2) Mary Geisser, Early Childhood Educator and Artist, Lesley University, MA and Rhode Island School of Design, RI

Books are a staple in most classrooms, but books created by children are not as common. The art of book making can empower children and introduce them to concepts of language and literacy in a creative way. Participants will have the opportunity to explore, create, and share books in a stimulating environment. The presenter will share strategies that motivate children to be leaders in their own learning process and enlist teachers and families as co-learners from start to finish.

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tuesday | SESSION G

LCG-4

LCG-8

Generative Instruction for Decoding and Comprehension (Grades K–6)

Let’s Get It Write! (Grades K–2)

Joe Layng, Senior Scientist and Founder, Headsprout, Inc., WA Janet Twyman, VP of Instructional Development, Research and Implementation Headsprout, Inc., WA

This presentation will describe the importance of identifying and teaching the component skills necessary for successful decoding and reading comprehension. A special emphasis will be placed on what it means to comprehend and how the four major types of comprehension–literal, inferential, main idea, and derived word meaning–can be taught. LCG-5

Professional Writing Techniques to Use in the Classroom (Grades 3–8) Anastacia Leiphart, Middle School Language Arts Teacher and Literacy Trainer, Tambearly School, Nassau, Bahamas

A professional writer explores the skills and techniques writers use to create publishable pieces of writing. These same skills can be taught to students to give them the advantage of writing with ease when assignments demand it. Participants will explore three types of writing through the eyes of a writer–narrative, expository, and fiction. Each type of writing is approached in a different way but all produce extraordinary results for students, especially students who struggle with writing. This down-to earth way of writing instruction has been proven to raise standardized test scores, in-class essays, and most of all, the confidence of struggling students.

Handwriting fluency is an essential component of early learning. Students are expected to print legibly as early as kindergarten. This session introduces teaching techniques for students with diverse learning styles and abilities to print legibly with common classroom materials. The strategies are developmentally appropriate and simultaneously develop steps toward legibility including pencil grasp, letter formation, letter size, word spacing, and sentence skills. Learn how to integrate handwriting into your reading curriculum. LCG-9

Literacy in a Reggio Emilia Inspired Preschool: Engaging Families through “Learning Stories” (PreK) Suzanne Ryan, Full Day PreK Co-Teacher, Union #38 School District, MA Kathryn Bresciano, Full Day PreK Co-Teacher, Union #38 School District, MA

As early childhood educators, we want families to share in the excitement and understand the importance of literacy learning in preschool. Come and learn about how preschool teachers in a Reggio Emilia inspired preschool use documentation to create daily “learning stories” to educate and engage families. Through a multimedia presentation participants will experience how literacy can be integrated throughout all aspects of the preschool curriculum and how to inspire families to celebrate and actively engage in their child’s developing literacy.

LCG-6

LCG-10

Reading is Comprehending: Comprehending is Reading! (Grades K–2)

Long, Long Ago: A Genre Study of Traditional Literature (Grades 3–6)

Patricia Martin, Literacy Consultant, Heinemann and Adjunct Faculty, Lesley University, MA

Ganell Tremont, Intermediate Literacy Coordinator and Third Grade Teacher, Carthage Central Schools, NY

“Comprehension is involved in all reading…even a one-sentence message” (Clay, 2001). Comprehending is an active ongoing process that is fostered by effective teaching. This session will explore the role the teacher has in supporting children’s comprehension as they encounter texts. The emphasis will be on building the comprehending process during Guided Reading in the primary classroom.

Abigail Staab, Third Grade Teacher, Carthage Central Schools, NY

LCG-7

Designing Your Classroom for Effective Literacy Instruction (Grades K–2) Melanie Matthews, Lead Consultant, Literacy at Work, MI

Are you having trouble organizing your classroom for literacy instruction? This presentation will guide you step-by-step using illustrations showing various classroom layouts, routines, and procedures that will help you create the optimal environment necessary for teaching the skills of literacy. You will leave feeling more empowered with a better understanding of classroom design for literacy instruction.

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Melissa McHugh, Head Teacher, Children’s Country Day School, NY and Tradeshow Specialist, Handwriting Without Tears

Before we can expect students to write in a particular genre, they must first experience it as a reader. Participants will learn how to conduct a genre study of traditional literature (pourquoi tales, fables, and fairy tales) that integrates Read Alouds, reading and writing minilessons, and book clubs. Student writing work will be celebrated! No need to shy away from fictional writing in your classroom after attending this session.

