Page 1

L OCAL

GO! moves to Thursdays

SWIMMERS SHINE

GO! magazine, The Observer’s A&E and TV guide, will be inserted in the paper on Thursdays starting this week.

SPORTS, 10A

THE OBSERVER SERVING UNION AND WALLOWA COUNTIES SINCE 1896

75

CENTS,

ISSUE

W E D N E S D AY,

113

JUNE

8,

2011

LAGRANDEOBSERVER.COM LIFE FLIGHT’S Eurocopter B-3 A-Star carries cardiac monitors, ventilation equipment and everything else needed to respond to medical and trauma emergencies.

AIR

AMBULANCE

SERVICE

Life Flight replaces Air Link BILL RAUTENSTRAUCH The Observer

LISA MCMAHAN | The Observer

IN THE CALM BEFORE THE STOCK SHOW, Eastern Oregon Livestock Show Secretary JoAnn Hefner touches up the souvenir booth in preparation for the stampede of activities. Emma Stockhoff, Union FFA member and district president, takes a break from stocking the booth with souvenirs to ensure quality control. The livestock show’s 4-H activities began Monday. Events continue through Sunday in Union. For information about the upcoming bull riding contest and rodeos, see Page 10A.

It’s full speed ahead at Eastern Oregon Livestock Show Wednesday 1 to 7 p.m., livestock weigh-in 5 p.m., 4-H, FFA goat showmanship Thursday 6 a.m., cowboy breakfast 8:30 a.m., 4-H, FFA livestock conformation 3 p.m., 4-H, FFA judging contest Noon to 10 p.m., carnival, family night 7 p.m., PRCA Xtreme Bulls 9 p.m., karaoke contest, EOLS clubhouse Friday 6 a.m., cowboy breakfast

CELENA HEFNER Crowned EOLS queen Tuesday

8:30 a.m., 4-H, FFA showmanship 1 p.m., FFA awards presentation Noon to 10 p.m., carnival 2 p.m., Main Street Parade 4 p.m., PRCA rodeo and horse racing 6 p.m., 4-H awards presentation 8 p.m., youth

Lawmakers compromise on new district maps SALEM (AP) — Republicans and Democrats said Tuesday they’ve reached a compromise on new boundaries for Oregon legislative districts, scaling a key hurdle and potentially paving the way for the Legislature to finish a task it hasn’t completed in decades. Lawmakers were not able to agree on new boundaries for congressional districts. But in a news conference, four negotiators hailed their legislative plan as a groundbreaking bipartisan agreement on an intensely political chore. “Today’s agreement repre-

W E AT H E R

sents the first step toward eliminating decades of legislative futility,” said Rep. Shawn Lindsay of Hillsboro, a Republican negotiator. When U.S. Census figures are released every 10 years, the state must draw new boundaries for the 30 state Senate and 60 state House districts, realigning them based on shifting population. If lawmakers fail to enact new legislative maps by July 1, the task will fall to Democratic Secretary of State Kate Brown — a fallback option that gives See BOUNDARIES, 7A

dance 9 p.m., adult dance Saturday 6 a.m., cowboy breakfast 8 a.m., 4-H, FFA livestock auction 10 a.m., kids corral, Knott Family barn Noon to 10 p.m., carnival 1:30 p.m. PRCA rodeo and horse racing 9 p.m., adult dance Sunday 1:30 p.m., PRCA rodeo and horse racing

42 TOMORROW

69

BUSINESS/AG / 1B CLASSIFIED / 4B COMICS / 3B CROSSWORD / 5B

BILL RAUTENSTRAUCH | Observer photos

EMT-PARAMEDIC Raul Marroquin displays a trauma kit carried aboard Life Flight Network’s emergency transport helicopter.

