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2 2 n d A nnual L i t e racy f o r A ll N o rt h e a s t P r e K – 8 L i t e racy C o n f e r e nc e & R e a d in g R e c o v e ry I n s t i t u t e

Literacy for All

Featured Literacy and Coaching Speakers Jennifer Allen

Lisa Miller

Kathy Collins

Sara Pennypacker

Ruth Culham

Gay Su Pinnell

Irene Fountas

Kristin Rainville

Lori Jamison

Linda Rief

Leah Mermelstein

MaryEllen Vogt

Donalyn Miller

Reading Recovery Featured Speakers Nancy Anderson

Eva Konstantellou

Ann Ballantyne

Mary Rosser

Connie Briggs

Floretta Thornton-Reid

Mary Anne Doyle

n More than 100 PreK–8 and Reading Recovery Sessions n Administrators’ Strand with a 50% discount for school leaders attending with a team n Literacy Coaching Strand with Jennifer Allen and Kristin Rainville n Middle School Strand with Donalyn Miller and Linda Rief n Reading Recovery experts Nancy Anderson, Connie Briggs, and Floretta Thornton-Reid n Discounts for groups and repeat attendees n Children’s authors Sara Pennypacker and Rob Buyea

Rhode Island Convention Center Providence November 6–8, 2011 Hosted by Lesley University in collaboration with the University of Connecticut, New York University, and the University of Maine

Register online and save $15! See inside for details or visit: www.regonline.com/lfa2011


sponsors and conference CommitTee

Thank you to our sponsors! We are grateful to our corporate sponsors. Their generosity makes it possible for leading literacy experts to present at this professional development event.

Thank you to the Conference Program Committee! Conference Program Chairs: Margaret Crosby, Eva Konstantellou, and Diane Powell

Tote Bag Sponsor

Program Committee Members:

Speaker Sponsors Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for sponsoring MaryEllen Vogt

Scholastic, Inc. for sponsoring Ruth Culham

Mechelle Abney Julie Barnhart-Francis Gina Castaldo Colleen Clabault Barbara Collins Kerry Crosby Susan Cusack Cathie Desjardins Lisa Fiore Kristine Haveles-Pelletier Yvonne Hunt Katy Kennedy Louise Law Jaime Mendelis Kristina Seeley

If you would like to serve on the 2011 Conference Program Committee, please email Sharon Winston, Project Manager for Conferences and Events, at literacy@lesley.edu. The Committee will hold its first meeting at the conference on Tuesday, November 8, at 7:30 am.


Table of Contents Conference Schedule Overview............................... 1 Schedule................................................................ 2 Literacy for All Overview......................................... 6 Overview, Scholarships, and Grants......................... 6 Keynote Speakers................................................... 7 Literacy Conference Featured Speakers................... 8 Reading Recovery Featured Speakers.................... 10 Special Events and Features.................................. 12

Conference Schedule Overview Dynamic Structure with More Choices We have structured the schedule to give you more options, including three-hour sessions on Monday and Tuesday and choices with regard to attending a keynote or a workshop in the same time block.

Sunday, November 6, 2011 10:00 am–11:00 am

Registration

11:00 am–1:00 pm

Pre-conference workshops begin

  1:00 pm–2:00 pm

Lunch on your own

  2:00 pm–4:00 pm

Workshops continue

  4:00 pm–6:00 pm

Registration

Monday, November 7, 2011

Sue Hundley Memorial Fund................................. 12

  7:00 am–8:30 am

Pre-conference Workshops................................... 13

  8:30 am–10:00 am Session A: Keynote with Kathy Collins or breakout with Linda Rief

Workshops (Literacy Conference & Reading Recovery Institute)............................... 15 Locations, Directions, and Parking......................... 32 Hotel Information........................................... 32–33 Registration Information....................................... 33 RRCNA Membership............................................. 34 Registration Form................................................. 35

Questions? Contact the Literacy for All office:

617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu

www.lesley.edu/literacyforall

Registration

10:00 am–6:00 pm Visit exhibits on the fifth floor of the RI Convention Center (new location!) 10:30 am–12:00 pm

Session B

12:00 pm–1:30 pm

Lunch on your own; visit exhibits

  1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Session C or

  1:30 pm–4:45 pm

In-depth Session C

  3:00 pm–3:30 pm

Visit exhibits

  3:30 pm–5:00 pm

Session D

  5:00 pm–6:00 pm

Exhibit Fair and raffle on the fifth floor of the RICC

  6:00 pm–7:30 pm

Lesley University Almuni Event (see page 12)

Tuesday, November 8, 2011   7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:00 am–2:30 pm

Exhibit hours

  8:30 am–10:00 am Session E: Keynote with Ruth Culham or a 90-minute breakout Session E 10:15 am–11:45 am Session F: Reading Recovery Keynote with Nancy Anderson or Literacy Conference Session F (then select Session G) or 10:15 am–1:30 pm

In-depth Session F

11:45 am–1:00 pm

Lunch on your own

  1:00 pm–2:30 pm

Session G

Follow Literacy for All on Facebook and Twitter: http://bit.ly/cLcHw6

www.twitter.com/lfa_conference

Subscribe to our blog to get tips and information you can use to enhance your teaching: https://lesleyuniversitycrrlc.wordpress.com/ 1


DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS Sunday, November 6 11:00 am–4:00 pm

LCC-13 In-depth: Exploring the Possibilities of Layered Coaching (K–8)

LCB-16: Systems Thinking Tools for Content Area Literacy Instruction (K–6)

H

LCC-14 In-depth: Reading to Write; Writing to Read (5–8)

LCB-17: Infusing Phonics Instruction Throughout the Kindergarten Classroom

LCC-15 In-depth: Response to Intervention: How to Begin the Process (1–6)

H

RRB-1: Yes, We Teach Phonics and So Much More!

H

RRB-2: Acquiring the Visual Working System for Literacy: Supporting Change Over Time

LCC-16 In-depth: Designing Instruction for the Writing Workshop: Meeting the Needs of Students and Core Standards (3–8)

H

RRB-3: Language, Literacy, and Learning: A Basis for Achievement, Acceleration, and Success for ELL Students

PC-2: The Book Whisperer: Balancing Academic Reading Goals and Students’ Lifelong Reading Habits (3–8) PC-3: Processes and Perspectives on Learning and Leading as a Literacy Coach (K–8)

PC-5: Teaching Writer’s Craft with Mentor Texts (3–6)

PC-6: Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI): Extending Students’ Reading Power Through Writing (K–2)

PC-7: Teaching Focus: Refining Reading Instruction (K–8)

H

PC-8: Assessing and Teaching for Phrased and Fluent Reading

SESSION A Monday, November 7 8:30 am–10:00 am

RRB-4: “That would make an interesting story!”— Scaffolding the Art of Composing

SESSION C Monday, November 7 1:30 pm–3:00 pm H

H

LCC-2: I Do, We Do, You Do: Modeled, Shared, Guided, and Independent Reading in the Kindergarten Program (K–1)

H

LCC-3: Don’t Forget to Share: The Crucial Last Step in the Writing Workshop (K–6)

LCC-4: Teaching Students to Write about History with Voice and Passion (3–6)

LCA-1: Engagement: Creating Fluent Writers and Readers (4–8)

SESSION B Monday, November 7 10:30 am–12:00 pm H

LCB-1: Supporting New Teachers Through Layered Coaching (K–8)

H

LCB-2: More Than Words: Comprehension Instruction in Reading Conferences with Young Readers (K–1)

H H

LCC-5: Developing Norms for Coaching Partnerships (K–8) LCC-6: Creating Opportunity for Professional Development Through Supervision and Evaluation (K–6)

LCB-8: Content Literacy: Social Studies (3–6)

LCB-9: Creating a Vision: Planning for Teacher Learning in the Writing Workshop (K–8)

LCB-10: Using Culturally Relevant Text in the Classroom (5–8) LCB-11: Performance Poetry for Fun and Fluency (3–6) LCB-12: Mobile Learning and Literacy: Experiences and Possibilities in Preschool Classrooms (PreK–K)

H

RRC-4 In-depth: Changing Minds—Changing Practice!

SESSION D Monday, November 7 3:30 pm–5:00 pm H

LCD-1: Using a Reader’s Genre Notebook: Talking, Thinking, and Writing about Texts (2–8)

H

LCD-2: Guided Reading: Taking a Deeper Look at Book Introductions and the Transfer to Independent Reading (K–2)

H

LCD-3: Make Me a Story: Teaching Writing Through Digital Storytelling (1–5)

LCD-4: Exploring Nonfiction: Units of Study for Reading and Writing (K–2)

LCD-5: Getting Your Students to Write Like Real Authors (K–8)

LCD-6: To Read Is to Think: Exploring Reading Comprehension Strategies (3–6)

LCC-8: The Power of Comprehension Strategy Instruction (K–4)

LCD-8: Conferring with Young Writers (K–2)

LCC-9: Using Book Introductions to Assure Successful Student Comprehension (K–6)

LCB-5: Planning Family Engagement Literacy Nights (PreK–6)

RRC-3 In-depth: Achieving Shifts in Teaching and Learning in Lesson Activities Over Time

LCC-11: Creating Lifelong Readers: Children’s Literature in the Reading Program (3–6)

H

LCD-7: Interactive Read Aloud: Expanding Thinking Through Shared Talk (K–5)

LCB-7: Moving Writing Instruction into the Digital Age (3–8)

LCC-17 In-depth: Illustration Study in the K–2 Writing Workshop

LCB-4: Make Me a Story: Teaching Writing Through Digital Storytelling (1–5)

LCC-7: One Book, One School: Improving Family and Community Involvement in Middle School (5–8)

LCC-10: Wikis, Blogs, and Writing—Oh My! (5–8)

LCB-6: Using Culturally Relevant Text in the Primary Classroom (K–2)

2

LCB-3: Marvelous Minilessons for Teaching Writing (3–8)

LCC-1: Nonfiction Reading Clubs: Nurture the Habits of Mind and Teach the Strategies Young Nonfiction Readers Need Most (K–3)

H

Keynote Address A: The Lenses of Our Teaching: Making Adjustments So We See Clearly and Teach Responsibly

SESSION C IN-DEPTH Monday, November 7 1:30 pm–4:45 pm H

H

PC-4: Teacher Language That Supports Independent Problem Solving: Using the Prompting Guide in Guided Reading Lessons (K–3)

LCB-14: Transformation of One School District to Support Literacy Learning for All Students (PreK–8) LCB-15: The Daily 5 (Independent Literacy Centers) (K–2)

PC-1: Genre Study in a Reader’s Workshop (1–8)

LCB-13: Testing as a Genre (3–8)

H

H

LCC-12: Reading Conferences: Brief, Powerful Interactions for Building a Self-Extending System (K–2)

H

RRC-1: Language, Literacy, and Learning: A Basis for Achievement, Acceleration, and Success for ELL Students (Repeat)

RRC-2: Reading Recovery in Rhode Island: Renewing, Reporting, Recruiting, and Responding

LCD-9: A Cycle of Professional Growth (K–6)

LCD-10: “Halls and Walls that Teach”—Looking and Learning Together (K–8)

LCD-11: Integrating Math and Literacy in the Middle School (5–8)

LCD-12: Telling Stories: Imagination Supporting Literacy Development Throughout the Curriculum (PreK–2)

H

RRD-1: What’s Fluency Got to Do With It? Theory to Practice

RRD-2: All the “Write” Moves


LCF-13: Reading Strategically, Thinking Critically: Making Connections with Nonfiction Texts (3–6)

LCF-14: A Classroom of Storytellers: Promoting Literacy Development in Early Childhood (PreK–K)

Keynote Address E: One Student, One Voice: Inspiring Authentic Writing (K–8)

LCE-1: Response to Intervention: You’re Up and Running, but How Do You Sustain This Educational Movement? (1–6) LCE-2: Visual Literacy and the Technology Strategies to Make It Happen (3–8)

LCE-3: Put Your Best Book Forward: First-Class Reading Recommendations (5–8)

LCE-4: Literacy Coaching: The Need to Deepen Our Listening Ability (K–8)

H

RRE-1: It’s More Than the Picture: Teaching for Processing Early in First Grade

H

RRE-2: Acquiring the Visual Working System for Literacy: Supporting Change Over Time

H

RRE-3: Are We There Yet?

RRE-4: Priming the Processing in Roaming Around the Known

SESSION F Tuesday, November 8 10:15 am–11:45 am

SESSION F IN-DEPTH Tuesday, November 8 10:15 am–1:30 pm

H

LCF-1: Using Picture Books to Teach Writing (K–2)

H

LCF-2: Coaching for Expert Teaching in Guided Reading Lessons (K–8)

H

LCF-3: Three Keys to Supporting Struggling Readers (3–8)

LCF-16 In-depth: Developing the Foundation: Expanding the Oral Language of Young Students (K–2)

LCF-17 In-depth: Supporting Writers Through Powerful Minilessons, Conferring, and Sharing Sessions (K–2)

LCF-18 In-depth: Designing and Leading Demonstration Lessons (K–6)

SESSION G Tuesday, November 8 1:00 pm–2:30 pm H

LCG-1: Using Picture Books to Teach Writing with The Traits (3–8)

H

LCG-2: Beyond the Page (2–6)

H

LCG-3: Academic Vocabulary: Engaging Activities for Struggling Readers (and Others!) (6–8)

Reading Recovery Keynote F: Making the Invisible Visible: The Role of Meaning in Effective Literacy Processing

LCF-4: Don’t Forget to Share: The Crucial Last Step in the Writing Workshop (K–6)

H

LCF-5: Why Write for Children? (2–6)

H

LCF-6: Academic Vocabulary: Engaging Activities for Struggling Readers (and Others!) (2–5)

LCF-7: Engaging Adolescent Students in Active Talk about Text (6–9)

LCF-8: Books to Delight Us, to Amaze Us, to Inspire Us! (3–8) LCF-9: Teaching “Robust” Vocabulary During an Interactive Read-Aloud (PreK–2)

LCG-4: Novel Ideas for Novels (5–9) LCG-5: Benchmark Assessment System: Going Beyond the Numbers (2–5)

LCG-6: The Impact of a Literacy Team: Using Data and Teamwork to Reach Goals (K–8)

LCG-7: A Framework for Text Selection for a Critical Literacy Curriculum (3–8)

LCG-8: Say Goodbye to Coach Books: Test Prep that Makes Sense (K–8)

H

LCF-15: Establishing a Strong School Literacy Climate (K–6)

LCG-9: Using Inquiry to Explore Grammar and Punctuation in Writing Workshop (3–8) LCG-10: Reading, Writing, and Rap: Hands-on Activities for Literacy Learning (K–8)

LCG-11: RTI: The Realities, Research, and Planning for Schools with Limited Resources (K–8)

LCG-12: Pages of Possibility: Exploring the Potentials of Bookmaking with Children (PreK–2)

LCG-13: Literacy Coaching and Public Practice: Building Leadership Capacity Together (K–8)

LCF-10: Units of Study Across the Year in Middle School (5–8)

LCG-14: Treating Words and Pictures as Equal Languages for Learning (K-6)

H

RRG-1: It’s More Than the Picture: Teaching for Processing Early in First Grade

LCF-11: Using QAR to Prepare Students for ELA MCAS Open-Response Questions (3–6)

H

RRG-2: Fostering Flexible Thinking and Learning in Reading Recovery Lessons

LCF-12: Effective Uses of Data to Inform Reading Instruction (K–5)

RRG-3: What Is This Thing Called Acceleration?