LCG-11

Literacy Teaching with Emerging Technologies: Great Resources and Inspiring Examples (Grades 3–8) Maureen Yoder, Professor, Technology in Education Online Programs, Lesley University, MA

Emphasis will be on starting with a curriculum need in the area of literacy, then identifying activities that challenge and inspire students. In this context, several new technologies will be explored that will provide informative resources, collaboration tools, and vehicles for students to demonstrate their new knowledge. Participants will see an overview of emerging technologies and online resources that have been in existence long enough for their value to be demonstrated but are attracting more users and contributors daily, whose additions and improvements add to their quality and usefulness. The focus will be on free Internet applications and safe virtual worlds. Classroom examples of constructivist techniques and replicable examples will exemplify these exciting innovations. Participants will leave with an annotated list of resources and suggestions to supplement each topic.

Middle School Strand G Sessions NOTE: LCG-5, Professional Writing Techniques to Use in the Classroom, on page 30 and LCG-11, Literacy Teaching with Emerging Technologies: Great Resources and Inspiring Examples above, are suitable for grades 3–8. F E AT URE D S e ssio n MSG-1

Research, Reading, and Response Tools for Teachers (Grades 6–8) Donalyn Miller, Teacher and Author, Trinity Meadows Intermediate School, TX

Donalyn Miller, The Book Whisperer, shares online resources for expanding your online professional learning community and providing literacy support for students. Contact authors, discover new books, connect with like-minded colleagues, and increase your productivity through tools like Twitter, LiveBinder, Diigo, and more.

MSG-2

Making Learning Visible: Seeing Students’ Assets (Grades 6–12) Evangeline Harris Stefanakis, Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Development, Boston University, MA

This session will present six case studies of students’ digital portfolios from dual language programs in New York City public schools (grades 6–12), demonstrating the development of e-Portfolios, or digital portfolios, and their use as a comprehensive system of assessment for all students, including those with learning challenges. The presenter will demonstrate how digital portfolios can be used as a tool for observing, documenting, and keeping track of student progress. The power of portfolios will be described through sharing portfolios of best practice teachers in middle and high school classrooms. Workshop participants will design a portfolio system for their classroom or school.

TUESday | SESSION G

Session G Tuesday, November 16, 2010 1:00 pm–2:30 pm

Reading Recovery Institute G Sessions F E AT URE D S e ssio n RRG-1

Examining Literacy Processing Behaviors through Running Record Analyses Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut, CT

This interactive session for Reading Recovery teachers reviews in-depth analyses of Running Records and examines student examples. Discussion focuses on describing literacy processing behaviors, inferring the student’s strategic processing, and using Running Records to inform instruction. (Repeated: RRE-2) RRG-2

Teaching for Change in Writing One Child at a Time Andi Clark, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Salem Public Schools, MA

This session will focus on using information from the Observation Survey and on teaching from what the child knows from the start. Specific emphasis will be placed on generating conversations as a shared activity. Participants will share transcripts of conversations between teacher and child, which facilitate the construction of a composed message and demonstrate how the stories expand and increase in complexity over time. RRG-3

The Role of Language in Selecting and Introducing New Texts Wendy Mattson, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, NH

Text selection for Reading Recovery students is critical. Marie M. Clay states: “Choose the new book very carefully” and “select books to assist individual children to read with success” (LLDI-2, p. 89). The child’s control of language is one factor that must be taken into account. Participants will learn how to use the Record of Oral Language to think about the level of complexity in a child’s construction of spoken sentences and how this will impact text selection and orientation to the new text.

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location, directions, & parking

Location

By Air

The conference takes place in the Rhode Island Convention Center 1 Sabin Street Providence, RI 02903 401.458.6000

Just eight miles from downtown, T.F. Green Airport is the closest airport to the conference. A total of ten airlines provide more than 200 daily flights to major national and international destinations. For more information call 888.268.7222 or visit their website at www.pvdairport.com

The Rhode Island Convention Center is a first-class conference facility located in easily accessible Providence, Rhode Island. The Convention Center is connected to the Westin Hotel and the Providence Place Mall, offering attendees plenty of places to stay, eat, and shop. Shopping enthusiasts will marvel at the Providence Place Mall with 150 specialty stores, restaurants, cinemas, and an IMAX Theatre. Experience a slice of the city’s ethnic heritage on Federal Hill, Providence’s own “Little Italy.” Federal Hill is a 15-minute walk from the Convention Center.