Medical Center and several other regional hospitals. Life Flight provides air and ground ambulance service from helicopter and fixed wing bases throughout the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West. In Oregon, the company has helicopter bases in Aurora, Eugene, Ontario and La Grande. See AIRCRAFT, 3A

EOU class mails survey about proposed wind project Survey part of Eastern’s effort to bring back Rural Services Institute LISA MCMAHAN The Observer

Got mail? If you’re one of 1,000 randomly-selected Union County residents, you’ve got a survey, too. Eastern Oregon University sponsored and sent out the mailings last week to conduct a survey regarding the proposed Antelope Ridge Wind Farm on Craig Mountain. Professor Bill Grigsby worked with last spring’s Anthropology/Sociology 370 course, “Environment and

Society,” to develop ‘We want to add some the survey in coopinformation to the mix that eration with several hasn’t been part of the students, including debate yet. If everyone’s Pablo Haro and made up their minds, it’s Timothy Brown. quite a different issue than Many residents if many people are still make their opinions known with signs in deliberating.’ their yards, but the — EOU Professor Bill Grigsby survey is designed to assess some of the erating.” forces at work behind resiThe survey asks for basic dents’ opinions, including information, including age, knowledge and behaviors with residence and voting preferrespect to wind paper. ences. To find out about the “We want to add some residents’ opinion formation, information to the mix that the survey asks them to rate hasn’t been part of the debate the importance of informayet,” Grigsby said. “If everytion sources and the severity one’s made up their minds, — whether they perceive it as it’s quite a different issue than negative or positive — of variif many people are still delibous wind turbine impacts.

INDEX

TONIGHT

A helicopter equipped with all the latest medical gadgets and gear has taken up a station at the Union County Airport, standing ready to respond to emergencies in town or the countryside. On June 1, Life Flight Network officially opened for business in the hangar formerly occupied by AirLink Dominic Critical Care Transport. Pomponio Life Flight Director Life Flight of Clinical Network crews Operations will answer calls for transfers from Grande Ronde Hospital to other facilities in the region, and also respond to vehicle crashes, hiking and hunting accidents, and other emergencies hard to deal with in rural areas. “We can land on the football field near the hospital, on a mountainside, pretty much anywhere there’s an open area,” said EMT-Paramedic Raul Marroquin. AirLink, a fixed-wing air ambulance service, recently terminated its operation in Union County and gave way to Life Flight, a non-profit company owned jointly by St. Alphonsus Regional

EDITORIALS / 4A HOROSCOPE / 5B LOTTERY / 2A MOVIES / 3A

OBITUARIES / 5A RECORD / 5A SPORTS / 10A SUDOKU / 3B

It also asks if residents are familiar with the Strategic Investment Program negotiated between the Union County Commission and Horizon Energy and asks residents how knowledgeable they feel they are on the topic of wind power. The survey is part of EOU’s effort to bring back the Rural Services Institute. “It is clear to me that we have a vast amount of potential to serve rural Oregon,” EOU President Bob Davies

HOW TO REACH US 541-963-3161 lagrandeobserver.com Two sections, 18 pages La Grande, Oregon

See SURVEY, 2A


NEWS ON TWO

2 A The Observer

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Students learn how to conduct survey research SURVEY from 1A

the Rural Services Institute is reincarnated, allows the university to take on other projects that involve public policy and have important implications, economically and environmentally, for the region,” Grigsby said. The survey is beneficial for both students and the community, Grigsby said. Students learn how to conduct survey research and how to apply it to issues and problems in the real world, a time-consuming

said in his 2010 State of the University address. “I am working with our local, state and federal legislators to bring back the Rural Services Institute.” Once the results are calculated, Grigsby plans to inform the public of the results through printed materials and websites. “If we can do this well, we can create a template that, hopefully, if

process, as those helping with the project discovered. “Right now, I think Pablo has realized what he’s in for,” Grigsby said of the data collection and entry processes, which he estimates will take a few months upon the surveys’ return. A group of students in the course decided they wanted to focus on a public opinion survey after a series of projects on energy, Grigsby said. “The Antelope Ridge proposal

represents everything that’s difficult about public policy with respect to the environment,” Grigsby said. EOU will send out a second mailing soon and hopes to have 500 returned in the next few weeks to allow for a plus or minus confidence interval of 5 percent, a fairly narrow margin of error, Grigsby said. “Obviously we’d like a higher response rate — that would be a good problem to have,”

