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“FUTURE EUROPEAN TEACHERS:TRAINING KIT ACCORDING TO THE LISBON STRATEGY-ESkillsKit”

HAND BOOK OF GOOD PRACTICES

Lifelong Learning Comenius Project 2009-2011

SCHOOLS PARTICIPATED IN LIFELONG LEARNING COMENIUS PROGRAMME 2009-2011 Multilateral Partnership

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

ISTITUTO MAGISTRALE STATALE "F. ANGELONI", Terni, Italy (Coordinator) Mosjøen videregående skole Dept. Kippermoen, Mosjøen, Norway Instituto de Educación Secundaria A Sangriña, A Guarda, Spain Özel Doğuş Lisesi, Istanbul, Turkey LICEUL PEDAGOGIC “DIMITRIE TICHINDEAL”, Arad, Romania *LICEUL TEORETIC “GEORGE CALINESCU”, Constanza, Romania IX Liceum Ogólnokształcące Centrum Edukacji w Zabrzu, Zabrze, Poland Escola Basica e secundaria Padre Manuel Alvares, Ribeira Brava-Madeira, Portugal 105 SREDNO OBSHTOOBRAZOVATELNO UCHILISHTE “ ATANAS, DALCHEV”, Sofia, Bulgaria 10. JONISKIO ZEMES UKIO MOKYKLA, JONISKIS-Lietuva, Lithuania 11. GENERAL LYCEUM OF MELESES, Meleses Hraklion Crete, Greece

Sunrises in Madeira during our first meeting


INTRODUCTION One of the work teams of this Comenius Program was to prepare the Hand Book of the e-kit. The colleagues who coordinated the work was Maria Kalathaki from Greece, Geir Soli from Norway and Vaida Radzeviciene from Lithuania. The team was supported by all the colleges. At the beginning, prepared the concept and the contents of the Hand Book and uploaded to the Comenius project platform URL for Its-learning: https://nfk.itslearning.com. After this, was uploaded all the relative material, and started it‟s synthesis. Across the European Union there are significant differences in the ways recently graduated teachers are being followed-up in their first year as professionals. In some countries there is a system in place that secures professional follow-up during the first year through systematic tutoring and mentoring. Even though the systems in place may differ, education authorities have acknowledged the fact that even though recently graduated teachers are formally professionals, they are still beginners who need to be guided and socialised into their teaching profession. However, the measures to meet this challenge vary across Europe. Scientific reports state that recently graduated teachers feel there is a need for information, support and guidance during their first year in teaching. Teacher training is by definition a complete and formally recognised professional education. Even so, many graduates feel they are not fully educated until they have spent some time in their new profession. It is during this initial period that guidance and support is required. Well organised support during the initial year of teaching will enhance the will and ability to stay in the teaching profession and succeed as teachers. This handbook is based on findings made in 9 different countries participating in a Comenius Partnership project carried out over two years, ending in July 2011. During this project the partners have carried out investigations into the various systems of guiding post graduate teachers in their first year of teaching. Following the overview of the systems in place in the nine countries, the partnership has compared the findings in the overview to the initiatives in the Lisbon Strategy. Finally, based on best practice in the nine countries and the intentions in the Lisbon Strategy, the partnership has created the following “Handbook of Good Practicies” Information and procedures - General The following is based on the assumption that the school owner and unit manager of the school not only is familiar with, but also applies the mandatory provisions that are available, such as provisions for new workers‟ tasks, rights and duties, probation programs, work rules, safety rules and the Executive Service Agreement and local agreements. The points that follow are intended to complement and ensure the quality of the schemes that are already practiced in schools. Some key points:     

The principal initiates mentoring scheme for graduates. A framework and action plan for guidance must be in place. A local supervisor needs to be appointed (The principal is the supervisor's formal supervisor) Training services in guidance is organized under the supervision of the colleges providing teacher training. Key guidance documents must be placed in a binder (paper or digital) at hand and accessible for the teacher during the initial work period e.g. development plans, planning documents, procedures and programs, projects, responsibilities / role of various actors. Documents relating to teachers and teaching assignments are collected in a "in progress binder"; surveys of students they have particular responsibility for, school year programme with deadlines for term reports, parent cooperation, plan templates and sample plans etc.


Ideas on how to receive and mentor new colleagues at our school. Sources: Idéhefte. Høgskolene i Nesna og Bodø, Norway Before they start. Responsibility: Principal Mutual presentation and information to new employees. Preferably as an introductional conversation (2-3 hours) 1. Presentation of school. (about staff, buildings and outdoor areas) 2. Thorough information on priority areas. (what we focus on and why) 3. Reflection on education in our school. (Who we are / values / challenges) 4. Information about the organization and operation. (Working Arrangement, departments, supervision, various teams work sessions, planning, budget, cooperation with parents, tutor scheme, time-wheel, ICT systems etc.) 5. Review of the practical arrangements. (Keys, workplace, NDA, fire instruction, supervision etc.) 6. Presentation of important and binding documents (National curriculum for primary and secondary schools (Education Act), business plan, contingency plans, plans semi-annual, week-and course plans.) 7. Review of the newly appointed specific tasks (Job scope and characteristics - such as teacher, tutor,head of department, parent collaboration, who to work with etc.) 8. Presentation: The new employees will present themselves. The newly appointed clarify fundamental aspects of their expertise and their resources by following points:      

Work experience / background (education). Expectations for school. Expectations for him/herself. Specific areas of interest In what areas do he/she feel confident In what areas are advice and guidance required

9. The school's expectations for the newly appointed. A newly appointed teacher should:    

have a well developed consciousness regarding the role of a teacher and working with students be a resource for school. be able to add a new dimension to the teaching profession be a complementary asset to the teaching staff


    

familiarize him/herself with their own tasks and take responsibility. give him/herself room for trial and error be prepared for the unforeseen. be prepared for time squeeze. ask for help when problems arise.

Clarify how you will monitor section 6 and 7 Section 8 should also be repeated later.

Start up. For example, planning days, or other meetings with the staff. 1. meet colleagues. 2. meet locally appointed mentor. 3. practical preparation 4. prepare to meet with students 5. information about learning materials, learning resources, digital learning platform (LMS). Along. 1. Follow-up Call / staff development measures Responsibility: Principal. 2. Guidance that takes place within the collaborative team. Help, support, advice and guidance on the course of the ongoing cooperation. 3. Guidance in the already established system of experienced teachers during the working year

The objectives and purpose of mentoring; summarised:

       

reality orientation (What is this profession, problem, task, the subject project really about?) awareness (How do I stand really prepared in relation to the challenges I will meet?) knowledge development (How can I work to link theory and practice - what I know, but unable to carry out yet?) practice development (How to bridge the gap between what I say and believe that I do and know, and what I really do?) creative skills (Develop skills to handle the unexpected )

Requirements for the graduates and supervisors in order to establish reflective supervision and mentoring: 

It is required that both parties clarify the framework and objectives of the mentoring process. Both parties need to prepare themselves according to their professional tasks, execute agreements, and be willing and able to improve and develop their knowledge, skills and attitudes. The mentoring process must be characterized by transparency, clarity and receptivity. The requirements for mentoring must be adapted to the graduate‟s skills and needs.

Mentor shall contribute to the guidance is implemented in a qualified and systematic manner, and that it submit the school's daily operations in an orderly manner.


Mentor should not introduce his/her own views and experience too soon, but allow for the graduate to make his/her own reflections. The graduate should not be given "recipes" apart from those required according to directives or advice. The mentor cannot resolve the graduate‟s problems and give answers to possible questions. The main principle is that the graduate finds answers and solutions himself, based on his own reflections. The mentor‟s role is to support reflection and help the graduate find solutions and answers.

Mentor should show empathy and have the ability to involve in the graduate‟s experience and feelings. The supervisor must be able to accept the feelings that a worried, enthusiastic and strongly focused new employee might bring forward. Any information arising from the mentoring process must be treated strictly confidentially.

