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2015 - 2017

LISA KO S WA R A ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


OUR GUIDING PRINCIPLE WAS THAT DESIGN IS NEITHER AN INTELLECTUAL NOR MATERIAL AFFAIR, BUT SIMPLY AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE STUFF OF LIFE, NECESSARY FOR EVERYONE IN A CIVILISED SOCIETY.

“ W . GR O P I U S


LISA KO S WA R A B.Sc. Architecture and Sustainable Design, Singapore University of Technology & Design

TEL

(+65) 8687 7119

EMAIL

lisa_koswara@alumni.sutd. edu.sg

PROFILE I am an Architecture graduate who also has a passion for visual design and student organisations - I thrive in team settings and find group discussions enjoyable and fulfilling! I’ve been a learner of design long before I became an Architecture student. I think the design process is a sacred and beautiful thing - to witness the journey of an idea from conception to materialisation is one of life’s greatest delights. My interest in Architecture lies in the realms of Residential and Hospitality. Working so closely with the emotions, psyches and immediate needs of people is an incredibly exciting task!

E DUCATION+AWA RDS SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN Zhejiang University Asian Leadership Programme

HWA CHONG JUNIOR COLLEGE ASEAN Scholarship

NANYANG GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL ASEAN Scholarship


S K IL LS Rhinoceros

E XPE RIE NCE 16

SPATIAL ANATOMY

Intern Prepared drawings and renderings for the firm’s projects. Executed onsite data collection and subsequent 3D modelling

Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Autodesk Revit DIVA for Rhino

15 - 16

Publicity Director Designed publicity materials to represent the Student Government and helped devise initiatives to improve student communication

Adobe Muse

15

ORIENTATION COMMITTEE Creative Media Director Led a creative team and oversaw the production of all camp-related creative materials

CO MPETE N C I ES Effective Communication

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

14 - 15

Experience working in various student organisations

HOUSE GUARDIANS

Member Participated in the planning of hostel events and designed publicity materials and initiatives

Collaborative Design A for Collaborative Design modules: 3.007 Introduction to Design and 30.007 Capstone

16

Orientation Group Leader, Publicity Member Facilitated in the execution of camp activities and helped in the design of posters and booklets

Eye for Visual and Creative Design Self-directed pursuit and Freelance Work in Graphic Design and Art since 2012 Experience with Film and Photography in 2017

ASD CAMP COMMITTEE

12 - 13

HCJC HOUSE COMMITTEE

Publicity Director Designed promotional materials for events and publicity materials to improve student life


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ARCADE(S)

LAYERED DWELLING

SHARE HOUSE

PEEK-ABOO

CHAOS & ORDER

VOID JOINT


SUMMER 2017

A RCA DE(S) AN ARCHITECTURAL INTERVENTION IN THE URBAN HINTERLANDS OF GUANGZHOU with Mok Jun Wei under Prof. Calvin Chua


In the peri-urban districts of China is a populace caught in between forces of the old and new. While there is a prevailing need for these communities to stay economically relevant, there is also an equally important duty to preserve the unique village spirit and culture in the face of incessant change. The dichotomy between the old and new is especially evident in the village of Tang Cun - a management college lies in contrast to the cluster of homes. We think that for the village to thrive economically and socially, the two sides must be bridged and allowed to amalgamate. Thus came the idea of ‘learning arcades’ - avenues for the university students to set up temporary shops and test run learned theories, and the villagers to pick up modern techniques to benefit their existing businesses.


The arcade is defined by a series of columns - these supply the framework for platforms to be attached onto the existing buildings’ facade. The platforms are where students set up shops and, if they want to, live temporarily, and act as parasitic insertions to the village residents’ houses. This structure thus presents three different membranes for serendipitous encounters between student and resident to occur: on either side of the building’s facade are shared living spaces for both student and resident; on the platforms student and resident carry out their businesses; on the secondary tensile wire facade student and resident engage in trade.


FA L L 2 0 1 6

L AYER ED DW E L L I N G HIGH DENSITY PUBLIC HOUSING IN SINGAPORE under Prof. Yvonne Tan


Can the home be continuous with the urban landscape? In the age where social media invites people to put their lives on public display, the distinct boundary between the interior of a home and the exterior of it is perhaps unnecessary. This project reimagines the urban landscape to be composed of ‘layers’ and the home to be a seamless extension of it.

LEFT A study of how different views in the site at Yishun can be perceived in terms of layers. Views are obtained from the eight cardinal and intercardinal wind directions from the approximate center of the site. Background Midground Foreground Mass Void Greenery

RIGHT The built and natural elements surrounding the site are categorized into Mass, Greenery and Void. On the ground floor, commercial spaces are organised in North-South oriented layers, parallel to the MRT, and circulation pathways transverse these layers while and connect most frequented destinations.

RIGHT The residential block is organised in East-West oriented layers to avoid direct sunlight and mimic the existing urban fabric of the surrounding residential blocks.


