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368 THE FACTS ON FILE GUIDE TO GOOD WRITING colon A punctuation mark (:) that introduces a clause or word, used to expand upon something already mentioned or to introduce a list, quotation, or other material. comma A punctuation mark (,) that is commonly used to separate clauses within a sentence or to delineate separate items in a list. comment clause A clause within a sentence in which the writer communicates his or her views on what is being discussed: To be honest, this was never a good idea. common noun noun.

Any noun that cannot otherwise be classed as a proper

comparative A class of adjective used to compare two people or things (paler, stronger, more interesting). comparative clause pared:

A clause in which two people or things are com-

That ball is bouncier than the other one. complement A word, usually an adjective or noun, or phrase that follows a linking verb such as be, feel, or seem: He is a genius. She seems distracted today. complex preposition A preposition that consists of more than one word (as well as, because of, in addition to). complex sentence A sentence that includes a main clause and one or more subordinate clauses (typically introduced by because, if, while, etc.): It won’t work because the wires are incorrectly connected. compound adjective An adjective created through the combination of two or more words, at least one of which is usually an adjective (hardwon, work-shy). compound adverb An adverb created through the combination of two or more words (anywhere, thereby). compound noun A noun created through the combination of two or more words, at least one of which is a noun (showstopper, strike force). compound sentence A sentence that includes two or more main clauses, typically linked by such words as and, but, or or: The door opened, and a tall stranger walked in.

Guide to good writing - Martin Manser  
Guide to good writing - Martin Manser  
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