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nude food. Your food & wine feel-good fix. JULY 2017


Leave your home furnishing frustrations behind. On book stands now, The Open Book is the 500-page must-have guide to help homeowners navigate their way through renovating, furnishing or decorating a home in Malta. A compilation of reputable and recommendable options, insightful advice from those in the know, and solutions that can save a lot of heart and bank-ache, The Open Book helps you make the experience all the more efficient and well... fun. FIND THE OPEN BOOK AT ALL AGENDA BOOKSTORES, WH SMITHS (MALTA), AND LEADING BOOK STORES OR ONLINE AT www.maltahomeguide.com/openbookpurchase

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THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO DECORATING, DESIGNING OR RENOVATING A HOME IN MALTA

Created & produced by Lisa Borain


CONTENTS

Contents. 08 THE ROUNDUP Where to go, what to do, what's happening, and what new (in the local world of food).

54 FARMED OR WILD? A look at the pros and cons of the multibillion euro fish farming industry.

10 WIN WITH NUDE FOOD Dinners for two and a day at the spa.

58 POWER TO THE PRAWN Picking the freshest ones, making carpaccio, and the secret of prawn oil.

12 THIS SEASON’S STAR Sweet and succulent seafood and fish is this issue's main act. 14 FISH RECIPES Raw, pan-fried, grilled, you name it - seafood and fish ideas for every way of cooking. 26 PAN-FRY PERFECTLY Get that fish steak just right with these five steps. 34 SUMMER SWEETS Keep it refreshing this summer with these fresh fruit and herb recipes. 36 HERB + FRUIT PAIRING Don’t overlook your leafy fresh herb friends when you’re creating those delicious summer fruit recipes. 52 FISH: AN OVERVIEW What fish and shellfish are not ok to eat (sustainability-wise).

70 WINE ROUNDUP An update on events and news in the local world of wine. 72 STARDUST! A spotlight on vineyards owned by celebrities. 80 SAKANA {FISH} Rena Sasaki’s experiences of a Japanese fish market, a sushi restaurant, and what it’s like cooking at home in Japan. 94 CLAUDE. Chef-Patron of Palazzo Santa Rosa and the notorious local Neapolitan pizza-making Margo’s chain, Claude Camilleri is bringing us the best of both worlds. 102 THE INTERACTION SERIES An interview with Yasmin de Giorgio, which kickstarts Nude Food's The Interaction Series.

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CONTENTS

iV s i t u s ...for interesting food + wine articles, amazing recipes, fun quizzes, and the chance to win some awesome prices...

www.nudefoodmalta.com nude food. 6


CONTENTS

This fissue.. There's something about eating fish in summer; the lightness and pureness of it just seems to embody the season. It's the taste of summer for many of us in Malta, with octopus, prawns and mussels in abundance - from tiny rustic easteries to fine, elegant restaurants on the water's edge. Many have told me that they're hesitant to cook fish at home because they don't want to get it wrong. This is a missed opportunity with such a nutrientrich food source that's so widely available. As a nudge of encouragement to try it at home, this issue brings you a multitude of recipe ideas, but also offers a full picture on fish - from a complete overview to insightful how-to's. So please enjoy this fissue and make the most out of this glorious summer!

Claudio Farrugia Chef de Cuisine, Paranga

Peppi Peeva & Willie Bayou Head Chefs, Palazzo Santa Rosa

Producer Lisa Borain Photography Alan Carville Rena Sassaki Advertising info@nudefoodmalta.com

Contributors.

Mark Cauchi Head Chef, one80 Kitchen & Lounge

Publisher LB Publishing Ltd.

Rena Sasaki Feature Writer

Alan Carville Photographer

www.nudefoodmalta.com

COVER Spaghetti with clams, prawns & tuna bottarga shavings by Chef Mark Cauchi, One80 Kitchen & Lounge. Photography by Alan Carville. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced in whole or in part without prior written permission from the publisher. The information contained in this publication is believed to be correct at the time of going to print, however changes in circumstances may impact on the accuracy of the information. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure that the organisations and/ or individuals featured in this publication are reputable, the publisher shall not be held liable for the material submitted, whether photographic or written. The publisher does not accept liability for services rendered by the said organisations and/or individuals and no guarantee can be given that the said organisations and/or individuals will meet their obligations. Š LB Publishing Ltd. 2017

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UPDATE

THE ROUNDUP. Where to go, what to do, what's happening, and what's new.

1 MALTESE SAN PELLEGRINO YOUNG CHEF A signature dish by Chef Adrian Buttigieg called ‘Free-range rabbit, taro & forgotten carrots’ was selected for the semifinal group of the ongoing San Pellegrino Young Chef Competition, held in Tel Aviv this month. Chef Adrian Buttigieg, the Executive Head Chef of Le Meridien St Julians travelled to Tel Aviv to represent Malta. Malta's official San Pellegrino importer is Charles Grech & Co. Ltd. 2 THE KEY INGREDIENT We’ve discovered it! The key ingredient to cook delicious fish recipes: organic lemon essential oil by Marisilio. Available in a range, these essential oils are not only beneficial to our metabolic and digestive systems, but they also solve the problem of the availability of fresh seasonal products. Further, they offer the dish that bite that’s hard to put your finger on. Find Marisilio essential oils at La Coccinella. 3 SATCH: A BAR BY THE SEA Despite the fact that Malta is surrounded by sea, we have very few good bars right on the waters edge... which is why Satch is exactly what we need. Now we can enjoy the summer evenings with a view onto the sea that’s hard to beat. Find cold beer, spirits, cocktails, wine, a great atmosphere and good music! 4 NEW HANDY MINI SIZE San Michel is now available in a new handy mini size 33cl bottle. We’re loving this new size; it’s more convenient and easy to carry around for all day hydration. (It’s also especially suited to fit into lunch boxes.) Bottled, produced, marketed & distributed by Simonds Farsons Cisk plc, member of the Farsons Group.