The supervisor‟s role is mainly to enable the graduates to describe, analyze and explain the vocational challenges / problems faced by him / her while keeping the personal approach. During mentoring the graduate is the person to be focused on. The supervisor's advice must be based on an insight into the graduate‟s perception. The supervisor shall attempt to influence the development of the graduate‟s practical vocational theory through insight and empathy, support and demands, challenges and advice. Feedback should be directed to factors that graduates can actually do something about. Exchange between support, specific mentoring and open reflection must be viewed in the context of the graduate‟s development, situation and challenges.

In short  Time for mentoring must be allocated, (min 1-2 hour/week) 

Supervision and mentoring must be executed in an organized manner

There must be consensus on the framework for mentoring: when, where, how long, requirements and expectations, rules.

The Mentor is given the opportunity to be present in the new employee's workplace when this is desirable.

The focus of the guide may gradually shift from "how we do it here" to the graduate‟s own reflection on what type of teacher he/she is and want to be.

Mentor should help the graduate to articulate their thoughts and their educational choices and so become more aware of their own practice and help to see the connection between what he/she wants to be and what he/she actually is as a teacher.


The Comenius Group (Terni, February 2010)


HAND BOOK’S TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. HAND BOOK OF GOOD PRACTICES IN EUROPEAN TEACHERS’ TRAINING SYSTEMS 1.1. GOOD PRACTICES IN TRAINING PROGRAMS 1.1.1. THE LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMME: A SINGLE UMBRELLA FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAMS 1.1.2. TEACHERS AND TRAINING IN VET: OUTCOMES OF FOUR PEER LEARNING ACTIVITIES 1.1.3. ABOUT THE STUDY VISITS PROGRAMME 1.1.4. CONCEPTION OF TEACHER TRAINING 1.1.5. THE GREEK FRAME OF TEACHERS TRAINING EVALUATION 1.1.6. COLLABORATIONS WITH UNIVERSITIES

1.2. TRAINING APPLICATIONS AT SCHOOLS 1.2.1. ADVICES TO LITHUANIAN TEACHERS 1.2.2. CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION TIPS FROM VETERAN TEACHERS 1.2.3. UTILIZATION OF ICTS AND THEIR INCORPORATION INTO THE EVERYDAY EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURE 2. HAND BOOK OF GOOD PRACTICE IN PARTNERS’ MOBILITY FOR TEACHERS’ TRAINING 2.1. LESSONS IN PARTNER SCHOOLS 2.1.1. INNOVATIVE LESSONS 2.1.2. LESSONS ATTENDED BY THE TEACHERS 2.1.3. LESSONS PREPARED FOR THE STUDENTS OF PARTNER INSTITUTIONS 2.2. DISCUSSING MATTERS AT THE MEETINGS 2.2.1. MEETING AGENDAS 2.2.2. MEETING TIMETABLES 2.2.3. PROJECT WORK 2.2.4. EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT OF THE MEETINGS 2.3. MEETING WITH THE LOCAL AUTHORITIES 2.4. MEETING THE SCHOOL STUDENTS 2.5. MEETING WITH THE PARTNER SCHOOL COLLEAGUES 2.6. SIGHTSEEING OF PARTNER SCHOOLS


3. HAND BOOK OF GOOD PRACTICE IN DEVELOPING CULTURAL COMPETENCES 3.1. TRADITION 3.1.1. LOCAL FOOD 3.1.2. TRADITIONAL MUSIC & DANCES 3.1.3. CELEBRATIONS 3.1.4. DINNERS & LAUNCHES 3.2. LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY 3.2.1. BASIC PHRASES FOR COMMUNICATION 3.2.2. LANGUAGES‟ SYNTHESIS 3.3. VISITS 3.3.1. VISITING OF HISTORICAL PLACES 3.3.2. VISITING PLACES OF SPECIAL ENVIRONMENTAL INTERESTING 3.4. TRANSPORTATIONS 4. ORGANIZATIONS AND PROCESSES IN EUROPEAN TEACHERS TRAINING 4.1. ABOUT CEDEFOP 4.2. CONFERENCE ON "THE ROLE OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (VET) IN MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF TODAY AND TOMORROW" 4.3. EUROPASS 4.4. ABOUT THE STUDY VISITS PROGRAMME 4.5. EUROPEAN CREDIT SYSTEM FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING ECVET 4.6. QUALIFICATIONS‟ FRAMEWORK 4.7. THE EUROPEAN TRAINING FOUNDATION 4.8. FUTURE TEACHERS‟ TRAINING IN GREECE 4.8.1. OPERATIONAL PROGRAMMES FOR EMPLOYMENT, EDUCATION & TRAINING (EPEAEK), NATIONAL ACCREDITATION CENTRE FOR CONTINUING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION/ EKEPIS. 4.8.3. OFFICE OF SECONDARY EDUCATION TEACHERS‟ TRAINING OF THE GREEK MINISTRY OF EDUCATION 4.8.4 ORGANIZATION OF TEACHERS‟ TRAINING (OEPEK) 4.8.5. GREEK PEDAGOGIC INSTITUTE 4.8.6. THE REGIONAL TRAINING CENTRES (PEKs) 4.8.7. HELLENIC OPEN UNIVERSITY


5. EUROPEAN POLICY ON TEACHERS’ TRAINING 5.1. EUROPEAN STRATEGY AND CO-OPERATION IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING 5.2. LEARNING FOR ALL 5.3. EDUCATION REFORM INITIATIVE OF SOUTH EASTERN EUROPE (ERISEE) 5.4. LISBON STRATEGY EVALUATION DOCUMENT 5.5. CONSULTATION ON THE FUTURE "EU 2020" STRATEGY COMMISSION WORKING DOCUMENT 5.6. COUNCIL CONCLUSIONS OF 12 MAY 2009 ON A STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK FOR EUROPEAN COOPERATION IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING („ET 2020‟)-NOTICES FROM EUROPEAN UNION INSTITUTIONS AND BODIES 6. TEACHER EDUCATION AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING 6.1. LISBON STRATEGY ON EDUCATION AND TRAINING 6.2. THE COMMISSION‟S CONTRIBUTION IN IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF TEACHER EDUCATION 6.3. COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS 7. IDENTIFYING SKILL NEEDS 7.1. DEFINITIONS ABOUT SKILLS 7.2. SKILLS OF THE FUTURE TEACHERS 7.2.1 The Common European Principles for Teacher Competences and Qualifications 7.2.2 The eight key competences identified include: 7.2.3 Restructuring forum Sectors' New Skills for New Jobs by CEDEFOP-2009 7.3. THE NEEDS OF THE LABOUR MARKET - The OECD Policy Review of VET TEACHERS AND TRAINERS 7.4. BEYOND RECOVERY: SKILL STRATEGIES TO DRIVE INNOVATION AND CHANGE 7.5. KNOWLEDGE SYSTEM OF LIFELONG LEARNING 7.5.1. Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training (VET)-Aims and Objectives


8. EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE 8.1. CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT 8.2. PARTICIPATIONS OF THE CONFERENCE 8.3. CONFERENCE COMMITTIEES 8.4. CONFERENCE TIMETABLE 8.5. WELCOME TO THE CONFERENCE 8.6. CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS 8.7. CONFERENCE POSTERS 8.7.1. STATIONS OF THE EUROPEAN HISTORY 8.7.2 EMERGING EDUCATIONAL ORIENTATIONS ΙN NIKOS KAZANTZAKIS‟ WORKS 9. APPLICATION OF THE SOCRATES DIDACTIC METHOD- A JOINTED EXEMPLARY TEACHING OF TEACHERS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION WITH APPLICATION OF THE DIDACTIC METHOD OF SOCRATES (OBSTETRICAL METHOD), WITH THEATRICAL ACTIVITIES 9.1. INTRODUCING PHILOSOPHY IN TEACHING METHODOLOGY 9.1.1. Socrates - "I only know that I know nothing" 9.1.2. Protagoras Dialogue with Socrates 9.2. LESSON IN MOTHER TANGS OF 11 EUROPEAN SCHOOLS‟ DELEGATIONS 9.2.1 SOME OF THE AIMS OF THE DIDACTIC ACTION 9.2.2 METHODOLOGY OF THE “SOCRATES LESSON”-EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURE 9.2.3 THE THEATRE SCENE 9.2.4 ENDYMATOLOGY 9.2.5 THE SCRIPT (SENARIO) 9.3. THE PROCEDURE OF THE DIDACTIC ACTION 9.3.1. THE CASTING 9.3.2. INTERLOCUTORS OF SOCRATES 9.3.3. QUESTIONS OF SOCRATES AND ANSWERS OF HIS INTERLOCUTORS 9.3.4. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS OF CHOROS 9.3.5. ANSWER OF THE 6TH QUESTION IN ANCIENT GREEK, WRITTEN WITH LATIN CHARACTERS AS EPILOGUE…. DEVELOPING QUALITATIVE AND EFFECTIVE TRAINING OF THE EUROPEAN TEACHERS, ACCORDING TO THE LISBON STRATEGY


1.1. GOOD PRACTICES IN TRAINING PROGRAMS 1.1.1. THE LIFELONG LEARNING PROGRAMME: A SINGLE UMBRELLA FOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAMS http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-programme/doc78_en.htm The European Commission has integrated its various educational and training initiatives under a single umbrella, the Lifelong Learning Programme. With a significant budget of nearly €7 billion for 2007 to 2013, the new programme replaces previous education, vocational training and e-Learning programmes, which ended in 2006 The programme enables individuals at all stages of their lives to pursue stimulating learning opportunities across Europe. There are four sub-programmes focusing on different stages of education and training and continuing previous programmes:    

Comenius for schools Erasmus for higher education Leonardo da Vinci for vocational education and training Grundtvig for adult education

A transversal programme aims to ensure that they achieve the best results possible. Four key activities focus on policy co-operation, languages, information and communication technologies, effective dissemination and exploitation of project results. Aiming for a geographical reach beyond Europe's borders, the Jean Monnet programme stimulates teaching, reflection and debate on the European integration process at higher education institutions worldwide. D3 Targets Quantified targets have been set for the four sub programmes:    

Comenius should involve at least three million pupils in joint educational activities, over the period of the programme Erasmus should reach the total of three million individual participants in student mobility actions since the programme began. Leonardo da Vinci should increase placements in enterprises to 80,000 per year by the end of the programme Grundtvig should support the mobility of 7,000 individuals involved in adult education per year by 2013


1.1.2. TEACHERS AND TRAINING IN VET: OUTCOMES OF FOUR PEER LEARNING ACTIVITIES http://www.cedefop.europa.eu

B8 This brochure assembles and presents the outcomes of four Peer Learning Activities (PLAs) that were undertaken as part of the Open Method of Coordination in the context of the Education and Training 2010 work programme of the European Union. The activities were organised by the Focus Group on Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training, under the general aegis of the Thematic Cluster on Teachers and Trainers. The purpose of each PLA was to create a cooperative learning space for policy makers and social partners on a particular theme relevant to the overall agenda of the Focus Group. EXCHANGE OF GOOD PRACTICE AND PEER LEARNING ACTIVITIES http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/doc32_en.htm Exchanges of information on different policy options can help advance reforms in national education and training systems and, together with other mutual learning activities, form a key part of European cooperation in education and training. Such peer learning activities are organised by either groups ("clusters") of member states interested in specific topics, or by expert groups set up by the European Commission. In addition, the Copenhagen process organises specific peer learning activities for vocational education and training and the Working Group on the Adult Learning Action Plan organises peer learning in the field of adult education. The Knowledge System for Lifelong Learning (KSLLL) Visit the EU website on the outputs of the European cooperation in education and training. Current peer learning themes/Clusters and groups 

Cluster on Modernisation of Higher Education

Cluster on Teachers and Trainers o Teachers and Trainers in Vocational Education and Training

Cluster on Making best use of resources

Cluster on Maths, Science and Technology (MST)

Cluster on Access and Social Inclusion in LLL

Cluster on Key competences

Cluster on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)

Cluster on Recognition of learning outcomes




Working group on the Adult Learning Action Plan

European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network (ELGPN)


1.1.3. ABOUT THE STUDY VISITS PROGRAMME B4 A study visit is a short stay of three to five days in a host country for a group of 10 to 15 European education and vocational training specialists and decision-makers. They are stakeholders who want to examine a particular aspect of lifelong learning in another participating country. A study visit usually includes presentations and on-site visits to places such as educational and training institutions, ministries and training sites. They provide a forum for discussion, exchange and learning on themes of common interest and on European and national priorities. Study visits support European cooperation to develop policies for lifelong learning and are part of the EUâ€&#x;s Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-13 (LLP). Cedefop coordinates the programme at European level for the European Commission since the 1 January 2008. At national level study visits are coordinated by the National Agencies located in the participating countries: Information for organisers Organisers of the study visits programme are selected by the National Agency of their country. In order to implement a successful study visit, organisers need to respect several rules before, during and after the study visit which are written down in the handbook for organisers. If you are organising a future study visit, you will find further useful information on our site `information for organisers`. Information for participants A fruitful participation in a study visit requires that participants prepare themselves accordingly. On our page `Information for participants` you will find useful information on rules which participants should follow before, during and after their participation in a study visit.


1.1.4. CONCEPTION OF TEACHER TRAINING Approved by the order of the Minister of Education and Science No. ISAK-1441 September 16, 2004 I. THE OVERVIEW OF THE SITUATION 1. Due to the rapid change of social and cultural life, the development of information society and globalisation, Lithuania‟s education is facing ever new challenges, which, for the past two decades, have triggered an ongoing process of reform in the educational system. A new kind of learning culture and new learning environments have emerged, while lifelong learning has become the main mode of educational renewal. 2. The further progress and quality of Lithuania‟s education will largely depend on the preparation of teachers to work in new conditions. However, teacher training has been only marginally influenced by the process of the educational reform. The major drawbacks of the existing teacher training system have become apparent: teacher training higher schools underestimate the importance of pedagogical studies, there is too much emphasis on academic matters, too much orientation towards “pure science”; the institution of pedagogical placement does not function and there is no teacher licensing system; weak cohesion between colleges and universities; lack of involvement and familiarity with school life on the part of teachers of higher education institutions; the teacher training system is practically incompatible with lifelong learning needs; the content of studies is insufficiently oriented to new competences and skills – the development of critical thinking, problem solving, information literacy. 3. In the 2002 review of Lithuania‟s education policy, education experts from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) noted the slow pace of reform in the country‟s teacher training system. In their opinion, this was the reason why teachers were not adequately trained to meet the demands of changing education. The OECD experts recommended drawing up the standards of professional teacher training, which would serve as guidelines for all teacher training institutions when providing study programmes and organising pedagogical practice, also lengthening the duration of pedagogical practice at school, improving the proportion between academic studies and practical training. The Ministry of Education and Science, as an institution that commissions teacher training, was instructed to increase its impact on the improvement of teacher training quality. 4. Seeking alignment with the current goals and objectives of education, the renewal of teacher training and widening of possibilities for their professional development would ensure the training of teachers properly equipped for work in the knowledge society and with pupils of different abilities and needs as well as the adequate quality of education. The Conception of Teacher Training (hereinafter referred to as Conception) sets out the key principles for the improvement of teacher training. The Conception has been drafted in compliance with the provisions the National Education Strategy 20032012, approved by the decision of the Seimas of the Republic of Lithuania, No. IX-1700 (Official publication, 2003, Nr. 71-3216), on July 4, 2003, with other legal acts regulating education, the joint declaration on “the European Higher Education Area (Bologna Declaration) adopted by the European Ministers of Education on June 19, 1999, the Memorandum on Lifelong Learning by the European Commission on October 30, 2000, the “Detailed Programme on the Follow-up of the Objectives of Education and Training Systems in Europe” (Lisbon Strategy), jointly adopted by the European Council and European Commission on February 14, 2002.