Directions By Car From the North: From Interstate 95 South to Exit 22A. Follow the signs toward Downtown/Convention Center. Go through the first light in the right hand lane. Take your first right after the light. Take the next right onto Exchange Street. After the next light, bear right between the hotel and the convention center to the North Garage.

Bonanza Bus Lines: 800.556.3815 or 401.454.8800 Peter Pan: 800.343.9999 Greyhound Lines: 800.231.2222 or 401.751.8800; Web: www.greyhound.com Rhode Island Public Transit Authority: 401.781.9400 or 888.331.7500; Web: www.ripta.com

Parking There are numerous parking garages within a few blocks of the Convention Center. Parking for a fee is available at the Convention Center ($10 per day; $18 for overnight) and at the Westin Hotel, the Courtyard by Marriott, and Providence Biltmore (rates vary per hotel). See the hotel information for further details and costs associated with parking. All parking fees are subject to change without notice.

From the South:

Parking at the Rhode Island Convention Center

From Interstate 95 North to Exit 22A. Follow the signs toward Downtown/Convention Center. At the light, turn right onto Francis Street. At the next light, go right onto Sabin Street. Bear right between the hotel and the convention center to the North Garage.

The North Garage is located next to the Westin Hotel and the Rhode Island Convention Center. It is connected to the Westin, the Convention Center, and the Providence Place Mall. Look for signs to the North Garage.

From the East:

Rhode Island Convention Center Event Rate:

Take 195 West. Merge onto 95 North to Exit 22A. Follow the signs toward Downtown/Convention Center. At the light, turn right onto Francis Street. At the next light, go right onto Sabin Street. Bear right between the hotel and the convention center to the North Garage.

From the West: Take Route 6 East to the “Route 6 East and I-295 South” on ramp. Take a right and stay to the right following the signs to Providence and Route 6 East (you will use part of the I-295 on-ramp to get onto Route 6 East). Stay on Route 6 East to the end (sign will read “6 East to 10 North”) and stay to the left. Continue to the Dean Street Exit. Once on the exit ramp, stay to the left so that you will be on the left side of the island when you reach the light. Turn left onto Dean Street (four-lane road). Then immediately take your first right onto West Exchange Street to the Convention Center Garage.

By Train Providence is located on Amtrak’s Washington to Boston, Northeast Corridor main line. A high-speed train, the Acela, travels Monday through Friday from New York’s Penn Station to Providence in less than 3 hours. The rail service whisks visitors to and from the modern and welldesigned Providence Station (adjacent to WaterPlace Park). Direct MBTA commuter rail service is also available to Metro Boston. For more information on fares and schedules please call Amtrak at 1.800.USA.RAIL or MBTA at 1.800.392.6100 or visit their websites at www.amtrak.com or www.mbta.com.

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By Bus

$10 per day; $18 per overnight stay All parking garage rates are subject to change without notice. For more information call the garage at 401.458.6339 or visit www. riconvention.com.

Parking at the Providence Place Mall Parking is available at the Providence Place Mall. The Providence Place Mall parking area is connected to the Westin and the Rhode Island Convention Center. For more parking rates at the Mall visit their website at www.providenceplace.com.

Hourly Parking Rates: 0–3 hours: $1; 3–4 hours: $5; 4–5 hours: $7; 5–8 hours: $10; 8–20 hours: $20; 20–24 hours: $25. If you park longer than 24 hours, the cost would be $25 plus any additional hours at the above hourly rates.

How to Make a Reservation The Literacy for All Conference has discounted room blocks at the following four hotels. When calling the hotel to make a reservation, be sure to indicate you are attending the Lesley University Literacy for All Conference to get these special rates. We strongly recommend you make your reservation early, as the discounted room blocks may fill prior to the cut-off date.

The Westin Providence (Attached to the Rhode Island Convention Center)

LITERACY FOR ALL CONFERENCE Registration Information Please read all the information below before completing the registration form.

