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Glad Tidings April

Inside this issue:

From Rev. Laurel

From Rev. Laurel

1

Liturgical Changes for April

2

From the Deacon’s Bench

3

Lenten Stations of the Cross

5

Pledges

5

Crossroads Soup Kitchen Sunday Leadership

6

Counters Needed

6

CROP Hunger Walk

6

Health and Wellness

8

Greetings Parish, As we make our way into April, we find ourselves as though tossed on an angry sea. Just as we’re getting used to our Lenten disciplines, Holy Week is upon us. I don’t know about you, but I find that week emotionally and spiritually difficult and exhausting. Of course I know how the story ends, but it still pains my soul to remember how we treated Jesus the way we do. Before we know it, we’ll be shouting halleluiahs to the risen Christ, and all the strife of the previous week will suddenly be gone. Liturgically and traditionally, April will involve an awful lot of pitching and rolling, and trying to find our bearings as we navigate our way to the calmer season of Easter. It’s supposed to be that way. Part of the faith journey is being tested (Lent), enduring struggle (Holy Week), and learning to see the world and our place in it with new eyes (Easter). It’s up to each of us to embrace these aspects of our faith. Avoiding them may seem easier and more convenient, but in the long run, we’re just short-changing ourselves and the deep relationship we could have with God in Christ. No two journeys are necessarily the same, and some are harder than others. Part of being Christian is being in communion with one another to share the burden of the journey. We grow in faith together. As Paul writes to the Galatians “Bear one another's burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ. Whenever we have an oppor-


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tunity, let us work for the good of all, and especially for those of the family of faith” (Gal 6:2,10). No matter how trying the journey of faith may be, we learn and grow in faith the best when we do so in communion together. May we be open to the graces of our journeys. May the trials of life bring us closer to the God of love. May the blessings of Lent, Holy Week, and Easter bring us to a deeper communion with Jesus and one another. Yours in Christ, L+ April worship times: Date Day Service 4/2 Wed H.E. 4/6 Sun H.E. 4/9 Wed H.E. 4/13 Sun Palm Sunday 4/17 Thu Maundy Thursday 4/18 4/19 4/20 4/27

Fri Sat Sun Sun

Good Friday Holy Sat/Vigil Easter Sunday H.E.

Time 7p 8:30 & 10a 7p 8:30 & 10a 5:30p dinner/foot washing 7p worship, all-night vigil 7p 12p Holy Sat, 7p Easter Vigil 10a 8:30 & 10a

Liturgical Changes for April Liturgical seasons in April include Lent, Holy Week and Easter, so brace yourself for some fast changes in our liturgy. We will continue with Rite I for the remainder of Lent. When we get to Holy Week, our Book of Common Prayer gives us liturgies specific to each day. This year we’re going to include the service for Holy Saturday at noon on Holy Saturday. It’s a very short, lay-led service, that puts a cap on the expression of Holy Week. Holy Saturday is a funeral service at its core, and the scripture selections for that day close the story of our Lord’s passion. Please join us for this unique service. When we move into the Easter Vigil (with a baptism!) we’ll move back into using Rite II language, as well as Alleluias. It usually takes a couple weeks for


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our mouths’ muscle memory to make the switch from one Rite to the other, so don’t worry if someone wishes peace be with thy spirit when you shake hands. I truly believe God smiles with us when we catch ourselves in a “blooper” moment. As we make our way through the final weeks of Lent, and the difficult walk through Holy Week, I pray that we all do so with peace in our hearts, the certain knowledge that we are loved by God, and the blessings of all in this community of disciples. Faithfully, Rev. Laurel+

From the Deacon’s Bench Dear Friends, This Lenten season I chose a little book with great insight and wisdom. It is Anthony Stern’s selection of Mother Teresa’s MEDITATIONS ON SPIRITUAL LIFE FOR PEOPLE OF ALL FAITHS collected under the title, Everything Starts from Prayer, Second Edition. I believe that using this book of meditations as a guide my own prayer life will deepen, and that if I journal and pray the book, I will grow not only in my relationship with God but also in my relationships with self and others. Mother Teresa uses her own struggles with doubt and darkness, and she applied the advice that she gives us to herself: “Everything starts from prayer” (n.p.). I find myself thinking about a couple of things lately, and they have become a cloud that invades that inner peaceful place I find in my mind and heart. The two things are first, the need to understand and to be understood, and second, the vast number of lonely people I see about me, in my immediate world as well as the world at large. I’m not sure if these two are interconnected or they simply bump into each other once in awhile. I do find that when I’m journaling after reading one or more of Mother Teresa’s meditations, that these things invaded her thoughts and life as well. For example, Mother Teresa writes, There is much suffering in the world—very much. And this material