5 THE OPEN BOOK Just officially launched, The Open Book is the 500-page must-have guide to help homeowners navigate their way through renovating, furnishing or decorating a home in Malta. Launched by the same publishers as Nude Food, this book is a compilation of reputable and recommendable options, insightful advice from those in the know, and solutions that can save a lot of heart and bank-ache. 6 SUNDAY NIGHT DINNER Palazzo Preca restaurant is now open for dinner instead of Sunday lunch for summer. The restaurant in Strait Street Valletta offers a broad range of Mediterranean food and an extensive wine list. 7 FUSION FRIDAYS Fusion Fridays at one80 Kitchen & Lounge in Mellieha presents the hottest nights happening in the north of the island. Alongside their incredible views and fantastic cocktails, the evenings include live music, a small eats menu prepared by Head Chef Mark Cauchi, and house infused gin & tonics. Admission is free, but booking a table is recommended. Can you think of anywhere better to be on a Friday evening? Tel: 2152 1637. 8 THEMED NIGHTS AT PALAZZO DE PIRO Palazzo de Piro in Mdina has your entire week virtually sorted for you; live entertainment on Tuesday nights, jazz on Wednesdays and BBQs on Thursdays. Their a la carte menu is also available too, so you have the freedom of choice. Tel: 2010 0560 | events@xaracollection.com

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win this issue; CONTENTS

LAST ISSUE'S WINNERS

WINNER OF A BOTTLE OF 'THE STORYTELLER' from Stellar Winery - Cabernet Sauvignon, courtesy of Hall Distribution: SUSAN ROBERTS

WIN DINNER FOR 2 AT PARANGA RESTAURANT Win a 3-course meal for two persons at Paranga restaurant, including a bottle of water and local wine. Enter to win at www.nudefoodmalta.com/win WIN DINNER FOR 2 AT ONE80 KITCHEN & LOUNGE Win a 3-course meal for two persons at One80 Kitchen & Lounge, including a bottle of water and local wine. Enter to win at www.nudefoodmalta.com/win

WINNER OF THE OPEN BOOK The 500-page musthave guide for anyone renovating, decorating or designing a home in Malta, courtesy of LB Publishing: SONIA FARRUGIA

WIN A DAY AT SANYA SPA Win a day pass at Sanya Spa by answering 'The Interaction Series' questions here: www.nudefoodmalta.com/interactionseries nude food.

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Dear Seafood Lovers, You’re in luck because this issue is positively brimming with it. Not only is seafood delicious, but it’s actually quite good for you (in moderation, of course). It provides essential nutrients (heavy on the B vitamins, as well as A and D), it promotes heart health, it’s good for the joints, maintains eyesight, it’s good for the skin, improves immune function, and it boosts brainpower. How often is a food this awesome this good for you? Not often, we say. Not often. >> This cooked seafood platter by Chefs Peppi Peeva & Willie Bayou at Palazzo Santa Rosa Photography: Alan Carville nude food. 12

Lobsters turn red when cooked because the boiling process changes the protein molecules in their shell into shapes that absorb everything apart from red light.

Zoologically speaking, shrimps and prawns are the same thing. Prawns are any of certain crustaceans of the shrimp suborder Natantita.

Clams live in the sand upside down.


FOOD INSPIRATION

A crab’s shell is really a skeleton on the outside of its body.

Mussels have been used as a food source for more than 20,000 years and have been cultivated for almost 800 years in Europe.

Yummy broad beans. See how on page 32.

Each ring on a scallop’s shell represents a year of growth, although a ring might also record a stressful incident in the scallop’s life. 13


FOOD INSPIRATION

THIS SEASON! It’s the fissue and we’re making the most of it - from fish dishes to be truly inspired by - to mastering the perfect pan-fry. >>

Photography Alan Carville

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Recipe for Beetroot Cured Salmon on page 44. >>

THIS DISH Marinated Silver Bream & Prawns with a Lime Dressing + Fresh Chives, served with Beetroot Cured Salmon with Asparagus & Orange Gel by Chef Claudio Farrugia, Chef de Cuisine at Paranga.

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FOOD INSPIRATION

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FOOD INSPIRATION

Roasted Meager Fillet

set on pak choy served with scallops in guanciale, caponata, rock salt shallots, beetroot gel, puffed quinoa & passion fruit sauce.

Chef Claudio Farrugia, Chef de Cuisine, Paranga Photography, Alan Carville

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FOOD INSPIRATION

Grilled Octopus with a mashed potato purĂŠe, crushed peas and candied tomatoes. 450g cleaned octopus 1 bay leaf 4 thyme branches 20 peppercorns 1 tsp sea salt, plus to taste 1 head garlic, cut in half 3 lemons 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method on page 45 >>

Chef Claudio Farrugia, Recipe page 46. Paranga Chef deonCuisine, Photography, Alan Carville nude food. 18


FOOD INSPIRATION

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FOOD INSPIRATION

Crudo of prawn & seared

scallops with a coriander dressing

Serves 1 Chef Mark Cauchi, One80 Lounge Photography Alan Carville 4 local medium prawns 2 scottish fresh scallops butter lemon leaves to garnish Dressing 1 red chilli, finely chopped 1 handful coriander, finely chopped 1 shallot, finely chopped 1 handful parsley, finely chopped salt & pepper to taste 1 juice of lime

Dressing method Make the dressing by chopping all the ingredients and mixing together. Taste for seasoning. Prawns & scallops method Clean the prawns by removing the heads and peeling completely. Make a slit with a knife on the back of the prawn to remove the grain. Go on to make a deeper cut so that you can shape the prawn into a butterfly. Lay it flat on a medium sized plate. Repeat the process for all of the prawns.