Schedule Key: H

Featured

Administrators’ Strand

Grades K–8 Literacy

Children’s Literature & Authors

Grades K–2 Literacy

Grades K–6 Literacy

PreK–K Strand

Literacy Coaching

Grades 3–6 Literacy

Reading Recovery

Middle School Strand

Technology

Strand

Sunday, November 6, 2011 10:00 am–11:00 am

Registration

11:00 am–1:00 pm

Pre-conference workshops begin

  1:00 pm–2:00 pm

Lunch on your own

  2:00 pm–4:00 pm

Workshops continue

  4:00 pm–6:00 pm

Registration

DETAILED CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Session E Tuesday, November 8 8:30 am–10:00 am

Monday, November 7, 2011   7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:30 am–10:00 am Session A: Keynote with Kathy Collins or breakout with Linda Rief 10:00 am–6:00 pm Visit exhibits on the fifth floor of the RI Convention Center (new location!) 10:30 am–12:00 pm

Session B

12:00 pm–1:30 pm

Lunch on your own; visit exhibits

  1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Session C or

  1:30 pm–4:45 pm

In-depth Session C

  3:00 pm–3:30 pm

Visit exhibits

  3:30 pm–5:00 pm

Session D

  5:00 pm–6:00 pm Exhibit Fair and raffle on the fifth floor of the RICC   6:00 pm–7:30 pm Lesley University Alumni Event

Tuesday, November 8, 2011   7:00 am–8:30 am

Registration

  8:00 am–2:30 pm

Exhibit hours

  8:30 am–10:00 am Session E: Keynote with Ruth Culham or a 90-minute breakout Session E 10:15 am–11:45 am Session F: Reading Recovery Keynote with Nancy Anderson or Literacy Conference Session F (then select Session G) or 10:15 am–1:30 pm In-depth Session F 11:45 am–1:00 pm

Lunch on your own

  1:00 pm–2:30 pm

Session G

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OVERVIEW, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND GRANTS

OVERVIEW, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND GRANTS

CONFERENCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

FUNDING

November 6, 2011 (Sunday)

Funding for your conference participation may be available through Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Charter Schools Funding, and Parent-Teacher Organizations. Investigate these resources with your district and secure funding soon.

Improve and extend the quality of your teaching! Participate in a fourhour intensive session with experts in the field of literacy learning. Take the opportunity to learn valuable strategies and techniques to use in your classroom.

READING RECOVERY TRAVEL GRANTS LITERACY CONFERENCE November 7–8, 2011 (Monday and Tuesday) Expand your learning and teaching skills by attending this two-day conference for literacy educators. Learn the best literacy practices from the finest trainers in the field. Return to the classroom with a better understanding of research-based practices in education.

READING RECOVERY INSTITUTE

Bruce Larkin will award 500 travel grants each school year, up to a maximum of $200, to offset expenses incurred by attending the Reading Recovery portion of the conference. Please visit www.wilbooks.com and click on the link for scholarships and grants for an application.

SUE HUNDLEY MEMORIAL FUND Scholarships are available for one Reading Recovery teacher and one classroom teacher to attend Literacy for All. The scholarships cover: • Two-day conference registration fee (Monday and Tuesday)

November 7–8, 2011 (Monday and Tuesday)

• Two nights’ accommodations

This is a two-day professional development event designed for Reading Recovery professionals. Sessions will strengthen and reinforce skills of Reading Recovery teaching.

• Up to $100 for food and travel expenses (upon submission of itemized, original receipts) We encourage you to apply! Please visit www.lesley.edu/ literacyforall for an application and guidelines. Click on the link for “funding.” See page 12 of this program for a profile of last year’s Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship winners.

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS University students who volunteer on Monday have the opportunity to attend the conference for free on Tuesday. Tasks include collecting tickets for sessions, introducing and assisting speakers, and collecting evaluations from participants. Students must be matriculated in a fulltime accredited university degree program. Email literacy@lesley.edu for details.

COMPLIMENTARY REGISTRATION FOR PRESENTERS Submit a session proposal for the 2012 conference program and if your session is selected, you will receive a complimentary two-day 2012 conference registration. Visit our website, www.lesley.edu/ literacyforall, and click on “Next Year” to download a proposal form. The deadline for proposal forms is January 17, 2012.

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Nancy Anderson Professor, Department of Reading, Texas Woman’s University and Reading Recovery Trainer

Nancy specializes in the relationship between language and thinking related to professional learning and children’s literacy development. She works extensively with graduate student research and provides professional development for teachers. Her most recent publication, Linking Assessment to Reading Comprehension Instruction: A Framework for Actively Engaging Literacy Learners K–8 (Prentice Hall, 2008), is based on her clinical work with novice teachers. Her professional passion is working with children at risk of literacy failure, and she can often be found in schools teaching children and coaching teachers. Reading Recovery Keynote F: Making the Invisible Visible—The Role of Meaning in Effective Literacy Processing Sessions: RRE-1 and RRG-1

Ruth Culham Author and President, Culham Writing Company, OR

Ruth was English Teacher of the Year in Montana, the highlight of her 19-year teaching career. She is the former Unit Manager of the Assessment Program at Education Northwest in Portland, Oregon. She is the recognized expert in The Traits of Writing and the author of several teaching resources published by Scholastic, including 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: The Complete Guide, Grades 3 and Up (2003); 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: The Complete Guide for the Primary Grades (2008); and Traits of Writing: The Complete Guide for Middle School (2010). Sponsored by Scholastic, Inc.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Keynote E: One Student, One Voice: Inspiring Authentic Writing (Grades K–8) Sessions: LCF-1 and LCG-1

Kathy Collins Literacy Consultant and Author, NH

Kathy is the author of Reading for Real: Teach Students to Read with Power, Intention, and Joy in K–3 Classrooms (Stenhouse, 2008) and Growing Readers: Units of Study in the Primary Classroom (Stenhouse, 2004). She is the co-author with Lucy Calkins of Resources for Upper Grade Writing, a part of the Units of Study for Teaching Writing, Grades 3–5 series (Heinemann, 2006). Kathy has worked closely with the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University. She works in schools to support teachers in developing high-quality, effective literacy instruction in the primary grades. She was a first grade teacher in Brooklyn, New York, and she is looking forward to returning to the classroom in the near future. Keynote A: The Lenses of Our Teaching: Making Adjustments So We See Clearly and Teach Responsibly (PreK–8) Sessions: LCB-2 and LCC-1

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FEATURED SPEAKERS

LITERACY FOR ALL prek–8 literacy conference FEATURED SPEAKERS Jennifer Allen

Leah Mermelstein

Literacy Specialist, Waterville School District, ME

Author and Consultant, Read-Write-Connect, Inc., NY

Jennifer works as a literacy coach and leads professional development programs for teachers. She has presented her work to regional and national audiences, including the National Council of Teachers of English and International Reading Association. Jennifer is a contributing author to Choice Literacy (www.choiceliteracy.com). She is the author of Becoming a Literacy Leader: Supporting Learning and Change (Stenhouse, 2006) and A Sense of Belonging: Sustaining and Retaining New Teachers (Stenhouse, 2009). Sessions: LCB-1 and LCC-13 In-depth

Irene C. Fountas Author and Professor, Lesley University, MA

Irene directs a comprehensive school reform project in the School of Education at Lesley University. She has been a classroom teacher, language arts specialist, and consultant in school districts across the nation and abroad. She has received numerous awards for her contributions to literacy. Irene and co-author Gay Su Pinnell have published several books with Heinemann, including Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency: Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Reading (Grades K–8) (Heinemann, 2006); The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades PreK–8, Second Edition: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010); and Literacy Beginnings: A Prekindergarten Handbook (Heinemann, 2011). Sessions: PC-1, LCD-1, and LCF-2

Leah taught in Massachusetts and in New York City before becoming a staff developer at the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project at Columbia University. While at the Project, Leah mentored teachers, providing the demonstration teaching, coaching, and study groups necessary to help teachers establish joyful and rigorous Reading and Writing Workshops. Now, Leah is an internationally recognized literacy consultant. She is co-author with Lucy Calkins of Launching the Writing Workshop (Heinemann, 2003) and is the author of Reading/Writing Connections in the K–2 Classroom: Find the Clarity and Then Blur the Lines (Allyn & Bacon, 2005), as well as Don’t Forget to Share: The Crucial Last Step in the Writing Workshop (Heinemann, 2007). Sessions: LCC-3, LCD-2, and LCF-4

Donalyn Miller Author and Sixth Grade Language Arts and Social Studies Teacher, Trinity Meadows Intermediate School, TX

Donalyn is a sixth grade language arts and social studies teacher at Trinity Meadows Intermediate School in Keller, Texas. Her staff development presentations, articles, and book, The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child (Jossey-Bass, 2009), describe her successful methods for inspiring and motivating students to read. Donalyn currently writes a blog, The Book Whisperer, for the website teachermagazine.org. Session: PC-2

Lori Jamison Educational Consultant, Toronto, Canada

Lori is an educational consultant whose work on best practices in literacy instruction is recognized across North America. She is a former classroom teacher, K–12 literacy consultant, and Reading Assessment specialist. Lori has written five professional books as well as many journal articles, teaching guides, and other materials for teachers. Lori is one of the few classroom practitioners to have served on the International Reading Association (IRA) Board of Directors. She continues to be a passionate advocate for children, teachers, and literacy. Sessions: LCB-3, LCC-2, and LCF-3

Lisa Miller Associate Professor of English, University of New Hampshire

Lisa directs the Journalism Program at the University of New Hampshire, where she teaches news and feature writing, editing, and multimedia journalism. She has worked with elementary school students and elementary and middle school teachers on digital storytelling. She is the author of Make Me a Story: Teaching Writing through Digital Storytelling (Stenhouse, 2010) and Power Journalism: Computer-Assisted Reporting (Wadsworth Publishing, 1997). She is co-editor of The Essential Don Murray: Lessons from America’s Greatest Writing Teacher (Heinemann, 2009). Sessions: LCB-4 and LCD-3

Sara Pennypacker Children’s Author, Cape Cod, MA

Sara is the author of many well-known children’s books, including the Clementine series (Hyperion Books), Sparrow Girl (Hyperion Books, 2009), the Stuart series (Scholastic Paperbacks), and Pierre in Love (Orchard Books, 2007). Sessions: LCF-5 and LCG-2

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Gay Su Pinnell

MaryEllen Vogt

Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University

Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Education, California State University, Long Beach

Gay’s professional work focuses on literacy education of children and ways to support teachers of reading, writing, and language arts. She has written many articles and has received several prestigious awards for her work. She has co-authored numerous books and articles related to language and literacy teaching with Irene Fountas. Their latest publications are The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades PreK–8, Second Edition: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010) and Literacy Beginnings: A Prekindergarten Handbook (Heinemann, 2011). Sessions: PC-1, LCD-1, and LCF-2

Kristin Rainville Assistant Professor and Chair, Department of Literacy, Manhattanville College, NY

Kristin is a full-time faculty member and teaches courses in K–12 literacy at Manhattanville College in Purchase, NY. Kristin serves as a liaison at Jefferson Elementary School, one of Manhattanville’s Professional Development Schools, where she teaches field-based literacy courses, works with student teachers, and provides professional development to the faculty. Kristin works with teachers and literacy coaches throughout the tristate area. Previously she worked as an instructor at Teachers College, Columbia University, and as a coordinator for the New Jersey Department of Education’s Office of Early Literacy (which developed the state’s Reading Coach Program). Kristin has presented at state, national, and international conferences, primarily on her research with literacy coaches. Kristin co-authored an article in The Reading Teacher entitled “Situated identities: Power and positioning in the work of a literacy coach.”

MaryEllen has been a classroom teacher, reading specialist, special education specialist, curriculum coordinator, and university teacher educator. She received her doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley, and is co-author of fifteen books, including Reading Specialists and Literacy Coaches in the Real World (Allyn & Bacon, 2006) and Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model (Allyn & Bacon, 2007). She has provided professional development for teachers and administrators in all 50 states and nine countries, most recently in Germany, China, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines. She was inducted into the California Reading Hall of Fame, received her university’s Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, and served as president of the International Reading Association in 2004–2005. Sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

FEATURED SPEAKERS

LITERACY FOR ALL prek–8 literacy conference FEATURED SPEAKERS

Sessions: LCF-6 and LCG-3

Session: PC-3

Linda Rief Eighth Grade Teacher, Durham, NH and Instructor, Summer Literacy Institute, University of New Hampshire

Linda is a national and international presenter on issues of adolescent literacy. She is the author of 100 Quickwrites (Scholastic, 2003); Inside the Writer’s-Reader’s Notebook (2007); Seeking Diversity: Language Arts with Adolescents (1992); and Vision and Voice: Extending the Literacy Spectrum (1999), published by Heinemann. She is co-author of Visual Tools for Differentiating Reading and Writing Instruction (Scholastic, 2008). She is co-editor (Beers, Probst, and Rief) of Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice (Heinemann, 2007) and for five years co-edited with Maureen Barbieri, Voices from the Middle, a journal for middle school teachers, published by the National Council of Teachers of English. Sessions: LCA-1 and LCC-14 In-depth

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FEATURED SPEAKERS

reading recovery FEATURED SPEAKERS

Ann Ballantyne

Eva Konstantellou

Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University

Reading Recovery Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Ann is an experienced Reading Recovery practitioner who has trained as a teacher, teacher leader, and trainer in her home country of New Zealand. Ann spent a year as a teacher leader in Maine in 1994–95 and over the past 10 years has worked at university training sites in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, and New Zealand. She is the director of the Reading Recovery Project at New York University.

Eva is an associate professor and a Reading Recovery Trainer at the Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative in the School of Education at Lesley University. Her research interests include language learning, teachers’ learning and professional development, and critical pedagogy. She currently serves as Teaching Section editor for the Journal of Reading Recovery.