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK

Grigsby said. The survey comes with a selfaddressed stamped envelope and an invitation to send in additional comments not addressed by the questionnaire. “Wind power has everything that makes for a thorny environmental issue, and sometimes societies have to figure out how to navigate thorn patches,” Grigsby said. “This one happens to be in our backyard.”

‘The Antelope Ridge proposal represents everything that’s difficult about public policy with respect to the environment.’ — Bill Grigsby Professor

Grant helps fund Arts in the Field program

CHRIS BAXTER | The Observer

VOLUNTEERS GATHER at Gangloff Park in west La Grande recently to help remove invasive and non-native plants that could overtake the park if left on their own. The ultimate goal of an ongoing Gangloff project is to restore the park grounds to a state in which the first pioneers entering the valley would most likely have encountered. The project is a joint effort by the Hells Canyon Preservation Council, Oregon Rural Action and the Native Plant Society.

Arts in the Field, a theater arts/equine program serving disadvantaged middle school youth from the tri-state corner of Oregon, Idaho and Washington, has received a $6,700 grant from the Oregon Community Foundation to fund the efforts of the Wallowa County Youth Center and Antelope Valley Movement Arts Foundation to institute Arts in the Field. The program is dependent on donations, community support and volunteers to accomplish their goal. Students 10 to 14 are introduced to rural life through working with horses and learning about the lifestyle from ranchers and through theater at the Wallowa County Family Youth Center and on an adjacent horse ranch near Joseph. Workshops increase understanding of country life and heritage, according to program director and trustee Janine Kovsky. “All the children have a fantastic time working with horses, learning about theater, experimenting with movement, hik-

ing in the local highlands and camping. It’s a thorough, wellrounded rural and arts experience,” she said. “This support from the Oregon Community Foundation will enable us to serve more students, many who have challenges to overcome.” Registrations for the summer session Aug. 5-7 are open. For information about student registration and how to get involved, call AVMAF at 661-965-7915, Wallowa County Family Youth Center at 541-432-0750, or Point of Connection at 541-398-0761. Email inquiries may be sent to jrkovsky@earthlink.net. Scholarships are available for youth in need. This project is made possible by a grant from Oregon Community Foundation, Alpine House, Antelope Valley Movement Arts Foundation, Community Bank, Point of Connection, Lewis-Clark State College, Lewiston Civic Theater, McClure Honda, Wallowa County Family Youth Center, Riddle Marine and SZ Quarter Horses.

DAILY PLANNER calls after 6, please call 541-9751690, leave your name, address and phone number. Your paper will be delivered the next business day.

the state legislature.

Today in history Today is Wednesday, June 8, the 159th day of 2011. There are 206 days left in the year.

Newspaper late Every effort is made to deliver your Observer in a timely manner. Occasionally conditions exist that make delivery more difficult. If you are not on a motor route, delivery should be before 5:30 p.m. If you do not receive your paper by 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, please call 541-963-3161 by 6 p.m. If your delivery is by motor carrier, delivery should be by 6 p.m. For

Highlight On June 8, 1861, voters in Tennessee approved an Ordinance of Secession passed the previous month by

Lottery numbers PICK 4 Tuesday’s numbers: 1 p.m.: 4-6-0-2 4 p.m.: 8-2-0-3 7 p.m.: 7-8-8-0 10 p.m.: 9-2-6-3

MEGAMILLIONS Nobody won the $24 million jackpot. Estimated drawing Friday: $33 million. Megaplier: 04 Tuesday’s numbers: 29-32-35-47-52, MB 13

July, $9.16; August, $9.25 Dark northern spring — June, $11.07; July, $11.07; August, $11.07 Barley — No bid available

Markets

Quote of the day

Grain report

WALL STREET AT NOON Dow Jones average — Down 11 at 12,060 Broader stock indicators Standard & Poor’s 500 Index — Down 1 at 1,284 Tech-heavy Nasdaq composite index — Down 15 at 2,687

“The excellence of a gift lies in its appropriateness rather than in its value.”