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Place a baking sheet over them and hammer gently. Place a non-stick frying pan on medium heat and add the olive oil. When hot, sear the scallops for 1 minute on each side, but do not season as yet. Add a teaspoon of butter and baste the scallops. Remove them from the pan and place them onto kitchen paper, then season to taste. Lay the scallops next to the prawn carpaccio, drizzle the dressing over, and garnish with some micro greens. nf.


FOOD INSPIRATION

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Spaghetti with clams, prawns & tuna bottarga shavings Recipe on page 46 >>

Chef Mark Cauchi, One80 Lounge Photography Alan Carville 23


FOOD INSPIRATION

"This is probably the simplest risotto you can prepare. It's extremely tasty and requires only a few ingredients..."

riso (50-80g per person) + prawns (100-150g per person) + 1 onion + 1 leek for the tartare prawns + 1 lime + basil or coriander + 1 tsp sugar

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FOOD INSPIRATION

Prawn Ristto with a Prawn Tartare Chef Claude Camilleri, Palazzo Santa Rosa Photography Alan Carville

Let us start with the tartare. Simply peel the baby prawns (Why we chose these? They’re local, fresh, cost far less than the big prawns, without ammonia, extremely sweet, tender, do not require chopping up, and they’re tasty.) Don’t throw away the shell, tails and heads. We’ll use those for two more things. Finely zest the lime and juice it. Chop the herbs. Throw in the teaspoon of sugar. Half a spoon of finely chopped fresh chillies might not go amiss. Add the prawns to the mix and set aside to infuse.

Add it through a strainer though to avoid any little shells getting into the risotto.

Peel some more prawns to add to the actual risotto. Now, here is the tricky bit. Use a fruit/vegetable juicer to juice all the shells, heads, tails and all that stuff you were about to throw out. A thick brownish/ red substance oozes out of the juicer. This is full of prawn flavours and will be added to risotto. Think of it as the home-made prawn stock cube.

Towards the end of the cooking, throw in the stock that was extracted from the shells as well as the prawns set aside to add to the risotto. Cook for a further five minutes. Taste for seasoning. Usually the seasoning is done at the beginning of the preparation, but it’s hard to tell how much saltiness the prawns will contribute to the dish. So adjust at this stage. No need to add anything. Just serve.

It’s not over yet. We can get out more flavour from the by-product of the juicing. Add the bits that were thrown out by the juicer to a litre of water and simmer gently. This stock will be used to add to the risotto.

For the risotto, chop the onion and the leeks extremely finely. We really want them to melt in the risotto. Sauté these in some sunflower oil. Then as usual, once translucent, throw in the riso and stir continuously. Once the pot is dry and beginning to stick to the base of the pot, start adding the stock through the strainer, a little at a time. Do not overcook the riso. It should take about 20 minutes.

Serve the prawn tartare on the side (drain the liquid and squeeze the prawns dry). The combination of the two makes for a pleasant contrast. nf.

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5 steps closer to panfrying fish

FOOD PAN-FRYING INSPIRATION FISH

PERFE Photography Alan Carville

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FOOD PAN-FRYING INSPIRATION FISH Pan-fried Sea Bream by Chefs Peppi Peeva & Willie Bayou at Palazzo Santa Rosa.

ECTLY > nude food.

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FOOD INSPIRATION TIP If the flesh is too thick you might need to continue cooking in the oven, but be sure not to over-cook

Local brown Meagre, Gurbell fillets, spring greens + prawn bisque by Chef Mark Cauchi, One80 Lounge {recipe on page 46}

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FOOD INSPIRATION

Get that fish steak just right. 1. Dry the fish skin. Fish skin is going to stick to a pan for one of two reasons: either the pan isn't hot enough or the skin isn't dry enough. Thoroughly pat the skin with a paper towel before seasoning it. (Don’t forget to season the flesh side of the fish too.) 2. Use a the right pan and make sure it’s hot. Get a heavy-bottomed pan (black steel or cast iron if possible) super hot, but don’t cook the fish on it straight away. Let it sit over a medium-high heat for several minutes before you start cooking. A nonstick pan will ensure that the skin won’t stick, but you’ll never get the skin to brown as well. 3. Coat the fish with a natural oil. Use a neutral oil, such as

canola or grapeseed, and make sure there’s an even coating on the pan. It should be just smoking when you add the fish.

4. Even out the skin. When you begin frying, make sure the fish is

skin side down in the pan. This will cause the proteins to contract straight away, which will cause the fish to curve upwards. As a result, the skin will only be in contact on the outside edges. Take a flexible spatula and press on the flesh until the fillet flattens out (this is a matter of seconds). This ensures that the skin remains touching the pan and will give you an evenly crisp skin.

5. Only flip once. As wrong as it may feel, let the fish cook; don’t keep

flipping it back and forth. When you see a nice golden brown colour on the edge of the skin, gently slide the spatula under and turn it over. The fish is most likely to flake and fall apart when it’s cooked, so be really careful with it. At this stage, the fish is about three-quarters cooked and will only need a couple of minutes on the flesh side. nf.