How to Register • Online via our secure system: www.regonline.com/lfa2010. Save $15 when you register online. • U.S. Mail: Complete the registration form on the next page and fax it or mail it with your payment to the address on the form.

One West Exchange Street Providence, RI 02903 800.937.8461 (800.WESTIN.1) or 401.598.8000

• Registrations will not be taken over the phone.

Room Rate: $159 single/double; $25 additional person charge

$385

Package Deal (Pre-Conference Workshop and Full Conference)

$265

Full Conference (Monday and Tuesday)

Reservation deadline (to be eligible for block rate): Wednesday, October 13, 2010

$165

Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday only)

Parking: $26 per night, with in and out privileges; rate subject to change without notice

$210

Monday Only

$210

Tuesday Only

(Note: $5 of the $159 room rate will help offset the cost of the conference.)

Providence Biltmore Hotel (One block from the Rhode Island Convention Center) 11 Dorrance Street Providence, RI 02903 800.294.7709 or 401.421.0700 Junior Suite/Two California Kings Room Rate: $159 single/double

Registration Fees

$375 Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday) plus one day (Monday OR Tuesday) Registration fees do not include meals or parking. Registrations cannot be shared.

NEW Discounts for 2010!

Reservation deadline (to be eligible for block rate): Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Group Discount: Send 12 people from your school district to the Literacy for All Conference for two or three days and the 13th person may attend for free (on a lesser or equal value registration).

Parking: A privately owned and operated parking garage is located adjacent to the hotel. Currently, overnight guests are charged $26 per night, per car. Non-registered guests are charged $15 to attend a function. All prices are subject to change without notice.

Loyalty Reward Discount for Repeat Attendees: If you attended the Literacy for All Conference in 2008 and in 2009, and if you register for the 2010 Conference for two or three days, you will receive an additional $15 off your registration.

Courtyard by Marriott

School Leader Discount: If your school (not district, but one school) sends 3 or more educators to the 2010 Literacy for All Conference for two or three days, the school may send their school leader (principals and assistant principals) for a 50% discount for any of the conference registration options (one-day, two-day, or three-day registrations).

(Across the street from the Rhode Island Convention Center) 32 Exchange Terrace at Memorial Boulevard Providence, RI 02903 888.887.7955 Rate: $174 single/double (Note: $5 of the $174 room rate will help offset the cost of the conference.)

Reservation deadline (to be eligible for the block rate): Friday, October 22, 2010 Parking: Parking is available at the hotel for $22 a night or $10 per day until 5:00 pm to attend a function.

Hilton Providence

hotel and registration information

Hotel Information

Visit the Literacy for All website registration page for detailed instructions on how to register and receive any of the above discounts: http://lesley.edu/crr/lfa_reg.html

Methods of Payment Participants may pay by check, credit card, or with a purchase order payable to Lesley University. Payment must be received within 5 (five) business days of receiving your registration form.

(Five-minute walk from the Convention Center) 21 Atwells Avenue Providence, RI 02903 1.800.HILTONS or 1.800.445.8667 Room Rate: $139 single/double Reservation deadline (to be eligible for the block rate): Friday, October 15, 2010 Parking: $20 for self-parking and $24 for overnight valet with in/out privileges

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Registration information

Online Registration

Volunteer! We need your help.

There are many benefits to registering online:

We need many volunteers to collect tickets and introduce featured speakers at the conference and would greatly appreciate your help. Below are brief descriptions of the volunteer duties. If you would be willing to volunteer, please check off the volunteer box on your registration form or within the online registration system. A member of the Literacy for All Conference team will contact volunteers with details. Thank you!

• It’s easy and the system is user-friendly. • Immediate confirmation. As soon as you click “Finish My Registration,” you will receive a confirmation e-mail with a link to your conference agenda and a receipt. • Save money! Register online and save $15! • Easy payment! Online registration can be paid with credit card, purchase order, or check.

Session Assistant Volunteer (about 50 volunteers needed)

• Sign up for RRCNA membership or donate to the Sue Hundley Memorial Fund via the online registration system.

• Assist the featured speaker with the distribution of materials, if any

• Session descriptions are in the system. Just click “details” for easy viewing.