Session: RRG-2

Session: RRC-3 In-depth

Connie Briggs

Mary Rosser

Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, Department of Reading, Texas Woman’s University

Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine

Connie has 13 years of public school experience and more than twice the number of years teaching in higher education. She continues to teach children so that she may keep current and inform her teaching of undergraduate and graduate students in the reading education courses she instructs. Connie is past president of the Reading Recovery Council of North America and the North American Trainers Group. Sessions: PC-8, RRB-1, and RRD-1

Mary Anne Doyle Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut

Mary Anne is professor of education and director of the Reading-Language Arts Center at the University of Connecticut. She is director of Connecticut’s Reading Recovery Project. Her experience includes positions as an elementary classroom teacher and a reading consultant. Her research interests include early literacy development and readingwriting connections. Her related, co-edited text is Reading/Writing Connections: Learning from Research (International Reading Association, 1992). She has also been co-author of the International Reading Association’s “Annual Summary of Investigations Relating to Reading.” Mary Anne has served the Reading Recovery Council of North America as president (1999–2000), executive officer (1998–2001), and as chair of the Publications Committee (1994–1999). She is editor of the Journal of Reading Recovery. She chairs the Executive Board of the International Reading Recovery Trainers’ Organization. Sessions: RRB-2 and RRE-2

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Mary is the director of the University Training Center for Reading Recovery and coordinator of Literacy Professional Development Programs at the University of Maine. She was formerly the state trainer for Reading Recovery and lecturer in the School of Cultural and Language Studies at the Queensland University of Technology in Australia. Mary’s particular areas of expertise are language education, curriculum development, and early literacy intervention. She has worked at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of education and has extensive international experience as a literacy consultant and popular conference presenter. Mary’s research interests focus on analysis of pedagogy, with particular attention to teacher/student interactions that promote powerful learning. Sessions: RRB-3 and RRC-1

Floretta Thornton-Reid Executive Director of the University Training Center for Reading Recovery, Literacy Lessons, FirstChance, Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) and Partnerships in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL), Georgia State University

Floretta’s experiences, in addition to early childhood education, include social services, parent involvement, and adult literacy. Her interests and expertise include early intervention and diverse learners. Recently she and her colleague Sue Duncan explored the processing observations of young literacy learners when reading fiction and nonfiction. Sessions: RRC-4 In-depth and RRE-3


Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative School-Based Programs Reading Recovery

Professional Development Programs

An early intervention program to assist the lowest achieving first graders who are having difficulty learning to read and write

Leveled Literacy Intervention

Literacy Collaborative

What Every School Leader Needs to Know About Good Literacy Teaching and Effective Literacy Coaching

A research-based, comprehensive model for school reform designed to raise the literacy achievement of all children in elementary and middle school

Contact us if you would like more information about these programs or if you would like to be put on our mailing list. Call: 617.349.8424 Visit: www.lesley.edu/crr Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138

A small group intervention for children who find reading and writing difficult, K–2

A training designed for school leaders who are interested in examining the roles of effective teaching, student assessment, coaching, and supervision in improving student achievement in reading and writing

The Effective Literacy Coach New blended format for 2012! This blended professional development is designed to help educators analyze the multiple roles of the literacy coach as well as the overall importance of the literacy coach in a school. Courses and Institutes (graduate credit available) • Guided Reading courses for grades K–2 and 3–8 • Phonics Course, K–3 • Coaching Institute • Summer Literacy Institutes for K–8 educators

Join In Subscribe to our blog Get tips and information you can use to enhance your teaching: lesleyuniversitycrrlc.wordpress.com/ Join us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/LesleyCenterRRLC Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/lesleyctrrrlc

Onsite Professional Development If you are interested in bringing our expertise to your district, visit www.lesley.edu/crr/onsite_pd.html

School of Education Professional Development and Resources


SPECIAL EVENTS, FEATURES, AND SUE HUNDLEY MEMORIAL FUND

EXHIBIT FAIR

SUE HUNDLEY MEMORIAL FUND

Monday, November 7, 2011

Sue Hundley, a Reading Recovery Teacher Leader and a Literacy Collaborative Trainer at Lesley University, was dedicated to her teaching and her students. She was also a person who cared deeply about her own professional growth. Following her death from cancer in May 2000, a memorial fund was established in her name at Lesley University. The fund provides teacher scholarships, promotes the development of literacy materials in primary classrooms, and initiates partnerships with schools to support young readers and writers. Please consider a donation in her name to support teachers and schools. Donations to the fund can be made through your registration form.

5th level of the Rhode Island Convention Center 5:00 pm–6:00 pm NEW LOCATION! We are moving the exhibit booths to the 5th level of the Rhode Island Convention Center. The booths will be located just outside of the workshop rooms.

During the Exhibit Fair, YOU can: • Spend an hour of uninterrupted time to view and purchase from the selection of children’s books, professional development books, and educational resources from the nation’s leading publishers • Get a book signed by one of our participating children’s authors • Enter our FREE raffle to win one of the many fabulous prizes donated by the exhibitors

BOOK SIGNINGS Monday, November 7 Meet featured authors! Participating authors will sign books during the Exhibit Fair. Bring your own books or purchase books from the exhibitors. • 5:00 pm–6:00 pm: Sara Pennypacker, author of the Clementine series, the Stuart series, and Pierre in Love • 5:15 pm–6:00 pm: Rob Buyea, author of Because of Mr. Terupt

FREE BOOKS Receive a free children’s book at the conference by registering for RRCNA membership. Check the membership box on the registration form or when you register online. Include in your payment the membership fee of $60 ($40 for in-training and $125 for supporting members). Your book will be waiting for you at the conference.

The Lesley University Alumni Association invites you to the

LITERACY FOR ALL ALUMNI & FRIENDS RECEPTION Monday, November 7, 2011 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm The West Lobby The Rhode Island Convention Center Providence, Rhode Island Please respond by October 14, 2011, to Pattyanne Lyons at 617.349.8178 or www.lesleyalumni.org 12

2010 Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarship Winners and Program Chairs:

(left to right): Eva Konstantellou, Shauna Magee, Diane Powell, Crystal MacArthur, Margaret Crosby

Crystal MacArthur is a new K–6 reading teacher who traveled from a small community in the Northwest Territories, Canada, to attend the 21st Annual Literacy for All Conference. In her school, teachers are in Professional Learning Communities so that they may engage and learn from each other. Crystal shared strategies she learned at Literacy for All with her fellow teachers. “One of the major strategies that I learned and presented to my group was from Kathy Collins’s sessions in which she stressed the value of giving students as much time to be successful in their reading in all subject areas,” she said. Kathy Collins will be the Monday keynote this year. Shauna Magee is a Reading Recovery teacher in Rowley, Massachusetts. At the 2010 Literacy for All Conference, Shauna attended sessions that would enhance her Reading Recovery teaching. “One of the most influential workshops I attended was on contingent teaching in Reading Recovery…I am now much more mindful of how and when I am prompting and supporting students in day-to-day lessons, and I believe my teaching has improved because of this mindfulness,” she said. Shauna also gained knowledge on Guided Reading, which she then used to support her fellow teachers.


Choose one of the following four-hour workshops designed to improve and extend the quality of your teaching. F eatured S essi o ns PC-1

Genre Study in a Reader’s Workshop (Grades 1–8) Irene Fountas, Author and Professor, Lesley University, MA Gay Su Pinnell, Author and Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University

In this interactive session, learn about the process of genre study for developing your students’ foundation of knowledge in fiction and nonfiction genres. In a Reader’s Workshop structure, you will learn how to help your students get inside the characteristics of a variety of engaging books as a means of developing their understandings to improve comprehension and writing about reading. Please bring The Continuum of Literacy Learning, PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010) to this workshop. If you have an earlier version of The Continuum, or the K–2 or 3–8 versions, you may use them in the workshop. PC-2

The Book Whisperer: Balancing Academic Reading Goals and Students’ Lifelong Reading Habits (Grades 3–8) Donalyn Miller, Author and Sixth Grade Language Arts Teacher, Trinity Meadows Intermediate School, TX

Abundant studies reveal that students who read widely and avidly experience the greatest academic success across the school day and report greater agency and self-determination as readers. While we strive to create readers in our classrooms, reading volume and interest often decline throughout the teenage years. In classrooms with high expectations for independent reading, we must still ensure that students master grade level content. In this hands-on workshop, you will explore numerous standardsaligned reading lessons incorporating mentor texts, graphic organizers, and assessment tools that connect to students’ independent reading while moving them forward as engaged, motivated readers. You will learn practical, classroom-tested strategies for implementing Reading Workshop and holding students accountable for their reading. This workshop is suitable for classroom teachers, special education teachers, literacy and instructional coaches, librarians, and administrators.

PC-3

Processes and Perspectives on Learning and Leading as a Literacy Coach (Grades K–8) Kristin Rainville, Assistant Professor and Chair, Literacy, Manhattanville College, NY

Literacy coaching engages and supports teachers and school communities in becoming more reflective, knowledgeable, and skillful within their professional practice so all students learn. The learning processes involved in performing as a literacy coach are numerous and require excellent people and communication skills, combined with sound content knowledge that is backed by theory and evidenced in practice. To achieve high-quality professional development through the vehicle of coaching, ongoing support is necessary for coaches and school literacy leaders. Kristin will present ways to guide coaches, those supporting coaches, teachers, and school leaders through several of the processes that accompany gaining new perspectives that result in changed thinking, changed behavior, and improved professional practice. PC-4

Teacher Language That Supports Independent Problem Solving: Using the Prompting Guide in Guided Reading Lessons (Grades K–3)

SUNDAY | PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

Pre-Conference Workshops Sunday, November 6, 2011 11:00 am–4:00 pm

Chris Chase, Educational Consultant, VT

Learn about teaching moves that facilitate your students’ ability to work through a text with effective problem-solving actions. You will learn about the language to use when students have difficulty and need your support to initiate effective reading behaviors. You will also hear about how to teach for, prompt for, and reinforce word-solving actions, self-monitoring, self-correcting, fluency, and the ability to search for and use information in a text. Please bring The Fountas and Pinnell Prompting Guide Part 1: A Tool for Literacy Teachers (Heinemann, 2008) to the session. PC-5

Teaching Writer’s Craft with Mentor Texts (Grades 3–6) Donna Eident, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Susan Lupone Stonis, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Maureen Wiklund, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA

Revisit your Interactive Read-Alouds in Writer’s Workshop. In this session, we will dig into some of our favorite children’s picture books to discover the craft of writing. Through inquiry, we will uncover the author’s craft and develop minilessons inspired by the work of some of our favorite authors.

The Literacy for All Conference awards two Sue Hundley Memorial Scholarships each year, one to a Reading Recovery teacher and one to a classroom teacher. See page 6 of this brochure for details. We encourage you to apply! 13


SUNDAY | PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS

PC-6

Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI): Extending Students’ Reading Power Through Writing (Grades K–2)

Reading Recovery Pre-Conference Workshop

Linda Garbus, Educational Consultant and Adjunct Faculty, Lesley University, MA

F eatured S essi o n

Diane Powell, Assistant Director, Primary Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA

PC-8

This session is intended for LLI teachers who are working with students, as designed by the Fountas and Pinnell Leveled Literacy Program. The focus of the session will be to build on the reciprocity between reading and writing so that what is learned in writing powers the reading process and vice versa. We will look in depth at reading and writing samples across the text gradient. This process will allow us to explore effective teaching moves that empower students’ writing about reading. We will be working from When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works (Heinemann, 2008); The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades PreK–8, Second Edition: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010), and The Fountas and Pinnell Prompting Guide Part 1: A Tool for Teaching (Heinemann, 2008). All three professional texts are required for the session.

Assessing and Teaching for Phrased and Fluent Reading Connie Briggs, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor of Reading, Texas Woman’s University

This workshop will explore the aspects of fluency that contribute to a consolidated, complex, generative learning system. You will listen to children’s reading and analyze records to determine how best to teach for phrased and fluent reading within a Reading Recovery lesson. Connie will address assessing, monitoring, and teaching for phrased and fluent reading within a classroom setting. New and experienced teachers may find this session helpful.

PC-7

Teaching Focus: Refining Reading Instruction (Grades K–8) Chrisie Moritz, Primary Literacy Collaborative District Trainer, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA Helen Sisk, Consultant, VA

What do I teach next in reading? How do I plan responsive instruction to meet the diverse needs of my students? These are questions that often plague many teachers. In this session, you will delve into The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades K–8: Behaviors and Understandings to Notice, Teach, and Support (Heinemann, 2007) by Pinnell and Fountas to understand how this resource supports teachers in planning for instruction around the reading process. Through the analysis of teaching interactions and student work, you will learn to determine what to teach, and how to teach it, when designing whole class, small group, and individual lessons based on student need. You will need to bring a copy of The Continuum of Literacy Learning to this workshop. This workshop is suited for those familiar with the components of a Reading Workshop.

“Our district sent a team of 12 people.

We loved having the chance to process and reflect together. We really enjoyed

learning more about Reading Recovery

(we are not a Reading Recovery district) and hearing many perspectives on RTI from around the country. Providence was a wonderful city! Thank you!” —Erin Ciccone, ELA Curriculum Coordinator, Pittsford Central Schools, Pittsford, NY

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This year, you may choose to attend the Session A Keynote with Kathy Collins or a breakout session with Linda Rief.

Session A Keynote: The Lenses of Our Teaching: Making Adjustments So We See Clearly and Teach Responsibly (Grades PreK–8) Kathy Collins, Literacy Consultant and Author, NH

Kathy will suggest a variety of ways that we can see and know students so we are better able to teach both where they are and who they are.

F eatured S essi o n LCA-1

Engagement: Creating Fluent Writers and Readers (Grades 4–8) Linda Rief, Teacher and Author, Oyster River Middle School, Durham, NH

To become fluent writers and readers, our students need reading that engages, interests, and challenges them, and writing for real reasons for a real audience. What are the beliefs that ground a Writing and Reading Workshop? As a tool in the language arts, how does technology engage learners? This session will answer these questions. Linda will give an overview of Writing and Reading Workshop, including Writers-Readers Notebooks, portfolios, examples of writing conferences, evaluation, and reading connections.