II. GENERAL PROVISIONS 5. The Conception of Teacher Training defines the goals and objectives of teacher training, general provisions, the teacher‟s professional competence, the ways of organising teacher training and means of training quality assurance. 6. The Conception applies to training of pre-school, primary, basic, secondary and vocational teachers, social, special and other pedagogues at Lithuania‟s higher educational institutions.


7. The terms used in the Conception: “Partnership school” is a school where students carry out their pedagogical practice, according to the agreement with a teacher training higher education institution; “Parallel model” means a way of teacher training whereby a subject training and professional training take place at the same time. “Consecutive model” is a way of teacher training whereby professional training takes place after subject training. “Pedagogical qualification” refers to the total of knowledge and skills necessary for work in the educational process, validated in the order established by the legal acts of the government or any other institution authorized by the government. “Pedagogical practice” is part of the teacher training study programme, the function of which is to develop a would-be teacher‟s practical skills of work at a partnership school. “Pedagogical placement” refers to a year-long (two semesters) part of the teacher training study programme (for vocational teachers – half a year) during which they can acquire the experience of working at school. “Supervisor of the pedagogical practice” means a teacher of a higher educational institution, who provides methodological guidance for the student on pedagogical practice. “Pedagogical studies” refer to first level university studies or, in the parallel model, that part of the study programme which is dedicated to the acquisition of the teacher‟s professional competence, upon completion of which a graduate is issued with a certificate. “Teacher‟s license” refers to a document, issued in the order established by relevant legal acts, which entitles a person who has acquired a pedagogical qualification to work as a teacher. “Professional teacher training” refers to that part of teacher training that is dedicated to pedagogical sciences, psychology and subject-specific methodology as well as to practical teacher training during the pedagogical practice and the pedagogical placement. “Mentor of the student-teacher(-s)” refers to a school teacher who provides methodological assistance to would–be teachers during their pedagogical practice at a partnership school. “Mentor of the trainee on placement” refers to a school teacher who provides methodological assistance to the trainee in his practical work. III. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF TEACHER TRAINING 8. The goal of teacher training is to provide conditions for a person to acquire a professional competence that is necessary for successful work at school, by nurturing a personality who, while developing in their pupils competences relevant for contemporary society, will be guided by the values of humanism, democracy, modern understanding of national identity and renewal. 9. The main objectives of teacher training are as follows: 9.1. to help a person to acquire a teacher‟s professional qualification, enabling the graduate to work successfully within formal and non-formal education programmes in the context of integration of Lithuania‟s education into the educational space of Europe and the world; 9.2. to help a person to acquire a higher education which meets the standards of contemporary science and culture;


9.3. to help a person to develop the attitude and ability to continually upgrade the teacher‟s professional competence, to become an active participant of social and cultural life. IV. PRINCIPLES OF TEACHER TRAINING 10. Teacher training shall be guided by the following principles: 10.1. teacher training must be flexible and responsive to the country‟s needs arising from the challenges of modern life as well as be geared to the goals and objectives of Lithuania‟s educational system and educational reform; 10.2. teacher training must provide conditions for the prospective teacher to acquire competences necessary to fulfil his new roles: the organizer of teaching process, resourceful educator, creator of opportunities, facilitator, adviser, partner, mediator between the pupil and a variety of modern sources of information; 10.3. teacher training programmes must focus on achieving the main objectives of teacher training and readily respond to the changing requirements for the teacher‟s competence; they should more actively promote the holistic approach to teacher training, which is still given insufficient attention, and overcome the consequences resulting from the lack of this approach, in particular, the unjustified inclusion of certain courses into study programmes, which reflect the possibilities of higher educational institutions and interests of their academic staff rather than students‟ needs; 10.4. the part of general education subjects and subjects of the selected study field within a teacher training study programme must be purposefully aligned with that part of studies which is dedicated to professional training of would-be teachers, with priority given specifically to the latter part; 10.5. theoretical studies within the professional teacher training block must be well coordinated with the development of skills and experience necessary for the teacher‟s practical work, with priority given to the latter; 10.6. the effectiveness of teacher training must be assessed, both by internal and external evaluation methods, on the basis of teaching outcomes – the competences gained by teachers; 10.7. studies of future teachers at higher education institutions as well as their pedagogical practice should be primarily based on students‟ independent work, as one of the best ways for acquiring professional competence; 10.8. when drawing up and renewing teacher training programmes, the prospects for continuous upgrading of the gained qualification and professional development should be taken into account. V. THE TEACHER’S COMPETENCE 11. The foundations of the teacher‟s competence encompass the following closely knit components: general cultural competence, subject competence, professional teacher competence. 12. Teacher training is targeted at the development of the competence that is necessary for the teacher‟s practical work. 13. The requirements applying to the teacher competence are thoroughly defined in the Regulation on Teacher Training and the regulations of study fields. VI. THE TEACHER’S QUALIFICATION AND HOW TO ACQUIRE IT 14. The teacher‟s qualification is granted to persons who have acquired general cultural, subject and professional competences, completed pedagogical placement and passed a qualifications examination. 14.1. The teacher‟s general cultural and subject competences are gained while studying at a higher educational institution;


14.2. The teacher‟s professional competence is gained upon completion of studies at a higher education institution, where a parallel model of studies is used, or upon completion of pedagogical studies and pedagogical placement. 15. Teachers who work at school but do not have higher education and/or adequate subject competence may acquire it while studying at higher educational institutions under bachelor or applied bachelor study programmes. Their pedagogical work at school, if assessed positively, is accepted as a valid equivalent of pedagogical placement. 16. Persons who have acquired higher education, but do not have adequate professional competence may acquire it while studying at a higher educational institution in pedagogical study programmes. Their pedagogical work at school, if assessed positively, is accepted as a valid equivalent of pedagogical placement. VII. TEACHER TRAINING AND LICENSING 17. The process of teacher training consists of first level university or non-university studies (with pedagogical practice at a partnership school included), pedagogical placement and a qualifications examination. 18. Studies at a higher educational institution: 18.1. Pre-school and primary education teachers are trained under non-university study programmes, using a parallel teacher training model. The scope of studies for pre-school and primary teachers ranges from 120 to 160 credits. Upon completion of such study programmes graduates are awarded an Applied Bachelor‟s degree in education and a certificate of completion of pedagogical studies. On researching the demand for teachers in the labour market, the Ministry of Education and Science may commission educational institutions to train a specific number of basic education subject teachers according to non-university study programmes. 18.2. Teachers of one or more taught subjects, special and social pedagogues are trained under university study programmes, using both parallel and consecutive teacher training models. 18.2.1. Persons, who have completed studies dedicated to teachers of one subject according to the parallel model, receive a Bachelor‟s diploma which confirms the acquired Bachelor‟s degree in a study field constituting the foundation of a respective subject as well as a certificate of completion of pedagogical studies. The scope of studies ranges from 140 to 160 credits. 18.2.1.1. Persons, who have completed studies dedicated to teachers of two subjects according to the parallel model, receive a Bachelor‟s diploma which confirms the acquired Bachelor‟s degree in study fields constituting the foundation of respective subjects as well as a certificate of completion of pedagogical studies. The scope of studies ranges from 160 to 180 credits. 18.2.1.2. Persons, who have gained a Bachelor‟s degree but do not have a certificate of completion of pedagogical studies, may acquire the professional competence necessary for a subject teacher by taking up university (pedagogical) study programmes. The scope of these studies amounts to 40 credits, and, upon their completion, graduates are issued with a certificate of completion of pedagogical studies. 18.2.2. The scope of studies for special and social pedagogues according to the parallel teacher training model ranges from 140 to 180 credits. Through separate modules of a programme, conditions may be created for them acquire the professional competence of a subject teacher. In this case, the study scope is from 160 to 180 credits. Upon completion of studies, graduates are issued with a Bachelor‟s diploma, attesting to the gained Bachelor‟s degree in education, and a certificate of completion of pedagogical studies. Social workers, who have completed non-university studies, are provided with opportunities to acquire the required competence of the social pedagogue. 18.3. Vocational teachers are trained under university and non-university study programmes, using a consecutive teacher training model.