• Arrive at the session 15 minutes early • Start the session by introducing the speaker (a short statement will be placed in your registration envelope)

• Register online now! Go to www.regonline.com/lfa2010

• End the session by reminding participants to put their evaluation forms in the drop box

Please call us if you should need assistance at 617.349.8402 or email literacy@lesley.edu.

Ticket Taker Volunteer (approximately 100 volunteers needed)

• Arrive at the session 15 minutes early

Session Tickets

• Collect tickets at the door from participants

Tickets to sessions will be distributed to participants at the conference registration check-in booth at the Rhode Island Convention Center. Each participant will receive a perforated ticket sheet, containing their selections, in their registration envelope. We will make every effort to accommodate your selections; however, if sessions are full, we will provide you with a ticket to your second choice workshop and you will have the option to exchange your tickets at the ticket exchange table. Please note: Although you will be issued a ticket for each of your sessions, including keynotes, tickets will only be collected at sessions that are full or close to capacity. Take your tickets with you to all sessions, however, as they will have room names printed on them and will help you remember your selections and start times.

• Make sure the room does not fill beyond capacity

How to Contact the Literacy for All Conference Team US Mail: Literacy for All Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138 Phone: 617.349.8402 Fax: 617.349.8490 E-mail: literacy@lesley.edu

Certificate of Attendance Each attendee will receive a certificate of attendance at the conclusion of their stay at the conference upon completing and turning in a purple objectives form. Certificates may be used toward earning professional development points.

Professional Development Hours Earn up to 10.5 PDPs for attending the two-day conference and an additional 4 PDPs (for a total of 14.5 PDPs) for attending a pre-conference workshop on Sunday.

Payment, Refund, and Cancellation Policy Please read carefully. Submission of the registration form or completion of a registration via the online registration system is a commitment to pay the conference fees if the conference is held, regardless of the participant’s reason for canceling. No-shows will be invoiced and subject to collection for the full amount. Unpaid registrations (including no shows) may necessitate barring registration from future institutes, conferences, and professional trainings sponsored by Lesley University. A refund, less a $50 processing fee, will be granted if a written request is postmarked on or before Friday, October 1, 2010. No refunds will be issued after this date under any conditions, though substitutions can be made at any time. Participants must notify the conference office in writing if you are sending a substitute so that we may maintain accurate attendance records for the conference.

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RRCNA Membership The Reading Recovery Council of North America (RRCNA) is an association of Reading Recovery professionals (Reading Recovery teachers, teacher leaders, site coordinators, and university trainers) and partners (classroom teachers, Title 1 teachers, school administrators, parents, and community members). Membership benefits include subscriptions to newsletters and journal, a logo lapel pin, and membership certificate. Membership is just $60 per year ($40 for Reading Recovery teachers-intraining). To sign up for membership, simply check the membership box on your registration form and include an additional $60 with your registration fee. Supporting membership is $125. It includes all benefits of membership and recognition in the Council Connections newsletter for supporting the Council’s ongoing development. Please check the status of your membership prior to signing up by calling the RRCNA membership line 614.310.7323.

Job Title: Principal/Asst.

Literacy

Reading Recovery

PreK Teacher

Literacy

Reading Teacher

K–2 Classroom

Middle School

Special Education

3–6 Classroom

Reading/Literacy

Title I Director

Consultant

Reading Recovery

Title I Teacher

ELL Teacher

Reading Recovery

University/College

$210 Monday only

Literacy Coach

Reading Recovery

$210 Tuesday only $375 Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday) plus one day (Monday or Tuesday)

Other

Email address (Required. Confirmation and receipt will be sent via email.)

Are you a NYC educator registering for Literacy for All under the New York City contract? (If “yes” please stop filling out this form and contact the conference office at 617.349.8402 to obtain a NYC registration form. If the answer is “no”, please continue.) Please select registration type:

Principal

Teacher Teacher

$385 Package Deal

(Pre-Conference Workshop and Full Conference)

$265 Full Conference (Monday and Tuesday) $165 Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday only)

$0

I am a lead presenter for a Monday or Tuesday workshop (lead presenters receive a complimentary Full Conference registration)

$0

Group Discount: “13th free”

Coordinator

Coordinator in Training Teacher

Specialist Teacher

Teacher in Training

Teacher Leader in Training

Teacher

Professor

Teacher Leader

School Name

School District/Company

Loyalty Reward Discount: In addition to selecting a

registration type above, check here if you attended the Literacy for All Conference in 2008 AND 2009 to receive a $15 discount for 2010.