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250g

with a black peppercorn crust

k a e st

e t 1 +

s t 4 / 1 + t l a s n sa poo

tun a

Tuna Fish Steak

FOOD INSPIRATION

Season the tuna steaks with salt, paprika, lemon juice, and sesame oil. Then coat entirely with the peppercorns. Heat the sesame oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the seasoned tuna in the skillet for approximately 15 seconds per side for rare. nf.

By Chefs Peppi Peeva & Willie Bayou at Palazzo Santa Rosa. 30


juice

+ 2 tb sp s

o il

esa me

y arsel + co

ground bl a c k p ep p e r c o r

ns

sp paprika + 2 tbsp lemon

FOOD INSPIRATION

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FOOD INSPIRATION

...those gorgeous broad beans.... Chef Claude Camilleri tells us how to make them (and gives us a lecture on how awesome they are in general). “Broad or Fava beans are an amazing source of nutrients, vitamins, potassium, manganese and levodopa. Cooking can destroy some of these nutrients, so we should only cook them lightly, more to infuse other flavours than to actually cook them as such. You would need some sunflower oil, some minced garlic, mint, salt and pepper. Warm up the oil with the minced garlic. Once the garlic starts to sizzle, turn up the heat to full blast and throw in the peeled beans. Season with salt and pepper. Toss for a couple of minutes over the high heat. Some late season beans might be a bit tough, so they might require further cooking. If in doubt, test for tenderness. Remove from heat and throw in the finely chopped mint. Serve!� nf.

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FOOD INSPIRATION

“...we should only cook them lightly, more to infuse other flavours than to actually cook them as such.”

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FOOD INSPIRATION

SUMMER SWEETS KEEP IT REFRESHING THIS SUMMER WITH FRESH FRUITS & HERBS TO GIVE EVEN A SIMPLE NONCHURN ICE CREAM A BOOST! CHECK OUT OUR HERB + FRUIT CHART TO SEE WHAT THE BEST MATCHES ARE. AND THEN... GET READY FOR SOME YUMMY SUMMER DESSERTS >>

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The word ‘'cherry'’ comes from the Turkish town of Cerasus. They belong to the rose family. The first cultivated ones were in Mesopotamia in 8BC.

cherry

Best Paired With: HERBS Sage, chives, verbena DAIRY Sweet cream, ricotta MEATS Pork, beef

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DESSERTS

PAIRING FRUITS + HERBS pair

plums figs peaches apricot blueberries

pair

peaches cherries honeydew figs

basil

thyme

pair

honeydew Cantaloupe mangos

pair

berries citrus stone fruits melons

coriander

mint

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DESSERTS

Sugar, meet spice... Don’t overlook your leafy fresh herb friends when you’re creating those delicious summer fruit recipes. The lovely collision of sugar and spice is simple enough to master; you just need a general idea of which herbs pair best with which fruits. Check out our handy chart on the left to offer you a herb-fruit pairing guide at a glimpse.

Mint & mixed berry Smoothie Serves 2 1 banana + ½ cup blackberries (fresh or frozen) + 1 cup fresh raspberries (fresh or frozen) + 1 vanilla yogurt + 1 tbsp honey + 4 ice cubes + mint leaves. Method Place all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Add a few whole berries with a leaf of mint on top to serve.

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FOOD INSPIRATION

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DESSERTS

Strawberry & Yoghurt + Mint Popsicles 2 cups strawberries + 2-3 tbsp sugar + 3-4 tbsp orange juice + 1 cup greek yoghurt + ½ tsp vanilla extract + ½ tsp lemon juice + mint leaves + honey Method Begin with the strawberry compote by heating the orange juice and sugar in a saucepan so that it dissolves. Add in the chopped strawberries and let them cook for about 10 minutes. Gently crush the strawberries with a wooden spoon while they cook. Remove to the side and let cool. In a bowl, mix the yogurt, vanilla and lemon juice together. In the popsicle moulds, first add the strawberry compote and then add in a spoonful of yogurt on top. Place into a freezer for at least 3 hours until iton becomes Recipe solid.

page 47 >> Garnish each popsicle with a drizzle of honey and fresh mint leaves. >>

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DESSERTS

Non-Churn Vanilla Ice Cream {Make a delicious ice cream with only three ingredients - without a fancy ice cream maker!}

Serves 4 Cook Elisabeth Cardona

1 pint of heavy cream + 395g can of sweetened condensed milk + vanilla of choice (1 tbsp vanilla extract or 1 vanilla bean) Method Whip the cream with a hand mixer or mixer until stiff peaks form. Separately, mix the condensed milk and vanilla together. (If using a vanilla bean, slice the pod in half lengthwise with a paring knife and scrape the seeds out using the dull edge of the knife.) Then, with the mixer on low speed, slowly pour the vanilla/milk mixture into the whipped heavy cream. Once combined, transfer the mixture into a freezer-safe container and wait at least 6 hours for the ice cream to freeze. >>

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FOOD INSPIRATION

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FOOD INSPIRATION

Mini Angel Food Cakes Serves 8 For the cakes 1 cup + 1 tbsp cake flour* 1½ cups sugar 12 large egg whites, room temperature 1 tbsp warm water ½ tsp coarse salt 1½ tsp baking soda 1 tsp pure vanilla extract blueberries for garnish For the glaze 6 cups confectioners’ sugar ¾ cup lemon juice * To make cake flour, see recipe method. >>

Full recipe on page 48 >> nude food. 43


recipes.

RECIPES

BEETROOT CURED SALMON (PAGE 14) Chef Claudio Farrugia, Chef de Cuisine at Paranga For the cure 1 cup of sea salt 1 cup sugar 2 medium-sized beetroot (chopped & pulverised in food processor) 2 tbsp fennel seed (toasted) handful fresh dill (chopped) For the salmon 1 salmon fillet (de-skinned) Âź cup vodka Method Mix all of the cure ingredients together in a dish until combined. Pour a quarter of a cup of sugar with the vodka over both sides of the salmon.