Session B Monday, November 7, 2011 10:30 am–12:00 pm PreK–8 Literacy Conference

LCB-2

More Than Words: Comprehension Instruction in Reading Conferences with Young Readers (Grades K–1) Kathy Collins, Literacy Consultant and Author, NH

Young readers need support as they orchestrate strategies to figure out words, but there is also a treasure trove of essential comprehension instruction we can offer as our students read even the easiest books. Kathy will help teachers approach conferences with multifaceted intentions so that we are supporting children to become efficient word solvers while also teaching them to be readers who think about their stories, no matter the level of text. This workshop is suitable for classroom teachers. LCB-3

Marvelous Minilessons for Teaching Writing (Grades 3–8)

Monday | SESSIONs A–D

Session A Monday, November 7, 2011 8:30 am–10:00 am

Lori Jamison, Educational Consultant, Canada

How can we take our student writers beyond the “laundry list” to well-crafted and engaging pieces of writing? This session looks at the power of the ten-minute minilesson, a structure for explicit, focused teaching, followed by opportunities for guided practice and independent application. Lori will offer techniques for prewriting and prescriptions for the pain of revision, as well as practical lessons on elaboration, voice, and the writer’s craft, in both narrative and expository writing. LCB-4

Make Me a Story: Teaching Writing Through Digital Storytelling (Grades 1–5) Lisa Miller, Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire

Digital storytelling—combining text, art, voiceover narration, and music on a computer—is a powerful tool for teaching writing, for students must go through a writing process to create effective stories. In this workshop, we will view examples of students’ digital stories and discuss the process students must go through to create them, reasons we should teach digital storytelling, ways to teach students to make these stories, and skills students learn by completing such projects. Repeated: LCD-3. LCB-5

F eatured S essi o ns LCB-1

Supporting New Teachers Through Layered Coaching (Grades K–8) Jennifer Allen, Literacy Specialist and Coach, Waterville School District, ME

Too often, new teachers enter the profession excited to make a difference in the lives of children only to find themselves disillusioned and overwhelmed with the expectations of the classroom. This session will explore ways to create an infrastructure of support within a school for new teachers. We will discuss strategies of how to support new teachers through administering and analyzing assessments, curriculum planning, coaching in and out of the classroom, peer observations, and providing ongoing professional development where new and veteran teachers have opportunities to learn alongside one another. This workshop is suitable for mentors, coaches, and administrators.

Planning Family Engagement Literacy Nights (Grades PreK–6) Margaret Berges, Reading Specialist, Randolph Public Schools, MA Heather Fagan-Kela, K–5 Reading Specialist, Somerset Public Schools, MA

This workshop will outline the process of planning, promoting, and running fun, interactive literacy-based events for students and their families based on community needs. Margaret and Heather will present specific examples of events designed to strengthen home-school relationships. The focus of these events is to provide families with literacy-enriching activities that are easily applied to their lives at home.

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Monday | SESSIONs A–D

LCB-6

LCB-10

Using Culturally Relevant Text in the Primary Classroom (Grades K–2)

Using Culturally Relevant Text in the Classroom (Grades 5–8)

BethAnn Browning, Literacy Coordinator, Dalton City Schools, GA

Mitch Doxsee, English Teacher, Dalton City Schools, GA

This workshop will investigate the benefits of using culturally relevant texts in primary literacy classrooms. Discovering the culture of your classroom is important. Culture in the classroom could be described as ethnic, religious, or societal, among others. Come learn how we can use culturally relevant text to allow our students to bring the background knowledge they have to class and to aid them in their acquisition of literacy skills.

Rebecca Doxsee, ELL Teacher, Dalton City Schools, GA

LCB-7

Moving Writing Instruction into the Digital Age (Grades 3–8) Cheri Burke, Language Arts Consultant, Ellington Middle School, CT Sheelah Sweeny, Assistant Professor, Northeastern University, MA

Literacy practices are rapidly changing in the digital age of the 21st century. Taking the first steps to integrating technology with writing instruction can often seem daunting. This session explores how teachers can incorporate online resources with their current writing instruction and move toward using new processes for writing instruction using different devices. Sheelah and Cheri will share sites for the writing process, expository writing, authors as mentors, and others, along with student work and responses.

Julie Stokes, Literacy Coordinator, Dalton City Schools, GA

This workshop will investigate the benefits of using culturally relevant texts in ELL and in Gifted Classes. Discovering the culture of your classroom is important. Culture in the classroom could be described as ethnic, sports, or societal, among others. How can we use culturally relevant text to motivate our students to read? Come find out in this session. LCB-11

Performance Poetry for Fun and Fluency (Grades 3–6) Donna Eident, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Susan Lupone Stonis, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Maureen Wiklund, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA

As Georgia Heard said, “Poetry, like bread, is for everyone.” This workshop will help you discover how to celebrate poetry through performance while strengthening all six dimensions of fluency in your readers. You will dive into a variety of poetry anthologies to explore and experience the possibilities for making poetry come alive in the classroom. LCB-12

Content Literacy: Social Studies (Grades 3–6)

Mobile Learning and Literacy: Experiences and Possibilities in Preschool Classrooms (Grades PreK–K)

Margaret Crosby, Intermediate and Middle Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Lisa Fiore, Associate Professor and Director, Early Childhood Education, Lesley University, MA

One writer said that the “Social” has been taken out of “Social Studies.” In this session, we will examine how we can help students read and write to develop a process for learning in Social Studies. We will look at using multiple sources of information and writing for authentic reasons.

In this session, you will explore the concept of mobile learning (mLearning) in preschool classrooms with examples of thoughtful, developmentally appropriate activities presented in an interactive format. An alternative stance to the argument that technology is harmful for young children’s development will be built as you engage with materials and each other. Lisa will discuss resources and ideas for funding.

LCB-8

LCB-9

Creating a Vision: Planning for Teacher Learning in the Writing Workshop (Grades K–8) Erica Denman, Literacy Consultant, Independent Readers and Writers, LLC, NY

Once schools embark on the journey of creating Professional Learning Communities, the challenge is: How do we deepen and extend teacher learning and practice to create strong Writing Workshops that produce strong writers? Schools need a plan for how to roll out the implementation of Writing Workshop across time. This session will highlight a multiyear implementation plan for creating structures, professional development, key practices, and assessments for all schools.

LCB-13

Testing as a Genre (Grades 3–8) Yvonne Hunt, Literacy Coach, Sandwich Public Schools, MA

Do not suspend your workshop model to “prep” for the state test! In this session, you will learn strategies that will help your children perform better on reading comprehension tests with open responses. You will leave with “test talk” strategies, graphic organizers, and lessons that you can embed throughout the year in your class. Thinking about testing as a genre will reduce your and your students’ anxiety. LCB-14

Transformation of One School District to Support Literacy Learning for All Students (Grades PreK–8) Mary Ellen Johnson, Former Superintendent, Sandwich Public Schools, MA

This workshop will describe the change process and the structures that were put into place to support and ensure long-term sustainability of a district-wide literacy approach to teaching and learning for grades prekindergarten through grade eight.

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RRB-2

The Daily 5 (Independent Literacy Centers) (Grades K–2)

Acquiring the Visual Working System for Literacy: Supporting Change Over Time

Bridget Minute, Kindergarten Teacher, Duanesburg Central Schools, NY Jessie Westfall, First Grade Teacher, Duanesburg Central Schools, NY

The Daily 5 is an independent literacy program that allows for more individualized reading instruction. We will review each of the five parts in depth and discuss suggested schedules for practicality. Jessie and Bridget will share center ideas and sample activities that you can use right away.

Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut

This session explores the acquisition of proficient visual processing strategies by Reading Recovery students. The discussion includes a review of relevant theory and related instructional procedures. Repeated: RRE-2.

LCB-16

Systems Thinking Tools for Content Area Literacy Instruction (Grades K–6) Tara Nattrass, Assistant Principal, Rockwood School District, MO

How can we deepen levels of thinking when students compose reading responses, help students determine main ideas, and strengthen content area comprehension? Bringing systems thinking tools into the classroom provides these opportunities. Review how to use Behavior Over Time (BOT) graphs to deconstruct text. Learn how to use connection circles and icebergs to determine main ideas, explore interrelationships, and engage in character analysis. You will delve into texts and use these tools. We will analyze student work samples in this session. LCB-17

Infusing Phonics Instruction Throughout the Kindergarten Classroom Michelle Witman, Consultant and Literacy Coach, Sail Consulting, LLC, NY

This interactive workshop will help you gain a further understanding of why phonics instruction is an essential part of the kindergarten classroom. You will explore how implicit and explicit phonics instruction can meet the needs of all learners in the kindergarten classroom. The workshop will walk you through the various components of a balanced literacy framework, providing techniques and tools that can be immediately infused into any classroom setting.

Reading Recovery Institute B Sessions

RRB-3

Language, Literacy, and Learning: A Basis for Achievement, Acceleration, and Success for ELL Students

Monday | SESSIONs A–D

LCB-15

Mary Rosser, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine

This session will explore the dynamics of rich language environments where oral language is used to support and promote accelerated literacy learning in reading and writing with students who are English language learners. Video clips will demonstrate how conversations around books become the catalyst for powerful, linked student learning experiences in individual and small group settings. Repeated: RRC-1. RRB-4

“That would make an interesting story!” —Scaffolding the Art of Composing Laurel Dickey, Teacher Leader, Collaborative for Educational Services, MA

In writing, it is necessary for Reading Recovery teachers to support children across a gradient of difficulty, similar to the gradient provided by the set of leveled texts used for reading. The child’s composing of a story is the starting point. In this session, you will explore the theory and guidance provided for supporting children in composing stories during Reading Recovery lessons and how this changes over time. This work will take you beyond the question “What could you write about that?”

F eatured S essi o ns RRB-1

Yes, We Teach Phonics and So Much More! Connie Briggs, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor of Reading, Texas Woman’s University

This session will look at how Reading Recovery professionals teach phonemic awareness and phonics within the larger framework of research and effective practices. We will also explore, through lesson records that show change over time, the importance of close observation and documentation to support teaching of Reading Recovery students.

Beginning October 21, 2011, handouts will be available on the Lesley University website at www.lesley.edu/literacyforall. You are responsible for downloading handouts for the sessions you are attending. Many presenters do not post their handouts online, but will provide them in the sessions. 17


Monday | SESSIONs A–D

Session C Monday, November 7, 2011 You may select a 90-minute C session (1:30 pm–3:00 pm) then attend a D session from 3:30 pm–5:00 pm or select an In-depth C session (1:30 pm–4:45 pm with a 15-minute break).

1:30 pm–3:00 pm PreK–8 Literacy Conference F eatured S essi o ns LCC-1

Nonfiction Reading Clubs: Nurture the Habits of Mind and Teach the Strategies Young Nonfiction Readers Need Most (Grades K–3) Kathy Collins, Literacy Consultant and Author, NH

Kathy will begin by introducing the structure of reading clubs in K–3 classrooms and show how reading clubs provide opportunities for young students to read in authentic, engaged, and self-initiated ways. She will show how teachers might implement cycles of nonfiction reading clubs, using the structure to teach kids to read nonfiction with power, intention, and joy. This workshop is suitable for classroom teachers. LCC-2

I Do, We Do, You Do: Modeled, Shared, Guided, and Independent Reading in the Kindergarten Program (Grades K–1) Lori Jamison, Educational Consultant, Canada

The Gradual Release of Responsibility Model is every bit as relevant for emerging readers as for other stages of development. Find out how we can make the most of the classroom read aloud for modeling comprehension strategies and teaching vocabulary. Explore the links between Shared and Guided Reading in kindergarten, and see how our youngest children can learn to read by reading with “must do” activities that encourage independent practice of key strategies. Pick up ideas for implementing an independent reading program that supports growth and joy in reading.

LCC-3

Don’t Forget to Share: The Crucial Last Step in the Writing Workshop (Grades K–6) Leah Mermelstein, Author and Consultant, Read-Write-Connect, INC., NY

In this session, we will learn about “the share” as both a celebratory and instructional tool in the Writing Workshop. Leah will outline many different types of shares and how to conduct these shares as instructional conversations. She will address whole class and partner shares, how students benefit from the shares, and the best times in the year to conduct them. This workshop is suitable for teachers and coaches. Repeated: LCF-4. LCC-4

Teaching Students to Write about History with Voice and Passion (Grades 3–6) Karen Caine, Literacy Consultant and Author, NJ Amy Ludwig Vanderwater, Literacy Consultant and Author, NJ

Come learn how to use a Writing Workshop approach to teach students to write articles, poems, and narratives about the past. We will look closely at a variety of mentor texts and learn how to teach students to write about a historical event, place, or person. We will then focus on minilessons and explorations that teach students to write with voice, description, and detail about the past. LCC-5

Developing Norms for Coaching Partnerships (Grades K–8) Toni Czekanski, Intermediate and Middle Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

We finally have a literacy coach! Now what? The coach has been hired to help improve student achievement and teachers’ instruction. What role does each of the players have in this coaching partnership? In this session, we will look at the complex relationships that develop over time and need nurturing so they can evolve toward productive partnerships where teachers, administrators, and coaches all have specific roles to play. We will examine how developing norms around what those roles are can help a coaching initiative get off to a positive start or enhance one that is already in place. LCC-6

Creating Opportunity for Professional Development Through Supervision and Evaluation (Grades K–6) Terri Griffin, Assistant Professor, Westfield State University, MA Stephanie Grimaldi, Assistant Professor, Westfield State University, MA

This session will explore the opportunity for administrators to use the contractual supervision and evaluation process as a means of professional development for their teachers. Specifically, this session will highlight the pre- and post-observation conference times to focus the formal observation and extend teacher growth and understanding of effective instructional practices and contexts. Terri and Stephanie will share rubrics for teacher self-evaluation, common understanding, shared language, and focused conversation.

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LCC-10

One Book, One School: Improving Family and Community Involvement in Middle School (Grades 5–8)

Wikis, Blogs, and Writing­—Oh My! (Grades 5–8)

Katrina Hatch, Literacy Specialist, Caledonia-Mumford Middle School, NY

Judy York, Sixth Grade Language Arts and Math Teacher, Regional School District 15, CT

Higher levels of family involvement predict higher literacy levels. Do you want more parent and community involvement in your middle school? Examine the findings of our school’s four-year case study and explore how districts can use aspects of a “One Book” summer reading program as a vehicle for improving family and community involvement. As teachers and administrators, you will have a chance to discuss how to implement your own successful book projects in your school.

Meredith Menton, Reading Consultant, Regional School District 15, CT

We will look at how to incorporate technology in the form of wikis and blogs into the English Language Arts classroom and curriculum. By using blogs and wikis, we can promote and foster critical thinking, engagement, and collaboration and increase the amount of time reading and writing. Meredith and Judy will share wikis and blogs they have used with middle school students in their ELA classes.

LCC-8

LCC-11

The Power of Comprehension Strategy Instruction (Grades K–4) Rebecca Flynn, Reading Specialist, SAU #39, NH

Creating Lifelong Readers: Children’s Literature in the Reading Program (Grades 3–6)

Mary Ireland, Grades 2–3 Teacher, SAU #39, NH

Ellie Papazoglou, Adjunct Faculty, Graduate Studies, Plymouth State University, NH

Katy Kennedy, Literacy Coach, SAU #39, NH

Reading is an emotional journey and a cognitive process. In a literacy tapestry of practical and effective teaching strategies, you will experience ways to inspire a lifelong pursuit of reading. This session is designed to present multiple conditions that foster the skill and the will to read. Through experiences with children’s literature, you will learn to hold on to the principles that encourage students to want to read.