18.3.1. Admission to pedagogical studies is granted to persons who have completed university or non-university study programmes and have no less than three years of work experience in a certain vocational field; 18.3.2. Pedagogical studies are implemented under university study programmes, their scope being no less than 40 credits. 19. The pedagogical practice. 19.1. The purpose of the pedagogical practice is to assist a would-be teacher in acquiring the experience, competences and skills necessary for the teacher‟s practical work, by providing conditions for him to do practical teaching and carry out separate functions of the teacher‟s professional activities at a partnership school for a set period of time (under the supervision of an experienced teacher); 19.2. The pedagogical practice is based on students‟ direct participation in professional pedagogical activities. The roles of the student on pedagogical practice should evolve in the following stages: the observer - the teacher‟s assistant - the student-teacher working under the guidance of an experienced teacher - an independently working teacher; 19.3. It is recommended that pedagogical practice should amount to no less than 20 credits, and in the case of the parallel teacher training model, it is to start in the first year of studies; 19.4. The pedagogical practice is based on the cooperation between the teacher training higher educational institution and a partnership school. The goals and objectives set for the student‟s pedagogical practice as well as concrete tasks to be carried out at school are jointly discussed and agreed upon by the student-teacher, the supervisor of pedagogical practice and the mentor of the student-teacher(s). The rights and duties of the higher educational institution, the partnership school and the student-teacher are defined in the agreement on practical teaching; 19.5. The quality of practical task performance, activities and contributions of individual studentteachers are analysed in public discussions held at a partnership school, attended by all interested teachers, other student-teachers who carried out similar practical tasks and the supervisor of pedagogical practice. The pedagogical practice should become a factor spurring not only the student-teacher‟s professional progress, but also that of the partnership school and the teacher training higher educational institution. 20. The pedagogical placement. 20.1. The pedagogical placement is an essential teacher training component, providing conditions for the trainee on placement to acquire skills and experience necessary for the teacher‟s practical work. The school‟s administration appoints the mentor to the trainee, who provides guidance to the trainee throughout the school placement. At the end of the placement period, the mentor reports to the school administration on his assessment of the trainee‟s work. In addition to this, the trainee writes a final paper where he analyses his work at school. The paper is publicly presented to the teachers of the school and submitted to the Qualifications Examination Commission. On the basis of the mentor‟s trainee assessment report and the trainee‟s final self-assessment paper, the school administration present their evaluation of the trainee‟s performance on placement; 20.2. Rights, duties, responsibilities and remuneration terms of the trainee on placement and his mentor are defined by legal acts. 21. The qualifications examination. 21.1. After the pedagogical placement, professional competence is assessed in a qualifications examination, conducted by the Qualifications Examination Commission, set up by the Ministry of Education and Science, in the order established by the Minister of Education and Science; 21.2. The Qualification Examination Commission evaluates the would-be teacher‟s competence, taking into consideration his study results, evaluation of the pedagogical placement and the results of the qualifications examination. The document testifying to the acquired teacher‟s professional qualification is awarded in the order set by the Minister of Education and Science. 22. Licensing.


22.1. In accordance with legal acts, a teacher‟s license is issued to persons who have completed a pedagogical placement, passed a qualifications examination and who meet the set requirements, in the order established by the Minister of Education and Science. VIII. TEACHER TRAINING QUALITY ASSURANCE 23. The main quality element in teacher training is the teacher‟s ability to implement the goals of a certain curriculum. 24. Seeking to upgrade the quality of teacher training, the audit of teacher training effectiveness (further – audit), assessment and accreditation of pedagogical study programmes are regularly carried out. 25. The audit assesses the compliance of the teacher training model with the goals and principles of the educational system. The conclusions of the audit are presented to the public. On the basis of these conclusions, teacher training is modified accordingly. 26. The key elements in the assessment of study programmes include self-assessment of study programmes, visits of domestic and foreign assessors to teacher training higher educational institutions, the formulation of assessment conclusions, their approval and presentation to the public at large. On the basis of assessment conclusions, study programmes are improved; and, if they conform to the requirements, study programmes are accredited. 27. Organisers and implementers of teacher training programmes must be aware of and have a thorough understanding of the general and special quality assessment criteria, on the basis of which study programmes are evaluated and accredited. General assessment criteria are set out in the regulations of study fields, whereas special criteria are defined in the Regulation on Teacher Training. 28. Seeking to enhance practical pedagogical skills of would-be teachers, school teachers must be trained for the roles of the mentor to the student-teacher and mentor to the trainee on placement, and higher school teachers must be trained to act as supervisors of pedagogical practice. With a view to this, the system of measures aimed at the development of these competences has been prepared and implemented, cooperation and exchange with overseas secondary and higher education teachers involved in the same work are being carried out. 29. While promoting the improvement of the teacher training system and the quality of training, a significant role is played by applied research geared to these goals. These researches are carried out by higher educational institutions, either on their own initiative or upon commission from the Ministry of Education and Science, non-governmental organisations, foundations and other institutions. 30. To ensure the flexibility of the teacher training system, modular studies, allowing for differentiation and individualization of teacher training programmes, and opportunities provided by distance learning should be widely used. 31. Studies of would-be teachers at higher educational institutions should seek maximum orientation towards students‟ independent study. This would help to overcome the still prevalent reproductive model of knowledge transfer and help students to develop skills of independent study, crucial for lifelong learning and professional development. Lecturers should become facilitators and consultants in student self-study rather than mere transferors of knowledge. More attention should be given to training would-be teachers how to use modern communication technologies in the educational process. 32. Teacher training higher schools should develop closer cooperation with schools of similar profile in the country and with research and study institutions abroad. The cause of common academic advancement would be greatly aided by the establishment of associations of higher education institutions and by associations of higher education teachers, by broadly-based teacher and student exchange programmes, drawing on international resources of expertise and funding 33. Higher educational institutions must provide conditions for continuing professional development of their academic staff. Every five years lecturers shall be granted a sabbatical holiday for a substantial renewal of their taught courses.


34. Higher teacher training institutions should pay far more attention to the selection of candidates who decide to take up pedagogical studies, to their professional interests, academic skills and their individual qualities. IX. IMPLEMENTATION OF CONCEPTION 35. To implement the principles of teacher training reform envisaged in the Conception: 35.1. legal acts, enabling the implementation of the Conception, should be drawn up; 35.2. the reform programme for teacher training and professional development, in compliance with the Conception, should be drafted; 35.3. Resources of the European Union structural funds and opportunities provided by international cooperation and exchange programmes should be used for the implementation of the Conception. 1.1.5. THE GREEK FRAME OF TEACHERS TRAINING EVALUATION  The Frame of Evaluation of the training program The training process of A of Phase is evaluated with concrete tools that correspond in modern and reliable methods of evaluation. The possibility of visits the PEKs is provided to the members of Pedagogic Institute (participating in the Team of Work and in the Team of supporting the Program of Introductive Training) These visits are realized in order to detect and record the needs and demands of participating in the training process, as well as the problems that concern in the planning and the organisation the Program. The members of Pedagogic Institute owe to watch proposals and samples teachings and to assemble all elements judge essentially for the internal evaluation of Program. Certification At the end of the training program is granted certification to the new nominated teachers certifying that they have not exceeded the limit of absences and they attended successfully their introductory training. GREEK INTRODUCTIVE TRAINING PROGRAMS AT REGIONAL TRAINING CENTRES (PEKs) 1st Regional Educational Centre (PEK) of Athens http://1pek-athin.att.sch.gr/ ORGANISATIONAL FRAME OF REALISATION OF THE PROGRAM OF THE INTRODUCTIVE TRAINING FOR SCHOOL YEAR 2007-2008  REALISATION of A PHASE The A Phase of the Program of Introductive Training attend obligatorily all the new served teachers in all schools of Primary and Secondary Education at the beginning of the school year (September). It has duration of 60 hours and works out mainly in the afternoons, at the cities of each PEK prefecture. The Syllabus of the A Phase of the training is shaped in each PEK by it‟s Coordinative Council, which takes into consideration the directives of Department of Evaluation and Training of Pedagogic Institute and the particularities of concretisation of training action in the region of it‟s responsibility. Thematic Fields of A Phase:


The Program of the A Phase Training includes subjects that have relation with the school, the education, the teaching and the educational process. 1st Thematic Field (15 instructive hours)  Modern methods of teaching (4 hours)  (active learning, new instructive approaches, method project, alternative environments of learning, psychopedagogical theories etc).  The role of teacher in the modern school (3 hours)  (professionalism, long life learning, management of relations and collaboration with the educational community, the parents and the social partners).  Sensitization for the management of the diversity of school population (3 hours) (cultural, social, learning, problems of puberty, school advisory)  The school as general purpose educational and cultural centre (3 hours) (democratic and active citizen, Cross-cultural education, Day-long school, Flexible Area ).  Principles of administration and organisation of education (2 hours)  (institutional frame, educational structure and hierarchy, school unit and frame of it‟s administrative operation, competences and duties etc). For the trained teachers of specialities of Technique and Professional Education is given particular accent: in the psycho-pedagogic theories aiming at the confrontation of problems that has relation with the Technical Education and the school failure in the particular institutional frame of the technical and vocational education. 2nd Thematic field (35 instructive hours) Didactics of the particular cognitive objects and courses for the lower and upper secondary education (8 hours) about • curriculum, • aims and objectives of individual courses, • specialised methodology of teaching for each one of the cognitive object, • organisation of lessons and courses, • ways of concretisation of the instructive and training objectives etc Model teachings in virtual reality‟s laboratories and in other type laboratories (22 hours) Use of Νew Τechnologies at each cognitive object (5 hours) with exploitation of New Technologies in the construction of the knowledge, theories of learning and computers, use of internet and multimedia in the lessons. For the trained teachers of specialities of Technique and Professional Education is given particular accent in the didactics of the lessons of specialities (laboratories, linear and free drawing). 3rd Thematic Field (10 instructive hours) The evaluation as pedagogic action concerning: a) the students (4 hours) (types, criteria, procedure etc) b) the instructive work (4 hours) (methods of teaching, application, pedagogic approaches, self-assessment of teacher and student) g) the educational material (1 hour) (criteria) d) the educational work (1 hour) (school unit, factors of education etc)

 REALISATION OF B AND C PHASES


Because of the particular regulations and the limited time that are imposed by the Special Service of Management of SPECIAL TRAINING PROGRAM, with regard to the concretisation and termination of all processes which are related with the development of Natural and Economic object of the "Introductive Training", the B and C Phases of Program are materialised inside the same time period as follows: In the B and C Phases participate all the in-served (new nominated) teachers from all the sectors of Primary and Secondary Education, who at the moment of their nomination had instructive previous experience in schools less than 8 months and also they have attended the A Phase of Introductive Training. The B and C Phases of Introductive Training last in total 40 hours (35 hours for the B Phase and 5 hours for the C Phase) and their concretisation begins in February and is completed in March. The curriculum of this training process is shaped by the Coordinative Council of each PEK, which takes into consideration with the directives of the Department of Evaluation and Training of Pedagogic Institute and the particularities of concretisation of training action. The PEKs notify their planning in the Department of Evaluation and Training of Pedagogic Institute and in the relative Address of the Greek Ministry of Education at least 7 days before the beginning of concretisation of training process in their responsibility‟s region. The training process is realised in the cities of the PEKs or any where else of the region of their responsibility facilitating the attendance of the Training Program. The administrations of the PEKs notify in time, the curriculum of the training program and they attend to his precise observation. Also, the administrations of the PEKs inform and coordinate the Educators-members of training teams, in order to avoided repetitions, coverings and omissions in the content of the training programs.  The Frame of the Curriculum of B andC Phases The content of the training programs of B and C Phases concerns • • •

in the follow-up of process of planning and concretisation of the instructive work in the schools, in the presentation and discussion of problems that face the teachers during their instructive duties in the schools as well as in these ways of resolution of the problems.

More analytically: 1st Part: 5 hours disposed for the development of drawings of the lessons, - the familiarization with different ways of the preparation of the lessons, - the determination of instructive objectives per lesson, - the configuration and exploitation of instructive tools and sheets of work, laboratories and evaluation. So, B and C phase will be associated with the A Phase of the Introductive Training and will be elected the affinity and their additionality. 2nd Part: Sample teachings of duration of 30 hours (5 school days) in the reality of the schools. The first 3 hours the teachers in training attend teachings in public schools of experienced teachers of various specialities in the classrooms of the schools that they teach and assisted by the School Advisers or relative specialities. The remainder three hours, the trained teachers, with the teaching-teachers and the School Advisers discuss about the methodology and it‟s application at the teaching.


The School Advisers suggest writtenly in the Address of PEKs the names of the educators-teachers (experienced teachers or Directors of schools) who agree to undertake the sample teachings, taking into consideration the following criteria: a. Their training or their specialisation on didactic and pedagogic issues b. Their activity in the concretisation of innovative educational programs. c. Their teaching in Experimental Schools or in schools characterized as experimental. The Administrations of PEKs owe to check that the sample teachings represent as possible all the cognitive objects of the training programs and trained, new nominated teachers to attend teachings of their speciality or others nearest to them. The public schools in which take place the sample teachings belong in the region of responsibility of the PEKs and are determined by the Address of each PEK in collaboration with the School Advisers of their responsibility‟s region. For the realisation of the training program of these 30 hours in the real teaching environment, in schools, the trained teachers are absents from their work. 3rd Part: It consists of 5 hours of training, not during the school operation. During these hours the trained teachers discuss about problems that resulted during their instructive work, matters that are related with their pedagogic work or their role in the school community and be studied, with the collaboration of the advisers ways of more effective confrontation of these problems. The form of the 3rd part of the Training Program is organized in the following way: 1st Thematic Field (2 instructive hours): Presentation and Analysis of Problems and matters of : a) Pedagogic issues, management of school classes, training difficulties, relations of teachers and students etc b) Management of polymorph, diversity and particularities of school population, cross-cultural educational problems, psycho-social problems of the adolescents, exploitation of particular dexterities of some students etc 2nd Thematic Field (2 instructive hours) Presentation and analysis of problems and matters of application of the instructive methods 3rd Thematic Field (1 instructive hour) Presentation and analysis of the problems and subjects of students‟ evaluation and of the instructive work. SOME TOPICS OF THE GREEK TEACHERS’ TRAINING SYSTEM http://ypepth.gr/el_ec_pagesst1045.htm Addressing the specific learning/training needs of teachers (including pre-primary) to enable them to cope with their changing roles in the knowledge-based society • The upgrading of teachers‟ training is implemented via the following actions: • The framework of the Operational Program for Education and Initial Vocational Training (EPEAEK) measure for upgrading the quality of education provided through Training in innovative programs. • Participation to research programs in Greece and abroad. • Distance training and implementation of the Information Technology and New Technologies (certification of teachers in the ICT). • Enrichment of school libraries. Two training programs are being operated by the Teachers’ Training Organisation (O.E.P.E.C.) scheduled to be completed in 2007: 1) “Modern teaching approaches leading to critical and creative thinking” so that 6.000 teachers are trained.