PORTLAND GRAIN Today Soft white wheat — June, $7.90; July $7.90; August, $7.93 Hard red winter — June, $9.06;

Bids provided by Island City Grain Co.

NYSE — Down 24 at 8,107 Russell — Down 4 at 793 GOLD AND SILVER Gold — Down $8.20 at $1,536.50 Silver — Down 56 cents at $36.58

— CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER

70°

W E AT H E R WEATHER AT A GLANCE C O M F O R TA B L E RATE THE DAY: 8 Thursday’s weather

T H U R S D AY

UNION COUNTY FORECAST

OREGON FORECAST

TONIGHT

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

39°

70°

67°

70°

72°

43°

47°

44°

47°

20 percent chance of showers

Slight chance of showers, with thunderstorms

Mostly sunny

Mostly sunny

LA GRANDE TEMPS Tuesday’s high: 71 Low this morning: 44 Average high/low: 73/47 Record high/low: 91/33

PRECIPITATION 24 hours ending 4 a.m.: .00 Month to date: .90 Normal: .40 Year to date: 13.59 Normal: 8.60 Today’s record: 1 inch State’s wettest: .20 at Aurora

SUN Sunset: 8:40 p.m. Sunrise: 5:03 a.m.

Chance of showers and thunderstorms

WA L L OWA C O U N T Y F O R E C A S T TONIGHT

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

35°

65°

63°

64°

67°

39°

43°

41°

42°

20 percent chance of showers

Slight chance of showers, with thunderstorms

Slight chance of showers, with thunderstorms

Slight chance of showers

LG COMFORT FACTORS As of 8 a.m. at La Grande airport Wind — Calm Temperature — 48 degrees

POLLENCAST Trees — low for pine, sweetgum and maple; Grass — moderate; Weeds — medium

Chance of showers and thunderstorms

OREGON TRIVIA Oregon and New Jersey are the only states without self-serve gas stations.

Hottest Tuesday

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Nation: 107 at Pecos, Texas Oregon: 76 at Medford

Sunny, warm

Coldest today

First quarter moon

Nation: 24 at Bellemont, Ariz. Oregon: 28 at Lakeview

Moon phase

Across the region Temperatures indicate previous day’s high and overnight low to 4 a.m. Hi Lo Prc The Dalles 68 51 T Joseph 64 39 .04 Corvallis 63 48 .00 Newport 59 54 T Portland 65 53 .01

Salem Hermiston Meacham Pendleton Redmond Pasco Walla Walla Baker City Ontario

63 72 63 67 66 78 73 69 73

51 49 40 46 30 50 50 40 49

T .00 .00 .00 T .00 .00 .01 .03

70 63 57 77 68 70 47 54 53 68

PCdy Clr PCdy PCdy Clr Clr Cdy Cdy .17 Cdy Clr

Across the nation Temperatures indicate previous day’s high and overnight low to 5 a.m. Pacific time. Hi Lo Prc Sky Anchorage 55 50 .06 Cdy Boise 66 54 .24 Cdy Boston 82 60 PCdy Chicago 96 75 Clr Denver 86 53 Clr Honolulu 84 72 .01PCdy

Houston Las Vegas Los Angeles Miami Beach New York City Phoenix Salt Lake City San Francisco Seattle Washington, D.C.

95 91 74 90 87 96 72 67 64 90

EOU class mails survey about proposed wind project  

Written by Lisa McMahan. Got mail? If you’re one of 1,000 randomly-selected Union County residents, you’ve got a survey, too. Click to read...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you