Are you interested in learning how to teach effective comprehension strategies to your students? Join us as we discuss research, model comprehension lessons, and explore mentor texts that support each of the comprehension strategies. LCC-9

Using Book Introductions to Assure Successful Student Comprehension (Grades K–6) Tisha Markette, Literacy Consultant and Leadership Coach, Achievement First, CT

You will learn key teacher moves in the book introduction that will set your readers up to comprehend the text with fluent processing. If you are struggling with these issues and questions: 1) too long of a book introduction; 2) when do I stop doing a picture walk?; 3) I did a book introduction, but they didn’t get the overall meaning; and 4) how many words am I supposed to pre-teach?, then this is the session for you! You will learn how to use observations and systematic assessment data to choose “just right” text that provides your students with opportunities to expand their systems of strategic actions. There will be an opportunity for you to plan a book introduction for Guided Reading, so please bring a book that you will be using in the next week or two. In this session, we will be referring to Fountas and Pinnell’s The Continuum of Literacy Learning, PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010); Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency (Heinemann, 2006); and When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works (Heinemann, 2008). If you have any of these three texts, it would be helpful if you brought them to this workshop.

Monday | SESSIONs A–D

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Reading Conferences: Brief, Powerful Interactions for Building a Self-Extending System (Grades K–2) Jessica Sherman, Literacy Coach and Reading Recovery Teacher, Achievement First, NY

In this interactive session, rooted in the work of Marie Clay, Irene Fountas, and Gay Su Pinnell, we will describe and notice observable reading behaviors. Through video clips and discussion, we will build our understanding of the reading process and our ability to discuss it powerfully with our students and with our colleagues. Jessica will share ideas for quick and effective conferring. This session is most suitable for those who have some experience with using running or reading records.

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Monday | SESSIONs A–D

Reading Recovery Institute C Sessions

Session C In-Depth Monday, November 7, 2011 1:30 pm–4:45 pm (with a 15-minute break)

F eatured S essi o n RRC-1

Language, Literacy, and Learning: A Basis for Achievement, Acceleration, and Success for ELL Students Mary Rosser, Reading Recovery Trainer, University of Maine

This session will explore the dynamics of rich language environments where oral language is used to support and promote accelerated literacy learning in reading and writing with students who are English language learners. Video clips will demonstrate how conversations around books become the catalyst for powerful, linked student learning experiences in individual and small group settings. Repeated: RRB-3. RRC-2

Reading Recovery in Rhode Island: Renewing, Reporting, Recruiting, and Responding Kathleen Desrosiers, K–12 ELA Coordinator, Warwick Public Schools, RI Julie Francis, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Warwick Public Schools, RI

This session features innovative and successful advocacy efforts of a newly established training site. Learn how to increase communication and reporting of Reading Recovery implementation and data analysis, highlight Reading Recovery as part of a comprehensive RTI model, and recruit new districts for training teachers.

PreK–8 Literacy Conference Session C In-depth F eatured S essi o ns LCC-13 In-depth

Exploring the Possibilities of Layered Coaching (Grades K–8) Jennifer Allen, Literacy Specialist and Coach, Waterville School District, ME

This session will explore the concept of layered coaching. Jennifer will share strategies of how literacy coaches can support teachers and student learning in and out of the classroom. We will explore how the various coaching layers can work together within a system to support school and district goals, while creating an environment that fosters sustained learning. We will also look at the possibilities for the role of literacy coach (being a resource, designing and facilitating professional development, study groups, peer observations, and supporting teachers in the classroom). The session is rooted in the belief that teachers know what they need when it comes to support in literacy, and that the best literacy leaders are those that listen to and respect the educators in their midst. This in-depth workshop is suitable for beginning coaches and administrators. LCC-14 In-depth

Reading to Write; Writing to Read (Grades 5–8) Linda Rief, Author and Teacher, Oyster River Middle School, NH

Our schools are filled with the rich, diverse voices of young men and women as they search in their reading and in their writing for who they are and where they fit in this world. Reading and writing are life endeavors for them, and real life is affected by their reading and writing. By gaining intimate knowledge and success as readers and writers, our students become the literate, articulate, and compassionate citizens of the world we need. In this in-depth session, we will use many of the strategies that have been most successful in engaging students in meaningful writing and reading. LCC-15 In-depth

Response to Intervention: How to Begin the Process (Grades 1–6) James Cline, Educational Consultant, IN

Response to Intervention is an essential educational plan to meet the needs of all students. Your school wants to adopt this model and yet there is little, if any, guidance. Attend this session and learn how to begin the Response to Intervention process that benefits the needs of all students by individualizing instruction in a collaborative educational setting. For the success of this presentation, audience participation is expected.

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Designing Instruction for the Writing Workshop: Meeting the Needs of Students and Core Standards (Grades 3–8) Kerry Crosby, Literacy Consultant and Adjunct Faculty Member, Lesley University, MA Jill Eurich, Assistant Director of Literacy Collaborative, Lesley University, MA Helen Sisk, Consultant, VA

Join us as we analyze student writing and integrate the instructional needs of our students with core standards to plan instruction for the Writing Workshop. Using The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching, we will work interactively to learn the process of designing curriculum, particularly writing minilessons. Topics include: 1) analyze students’ writing behaviors and artifacts to inform instruction; 2) learn how to translate key understandings into focused minilessons; 3) write clear, precise minilesson statements that reflect standards; and 4) use mentor texts, student writing, and shared and modeled writing to illustrate lessons effectively. Please bring a copy of The Continuum of Literacy Learning, PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010), or an earlier edition of this text, by Pinnell and Fountas to this session. LCC-17 In-depth

Illustration Study in the K–2 Writing Workshop Patricia Leary, Primary Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Ellen Mantenfel, Primary Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Karen Rood, Primary Literacy Coordinator, Whitney Point Central Schools, NY

We will explore writing and illustrating as parallel composing processes. Using The Continuum of Literacy Learning by Fountas and Pinnell and In Pictures and In Words by Katie Wood Ray, we will look at writing and illustrating goals, view classroom examples, and examine mentor texts to create units of study around illustrations. Please bring The Continuum of Literacy Learning, K–2 (Heinemann, 2007) and In Pictures and In Words (Heinemann, 2010) to this session.

Reading Recovery Institute Session C In-depth F eatured S essi o ns RRC-3 In-depth

Achieving Shifts in Teaching and Learning in Lesson Activities Over Time Eva Konstantellou, Reading Recovery Trainer, Lesley University, MA

The 30-minute daily Reading Recovery lesson provides the framework within which vast changes in processing occur from the beginning to the end of a child’s lesson series. In this session, we will explore the cognitive payoffs from the lesson activities over time facilitated by expert teaching. We will use examples from running records, lesson records, and video clips to discuss how children’s behaviors change on each task in the lesson over time and think about the changes we need to make in our teaching over time to support the children’s strategic processing. Please bring Literacy Lessons Designed for Individuals, Part One and Part Two (Heinemann, 2005), to the session.

Monday | SESSIONs A–D

LCC-16 In-depth

RRC-4 In-depth

Changing Minds­—Changing Practice! Floretta Thornton-Reid, Executive Director, University Training Center for Reading Recovery, Georgia State University

Helping young literacy learners change their minds about the ways to process text as a reader and a writer can change the learner’s practice. This session will explore how teacher understandings and decision-making enable young literacy learners to acquire flexible ways of problem-solving during the complex process of writing that result in support changes to young learners’ reading and writing.

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Monday | SESSIONs A–D

Session D Monday, November 7, 2011 3:30 pm–5:00 pm PreK–8 Literacy Conference D Sessions F eatured S essi o ns LCD-1

Using a Reader’s Genre Notebook: Talking, Thinking, and Writing about Texts (Grades 2–8) Irene Fountas, Author and Professor, Lesley University, MA Gay Su Pinnell, Author and Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University

Learn how to help your students use a reader’s genre notebook as a tool for thinking and writing about a variety of genres in a Reader’s Workshop. Using genre minilessons for building a foundation of genre knowledge, help your students learn how to use their understanding to think about, talk about, write about, and read texts with deeper understanding. LCD-2

Guided Reading: Taking a Deeper Look at Book Introductions and the Transfer to Independent Reading (Grades K–2)

Exploring Nonfiction: Units of Study for Reading and Writing (Grades K–2) Laurel Burns, Primary Literacy Coordinator, Bermuda Department of Education

Nonfiction literacy is an integral part of today’s high-quality classroom. We will survey various types of nonfiction texts, considering their unique structures and what is necessary to navigate them effectively. We will examine sample units of study for both the Reading and Writing Workshop. LCD-5

Getting Your Students to Write Like Real Authors (Grades K–8) Rob Buyea, Teacher and Author, Northfield Mount Hermon Schools, MA

Hear from a children’s author and former elementary school teacher as he talks about teaching writing in a way that nurtures young authors. Learn how to help students move beyond simply planning for their piece once to planning for their writing on a daily basis, thus becoming more productive writers. Teach students how to talk like writers so that they become more intentional writers. Learn about writing critique groups— what they look like, how they work, and how to implement them. Learn how Rob created seven distinct voices in his novel, Because of Mr. Terupt (Delacorte Books for Young Readers, 2010), and how you can teach voice. Teach your students to become better at revising by helping them identify what needs revision and showing them how to do revision work. Rob will address these topics as he connects his classroom experiences with his work as an author and makes practical suggestions that you can implement in your classroom immediately. LCD-6

To Read Is to Think: Exploring Reading Comprehension Strategies (Grades 3–6)

Leah Mermelstein, Author and Consultant, Read-Write-Connect, INC., NY

Jodi DeSantis, Learning Specialist, Mineola School District, NY

In this session, Leah will talk about different types of Guided Reading sessions and which students might benefit. She will talk about the components of a powerful book introduction, as well as how to help students transfer what they learn during Guided Reading into their independent reading. This workshop is most suitable for educators who already know the basics with regard to Guided Reading.

In this session, you will learn about effective reading comprehension strategies based on the work of Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis. This session will focus on teaching children how to engage in a “conversation” with the text, to infer meaning, to make connections, to determine importance, to ask questions, and to summarize and synthesize. This session is designed for intermediate teachers (grades 3–6) and administrators.

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Make Me a Story: Teaching Writing Through Digital Storytelling (Grades 1–5)

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Interactive Read Aloud: Expanding Thinking Through Shared Talk (Grades K–5)

Lisa Miller, Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire

Dina Hartung, District Trainer, Union Endicott Schools, NY

Digital storytelling—combining text, art, voiceover narration, and music on a computer—is a powerful tool for teaching writing, for students must go through a writing process to create effective stories. In this workshop, we will view examples of students’ digital stories and discuss the process students must go through to create them, reasons we should teach digital storytelling, ways to teach students to make these stories, and skills students learn by completing such projects. Repeated: LCB-4.

What are the strategic actions for expanding thinking? How can shared talk help us to gain a deeper understanding of texts? What are the characteristics of “intentional conversation”? How can the way we look at a variety of texts deepen our level of understanding of an author’s theme and idea? How will our deeper understanding help to shape our “intentional conversations” to be more effective? Throughout this session, we will examine these ideas to gain a deeper understanding of the texts we use and to increase the effectiveness of our conversations with our students to deepen their level of comprehension.


LCD-11

Conferring with Young Writers (Grades K–2)

Integrating Math and Literacy in the Middle School (Grades 5–8)

Martha Horn, Elementary Education Professor, Rhode Island College

Pendred Noyce, Author, MA

Chrissy Ahern, Teacher, Providence Public Schools, RI

Although math and stories are often linked in early elementary school, by middle school the two subjects are usually treated as entirely separate languages. This interactive session will explore opportunities for integrating the study of mathematics and literature in grades 5–8, drawing from several novels, including the presenter’s own book, Lost in Lexicon: An Adventure in Words and Numbers (Tumblehome Press, 2010). Pendred will share materials, strategies, and student work from a six-week integrated unit in which the math teacher taught one class session a week.

Julie Slater, Teacher, Providence Public Schools, RI Natasha White, Teacher, Providence Public Schools, RI

Conferring is a topic we return to over and over again because it is where so much teaching and learning takes place. In this session, we will examine how the teacher listens, observes, and makes decisions about what, when, and how to teach to help the writer move forward. We will also look at classroom structures that make effective conferring possible. LCD-9

A Cycle of Professional Growth (Grades K–6) Patty Hurley, Special Education Coordinator, Manchester, NH Jeneca Kenny, Title I Reading Supervisor, Manchester, NH Shelly Larochelle, Principal, Manchester, NH Michelle Macropol, Literacy Coach, Manchester, NH Kristine Haveles-Pelletier, District Literacy Curriculum Coordinator, Manchester, NH

By attending this session, you will learn about a coaching cycle being used in the Manchester School District. We will discuss the value behind focused coaching and student-centered feedback, in addition to implementation strategies to put this model into practice. You will gain insight on the importance of lead teachers being a direct link to learning opportunities, the critical impact of shared leadership in school, and how administration can provide support to sustain the motivation through celebration and playing an active role in the process.

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Telling Stories: Imagination Supporting Literacy Development Throughout the Curriculum (Grades PreK–2)

Monday | SESSIONs A–D

LCD-8

Melissa Tonachel, Kindergarten and First Grade Teacher, Boston Public Schools, MA

How can we use storytelling to support children’s development as readers and writers? How might storytelling support collaboration, problem solving, group work, and reflection? Where can we find stories around the classroom and what can these stories tell us about children’s thinking? How can we use stories to support all areas of curriculum? What is the usefulness of real-life stories and imaginative ones? What makes a story a good story? Who should tell the stories? This workshop will give you an opportunity to explore these questions and to practice telling some stories of your own.

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“Halls and Walls That Teach”—Looking and Learning Together (Grades K–8) JoEllen McCarthy, Literacy Consultant, Always Learning LL, NY

Educators do benefit from sharing and learning together. You will have the opportunity to reflect on a variety of literate environments from JoEllen’s work in K–8 classrooms. Classrooms will come alive as we visit Reading and Writing workshops, look at teacher- and student-created charts that provide records of minilessons, evidence of our teaching, thinking, and learning. Explore the wide range of possibilities to utilize anchor charts (Stephanie Harvey’s “halls and walls that teach”) and take back practical ideas through visual references that “show don’t tell” best literacy practices in action. JoEllen will provide you with a “must have” list of mentor texts.

“Each session left me with much to

think about, reflect on, and revise my

practice in at least some small way. The vocabulary session based on Building

Robust Vocabulary: Bringing Words to Life did just that—it brought the book to life. For me, this was the best of all the sessions I attended. It was well

presented, the presenters were excellent, and the focus critical.”

—Martha G. Hershey, Reading/ Language Arts Consultant, Berlin Public Schools, Berlin, CT

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TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

Reading Recovery Institute D Sessions

PreK–8 Literacy Conference E Sessions LCE-1

F eatured S essi o n RRD-1

What’s Fluency Got to Do With It? Theory to Practice Connie Briggs, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor of Reading, Texas Woman’s University

This session will address the importance of fluent reading and the complexity that is involved. We will discuss how phrased and fluent reading contributes to good processing and how good processing contributes to building an even stronger and efficient processing system. This is an introductory session for new teachers. RRD-2

All the “Write” Moves Maureen Gray, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Haverhill Public Schools, MA

Students’ writing in Reading Recovery should shift over time from simple to complex. You will be actively involved in a discussion of how to support writing throughout the lesson series. This session will explore how a teacher’s decisions, language, and careful record keeping can support a student’s writing. You will discover how to help students develop fluent control over the practical aspects of story production with an emphasis on meaningful conversations.