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suffering is suffering from hunger, suffering from homelessness, from all kinds of diseases, but I still think the greatest suffering is being lonely, feeling unloved, just having no one. (Stern n.p.) Loneliness, the word itself, covers a wide range of situations: Certainly, it refers to the person or people who are lonely or who are left alone due to a loved one’s death. It also is a word used to define the individual who appears to be on the outside of what’s happening; that is, a person is isolated from others or events because he/she doesn’t fit in, or perhaps he/she is not very sociable, or this is a person who chooses to isolate him/her-self. Then, there is the person who is lonely and alone when he/she is within the group, the family, or a mass of people. The economy, the social order of things, job classifications, and other things can work to isolate people and thereby create the loneliness they feel. There’s a difference between being alone and being lonely, or at least that has been my experience. I often choose to be alone, and I enjoy the time I spend with myself and my thoughts. However, I have been lonely, and I do not like that. Helping others to realize or to overcome either state, that is being alone, or being lonely, is not an easy task, but I believe it is one you and I share. The question I ask myself, and I urge you to ask of yourselves is “How can we, as Christians, help those who are lonely, feeling unloved, and/or feeling they have no one who cares? Mother Teresa tells us, “You and I have been created for greater things. We have not been created to just pass through this life without aim. And that greater aim is to love and be loved” (Stern n.p.). “Yes! She’s absolutely right! So how am I going to do that?” Paying attention, looking people in the eye, offering a genuine smile, offering a kindness, slowing down and taking time to be considerate of others and their concerns/needs, and above all trying out the old adage, “If you want to know me, walk a mile in my shoes.” These are all things that can work, but the last one will not work if you don’t first take of your own shoes. This thought gets me to that first point—to understand and to be understood. Really this action involves pretty much all of our senses but mostly seeing and listening. When we are fortunate to be communicating with another, most of listen so we know when we can insert our two cents worth of information. We are not really listening with our ears, mind, and heart; we are simply hearing to words and pauses while waiting to speak our own thoughts. To really listen, we have to take off our shoes, as it were, put aside our own need and listen. Responding to the other person in a way, and sometimes this means with silence, so the other person feels that what he/she said we truly understand. Steven Covey


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wrote in his book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People that being understood is like psychological air. Imagine that! By giving another person the gift of understanding, he or she is able to breathe again. Isn’t that marvelous, a true gift of love. I believe this is what Mother Teresa meant. I’ll leave you with one more of her meditations: “People throughout the world may look different or have a different religion, education, or position, but they are all the same. They are the people to be loved. They are all hungry for love” (Stern n.p.). God’s gift of love to us is great, beyond measurement; let’s share it everywhere we go and in every place we find ourselves! God is Good! All the Time! Deacon Marlyn

Lenten Stations of the Cross Project St. Mary’s In The Hills Church of Lake Orion will be extending an open invitation to the community during the Lenten (pre-Easter) season. Several parishioner groups are designing present day representations of the Stations of the Cross. Four visual representations will be presented to the public in the Fellowship Hall showing hidden and obvious injustices in the world and ways to be able to help. We will need volunteers to man the station for Friday, April 11 from 6-8 pm, Saturday, 4/12 6-8pm and Palm Sunday, 4/13 from 9:00am to 2pm; manning the stations for an hour our two would be a great help. A sign-up sheet for hours will be posted on the Fellowship Hall Bulletin Board.

Pledges! I realize that this is the worst winter we have seen in decades and that it has been difficult for some to get to church, but we still have to keep the lights on, heat the building and pay staff salaries. So, if you are behind on your pledge, please make every effort to catch up. If you never made a pledge, It's never too late and I will be happy to help you fill out a pledge card. It makes the life of the treasurer much easier when people pledge as opposed to simply donating. Thank you for your cooperation. Bobbi Patton 248 628-4428


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Crossroads Soup Kitchen Sunday Leadership Looking for a new challenge? Interested in another way to live out Jesus' challenge to "feed my sheep"? I am looking for someone to mentor to take over as chair of the Crossroads Soup Kitchen Sunday. Even though it is a big job, it's only for one Sunday. All of the shopping gets done in one day and the veggies get prepared in one day. (I will even contribute all of my clean litter buckets to the cause!) Seriously, this is a wonderful, rewarding ministry that "practically runs itself". Most volunteers have been going for some time and know what to do. I will give you my recipe for Split Pea Soup or you can decide to make something else. Please consider this ministry. I am not looking to get out of this business, I just want someone in place in case I get hit by a bus. Bobbi Patton 248 628-4428