Place a stretch of cellophane or parchment paper on a large rimmed cookie sheet. Scoop a few spoonfuls of the cure on top. Lay the salmon on top and coat the remainder of the cure on to the salmon, covering it entirely. Fold up the cellophane/parchment paper to make a neat bundle. Place a chopping board or even weight on top which will help the salmon seep out the dampness, then refrigerate. Check on the salmon periodically over the following 24 hours - 3 day curing time. Flow off the liquid when it builds up. (The longer left, the more the red colour will be enhanced). When ready to serve, wash the salmon off under the kitchen sink, and blot it with a paper towel.

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RECIPES

GRILLED OCTOPUS (PAGE 18) Chef Claudio Farrugia, Chef de Cuisine at Paranga 450g cleaned octopus 1 bay leaf 4 thyme branches 20 peppercorns 1 tsp sea salt, plus to taste 1 head garlic, cut in half ½ lemon 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil freshly ground black pepper, to taste

90 minutes, or until the octopus is tender (depending on whether you’re using two smaller octopi or 1 large one). Check whether it’s cooked properly by sticking the point of a sharp knife through it. If it goes through smoothly, it’s ready. Drain, discarding everything but the octopus. Set aside or refrigerate for up to a day.

Method Place the octopus, bay leaf, thyme, peppercorns, 1 teaspoon of salt, garlic, and lemon in a saucepan along with water to cover. Turn the heat to medium, cover, and bring to a boil. Adjust the heat so that the liquid simmers slowly, and cook for 30 to

Preheat a gas grill or start a hot charcoal or wood fire. Place the grill rack about 10cm away from the heat source. Cut the octopus into large serving pieces, brush it with half the olive oil, and sprinkle it with salt and pepper. Grill it quickly until the outside browns, but the inside is not dried out. Brush the octopus with the remaining olive oil. Serve with a mashed potato puree, crushed peas and candied tomatoes. >>

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RECIPES Cook for 1-2 minutes and then serve with the shaved Bottarga and parsley. *Tuna Bottarga can be bought as a whole piece or ready grated in small sachets.

SPAGHETTI WITH CLAMS, PRAWNS & TUNA BOTTARGA SHAVINGS (PAGE 22) Serves 1 Chef Mark Cauchi, one80 Lounge 200g spaghetti 8-10 vongole veraci 5-6 red king prawns (no 3), peeled tuna bottarga shavings* 1 tsp garlic, chopped ½ tsp capers, chopped 1 cup white wine ½ tsp parsley, chopped ½ tsp mint, chopped 6 cherry tomatoes 1 cup fish stock Method Boil the pasta. Place all the ingredients in a frying pan on a medium heat and add the olive oil, garlic and capers, but do not brown. Add the vongole and prawns, toss well and then add the wine. Reduce by half and add the fish stock and herbs. As soon as the pasta is nearly cooked, yet still al dente, remove it from the pot and place in the pan with the rest of the ingredients.

LOCAL BROWN MEAGRE, GURBELL FILLETS, SPRING GREENS + PRAWN BISQUE (PAGE 28) Serves 1 Chef Mark Cauchi, One80 Lounge 1 fresh brown meagre fillet leeks, asparagus, french beans, peas and mange tout (other vegetables in season can be used), all roughly chopped

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RECIPES For the prawn bisque 300g prawns shells and heads 1 litre fish stock 1 garlic clove 1 bay leaf 1 glass white wine 1 lemon, zest 1 onion, chopped chilli flakes 1 celery stick Bisque method In a deep pot, fry the prawn heads and shells. Add the onion, celery stick, bay leaf and garlic gradually, and continue cooking. As soon as these begin to take on some colour, add the wine. Cook for about 5 minutes until slightly reduced, then add the stock and simmer for 30 minutes. Blend with a hand blender and pass through a fine sieve. Fish method While making the bisque, heat up a non-stick frying pan, add olive oil and fry the fish on a medium heat, skin side first (for 5 steps on how to pan-fry perfectly, see page 26) Do not touch the fish until its cooked half way, about 5 minutes, after which turn gently on the other side with a metal spatula and let it cook for another 5 minutes (tip: if the flesh is too thick you might need to continue cooking in oven, but be sure not to overcook). Place the vegetables in the boiling water for 3 minutes and remove. To plate, place 2 tablespoons of the prawn bisque in a bowl. Place the vegetables on the sauce. Then place the cooked fish on top - and serve.

SELF-CHURN VANILLA ICE CREAM (PAGE 40) Serves 4 Chef Elisabeth Cardona “The vanilla beans offer a much more robust vanilla flavour, and it’s thrilling to see those tiny little flecks of vanilla running throughout the ice cream.” 1 pint heavy cream 395g can sweetened condensed milk Vanilla of choice (1 tbsp vanilla extract or 1 vanilla bean) Method Whip the cream with a hand mixer or mixer until stiff peaks form. Separately, mix the condensed milk and vanilla together. (If using a vanilla bean, slice the pod in half lengthwise with a paring knife and scrape the seeds out using the dull edge of the knife.) Then, with the mixer on low speed, slowly pour the vanilla/milk mixture into the whipped heavy cream. Once combined, transfer the mixture into a freezersafe container and wait at least 6 hours for the ice cream to freeze. >>

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RECIPES Beat the egg whites and the warm water with a mixer on low speed until the mixture is foamy. Add the salt, baking soda, and vanilla. Increase the speed to medium, beating until soft peaks form, about 3 minutes. With the mixer running, add the remaining three quarters of a cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well after each. Increase the speed to high, beating for about 2 minutes, until stiff peaks form - but make sure that the egg-white mixture is still glossy, not dry. Transfer to a large bowl. Sift the flour mixture over the egg-white mixture in 6 additions, folding gently after each. Pour the batter into a pastry bag. Cut off the tip, and pipe the batter into 1-cup mini angel food cake pans, filling each three-fourths full. Gently run the tip of a knife or skewer through batter to remove air bubbles that may have formed when piping. Bake for approximately 25 to 30 minutes, until the cakes have turned a golden brown colour and spring back when touched.