2) “Relation between family-social-cultural environment and the pupil‟s performance at school” so that 5.000 teachers are trained.  Under Law 3475/2006 regulating Secondary Vocational Education, specialisations and study fields for Music teachers are being defined.  Under Law 3467/2006 postgraduate degree and teaching experience in study fields are defined as prerequisites for teachers‟ appointment to Higher Ecclesiastical Academies or Faculties. Accreditation of Training Programs According to the recently developed legislation, training programs will be accredited on the condition that they are based on the accredited respective job profile. To date, the following programs have been accredited under priority conditions:  Training Program for Trainers for Trainers for Adults.  Training Program for Trainers for Adults.  Training Program for Trainers for Support Services Professionals.  Training Program for Support Services Professionals . Accreditation of Knowledge, Skills and Competencies The accreditation system for knowledge, skills and competencies is to enter the implementation stage after the implementation of the system for the accreditation of training programs. Acquisition of knowledge, skills and competences will be evaluated and certified upon successful completion of the accredited training program. Certification is not linked to national recognition at this stage of the system development.


THE HELLENIC MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS TRAINING OF THE TEACHERS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION http://ypepth.gr/el_ec_pagesst1045.htm  Office of secondary education teachers’ training of the Greek Ministry of Education Aim of the Office. The Office of secondary education teachers‟ training of the Greek Ministry of Education has the responsibility for the planning and the concretisation of training programs. The Training Programs concern of: A. The briefing of teachers who serves already with regard to the developments of science and new methods of teaching and evaluation and their development so that they correspond in the altered conditions of education and do more effectively their work. B. The briefing of teachers in important new educational subjects. General elements for the Training of the Teachers The training programs that are materialised by the Office of Training are distinguished in: A. Training programs of Medium (semi-annual) and long (annual) duration B. Periodical obligatory trainings for teachers, that are realised at the duration of instructive year in regional or even Pan-Hellenic scale, concerning changes of school programs and new courses, new instructive methods and school books. C. Periodical optional trainings in various Regional Training Centres (PEK). These programs are reported in various thematic so the teachers: - Be informed for the developments in concrete scientific, pedagogic, technological, social, politician economic sectors that are connected immediately with their work. - Acquire the suitable methodological tools for the better comprehension and critical confrontation of developments that will lead them to conscious choices, evener organisation and more effective reformation of their educational work. - Be informed for subjects that are connected with the school life, as: organisation and administration of school units, dynamics, problems and management of school community, confrontation of problematic situations, multicultural compositions etc - Familiarize itself with the use of PCs and multimedia, with the exploitation of European programs, with the development of advisory services and mechanisms in the school units etc - can renew their knowledge on each scientific subject, on pedagogic and didactic techniques as impose the rapid development of technology and the consecutive changes in the job market. - Be sensitised to promote a long life improvement of their professional qualifications


1.1.6. COLLABORATIONS WITH UNIVERSITIES 1. Patras University, Greece 2. Aegean University, Greece 2. Nesna University, Norway 3. Arad University, Romania

At Arad University, February 2011

Participation of Patras University to the Educational Conference which took place during the meeting at Crete, October 2010


At Nesna University, May 2010 EDUCATION & ROLE OF TRAINERS Greece has developed a three stage process leading to the accreditation system of trainers of adults in CVET : The first phase was to develop a trainersâ€&#x; register and since 2001 until now more than 15.000 trainers are already registered at EKEPIS (the National Accreditation Body for VET). Until recently, there were three main criteria in order for a trainer to be registered: a. specific academic qualifications (mainly a university degree), b. minimum professional experience which is at least three yearsâ€&#x; experience in his profession c. adult teaching experience, which is very crucial. One had to fulfil all these three criteria in order to be registered. According to a recent ministerial decree (December 2006) adult teaching experience is not necessary, once the trainer attends a specific 300 hour training programme for adult trainers. The second (undergoing) phase is the training of more than 10.000 trainers (out of the total). This includes a 300-hour distance learning course addressing the need of enhancing the ability of trainers to teach vocational skills: 225 hours is distance learning and only 75 hours (four weekends) of face to face cooperation with a trainer of trainers. The third and final phase is the accreditation of these trainers. If somebody has been registered and has attended this 300-hour course, it does not mean that he is an accredited trainer. He has to go through the final process of accreditation which is to present a sample of a training session and this lasts about 20 minutes. A special committee of assessors is responsible for the assessment and evaluation. Of course only if somebody succeeds he or she becomes an accredited trainer. In addition to the above, EKEPIS has planned the development of a new VET trainers’ profile and this is going to have the form of a study (an analysis) on the basis of the job profile accreditation system. The main components of this include:


• • • • •

a general description of the field of occupation. In this case it is a general description of the role of the VET trainer in Greece during the last years, the occupational standards of a VET trainer, the required knowledge, skills and competencies, an assessment methodology for these knowledge, skills and competencies will be proposed and last but not least, formal or informal paths of how somebody can acquire these knowledge, skills and competencies will have to be defined.

A similar process of offering adequate training in practical and theoretical aspects of pedagogy is planned for the case of Support Services Professionals for CVET. A relevant register has been developed, while the providers of such services will undergo a specific course in order to be able to apply for their accreditation. The above mentioned initiatives aim at increasing the pedagogical abilities of VET teachers in general, as well as of the specific case of Support Services Professionals for CVET.  Tutores – Ιnstructors- Educatοrs Professors of Universities, school advisers, executives of The Pedagogic Institute (advisers, assessors), teachers with upper qualifications (with postgraduate titles, with knowledge and experience in concrete objects, who work in public schools or in educational services of the region of the PEK, other persons who are validated in teaching, Pensioners professors of University, Advisers who have retired inside the last five-year period, experienced teachers who teach in public schools of the responsibility‟s region of each PEK, Directors of public schools in which are realised the sample teachings. The Coordinative Councils of PEKs select the tutores on the base of their essential and formal qualifications and after public statement. The Coordinative Council owes to develop the teachers depending on the specialised object of their studies. The candidate tutores owe to deposit their CV, titles which certify their increased qualifications and abstract of their lecture or drawing of their teaching. Afterwards their choice, they owe to deposit the entire training material that prepared for the educated.


1.2. TRAINING APPLICATIONS AT SCHOOLS COMENIUS EUROPE IN THE CLASSROOM http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-programme/doc84_en.htm The Comenius programme focuses on the first phase of education, from pre-school and primary to secondary schools. It is relevant for all members of the education community: pupils, teachers, local authorities, parents‟ associations, non-government organisations, teacher training institutes, universities and all other educational staff. Part of the Lifelong Learning Programme, Comenius seeks to develop knowledge and understanding among young people and educational staff of the diversity of European cultures , languages and values. It helps young people acquire the basic life skills and competences necessary for their personal development, for future employment and for active citizenship. The programme addresses issues strongly related to current discussions and developments in school policy. Priorities are set annually. Objectives Comenius has the following goals:     

To improve and increase the mobility of pupils and educational staff in different Member States To enhance and increase partnerships between schools in different Member States, with at least three million pupils taking part in joint educational activities by 2010 To encourage language learning, innovative ICT-based content, services and better teaching techniques and practices To enhance the quality and European dimension of teacher training To improve pedagogical approaches and school management

Current priorities The Comenius programme focuses on the following priority areas:        

Motivation for learning and learning-to-learn skills Key competences: improving language learning; greater literacy; making science more attractive; supporting entrepreneurship; and reinforcing creativity and innovation Digital educational content and services School management Addressing socio-economic disadvantages and reducing early school leaving Participation in sports Teaching diverse groups of pupils Early and pre-primary learning


1.2.1. ADVICES TO LITHUANIAN TEACHERS 

http://www.teachervision.fen.com/slideshow/teaching-methods-andmanagement/52294.html?page=2&detoured=1#ixzz1GmVJBjrV

Realize that you will make mistakes, because becoming a teacher did not make you perfect.      