Response to Intervention: You’re Up and Running, but How Do You Sustain This Educational Movement? (Grades 1–6) James Cline, Educational Consultant, IN

Response to Intervention is an essential educational plan to meet the needs of all students. Your school has adopted and followed this model for two to five years, but how do you sustain the Response to Intervention process? Is Fidelity of Implementation still an important component of your model? Attend this session and learn how to continue the purity of the Response to Intervention model in your educational setting. For the success of this presentation, audience participation is expected. LCE-2

Visual Literacy and the Technology Strategies to Make It Happen (Grades 3–8) Sue Cusack, Instructor and Project Director, Lesley University, MA

Visual literacy is an emerging concept that relates to the use of visual representation to foster comprehension, meaning making, and communication. Educators are constantly making decisions that impact representation of content. This session is designed to help educators make more informed choices about “representation” in ways that foster creativity, promote the effective use of background knowledge and experiences, integrate technology, and enhance the learning experience for all students.

Session E Tuesday, November 8, 2011 8:30 am–10:00 am

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You may attend Keynote E with Ruth Culham or a 90-minute breakout session.

There are oceans of books written for middle school students and teens every year, and navigating through trends and genres can be overwhelming. Is it really all vampires and spoiled boarding school cliques? Get new titles under your belt and learn the blogs and websites to follow for the latest news and reviews, and possibly even find that comic book that will make you a believer.

Keynote Address E: One Student, One Voice: Inspiring Authentic Writing (Grades K–8) Ruth Culham, Author and President, Culham Writing Company, OR

Ruth shares her knowledge of teaching strategies to inspire writers in the classroom. This keynote is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc.

Put Your Best Book Forward: First-Class Reading Recommendations (Grades 5–8) Maya Escobar, Teen Services Librarian, Cambridge Public Library, MA

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Literacy Coaching: The Need to Deepen Our Listening Ability (Grades K–8) Aili Pogust, Literacy Consultant, Trainer, and Coach, The Pogust Group, NJ

When we literacy coaches are communicating with colleagues, how do we indicate we have really heard what our colleagues have said? Eye contact and head nodding are only a part of the process. How deeply are we actually listening? You will practice three levels of listening and effective ways to paraphrase what we think we have heard. These communicating skills can build strong coaching relationships, particularly with hesitant coaching partners.

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Session F Tuesday, November 8, 2011 You may select one of these options for Session F.

F eatured S essi o ns RRE-1

• Reading Recovery Keynote with Nancy Anderson (10:15 am–11:45 am)

It’s More Than the Picture: Teaching for Processing Early in First Grade

• A 90-minute breakout Session F (10:15 am–11:45 am)

Nancy Anderson, Department of Reading, Texas Woman’s University, and Reading Recovery Trainer

If you attend the keynote or a 90-minute session, you may select a Session G from 1:00 pm–2:30 pm. If you attend an In-depth Session F from 10:15 am– 1:30 pm, you will finish your professional development at 1:30 pm. There will be a 15-minute break during the In-depth session. You may grab lunch when the session concludes.

Accelerative learning depends on students’ construction of useful strategic activities in reading and writing. Early teaching must focus on strategic action rather than items, procedures, or routine behaviors such as looking at the picture for the “right word.” This session will focus on the “what,” “when,” and “how” of teaching for strategic activity in early lessons. Repeated: RRG-1. RRE-2

Acquiring the Visual Working System for Literacy: Supporting Change Over Time Mary Anne Doyle, Reading Recovery Trainer and Professor, University of Connecticut

This session explores the acquisition of proficient visual processing strategies by Reading Recovery students. The discussion includes review of both relevant theory and related instructional procedures. Repeated: RRB-2. RRE-3

Are We There Yet?

• An In-depth Session F (10:15 am–1:30 pm)

TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

Reading Recovery Institute E Sessions

Reading Recovery Keynote F Making the Invisible Visible: The Role of Meaning in Effective Literacy Processing Nancy Anderson, Department of Reading, Texas Woman’s University, and Reading Recovery Trainer

Meaning is the most important source of information for literacy learners; however, it may be hard to value “invisible” information over “visible” letters on the page. Understand the critical role of meaning as the guiding force of strategic activity and explore how reading and writing weave together to support effective comprehension instruction that engages learners.

Floretta Thornton-Reid, Executive Director, University Training Center for Reading Recovery, Georgia State University

This session will explore the challenges of teacher decision making to support struggling young literacy learners with shifts in text complexity at higher gradients of text difficulty. This session will pay particular attention to the complexities of structure and how the Record of Oral Language can provide support for teacher decision making. RRE-4

Priming the Processing in Roaming Around the Known Michael Buonaiuto, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader, Cambridge Public Schools, MA

The Observation Survey gives teachers information about how students look at print. How do we use this information in Roaming Around the Known? Explore how to help children look at print “without deliberately teaching new processes.” This session is designed for Reading Recovery Teachers-in-Training.

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TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

Session F Tuesday, November 8, 2011 10:15 am–11:45 am PreK–8 Literacy Conference F Sessions F eatured S essi o ns LCF-1

Using Picture Books to Teach Writing (Grades K–2) Ruth Culham, Author and President, Culham Writing Company, OR

No matter what grade level, picture books can inspire writers to new heights. Ruth will suggest titles and sample lessons to use to motivate primary writers to think about writing, learning, and books. This session is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc. LCF-2

Coaching for Expert Teaching in Guided Reading Lessons (Grades K–8) Irene Fountas, Author and Professor, Lesley University, MA Gay Su Pinnell, Author and Professor Emerita, The Ohio State University

Why Write for Children? (Grades 2–6) Sara Pennypacker, Children’s Author, MA

After the publication of her first book for adults, people would ask Sara why she would go back to writing for children, as though writing for adults were a more desirable and challenging endeavor. In this presentation, Sara will explore the satisfactions and challenges of writing for children, what’s unique about young readers, and the importance of books to children. LCF-6

Academic Vocabulary: Engaging Activities for Struggling Readers (and Others!) (Grades 2–5) MaryEllen Vogt, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, California State University, Long Beach

Many students have difficulty mastering academic language and vocabulary. In this session, we will explore a variety of usetomorrow activities for teaching academic vocabulary in a variety of content subjects. MaryEllen will provide you with a comprehensive handout. This session is sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. LCF-7

Engaging Adolescent Students in Active Talk about Text (Grades 6–9)

What content expertise do teachers need and how can you support their ongoing development? Learn about key factors for coaches to consider in shifting teacher understandings and improving the outcomes of small group teaching.

Mechelle Abney, Former Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

LCF-3

This session will address ways in which teachers can engage adolescent students in talking about text. You will analyze student conversation and identify ways in which to extend thinking though talk. You will leave with a variety of practical, instructional techniques for engaging students in quality text talk.

Three Keys to Supporting Struggling Readers (Grades 3–8) Lori Jamison, Educational Consultant, Canada

Do you have students in your class who can’t cope with gradelevel texts? Do they act out to avoid reading? In this session, Lori will provide a brief overview of the Response to Intervention (RTI) model, and then you will examine three keys to supporting struggling readers: text choice, reading volume, and strategic independence. You will pick up practical ideas for helping students become metacognitive about comprehension strategies, with a particular focus on inference and self-monitoring. LCF-4

Don’t Forget to Share: The Crucial Last Step in the Writing Workshop (Grades K–6) Leah Mermelstein, Author and Consultant, Read-Write-Connect, INC., NY

In this session, we will learn about “the share” as both a celebratory and instructional tool in the Writing Workshop. Leah will outline many different types of shares and how to conduct these shares as instructional conversations. She will address whole class and partner shares, how students benefit from the shares, and the best times in the year to conduct them. This workshop is suitable for teachers and coaches. Repeated: LCC-3.

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Ann McNamara, Middle School Literacy Coordinator, Union Endicott, NY Kate Rodriguez, High School Literacy Coordinator, Middletown Public Schools, NY

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Books to Delight Us, to Amaze Us, to Inspire Us! (Grades 3–8) Donna Eident, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Susan Lupone Stonis, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA Maureen Wiklund, Literacy Coordinator, Sandwich Public Schools, MA

Teachers love nothing more than a great children’s book—we treasure Read-Alouds that cast their spell over our community of learners; we sniffle our way through poignant scenes that pop up in every genre; we exult when we can put just the right book in the hand of a student who is poised to take off as a reader. This workshop will be an opportunity for you to explore dozens of books of all genres and to think about how they can delight, amaze, and inspire our students.


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Teaching “Robust” Vocabulary During an Interactive Read-Aloud (Grades PreK–2)

Reading Strategically, Thinking Critically: Making Connections with Nonfiction Texts (Grades 3–6)

Laura Feinberg, Special Education Teacher, Duanesburg Central Schools, NY

Need a reminder about why reading aloud is important? Forgotten how much fun picture books are? This workshop will demonstrate how to do an interactive Read-Aloud and provide video footage from a primary classroom using the strategies discussed. Laura will also discuss how to incorporate vocabulary development through the use of children’s literature using “robust” vocabulary strategies. LCF-10

Units of Study Across the Year in Middle School (Grades 5–8) Sarah Foleno, Literacy Coordinator, Cambridge Public Schools, MA Katie Gribben, ELA Teacher, Cambridge Public Schools, MA

Deciding which units of study to teach can be a challenge for middle school teachers. In this session, we will share one middle school’s process of how teachers choose effective units of study across the year that focus instruction and remain student centered. Learn how to plan which units to teach and how to focus units of study on specific reading and writing objectives using The Continuum of Literacy Learning. You should bring a copy of The Continuum of Literacy Learning, Grades 3–8: Behaviors and Understandings to Notice, Teach, and Support by Fountas and Pinnell (Heinemann, 2007) to this session.

Dawn Little, Author and Literacy Consultant, Links to Literacy, MD

Do you want to increase the use of nonfiction texts in your classroom? In this session, you will take part in a hands-on lesson that teaches key comprehension strategies through interactive, nonfiction Read-Alouds. Learn how to use biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, journals, and letters to model for students how to make connections to the text to help build understanding of the topic. Leave with an action plan to incorporate nonfiction Read-Alouds into your curriculum. LCF-14

A Classroom of Storytellers: Promoting Literacy Development in Early Childhood (Grades PreK–K)

TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

LCF-9

Ben Mardell, Associate Professor, Early Childhood Education, Lesley University, MA

The ability to tell a coherent story is one of the foundational skills needed to launch children into literacy. This workshop provides prekindergarten and kindergarten teachers with the tools needed to understand their students’ stories and an approach to help promote their students’ storytelling abilities. Ben will use video clips of child-teacher interactions to help illustrate techniques used to support young children’s storytelling skills. LCF-15

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Using QAR to Prepare Students for ELA MCAS Open-Response Questions (Grades 3–6) Allison Dalton Griffin, Fourth Grade Teacher, Foxborough Public Schools, MA Dawn Sherlock, Teacher, Foxborough Public Schools, MA

In this interactive and practical workshop, learn how QAR can be successfully used to increase students’ effectiveness and confidence in planning, organizing, and composing answers to MCAS open-response questions. Leave with all the tools you need to incorporate these strategies in your classroom.

Establishing a Strong School Literacy Climate (Grades K–6) Barbara Sargent, Superintendent, Readington Township, NJ

Are you seeking terrific strategies for building a school climate devoted to rich literacy instruction? This presentation will offer solid and effective strategies for focusing a school community on literacy. We will discuss the use of faculty meeting time, teacher assessment, communication with parents and teachers, and professional development support. Be prepared to leave with new ideas that you can implement immediately!

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Effective Uses of Data to Inform Reading Instruction (Grades K–5) Jenny Koons, Consultant, LitLife, Inc., NY Jaime Margolies, Literacy Consultant, LitLife, Inc., NY Laurie Pastore, Literacy Consultant, LitLife, Inc., NY

Data is becoming more and more critical. How do we use data to empower our teaching, rather than being overwhelmed by it? This workshop will present specific strategies and protocol for analyzing formal and informal reading data. Presented in a simple way, we will examine time-efficient methods for teachers to use in their classroom right away! If you want more ways to use the reading data you collect, this workshop is for you!

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TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

Session F In-Depth Tuesday, November 8, 2011 10:15 am–1:30 pm (with a 15-minute break) PreK–8 Literacy Conference LCF-16 In-depth

Developing the Foundation: Expanding the Oral Language of Young Students (Grades K–1) Cindy Downend, Primary Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Young children who enter school with limited oral language development are at a disadvantage for developing the foundational skills necessary to be successful, literate learners. This in-depth session will demonstrate how the oral language of kindergarten and grade one students can be expanded through the structures of Interactive ReadAloud, Interactive Writing, and Writing Workshop. You will gain practical ideas for creating an optimal learning environment that fosters language development in primary-age students. Assessments and video writing samples around interactive writing, storytelling, and Writer’s Workshop from primary classrooms will be shared to demonstrate how the development of oral language impacts the ability to speak, read, and write. You will gain practical ideas for creating an optimal learning environment that fosters language development in primary-age students. We will be referring to When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works (Heinemann, 2008) by Fountas and Pinnell. Please bring this text to the workshop. LCF-17 In-depth

Supporting Writers Through Powerful Minilessons, Conferring, and Sharing Sessions (Grades K–2)

LCF-18 In-depth

Designing and Leading Demonstration Lessons (Grades K–6) Clare Landrigan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA Tammy Mulligan, Staff Developer, Teachers for Teachers, MA

This session will explore the nuts and bolts of demonstration lessons and answer the following questions: What is the purpose of a demonstration lesson? How do demonstration lessons fit into a school or district literacy plan? How is assessment data used in designing and leading demonstration lessons? Why is it important to co-construct the lesson as a group? How are debriefing sessions used to promote collaboration and impact classroom practice?

Session G Tuesday, November 8, 2011 1:00 pm–2:30 pm If you chose to attend the Reading Recovery Keynote with Nancy Anderson or a 90-minute Session F in the previous time block (10:15 am–11:45 am), you may select a Session G from 1:00 pm–2:30 pm.

PreK–8 Literacy Conference G Sessions F eatured S essi o ns LCG-1

Kathy Ha, Teacher, Lowell Public Schools, MA

Using Picture Books to Teach Writing with The Traits (Grades 3–8)

Lois Hartman, Literacy Coach, Haverhill Public Schools, MA

Ruth Culham, Author and President of Culham Writing Company, OR

Writing Workshop is an effective framework in which to support students in building a writing process. In this interactive session, we will explore how to meet the needs of writers through powerful minilessons, effective conferring, and supportive sharing sessions. We will discuss the use of student work to plan for instruction, the role of mentor texts, and view video clips of teaching.