MINI ANGEL FOOD CAKES (PAGE 42) Serves 8 For the cakes 1 cup + 1 tbsp cake flour* 1½ cups sugar 12 large egg whites, room temperature 1 tbsp warm water ½ tsp coarse salt 1½ tsp baking soda 1 tsp pure vanilla extract blueberries for garnish

Place the cake pans upside down on a wire rack, and let them cool for 1 hour. Carefully run a paring knife around sides of cakes to loosen, then flip them over to remove them from the tins. To make the glaze, whisk the confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice together in a bowl until smooth. If not using immediately, cover with plastic wrap, pressing it directly on the surface, and let stand at room temperature. Whisk until the glaze is smooth before using.

For the glaze 6 cups confectioners’ sugar ¾ cup lemon juice

To assemble, spoon some glaze over each cake and adorn with fresh blueberries.

* To make cake flour, see the end of method. . Method Preheat the oven to 160°C, with the rack positioned in the lower third of the oven. Sift the flour and three quarters of a cup of sugar into a medium bowl. Repeat the sifting four times.

* Make cake flour by measuring 1 cup of allpurpose flour. Remove 2 tablespoons of the allpurpose flour and place it back in the flour bag. Replace the removed all-purpose flour with 2 tablespoons of cornstarch. Sift up to 5 times to help thoroughly combine the mixture and to lighten and aerate the flour. nf.

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FISH FOCUS

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FISH FOCUS

Farmed or wild? Frozen or fresh? Sustainable or endangered? Nude Food takes you through the ins and outs of fish available today. >>

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FISH FOCUS

An overview. What Fish & Shellfish Are Not Ok To Eat

(sustainability-wise).

18 27 Halibut

67 Salmon

Herring

Dungeness Crab

Spider Crab Seabass (line & gilnet)

Sardine

Red Mullet Sardine Mackerel

Halibut

34

Spiny Lobster

Squid

Seabass (trawl) Yellowfin Tuna

77 Salmon

Anchovy

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47 Chilean Seabass

From fish that are abundant, well managed and caught in an environmentally friendly way - to vunerable or endangered species, caught or farmed in harmful ways, this graphic shows you which fish and shellfish from different parts of the world are okay or not okay to keep fishing.

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FISH FOCUS Which fish are ok to eat? Abundant, well managed or caught in an environmentally friendly way. Fish are flagged for concern and state of the stock is unknown. Vulnerable or endangered species, caught or farmed in harmful ways.

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King Crab

Spiny Lobster

FOA Fishing Zones 67 NORTHWEST PACIFIC

Tiger Prawns

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77 EASTERN CENTRAL PACIFIC 87 SOUTHEAST PACIFIC 18 ARCTIC SEA

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34 EASTERN CENTRAL ATLANTIC

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27 NORTHEAST ATLANTIC Langoustine

Seabass

47 SOUTHEAST ATLANTIC

Dolphinfish

Bluefin Tuna Red Prawns

37 MEDITERRANEAN & BLACK SEA

Red Mullet

51 WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN

Anchovy

57 EASTERN INDIAN OCEAN Grouper

61 NORTHWEST PACIFIC 71 WESTERN CENTRAL PACIFIC

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FISH FOCUS

Farmed or Wild? Today, the $78 billion fish farming (aquaculture) industry supplies nearly 40% of the seafood we eat and is growing faster than any other agricultural sector. While it has become a popular way to produce fish for the ever-growing demand, there have been questions raised about the sustainability of the practice and whether it’s an ecologically-friendly method of cultivating food sources. Nude Food takes a look at the pros and cons. nude food. 54


FISH FOCUS

F

ish farming has been practiced for millennia, from Pre-Columbian fish traps in the Amazon basin to carp ponds on ancient Chinese farms. Today, fish farming is already producing 50% of the fish used for human consumption and people will continue to depend on it for food sources as populations increase. Farming produces a wide variety of both freshwater and saltwater fin fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. Farmed species include salmon, shrimp, carp, trout, eels, tuna, crabs, crayfish, mussels, oysters, and even plants such as seaweed. Some species spend their entire lives on the farm, while others are captured and raised to maturity there. It’s still not yet widely known among scientists or fish farmers what the true impact of these fish farms will be on the local ecosystems, especially if the fish being introduced aren’t native to the area.>>

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AQUACULTURE +1 SPARES WILD FISH With over 70% of today’s world fish stocks either fully exploited or overfished, responsible fish farming can be seen as a way to satisfy the world’s growing appetite for healthy fish, and at the same time a means of sparing wild fish populations, allowing their numbers to rebound.

+

+2 RELIABLE FOOD SOURCE As populations rise all over the world, so has the demand for food. Fish is a nutritious high quality food source with essential oils for people of all ages. +3 AVAILABILITY Fish farms can be installed almost anywhere if there is a clean source of water. They can also can be combined with irrigation practices. Combining fish farming with irrigation reduces costs for businesses, while providing water and fish as a food source for the surrounding area. This makes fish farming an attractive option for areas with both water and food shortage problems.