Billing Address (required if you are paying by purchase order)

School Leaders Discount: In addition to selecting a

registration type above, check here if you are a school leader (principal or assistant principal) and 3 educators from your school are attending the conference. You will receive a 50% discount off of any registration type.

Note: Discounts cannot be combined.

Is this your first time attending the Literacy for All conference? YES

NO

2010 Literacy for all conference registration form

Email:

Yes, I’d be willing to volunteer to introduce a featured speaker or collect tickets in one or more of the sessions I am attending.

STOP! REGISTER ONLINE AND SAVE UP TO $25 PER PERSON! www.regonline.com/lfa2010 Paying by credit card? You must register online or complete this form and call the conference office with your credit card number. Please do not fax nor email credit card numbers.

In compliance with the American Disabilities Act, Literacy for All is making every effort to ensure all activities are equally available to all individuals participating in the conference. Check here if you require special assistance. A member of the conference team will contact you to make arrangements.

How did you learn about this conference?

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY: Full Name

Select YOUR WorkshopS

Home Address City

U.S. State/Canadian Province

OR Country: (Non US/Canada)

Zip/postal code

Indicate your first and second choice selections with numbers 1 and 2. If your first choice workshop is full, we will automatically place you in your second choice workshop. Pre-Conference Workshops Sunday, November 14, 2010 | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

Home Phone

Work Phone

Please complete and return both sides of the registration form.

___PC-1 ___PC-2 ___PC-3 ___PC-4 ___PC-5 ___PC-6

___PC-7

Session A | Monday, November 15, 2010 | 8:30 am–10:00 am Keynote Address with david boOTH (ALL PARTICIPANTS)

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2010 Literacy for all conference registration form

write your name again here:

RRCNA Memberships:

Session B | Monday, November 15, 2010 |10:30 am–12:00 pm

___LCB-1 ___LCB-5 ___LCB-9

___LCB-13 ___MSB-1 ___RRB-1

___LCB-2 ___LCB-6 ___LCB-10

___LCB-14 ___MSB-2 ___RRB-2

___LCB-3 ___LCB-7 ___LCB-11

___LCB-15

___LCB-4 ___LCB-8 ___LCB-12

___RRB-3

___RRB-4

Session C | Monday, November 15, 2010 | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm or 1:30 pm–4:45 pm

Attend a 90-minute Session C Session OR an In-depth (3-hour) Session C. If you choose an In-depth Session C, you will not attend a Session D (3:30 pm–5:00 pm). ___LCC-1 ___LCC-6 ___LCC-11 ___MSC-1

___RRC-2 In-depth

___LCC-2 ___LCC-7 ___LCC-12 ___RRC-1

___RRC-3 In-depth

$125 Supporting Membership

$60 New Membership

$60 Renewal Membership

$40 In-training Membership

Sue Hundley Memorial Fund Donation:

Donations support literacy learning for children and teacher scholarships. $100

$50

$25

Other amount: $____________

Subtotals: $

Registration Fee (from page 1 of this form)

$

RRCNA Membership (optional)

$

Sue Hundley Fund Donation (optional)

$

TOTAL AMOUNT DUE

Payment Method: Check

Purchase Order

Credit Card (do not write card numbers on this form)

___LCC-3 ___LCC-8 ___LCC-13 ___LCC-15 In-depth ___LCC-4 ___LCC-9 ___LCC-14 ___LCC-16 In-depth ___LCC-5 ___LCC-10

Check Number

___LCC-17 In-depth

Session D | Monday, November 15, 2010 | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm (only if you did not select an In-Depth Session C)

___LCD-1 ___LCD-4 ___LCD-7 ___LCD-10 ___LCD-13 ___MSD-1 ___RRD-1 ___LCD-2 ___LCD-5 ___LCD-8 ___LCD-11

PO Number Please make sure the total amount matches the amount on the PO or check. A check or a copy of the PO must be mailed or faxed to the conference office within 5 business days. Do not write credit card numbers on this form. Register online or call the conference office with your credit card number.

___MSD-2

Important!