Don't be afraid to apologize to your students when you have made a mistake. Realize that the lesson plan is just that – a plan. Remember, we make plans every day of our life but rarely do we carry them out 100% of the time. Get a good night's sleep every night. Read, read, read as much about the teaching profession as you can. Join a professional organization. Write your name in permanent ink on the front of everything you own in your classroom. Teachers are notorious for borrowing something of interest and then forgetting where they got it from. Don't let your teaching job become your life! Of all the professions in the world, teachers could easily work themselves to death because so much in this world can be used to teach our students.


ADVICE TO LITHUANIAN TEACHERS Everybody has their lists.. here's mine. the most obvious would be "know the subject" and "know how to teach." i might be able to bear the those cant do the second but definately not the first! 1. Never refer to the class or any student by "nonsense kahin ke" 2. Never make faces. Dont try the angry/dissatified... any look. Very few people can make it and you just end up looking silly and become the butt of all jokes. 3. When a student asks you a question, dont confuse them more and as far as possible, try to answer the question asked, not what you know. 4. Oh and while answering do look at the person who asks the question and not at the other end of class. 5. Its just as irritating to have a teacher's mobile phone ring in the middle of class though it might be a relief to students at times. But especially in an exam?? 6. Never wear dupattas with shells, trinkets or anything which make noise, not in class and definately not when there is an exam you are invigilating. 7. Never make a student appearing for an exam get the extra supplementary sheets which is your responsibility. 8. Never threaten students with attendance. it just shows you know how bad a teacher you are. 9. Never tell stories about your family or yourself. We are not the least interested that your son is giving CAT and doesnt have the decency to find out about colleges and entrances himself and you have to waste class times to ask us on what to do. 10. If possible, dont start in the middle of the blackboard and end up in the corners. Its a bit confusing. 11. Dont write too small on the blackboard. We dont have magnifying glasses. On the other hand dont write too big. We are not in kindergarden.


1.2.2. CLASSROOM ORGANIZATION TIPS FROM VETERAN TEACHERS http://www.teachervision.fen.com/classroom-management/teachingmethods/6429.html#ixzz1GmUUzAtO Use accordion folders with 10 to 14 slots to organize anything. It helps to keep assignments, activities, quizzes, tests, and lecture notes in order.

Teach your class an attention code. I say "Hey" in a sing-song voice and the class responds with "Ho." This code alerts the children that they need to stop whatever they are doing and immediately look in my direction. This is useful in the classroom when the students are working in centers and I need their attention. If we are on the playground, my class is quickly distinguished from the others by this code. Make a file folder for each child for all parent/teacher communication. Then all year you have a concise record of every note you have either written to or received from parents. Collect the kids' school supplies at the beginning of the year so they don't overfill the desks and floors. Label them with their names and do a bimonthly supply restocking. You don't have to grade and record every paper or piece of writing. As a new teacher, I felt I had to read through every piece of their work, write comments, and record nearly everything in the grade book. Prioritize what work is important enough to grade, note which students aren't catching on, and then recycle the rest of the papers and worksheets! At the beginning of a new quarter give each student a piece of paper with three bathroom passes drawn on it. They may use them during the quarter, but if they do not, add extra points to their report card grades. It motivates the students to use the restroom during their normal breaktimes, and really cuts back on classtime disruptions! Assign each child the number that corresponds to the number in the grade book. Each child writes that number in the upper right-hand corner of everything that has to be turned in. With this done, I can simply put the papers in numerical order and call out any missing numbers. It also helps with recording grades in the grade book and saves loads of time. Make a class list with columns. Draw the necessary columns next to the students' names and assign headings that are appropriate for that specific list. It can be used to keep up as students bring in supplies, money for field trips, and important signed forms. Offer extra credit when you need papers back ASAP. Give the extra credit to all that return the papers within two days! Make an "Appointment Clock" at the beginning of each quarter. Draw an outline of a clock, but only label the times 12, 3, 6, and 9. Next to these numbers I draw a line. I run off enough for each student and use a different color for each quarter. Then give students 3 minutes to get an appointment (or partner) for each of the times. They must have four different people and can not repeat the previous quarter. They clip it into their binder and the next time I say, "Meet with your 12 o'clock partner" they know exactly who to go to. The first week of school, write all of your student's names on 3"x5" notecards. When looking for "helpers," taking turns reading, or answering questions refer to the names on the cards. This will give everyone an equal chance and keep them on their toes. Use a blank card to separate the beginning and end; when you get to the blank card shuffle the cards before going on. It also cuts down on discipline


problems because if students are not doing what they should be, then they forfeit their turn.

When I was a new teacher, I amassed materials. That was 12 years ago. Since then, I have taught many different subjects and ability levels. I have also moved classrooms more times than I can count. With the wonder of the Internet and scanners and CD burners, it is no longer necessary to carry (and move) loads of papers and books everywhere. If I were starting out now, I would a)choose a color-code system b)store as much electronically as possible.

and

stick

to

it

from

the

get-go,

and

I'm preparing to go back to school to a new position and have spent much of the summer re-organizing, cleaning out files (wow, the things I'd forgotten I had!) and minimizing clutter. If only I'd started out that way! Good luck to all new teachers! Make sure you find out bus numbers for each child before school starts if you are a kindergarten, first grade or special education teacher.


1.2.3. UTILIZATION OF ICTS AND THEIR INCORPORATION INTO THE EVERYDAY EDUCATIONAL PROCEDURE By the Hellenic Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs http://www.ypepth.gr/ktp/en_home.htm http://www.de.sch.gr/epimorfosi Information Society Office The Hellenic Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs (Hellenic MoE) has launched a coordinate effort for the utilization of ICTs and their incorporation into the everyday educational procedure. This effort is implemented in the fields of the third Community Support Framework mainly from the Operational Program of Information Society, under the direct supervision of the General Secretary of the Hellenic MoE and with the support of the Hellenic MoE Information Society office and the "Strategy for ICTs in Education" Committee. It is constructed on to four lines of action:    

Installation and support of network and computational equipment. Development of software and digital content for educational and administrative purposes (educational software, information systems, Internet content e.t.c.). Training of the educational community on ICTs, targeting to the utilization of the above areas. Modernization of administration areas.

It aims to:    

The incorporation of ICTs in the teaching process. The support of the Informatics lesson taught in high school, senior high school and technical school. The support of every cognitive area through the use of ICTs. The elimination of digital illiteracy and variations on ICT skills.


GOOD PRACTICES IN MOBILITY AND LONG LIFE LEARNING PROGRAMS SUPPORTING CITIZENS' MOBILITY AND LIFELONG LEARNING http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/doc40_en.htm

A number of instruments have been developed to support European citizens, learning providers, companies, guidance counsellors and educational authorities and allow them to fully exploit the potential of the European lifelong learning area and the EU-wide labour market.  

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The European Framework of Key Competences identifies the skills that people need to lead successful lives in today's world. The European Qualification Framework for lifelong learning (EQF) aims at linking countries' qualifications systems, acting as a translation device for qualifications across different EU Member States, employers and individuals, and so make it easier for individuals to work or study abroad. Europass helps people make their qualifications and skills better understood and recognised throughout Europe. The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) provides a common basis to formally recognise study periods abroad. The National Academic Recognition Information Centres (NARIC) is a contact point for information on the academic recognition of diplomas and periods of study abroad. The European Credit system for Vocational Education and Training (ECVET) is a system under development for the transfer, accumulation and recognition of learning outcomes in Europe, including those outside the formal training system. Other tools are also being developed for the validation of informal and non-formal learning. The European Quality Assurance Reference framework for Vocational Education and Training (EQARF) is a reference instrument to help Member States to promote and monitor continuous improvement of their Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems, based on common European references.

Read more about information and guidance tools that are available to help with lifelong learning in the EU, including in particular the PLOTEUS portal on learning opportunities and the Euroguidance network.


2.1 - HANDBOOK