PROS

+4 PROVIDES EMPLOYMENT Fish farming provides a living for thousands of farmers and fishermen who have seen their usual crops lose value and their catches disappear. +5 EFFECTIVE LAND USE Effective use of marginal land (land that’s too poor or too costly to drain for agriculture) can be profitably devoted to fish farming, provided it’s suitably prepared.

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Pros & Cons -1 CONTAMINATION The crowding together of thousands of fish in an artificial environment can produce toxic micro organisms from the vast amount of faeces, uneaten food, and dead fish. These waste products are often flushed untreated to the area, which then infects local fish, putting them at risk of being killed off.

At a glance: The good and the not so good sides of fish farming (a.k.a. aquaculture).

-2 PESTICIDES Pesticides and veterinary drugs that have been used in an effort to treat the pests and diseases that afflict fish in these highly concentrated numbers are also often flushed into the sea. These chemicals affect the entire aquatic ecosystem. -3 UNBALANCE Food for the fish in the farms often consists of fish products derived from small ocean fish. This is straining wild fish stocks, unbalancing the food chain in the wild. -4 ECOSYSTEM ALTERATIONS Worldwide coastal areas have seen habitat and ecosystem alterations in order to accommodate fish farms.

CONS

-5 PEST INFESTATION Pests such as sea lice (tiny crustaceans that prey on fish) proliferate in fish farms and spread out to afflict wild fish. nude food. 57


Power to the Prawn. PRAWNS

Okay, so they’re good and bad for you. Prawns are a good source of unsaturated fat, which makes up the majority of its fat content. (Unsaturated fats can help improve your blood cholesterol levels when you eat them in place of saturated or trans fats.) Unlike other shellfish, they’re also a good source of omega-3 fatty acids (the essential fatty acids that your body doesn’t produce). Omega-3s can reduce inflammation and your risk of heart disease, cancer and arthritis, as well as help with brain function. While prawns are a low-fat food and contain lots of healthy fats, they’re also quite rich in cholesterol. We love them anyway. Here’s how to pick the freshest and best ones, clean them, and how to make extraordinarily flavoursome prawn oil. >>

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PRAWNS

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FISH FOCUS

“So it doesn’t mean that the prawns are off, but it does mean that they’re not at peak freshness...”

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PRAWNS How to Select the Best Prawns. Selecting fresh prawns is paramount. It can be pretty confusing, particularly choosing amongst all the different varieties. For frozen prawns, the information on the labels doesn’t offer much help. Prawns go bad quickly, so it’s important to know how to pick out the freshest available for taste and texture (and safety). To begin with, if buying from a fishmonger, ask if you can smell the prawns. Check for an ammonia scent; this is the first sign of spoilage. Inspect them to make sure they’re not slimy or falling apart, both of which are signs of decay. A more advanced sign if you’re buying prawns with the heads on: look for black spots on the head first, then the body. This is a good indicator that they’re not at optimal freshness. The black spots are called melanosis and are the result of the same oxidation process that turns your apples and avocados brown. So it doesn’t mean that the prawns are off, but it does mean that they’re not at peak freshness. Most of the prawns sold in the supermarket and even at the fishmonger were deep frozen at sea and delivered to the retailer in that state. So the display of fresh prawns at the counter are often from the same bags of frozen prawns you find in the freezer that have simply thawed out at the fishmonger before going on display. Sometimes it’s even better to buy the frozen prawns from the supermarket and defrost them at home, since there’s no way of knowing how long they’ve been defrosted for at the fishmonger. If you’re buying frozen prawns from the supermarket, look at the prawns through

the bag and check for freezer burn. If you see it, move on to the next bag. Freezer burn indicates that the prawns have either partially thawed before being refrozen, or have been poorly handled during their freeze, both of which are bad for texture and flavour. In the case when you buy fresh prawns from the fishmonger, make sure you serve them as soon as possible for the best taste and texture.

Freezer burn; A condition that occurs when frozen food has been damaged by dehydration and oxidation, due to air reaching the food. A frosty coating of ice crystals over the prawns is a sign of freezer burn.

Chemical: STPP There are a lot of prawns that make their way for sale in Malta which include chemical additives designed to increase their shelf life or to get them to suck up and retain excess moisture so that they can be sold as larger prawns. You don’t want this. Check the label and look at the ingredients list. Sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) is often used as a preservative in prawns to help retain tenderness and moisture during storage and transport. STPP can also improve the physical appearance of seafood and retain water to increase the weight, and therefore cost, of the product.

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FISH FOCUS

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PRAWNS

Deveining. The thin, dark vein at the back of a prawn is actually its digestive tract (meaning that it’s the prawn’s poo). You don’t want to eat this. It’s risky, it doesn’t taste good, and it could also contain sand (which has an awful texture). If buying from the fishmonger, you can ask them to do it. However, it’s easy to do it yourself with a paring knife. Make a shallow incision right through the shell on the prawn’s back, from its head to its tail, and then gently pick out the entire vein, trying not to break it up. >>

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FISH FOCUS

Prawn Carpaccio 101 The flesh for any carpaccio needs to be seriously fresh. In our humble opinion, the tastiest prawns in the world are found locally. To make a carpaccio out of them is to truly extract their outstanding texture and flavour.