___LCD-3 ___LCD-6 ___LCD-9 ___LCD-12 Session E | Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | 8:30 am–10:00 am

Attend the Literacy Conference Session E Keynote with Steven Layne or a 90-minute Session E. ___Layne Keynote

___LCE-1

___MSE-1

___RRE-1

___RRE-3

___LCE-2

___RRE-2

___RRE-4

Session F | Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | 10:30 am–12:00 pm or 10:30 am–1:45 pm (In-Depth)

Choose the Reading Recovery Keynote with Susan O’Leary, a 90-minute Session F (10:30 am–12:00 pm), OR an In-depth Session F (10:30 am–1:45 pm). Note: If you choose an In-Depth Session F, you will not attend a Session G. ___O’Leary Keynote ___LCF-4 ___LCF-8 ___LCF-12 ___LCF-15 In-depth ___LCF-1

___LCF-5 ___LCF-9 ___LCF-13 ___LCF-16 In-depth

___LCF-2

___LCF-6 ___LCF-10 ___LCF-14 ___MSF-2 In-depth

___LCF-3

___LCF-7 ___LCF-11 ___MSF-1

Payment, Refund, and Cancellation Policy: Submission of this registration form is a commitment to pay the conference fees. A refund, less a $50 processing fee, will be granted if a written request is postmarked or emailed on or before Friday, October 1, 2010. No refunds will be issued after this date regardless of the reason for canceling, though substitutions can be made at any time.

Fax both sides of this form to: Literacy for All, 617.349.8490

Mail to: Literacy for All Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery & Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138

Session G | Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | 1:00 pm­–2:30 pm (only if you did not select an In-Depth LCF Session)

Questions? Contact the Literacy for All office:

___LCG-1 ___LCG-4 ___LCG-7 ___LCG-10 ___MSG-1 ___RRG-1

617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu

___LCG-2 ___LCG-5 ___LCG-8 ___LCG-11___MSG-2 ___RRG-2

www.lesley.edu/literacyforall

___LCG-3 ___LCG-6 ___LCG-9

36

Optional:

___RRG-3

Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative School-Based Programs

Professional Development Programs

The Effective Literacy Coach

Reading Recovery

Leveled Literacy Intervention

An early intervention program to assist the lowest achieving first graders who are having difficulty learning to read and write

A small group intervention for children who find reading and writing difficult, K–2

Developed by Irene Fountas and Lesley University faculty

Literacy Collaborative A research-based, comprehensive model for school reform designed to raise the literacy achievement of all children in elementary and middle school.

What Every School Leader Needs to Know About Good Literacy Teaching and Effective Literacy Coaching A training designed for school leaders who are interested in examining the roles of effective teaching, student assessment, coaching, and supervision in improving student achievement in reading and writing Literacy Leaders K–6

Learn more at www.lesley.edu/crr

Professional development for Literacy Coaches, Reading Specialists, Literacy Coordinators, Instructional Coaches, and Language Arts Directors This two- or four-week training is designed to help educators examine the multiple roles and the importance of the literacy coach in a school as well as to develop effective coaching skills. Courses and Institutes (graduate credit available)

Professional Development in Reading Workshop, Writing Workshop, and Effective Coaching Skills for Literacy Coaches, Lead Teachers, and Staff Developers

• Guided Reading courses for grades K–2 and 3–8 • Coaching Institute • Phonics course • Summer Literacy Institute for K–8 educators

Contact us if you would like more information about these programs or if you would like to be put on our mailing list.

Call: 617.349.8424 Visit: www.lesley.edu/crr Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138

School of Education Professional Development and Resources

Literacy for All Conference

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage

Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery & Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street

PAID

Cambridge, MA 02138

Boston, MA Permit No. 20

2 1 st A nnual L it e racy f o r A ll N o rth e ast P r e K – 8 L it e racy C o n f e r e nc e & R e a d in g R e c o v e ry I nstitut e

Literacy for All

21st Century Literacy Skills for the 21st Annual Conference

2010 Literacy for All Highlights n More

than 100 high-quality PreK–8 and Reading Recovery sessions

n Middle

School Strand & PreK–K Strand

n NEW: Technology

Strand

n MORE

3-hour, in-depth sessions on Monday and Tuesday

n Administrators

Strand, with a School Leaders Pre-Conference workshop by Irene Fountas

n Literacy

Coaching Strand

Register Online and Save $15 OFF Each Registration! www.regonline.com/lfa2010


LFA 2010 brochure