This session provides examples and lessons of new and classic books that will delight and inspire powerful writing in your students. This session is sponsored by Scholastic, Inc. LCG-2

Beyond the Page (Grades 2–6) Sara Pennypacker, Children’s Author, MA

Reading a book is a powerful experience for a child. This presentation will focus on expanding the reading experience to include families, communities, and schools through group-reads, and integrating the arts with activities like plays, videos, music, and illustration. Sara will be drawing from her work at the DREAM (Developing Reading Education with Arts Methods) Project at California State University in San Marcos. The DREAM program’s goal is to train teachers to use visual arts and theater activities in class to improve students’ reading and writing skills.

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LCG-6

Academic Vocabulary: Engaging Activities for Struggling Readers (and Others!) (Grades 6–8)

The Impact of a Literacy Team: Using Data and Teamwork to Reach Goals (Grades K–8)

MaryEllen Vogt, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Education, California State University, Long Beach

Maura Bradley, Principal, Mission Grammar School, MA

Many students have difficulty mastering academic language and vocabulary. In this session, we will explore a variety of use-tomorrow activities for teaching academic vocabulary in a variety of content subjects. MaryEllen will provide a comprehensive handout. This workshop is sponsored by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. LCG-4

Novel Ideas for Novels (Grades 5–9) Mechelle Abney, Former Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA Ann McNamara, Middle School Literacy Coordinator, Union Endicott, NY Kate Rodriguez, High School Literacy Coordinator, Middletown Public Schools, NY

Does your literacy program consist of novel units that seem to drag on and on and on? In this session, three educators will share with you ways in which they have worked to “redefine” how they integrate the use of novels in an interactive and engaging manner to meet the various needs of their readers. LCG-5

Benchmark Assessment System: Going Beyond the Numbers (Grades 2–5) Sheila Assad, Literacy Consultant, MA

You will have the opportunity to think more carefully about how to use the information gathered from Benchmark Assessment conferences to form initial Guided Reading groups, to inform instructional decisions, and, if used more than once a year, to monitor student progress. You will have the opportunity to view a DVD that shares a teacher’s decision making on behalf of her students. The session will be focused on the professional development resources: The Continuum of Literacy Learning, PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching (Heinemann, 2010) and The Fountas and Pinnell Prompting Guide 1: A Tool for Literacy Teachers (Heinemann, 2008). Please bring these two texts to the session.

Ali Dutson, Intermediate and Middle School Literacy Coordinator and Seventh Grade Teacher, Mission Grammar School, MA

Our session at Literacy for All last year received strong feedback and participants shared a desire for more information as our school continues on this literacy journey. We will continue to focus on the impact of an effective literacy team. We will share examples of structure, meeting style, and whole school approach. We will also look at specific positive outcomes of an effective literacy team from Mission Grammar, including our ongoing development of our standards based report cards, gathering and sharing literacy data in our Annual Literacy Report, and working as a team to increase family involvement in literacy.

TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

LCG-3

LCG-7

A Framework for Text Selection for a Critical Literacy Curriculum (Grades 3–8) Mary Ann Cappiello, Assistant Professor of Language and Literacy, Lesley University, MA Erika Thulin Dawes, Associate Professor of Language and Literacy, Lesley University, MA

In the age of the Common Core State Standards, students’ ability to evaluate critically and to use information from multiple sources is important. Critical literacy engages students in the examination of multiple perspectives on a topic. Our classroom demonstration will take teachers through a four-step framework for selecting texts to use in a critical literacy curriculum, consisting of book identification, background knowledge development, discourse analysis, and considerations for classroom use. LCG-8

Say Goodbye to Coach Books: Test Prep That Makes Sense (Grades K–8) Sarah Cordova, Director and Literacy Consultant, The Distinctive Educator’s Institute, NY

While we are all faced with standardized tests and test preparation, there is a way to prep students for these tests without it being overbearing for students or taking tremendous time out of your everyday curriculum. This seminar will explore ways in which test preparation can be taught in an engaging manner within a workshop model. Teaching students strategies that are useful for all tests will be more meaningful for them and more manageable for teachers.

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Monday || SESSIONs TUESDAY SESSIONS E–G A&B

LCG-9

LCG-13

Using Inquiry to Explore Grammar and Punctuation in Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8)

Literacy Coaching and Public Practice: Building Leadership Capacity Together (Grades K–8)

Toni Czekanski, Intermediate and Middle Literacy Collaborative Trainer, Lesley University, MA

Jacy Ippolito, Assistant Professor, Adolescent Education and Leadership, Salem State University, MA

What do we want students to understand about using punctuation and grammar effectively in their writing? In this workshop, we will engage in inquiry that might help us answer that question and serve as a model of how to engage in this process with our students.

In this session, you will explore literacy coaching as a way to connect the work of leadership teams, grade-level teams, and individual teachers. We will focus on concrete ways that leaders, coaches, and teachers can make their work public and collectively improve instruction. You will walk away with new ideas from a recent study of district and school literacy coaches who use videotaping, discussion-based protocols, and instructional rounds to connect coaching with school improvement efforts.

LCG-10

Reading, Writing, and Rap: Hands-on Activities for Literacy Learning (Grades K–8) Rosalie Fink, Professor of Literacy, Lesley University, MA

Using hands-on activities from her articles and books, Rosalie will engage teachers in captivating reading, writing, and rap activities that develop engagement, fluency, and deep text comprehension. Activities include Reader’s Theater with movement, dance, and scarves; “I” Poems and Bio-Poems; and Rap Songs (such as “It’s Clean Up Time,” “The MCAS Test Rap,” “The Obama Rap,” and more). Rosalie will share “How-to-Teach-It” handouts for one-on-one, small group, and whole class instruction. LCG-11

RTI: The Realities, Research, and Planning for Schools with Limited Resources (Grades K–8) Michael Fredette, Elementary Principal, Hampshire Regional School District, MA

During this workshop, you will become familiar with curriculum-based measurements for your grade level and administer them in reading fluency, comprehension, phonemic awareness, phonics, written expression, and spelling. You will see the value of creating reports for analysis, conduct data team meetings, and plan interventions. Additionally, you will understand what it means to screen, benchmark, strategic monitor, and progress monitor students with valid and reliable measures. Ultimately there will be a planning portion of this workshop to use as a guide for schools to get started or to enhance their current RTI practices with limited resources and staffing. Administrators should attend this workshop with at least one teacher. LCG-12

Pages of Possibility: Exploring the Potentials of Bookmaking with Children (Grades PreK–2) Mary Geisser, Adjunct Professor of Early Childhood Education, Lesley University, MA and Instructor, Young Artist Program, Rhode Island School of Design

Books are a gateway into imagination, literacy, information, and creativity. They are powerful tools to excite young learners learning to read and write. When children are provided with opportunities to create their own books, they are given tools to share their stories, poems, and ideas. You will have the opportunity to explore and create different forms of handmade books and learn strategies for inspiring your students to engage in the art of bookmaking.

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LCG-14

Treating Words and Pictures as Equal Languages for Learning (Grades K–6) Merrilee Thissell, Retired Teacher and Assistant Principal, and Current Certified Trainer, Center for Advancement of Art-Based Literacy, University of New Hampshire

Pictures are a natural language for children. Artists/Writers Workshop treats words and pictures as equal languages for thinking and learning. It offers a progression of art-and-literature-based minilessons designed to build a strong foundation of literacy skills. This hands-on visual and kinesthetic approach to literacy learning has been proven to be particularly effective for Title I students, Special Education students, and English language learners. You will witness the process unfold in the classroom and review the data.

Reading Recovery Institute G Sessions F eatured S essi o ns RRG-1

It’s More Than the Picture: Teaching for Processing Early in First Grade Nancy Anderson, Department of Reading, Texas Woman’s University, and Reading Recovery Trainer

Accelerative learning depends on students’ construction of useful strategic activities in reading and writing. Early teaching must focus on strategic action rather than items, procedures, or routine behaviors such as looking at the picture for the “right word.” This session will focus on the “what,” “when,” and “how” of teaching for strategic activity in early lessons. Repeated: RRE-1.


Fostering Flexible Thinking and Learning in Reading Recovery Lessons Ann Ballantyne, Reading Recovery Trainer, New York University, NY

High-progress literacy learners are flexible thinkers; they can say to themselves, “Well it might work like this, or it might be this other way.” We will examine aspects of the teaching procedures and lesson design that will foster this kind of cognitive flexibility with the students we teach. RRG-3

What Is This Thing Called Acceleration? Susan Lynaugh, Teacher Leader, East Central Vermont Literacy Consortium

How is it possible to work with the lowest-achieving children and have them learn at an accelerated rate? Acceleration occurs when teachers “provide superbly sequenced series of lessons determined by the child’s competencies and make highly skilled teaching decisions.” How can we recognize signs of accelerated progress? What can we observe that tells us that the child is taking over the learning process, working independently, and discovering new things in reading and writing?

“This is a wonderful professional development opportunity. I have attended

several times over the past 10 years, and I always come away with new, useful

knowledge, and I feel energized to try out new strategies in my classroom! Thank You!”

—Melanie Gonyaw, First Grade Teacher,

TUESDAY | SESSIONs E–G

RRG-2

Blue Mountain Union School, Wells River, VT

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LOCATION, DIRECTIONS, AND PARKING

Location

BY BUS

Rhode Island Convention Center 1 Sabin Street Providence, RI 02903 401.458.6000

Bonanza Bus Lines: 800.556.3815 or 401.454.8800

The Rhode Island Convention Center is a first-class conference facility. It is connected to the Westin Hotel and the Providence Place Mall, offering attendees plenty of places to stay, eat, and shop.

Rhode Island Public Transit Authority: 401.781.9400 or 888.331.7500; Web: www.ripta.com

Directions and Parking BY CAR From the North: From Interstate 95 South to Exit 22A. Follow the signs toward Downtown/Convention Center. Go through the first light in the righthand lane. Take your first right after the light. Take the next right onto Exchange Street. After the next light, bear right between the hotel and the Convention Center to the North Garage.

From the South: From Interstate 95 North to Exit 22A. Follow the signs toward Downtown/Convention Center. At the light, turn right onto Francis Street. At the next light, go right onto Sabin Street. Bear right between the hotel and the Convention Center to the North Garage.

From the East: Take 195 West. Merge onto 95 North to Exit 22A. Follow the signs toward Downtown/Convention Center. At the light, turn right onto Francis Street. At the next light, go right onto Sabin Street. Bear right between the hotel and the Convention Center to the North Garage.

From the West: Take Route 6 East to the “Route 6 East and I-295 South” on-ramp. Take a right and stay to the right following the signs to Providence and Route 6 East (you will use part of the I-295 on-ramp to get onto Route 6 East). Stay on Route 6 East to the end (sign will read “6 East to 10 North”) and stay to the left. Continue to the Dean Street Exit. Once on the exit ramp, stay to the left so that you will be on the left side of the island when you reach the light. Turn left onto Dean Street (four-lane road). Then immediately take your first right onto West Exchange Street to the Convention Center Garage.

BY TRAIN Providence is located on Amtrak’s Washington to Boston, Northeast Corridor main line. A high-speed train, the Acela, travels Monday through Friday from New York’s Penn Station to Providence in less than three hours. The rail service whisks visitors to and from the modern and welldesigned Providence Station (adjacent to Waterplace Park). Direct MBTA commuter rail service is also available to Metro Boston. For more information on fares and schedules, please call Amtrak at 1.800.USA.RAIL or MBTA at 1.800.392.6100 or visit their websites at www.amtrak.com or www.mbta.com.

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Peter Pan: 800.343.9999 Greyhound Lines: 800.231.2222 or 401.751.8800; Web: www.greyhound.com

PARKING There are parking garages within a few blocks of the Rhode Island Convention Center. Parking for a fee is available at the Convention Center and at the Westin Hotel, the Courtyard by Marriott, Providence Biltmore, and Providence Hilton (rates vary). See the hotel information for further details and costs associated with parking. All parking fees are subject to change without notice.

Parking at the Rhode Island Convention Center The North Garage is connected to the Westin, the Convention Center, and the Providence Place Mall. Look for signs to the North Garage.

Rhode Island Convention Center Event Rate: $10 per day; $18 per overnight stay For more information, call the garage at 401.458.6339 or visit www.riconvention.com.

Parking at the Providence Place Mall The Providence Place Mall parking area is connected to the Westin and the Rhode Island Convention Center. Parking Rates: 0–3 hours: $1; 3–4 hours: $5; 4–5 hours: $7; 5–8 hours: $10; 8–20 hours: $20; 20–24 hours: $25. If you park longer than 24 hours, the cost would be $25 plus any additional hours at the above hourly rates. For more information, visit www.providenceplace.com.

PLACES TO STAY The Literacy for All Conference has discounted room blocks at four hotels. When calling the hotel to make a reservation, indicate you are attending the Lesley University Literacy for All Conference to get the special rates. We recommend you make your reservation early, as the discounted room blocks may fill prior to the cut-off date.

The Westin Providence (Attached to the Rhode Island Convention Center) One West Exchange Street Providence, RI 02903 800.937.8461 (800.WESTIN.1) or 401.598.8000

Room Rate: $165 single/double; $25 additional person charge (Note: $5 of the $165 room rate will help offset the cost of the conference.)

BY AIR

Reservation deadline (to be eligible for block rate): Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Just eight miles from downtown, T.F. Green Airport is the closest airport to the conference. Ten airlines provide more than 200 daily flights to major national and international destinations. For more information, call 888.268.7222 or visit their website at www.pvdairport.com.

Parking: $26 per night, with in/out privileges


Discounts for Literacy for All 2011!

(One block from the Rhode Island Convention Center)

Group Discount: Send 12 people from your school district for two or three days, and the 13th person may attend for free (on a lesser or equal value registration).

11 Dorrance Street Providence, RI 02903 800.294.7709 or 401.421.0700 Junior Suite/Two California Kings Room Rate: $149 single/double Reservation deadline (to be eligible for block rate): Thursday, October 20, 2011 Parking: A privately owned parking garage is adjacent to the hotel. Overnight guests are charged $26 per night, per car. Non-registered guests are charged $15 to attend a function.

Loyalty Reward Discount: If you attended Literacy for All in 2009 and 2010, and if you register for the 2011 conference for two or three days, you will receive $15 off your registration. School Leader Discount: If your school (not district, but one school) sends three or more educators to Literacy for All for two or three days, the school may send their school leader (principals and assistant principals) for a 50% discount for any of the registration options.

(Across the street from the Rhode Island Convention Center)

Visit the Literacy for All registration webpage for instructions on how to register and receive any of the above discounts: www.lesley.edu/literacyforall.

32 Exchange Terrace at Memorial Boulevard Providence, RI 02903 888.887.7955

How to Register

Rate: $174 single/double; $15 per day rollaway charge for extra guests

Participants may register by paper or online. Receive $15 off by registering online.