Counters Needed We are looking for a few new people to help with counting on Sunday. This is not difficult and only takes a small amount of time. Chris Beach has designed a computer program, so, as soon as he shows us all how to use it, the task will be even easier! Bobbi Patton 248 628-4428

2014 CROP Hunger Walk The 32nd Annual Lake Orion/Oxford Area CROP Hunger Walk has been scheduled for Sunday, May 4. CROP Hunger Walks are community-wide events sponsored by Church World Service (CWS) and organized by local congregations, raising funds and awareness to the needs of people in our community, country, and around the world. The following describes some projects that CROP Hunger Walk funds assist:  

The CWS School Safe Zones Program has targeted 80 schools in Kenya and 10 in Burundi, enhancing children’s access to secure and stimulating learning environments, with a total commitment of $175,000. Food security projects in Tanzania, with a commitment of $75,000, including a sweet potato growing project assisting farmers in 14 villages near Dar es Salaam; an irrigation project in Mheza that has also provided 80 farmers with seed to grow crops, 30


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farmers with chickens and another 30 farmers with dairy goats; and a project providing subsistence farmers in Gairo with improved techniques for growing, and storing sweet potatoes. An integrated development project in Muong Te District, Lai Chau Province, Vietnam, providing $206,000 to assist families in a small town and three communes. Projects include education for elementary school students, development of libraries, hygiene training, composting and vegetable raising, and training on good nutrition. Basic education at Luang Prabang Orphanage in Laos (budget $221,375): CWS supports the orphanage and its nonformal educational activities for the more than 200 orphan children. Partnership Program in Battambang and Kampong Thom provinces in Cambodia ($184,572): The CWS Partnership Program improves the lives of poor and vulnerable Cambodians by strengthening the capacity of Cambodian NGO partners to plan, implement, and manage local development effectively. SASANDO, Indonesia ($356,000): CWS Indonesia’s Therapeutic Feeding Center provides care and treatment for children with severe malnutrition. Sustainable food and nutrition and security in Georgia, Moldova, and Serbia ($161,000): Various projects undertaken by CWS Europe that take an integrated approach to sustainable community development through improved and diversified agricultural production and increased workforce development and employment opportunities Water projects in Kenya and Uganda (100,000/per year): A multi-year program in which CWS East Africa and its partners will construct 70 sand dams, 6 rock catchment systems, 5 boreholes with solar pumps, and drill 10 deep wells. We will also be training local water management groups in each community in which one of the inputs is undertaken who will be trained in water system maintenance and water conservations practices. Lastly and most importantly, 25 percent of all money raised stays in the local community (FISH and Love INC).

The CROP Hunger Walk does all these things and more. Being a CROP Walk Hunger Team Member makes a critical difference in the lives of people who live on the very edge of existence. Our goal this year is $3,600. Please consider walking, strolling, or jogging the 6.2 miles or do the shorter route that is only 2 miles. If you are unable to walk, but would like to participate, feel free to make a donation or sponsor one of our walkers. Every little bit helps. It is amazing what a community of churches can accomplish when we all work together in the name of Christ. The recruiters for St. Mary’s are Erika West (248-894-7154), and Deb Lunney (248-391-0852), and Maxine Henderson (248-393-1906). Please see us and sign up to be part of our team. Help us bring back the Golden Shoe Award to St. Mary’s (last year, we came in second).


ST. MARY’S IN-THE-HILLS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 2512 Joslyn Ct. Lake Orion Mi. 48360 (248) 391-0663

Health and Wellness There is a new bulletin board in the Fellowship Hall with Health and Wellness information. This is being provided for our church family in an effort to promote health within the context of the values, beliefs and practices of our church community. Health is not only the absence of disease but a sense of physical, social, psychological and spiritual well-being and of being in harmony with self, others, the environment and with GOD. Healing is the process of integrating the body, mind and spirit to create wholeness, health, and a sense of well-being, even when curing may not occur. Health and wellness encompasses many areas and the bulletin board will be ever changing. Future bulletin articles will also focus on health and wellness topics. Please let me know what type of health and wellness, and/or environmental information is of interest for the future. Some of our parishioners are professional health care providers and will review all information for relevance and accuracy before posting. Ann Kovl, RD

April 2014  

St. Mary's In The Hills April Newsletter

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