TOP On the residential floors, Mass represents the units while Void represents the corridor and balconies. The corridor alternates between either side of the block to introduce a variety of views. Greenery lie at the balconies, along the edges of the units.

TOP The ground floor houses a myriad of programmes. Mass represents enclosed commercial areas and Void represents open communal spaces. Greenery acts as a visual softener to the hard edges of the commercial blocks and provide shade to the communal areas. Circulation pathways allow a pedestrian to experience a variety of programmes.

TOP The same formal logic applies to the front elevation of the residential block: units form solid ‘columns’ that are held together by the floor plates of the corridors. Voids are introduced to allow light and views into the building.


In the units, programmes are arranged in a series of layers. Full-height windows provide views and visual connection to the urban landscape. Three unit types are present: a single storey unit, a duplex unit, and a small office home office unit. Each unit bears a unique permutation of programmatic layering, views and circulation. However, an overarching concept governs these unit types: at any point inside the home, one would be able to perceive the different layers of the home and its external environment - amalgamating the home and the urban landscape into a single entity.


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2

5

3

SPECIFIC PROGRAMMES 1

GYMNASIUM

2

HAWKER CENTRE

3

SUPERMARKET

4

PASAR MALAM

5

BASKETBALL COURT

6

GRASS PATCH

4 6


FLOOR PLANS OF FLOORS (FROM TOP TO BOTTOM) 12, 9, 2 AND 1


COMMERCIAL PROGRAMMES

GROUND FLOOR


R CIRCULATION

GREENERY SPACES


RESIDENTIAL UNITS

UPPER FLOOR


R CIRCULATION

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM


UNIT

SHORT SECTION - PLANTER WALL

UNIT


UNIT

PLAN - FACADE

PLAN - MULLION SYSTEM


FA L L 2 0 1 6

SH A R E H O USE PUBLIC HOUSING UNIT IN SINGAPORE under Prof. Yvonne Tan


In accordance with the rising trend of work-fromhome occupations, the design of this unit caters to the demographic of young professionals who desire a home where they can both work and live. This particular apartment houses six individuals and its spaces are designed to stimulate collaboration and nurture camaraderie that is typical of an office environment. In the unit, working and living spaces are purposefully separated from each other. On the ‘work’ side, a series of split levels define individual working spaces to cater to the residents’ varying occupations - however, the spaces are visually and audibly connected to one another, allowing the exchange of ideas and interaction between residents. Hence, an ‘atrium of collaboration’ takes form between these split levels, encouraging cross-learning between different fields of expertise.

WORK

LIVE


On the ‘live’ side, private quarters are minimised in size so that most of the living takes place in the communal area. This can be converted into an enclosed room through the use of retractable doors in the event that a resident’s family and friends come to visit and require a more intimate social space.

BEDROOM

SLIDE

BEDROOM


WORK SPACES

MEETING ROOM

BEDROOM

LIVING AREA

BEDROOM


SPRING 2016

P EE KA B O O FABRICATION OF COMPUTATIONALLY DESIGNED PRODUCT under Prof. Stylianos Dritsas


The project brief was to create an artifact that contains a computationally designed pattern that is irreproducible by hand. The idea was to create a pattern that seemed organic while being sufficiently controlled by computational parameters. A grid acts as the basic geometry for this pattern, which was later manipulated by a series of Grasshopper modules to “converge” at chosen points to form this seemingly natural pattern. The resulting product ‘reveals’ its contents at certain points - this could be a novel and environmentally friendly way to produce packaging for DVDs as it effectively protects the product from external damage while adequately displaying its cover art.

PATTERN DIAGRAM

PATT DIAG


TERN GRAM

I TERATIONS OF C ODED C OMPONENT

I TERATIONS OF C ODED C OMPONENT


SPRING 2016

C H AO S & O R D ER INSTALLATION WITH COMPUTATIONALLY DESIGNED JOINTS with Eunice Yong, Inez Ow and Pauline Siew under Prof. Stylianos Dritsas


With the elements of wood and cloth, a visual interplay of chaos and order is created. Are the cubes a container for the explosive form of the cloth? Or is the cloth a common fabric to the erratic arrangement of the cubes? This installation is a series of interlocking cubes made out of wooden dowels and held together by unique, 3D-printed joints that are produced with Grasshopper. The tensile fabric undulates through the spaces formed by these cubes, giving the installation a volume that is semi-transparent and ethereal.


SPRING 2016

VOID JOINT SPATIAL JOINT WITH USE OF WATERJETFABRICATED STEEL FINS with Ng Xing Ling under Prof. Stylianos Dritsas


The project brief was to design a joint that could hold together steel beam members at specified angles. To ensure ease of reproducability and construction, we have designed our joint to require no additional components - the steel beams themselves act as the main joining mechanism. Steel fins were cut with a waterjet machine and manually bent to achieve desired curvature.


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ASIL A R A W S OK ERUTCETIHCRA OILOFTROP

Profile for Lisa Koswara

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Lisa K Architecture Portfolio  

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