Providence Courtyard by Marriott

(Note: $5 of the $174 room rate will help offset the cost of the conference.)

Reservation deadline (to be eligible for the block rate): Friday, October 7, 2011 Parking is available at the hotel for $22 a night or $10 per day until 5:00 pm to attend a function.

Hilton Providence (Five-minute walk from the Convention Center) 21 Atwells Avenue Providence, RI 02903 1.800.HILTONS or 1.800.445.8667 Room Rate: $139 single/double ($25 extra per additional person over 18) Reservation deadline (to be eligible for the block rate): Friday, October 7, 2011 Parking: $21 for self-parking and $25 for overnight valet with in/out privileges

REGISTRATION INFORMATION Registration Fees $395 Package Deal (Pre-Conference Workshop and Full Conference) $275 Full Conference (Monday and Tuesday) $165 Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday only) $210 Monday Only $210 Tuesday Only $375 Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday) plus one day (Monday or Tuesday) Registration fees do not include meals or parking. Registrations cannot be shared or split.

Registering by Paper 1. Complete the registration form on pages 35–36 of this brochure. 2. Mail or fax the completed registration form to:

Hotel and Registration Information

Providence Biltmore Hotel

Literacy for All, Attn. Cara Dembkoski Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery & Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138 Fax: 617.349.8490

Please note: • Registrations will not be taken over the phone. • Registration forms sent without payment will not be processed. • Please do not write credit card numbers on the form. If you are paying by credit card, register online or call the conference office with your credit card number.

Registering Online There are many benefits to registering online: • Save money. Register online and save $15. • Get your first-choice sessions (space permitting). Online registration is open around the clock, whereas paper registrations are processed during business hours. Registering online improves your chance of getting your first choices. • Immediate confirmation. Click “Finish My Registration,” and you will receive an e-mail with a link to your agenda and receipt. • Easy payment. Online registration can be paid with credit card, purchase order, or check. • Session descriptions are in the system. Just click “details” for easy viewing. To register online, go to www.regonline.com/lfa2011. Please be sure to have your credit card or purchase order number ready. Questions? Please contact the Literacy for All Conference office at 617.349.8402 or email literacy@lesley.edu.

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REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Methods of Payment You may pay by check, credit card, or with a purchase order payable to Lesley University. Payment must be received within five business days of receiving your registration form.

Volunteer and receive a chance to win a 6-pack of new, leveled books for Guided Reading! As you are completing your registration, please consider checking “yes” to volunteering. We need many volunteers to collect tickets and introduce featured speakers at the conference and would greatly appreciate your help. Volunteering is easy and takes very little time. After the conference, we will hold a drawing and give away six-packs of leveled books for Guided Reading to several lucky volunteers. We will mail winners the books after the conference. Here are the descriptions of the volunteer duties. If you agree to volunteer, a member of the Literacy for All team will contact you with details. Session Assistant Volunteer (approximately 50 volunteers needed)

• Arrive at the session 15 minutes early • Assist the featured speaker with distribution of materials, if any • Start the session by introducing the speaker. A short statement will be placed in your conference registration envelope • End the session by reminding participants to put their evaluation forms in the drop box Ticket Taker Volunteer (100 volunteers needed)

• Arrive at the session 15 minutes early • Collect tickets at the door from participants • Make sure room does not fill beyond capacity

Payment, Refund, and Cancellation Policy • Submission of the registration form or online registration is a commitment to pay the conference fees if the event is held, regardless of weather conditions. • If you are planning to pay with a purchase order, please be sure you have obtained permission from your school district to register. If your school district does not come through with the purchase order, you will be responsible for the conference fees. • No-shows will be invoiced and subject to collection for the full amount. • Unpaid registrations (including no shows) may necessitate barring registration for future institutes, conferences, and professional trainings sponsored by Lesley University. • A refund, less a $50 processing fee, will be granted if a written request is emailed or postmarked on or before Friday, October 7, 2011. No refunds will be issued after this date under any conditions, although substitutions can be made at any time. Please notify the conference office in writing if you are sending a substitute. Though substitutions may be made at the conference, we would prefer to know in advance so we may have materials ready for the substitute when s/he arrives.

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Questions? Contact the Literacy for All Conference Team US Mail: Literacy for All Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138 Phone: 617.349.8402 Fax: 617.349.8490 Email: literacy@lesley.edu

At the Conference Session Tickets Tickets to sessions will be given to you at the conference registration check-in booth at the Rhode Island Convention Center. You will receive a perforated ticket sheet, containing your selections, in your registration envelope. We will make every effort to accommodate your selections; however, if sessions are full, we will give you a ticket to your secondchoice workshops. You will have the option to exchange your tickets at the ticket exchange booth. Please note: Although we will give you a ticket for each of your sessions, including keynotes, we will only collect tickets at sessions that are full or close to capacity. Take your tickets with you to all sessions, however, as they have room names printed on them and will help you remember your selections and start times.

Certificates of Attendance Each attendee will receive a certificate of attendance at the conclusion of their stay after completing and turning in an objectives form (found in your conference bag). Certificates may be used toward earning professional development points.

Professional Development Hours Earn up to 10.5 professional development hours for attending the twoday conference and an additional four hours (for a total of 14.5 hours) for attending a pre-conference workshop on Sunday.

RRCNA Membership The Reading Recovery Council of North America (RRCNA) is an association of the Reading Recovery professionals and partners. Membership benefits include subscriptions to newsletters and journal, a logo lapel pin, and a membership certificate. You may sign up for RRCNA membership when you register for Literacy for All. Check the membership box on the registration form or online, then add the additional fee to your registration fee. • RRCNA New or Renewal Membership: $60 • Reading Recovery Teachers-in-Training: $40 • Supporting Membership: $125 Supporting membership includes all benefits of membership and recognition in the Council Connections newsletter for supporting the Council’s ongoing development. Please check the status of your membership prior to signing up by calling the RRCNA membership line: 614.310.7323.


Job Title: Principal/School 

Email Address (Required. Confirmation and receipt will be sent via email.)

Are you a NYC educator registering for Literacy for All under the New York City contract? (If “yes,” please stop filling out this form and contact the conference office at 617.349.8402 to obtain a NYC registration form. If the answer is “no,” please continue.)

Leader

PreK Teacher 

K–2 Classroom  Teacher

Please select registration type: $395 Package Deal (Sunday–Tuesday) $275

Full Conference (Monday and Tuesday)

$165

Pre-Conference Workshop (Sunday only)

$210

Monday only

Tuesday only $210 Pre-Conference Workshop plus one day $375  $0

I am a lead presenter for a Monday or Tuesday workshop

$0

Group Discount: “13th free”

Loyalty Reward Discount: Select a registration type $15 OFF 

above and check here if you attended the Literacy for All Conference in 2009 AND 2010.

School Leaders Discount: Select a registration type 50% OFF 

above and check here if you are a principal or assistant principal and 3 educators from your school are attending the conference.

Note: Discounts cannot be combined. Registrations cannot be shared or split.

3–6 Classroom  Teacher

Literacy Coach/ 

Reading Recovery 

Literacy Coach/ 

Reading Recovery 

Coordinator

Coordinator-inTraining

Middle School  Teacher

Reading/Literacy  Specialist

Reading Recovery 

Consultant 

Teacher

Reading Recovery 

ELL Teacher 

Teacher-in-Training

Teacher Leader TL-in-Training

Reading Teacher  Special Education  Teacher

Title I Director  Title I Teacher  University/College  Professor

Other 

School Name School District/Company Billing Address (required if you are paying by purchase order)

Is this your first time attending the Literacy for All conference? YES

NO

Are you a graduate of Lesley University?

REGISTER ONLINE AND SAVE $15 PER PERSON! www.regonline.com/lfa2011 Paying by credit card? You must register online or complete this form and call the conference office with your credit card number. Please do not fax or email credit card numbers.

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY:

YES

NO

In compliance with the American Disabilities Act, Literacy for All is making every effort to ensure all activities are equally available to all individuals participating in the conference.

2011 LITERACY FOR ALL CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM

Email:

Check here if you require special assistance. A member of the conference team will contact you to make arrangements.

Volunteering Yes, I’d be willing to volunteer to introduce a featured speaker or collect tickets in one or more of the sessions I am attending. Volunteers will be entered in a raffle and could win a six-pack of new, leveled books for Guided Reading! Lucky winners will receive the books after the conference. Please consider volunteering. We need your help!

How did you learn about this conference?

Full Name

Home Address

City

U.S. State/Canadian Province

OR Country: (Non U.S./Canada)

Zip/postal code

Home Phone

Work Phone

Please complete and return both sides of the registration form.

Occasionally, we receive requests for contact information from our supporting exhibitors who may want to sponsor events at the conference, give free samples, materials, or provide coupons for discounts or other special offers. Please check here if you DO NOT want your contact information to be shared.

Select YOUR WorkshopS Indicate your first and second choice selections with numbers 1 and 2. If your first choice workshop is full, we will automatically place you in your second choice workshop. Pre-Conference Workshops Sunday, November 6, 2011 | 11:00 am–4:00 pm

___PC-1 ___PC-2 ___PC-3 ___PC-4 ___PC-5 ___PC-6 ___PC-7 ___PC-8

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2011 LITERACY FOR ALL CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM

write your name again here:

Session G | Tuesday, November 8, 2011 | 1:00 pm­–2:30 pm (only if you did not select an In-Depth Session F)

___LCG-1 ___LCG-4 ___LCG-7 ___LCG-10 ___LCG-13 ___RRG-1 ___LCG-2 ___LCG-5 ___LCG-8 ___LCG-11 ___LCG-14 ___RRG-2 Session A | Monday, November 7, 2011 | 8:30 am–10:00 am You may choose to attend the keynote with Kathy Collins or a breakout session with Linda Rief for grades 4–8.

___Collins Keynote ___LCA-1

___LCG-3 ___LCG-6 ___LCG-9 ___LCG-12

___RRG-3

Optional:

Session B | Monday, November 7, 2011 |10:30 am–12:00 pm

___LCB-1 ___LCB-5 ___LCB-9

___LCB-13 ___LCB-17 ___RRB-1

___LCB-2 ___LCB-6 ___LCB-10

___LCB-14

___RRB-2

___LCB-3 ___LCB-7 ___LCB-11

___LCB-15

___RRB-3

___LCB-4 ___LCB-8 ___LCB-12

___LCB-16

___RRB-4

Session C | Monday, November 7, 2011 | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm or 1:30 pm–4:45 pm (in-depth)

Attend a 90-minute Session C OR an In-depth (3-hour) Session C. If you choose an In-depth Session C, you will NOT attend a Session D (3:30 pm–5:00 pm). ___LCC-1 ___LCC-6 ___LCC-11 ___LCC-13 In-depth ___RRC-3 In-depth

RRCNA Memberships: $125 Supporting Membership

$60 New Membership

$60 Renewal Membership

$40 In-training Membership

Sue Hundley Memorial Fund Donation:

Donations support literacy learning for children and teacher scholarships. Amount: $________________

Subtotals: $

Registration Fee (from page 1 of this form)

$

RRCNA Membership (optional)

$

Sue Hundley Fund Donation (optional)

$

TOTAL AMOUNT DUE

___LCC-2 ___LCC-7 ___LCC-12 ___LCC-14 In-depth ___RRC-4 In-depth ___LCC-3 ___LCC-8 ___RRC-1

___LCC-15 In-depth

___LCC-4 ___LCC-9 ___RRC-2

___LCC-16 In-depth

___LCC-5 ___LCC-10

___LCC-17 In-depth

Payment Method: Check

Session D | Monday, November 7, 2011 | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm (only if you did not select an In-Depth Session C)

___LCD-1

___LCD-4

___LCD-7

___LCD-10

___RRD-1

___LCD-2

___LCD-5

___LCD-8

___LCD-11

___RRD-2

___LCD-3

___LCD-6

___LCD-9

___LCD-12

Check or PO Number Please make sure the total amount matches the amount on the PO or check. A check or a copy of the PO must be mailed or faxed to the conference office within 5 business days. Do not write credit card numbers on this form. Register online or call the conference office with your credit card number.

Important!

Session E | Tuesday, November 8, 2011 | 8:30 am–10:00 am

Attend the Literacy Conference Session E Keynote with Ruth Culham or a 90-minute Session E. ___Culham Keynote ___LCE-1

___LCE-3

___RRE-1

___RRE-3

___LCE-4

___RRE-2

___RRE-4

___LCE-2

Purchase Order

Credit Card (do not write card numbers on this form)

Session F | Tuesday, November 8, 2011 | 10:15 am–11:45 Am or 10:15 am–1:30 pm (In-Depth)

Choose the Reading Recovery Keynote with Nancy Anderson, a 90-minute Session F, OR an In-depth (3-hour) Session F. If you choose an In-depth Session F, you will NOT attend a Session G. ___Anderson Keynote ___LCF-4 ___LCF-8 ___LCF-12 ___LCF-16 In-depth ___LCF-1

___LCF-5 ___LCF-9 ___LCF-13 ___LCF-17 In-depth

___LCF-2

___LCF-6 ___LCF-10 ___LCF-14 ___LCF-18 In-depth

___LCF-3

___LCF-7 ___LCF-11 ___LCF-15

Payment, Refund, and Cancellation Policy: Submission of this registration form is a commitment to pay the conference fees. A refund, less a $50 processing fee, will be granted if a written request is postmarked on or before Friday, October 7, 2011. No refunds will be issued after this date regardless of the reason for canceling, though substitutions can be made at any time.

Fax both sides of this form to: Literacy for All, 617.349.8490

Mail to: Literacy for All, Attn: Cara Dembkoski Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery and Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street Cambridge, MA 02138

Questions? Contact the Literacy for All office:

617.349.8402 | literacy@lesley.edu

www.lesley.edu/literacyforall 36


Literacy for All Conference

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage

Lesley University Center for Reading Recovery & Literacy Collaborative 29 Everett Street

PAID

Cambridge, MA 02138

Boston, MA Permit No. 20

2 2 n d A nnual L i t e racy f o r A ll N o rt h e a s t P r e K – 8 L i t e racy C o n f e r e nc e & R e a d in g R e c o v e ry I n s t i t u t e

Literacy for All

2011 Highlights n More

than 100 PreK–8 and Reading Recovery Sessions

n Administrators’

Strand with a 50% discount for school leaders attending with a team

n Literacy

Coaching Strand with Jennifer Allen and Kristin Rainville

n Middle

School Strand with Donalyn Miller and Linda Rief

n Reading

Recovery experts Nancy Anderson, Connie Briggs, and Floretta Thornton-Reid

n Discounts

for groups and repeat attendees

n Register

online and save $15 off each registration! www.regonline.com/lfa2011

2011 Literacy for All Brochure  

This is the brochure for the 22nd Annual Literacy for All Conference in Providence, RI, USA for grades PreK-8 and Reading Recovery teachers.

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