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GLOSSARY OF GRAMMATICAL TERMS

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indicative mood The ordinary form of a verb used in making statements or asking questions: Have you received my letter? These are my things. indirect object A word, typically a noun or pronoun, or phrase that is indirectly affected by the action of the verb, in contrast to a direct object: She bought the child a toy. indirect speech

See

REPORTED SPEECH.

infinitive The base form of a verb, typically preceded by to (to give, to sell, to yield). inflection The changing of the base form of a word in order to express person, gender, number, or tense (talk/talked, train/trains, be/is, I/me). intensifier An adverb that serves to render a word greater or less in intensity, strength, amount, etc. (quite, slightly, very, too). interjection An expression of anger, approval, pain, surprise, etc. (ah! oh! ouch! ugh!). interrogative A pronoun or adverb used to introduce a question, in most cases one beginning wh- (how, what, when, where, which, who, whom, whose, why): What are you planning to do? intonation The variation in the pitch of a speaker’s voice when asking a question, making a statement, and so on. intransitive verb A verb that lacks a direct object (the flames rose; the bottle leaked), in contrast to a transitive verb. invariable noun A noun that is either always singular or always plural (athletics; cattle; news; scissors; shears). inversion Reversing the usual order of a subject and noun for the purposes of asking a question, increasing emphasis, etc.: Have you change? Dark is the night. inverted commas

See

QUOTATION MARKS.

irregular Used to describe a word that does not follow the standard pattern for words of a particular class. Irregular words include verbs that have an irregular form for the past tense and past participle

Guide to good writing - Martin Manser  
Guide to good writing - Martin Manser  
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