Since they’re not found in abundance, local red prawns are expensive. While they are definitely a preferred option for carpaccio, the dish can still be made (and well) with other types of prawns. There are loads of species from all over the world available here in Malta - and for reasonable prices. When it comes to complementing flavour in prawn carpaccio, Chef Mark Cauchi at one80 Kitchen & Lounge says, “Lemon and extra virgin olive oil work really well with prawn carpaccio. At their raw stage prawns have a sweet taste, so lemon gives them acidity and balances the palate. Having said that, how a person likes their carpaccio is very subjective - even the kind of extra virgin olive oil used makes a difference.” nf.

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FISH FOCUS

What’s the trick to slicing those prawns so thin? “You can ask the fishmonger to do it for you, but the method we use is to slice the prawn lengthwise into three pieces, and then gently hammer them onto the plate covered with greaseproof paper.” - Chef Mark Cauchi, One80 Kitchen & Lounge

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PRAWNS RECIPE

Grilled Prawns with a Cucumber & Tomato Salsa

8 fresh medium-sized prawns + extra virgin olive oil + salt to taste for the cucumber salsa 4 medium tomatoes, finely diced + 1 cucumber, finely diced + ½ onion, finely diced + 1 green pepper, finely diced + 3 cloves garlic, minced + juice of ½ lime + 1 tbsp red wine vinegar + salt + pepper to taste Method Season the prawns with salt, brush them with olive oil and grill them ever so slightly. Mix the cucumber salsa ingredients together and lay the prawns over to serve.

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PRAWNS

HOW TO: PRAWN OIL Prawn oil adds that full-on flavour that we can’t always put our finger on. It’s great drizzled over any seafood and is particularly good tossed through seafood or prawn pasta. 250 ml (1 cup) grape seed oil 1 small onion, coarsely chopped 1 small carrot, coarsely chopped 1 celery stalk, coarsely chopped 2 garlic cloves 1 tbsp tomato paste Prawn heads from 1.2kg prawns 2 fresh bay leaves 1 tsp whole black peppercorns Method Heat 1 tbsp of the grape seed oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and garlic, and stir occasionally until tender (4-5 minutes). Stir in the tomato paste and stir occasionally until the paste darkens (1-2 minutes). Add the prawn heads and shells and stir (breaking up with the back of a wooden spoon), until coloured (3-4 minutes). Add the bay leaves, peppercorns and 250ml water, bring to a simmer, and then add the remaining oil and simmer until infused (approximately 1½ hours). Ladle the oil from the surface into a jug (discarding liquid and solids), then strain the oil through a fine sieve (discarding solids). Refrigerate until it’s chilled - it’ll keep for three weeks. nf.

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WINE

WINE TIME! The latest wine news roundup, wine of the issue, and vineyards owned by celebrities (including the lovely Drew Barrymore’s Camel Road Winery). >>

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WINE OF THE ISSUE Petit Sale, Chateau de Roquefort The Clairette vines were planted in 1954 on stony, clay-limestone soils. “Petit Salé” (little salty) is the local name given to the Clairette grape. It refers to the small white dots present on the grape and also to its slightly saline taste. The bouquet is fine and floral with mineral notes and a whisper of white peach and lemon. Lively and precise on the palate, definitely influenced by limestone and flint soils... and delightfully fresh. “Green citrus nose. Grapefruit sharpness and bite, a saltiness and intense citrus fruit on the mid-palate. Some fresh herbs. Super fresh and crunchy crisp. Like salad in a glass... you almost feel virtuous drinking this!” - 17/20 - Tamlyn Currin - jancisrobinson.com

Grape varieties Clairette. Soil Stony, clay-limestone soils. Harvest Late, during the first fortnight of October. Tasting Colour Pale yellow. Nose Green citrus. Palate Grapefruit sharpness and bite, a saltiness and intense citrus fruit on the mid-palate.

Chateau de Roquefort wines are available from Philippe Martinet Fine Wines. www.martinet-finewines.com | Tel: 2703 0093 69

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WINE

THE WINE ROUNDUP.

Happenings in the world of wine.

1 MARSOVIN GRAPE HARVEST FEAST On the 13th & 14th August 2017 Marsovin wine producers will be holding Marnisi Under The Stars - The Marsovin Grape Harvest Feast at their Marnisi Estate in Marsaxlokk. As the event name suggests, the winery will be celebrating the start of the grape harvest for vintage 2017, whilst also giving patrons the opportunity to taste the wines produced from the Marnisi Estate in the idyllic setting of the vineyard. Tickets are being sold at €25 per person, which include: entrance, a vineyard tour, a wine glass to take home, and Marsovin premium wine all throughout the evening.

in Valletta from August 10th to the 13th. Each one of the four wine-and-joy filled evenings promises a great line-up of wine, food and music. “Balmy, starlit Maltese summer sunsets, delicious wines, great music and friendly hospitality, the Delicata Classic Wine Festival is all rolled into one.”

2 ARGENTINIAN DINNER Wine & Dine by P. Cutajar and Bodegas Trivento Wines are organising an Argentinian dinner on July 26th. The evening will consist of food, wine and a lovely performance by Isla del Tango, at Bottegin, Palazzo Xara in Rabat. The 5-course dinner will be paired with a selection of Argentinian wines from Bodegas Trivento. The price of the menu is €45 per person, including wines, water and coffee. Bookings: 7945 4538 / info@bottegin.com.mt

5 MINI BOTTEGA PROSECCO BOTTLES Bottega Gold is a fresh, crisp and aromatic ultra premium Prosecco with a pale straw yellow colour. Hailing from Venice, it’s made from hand-picked grapes. Now get the perfect twoglass portion from these 20cl bottles.

4 RIEDEL CLEARANCE SALE La Coccinella is holding a clearance sale on all Riedel decanters, glassware & accessories. Only limited stock available, so don’t miss out! La Coccinella, 65 Main Street, St Julians. F @LaCoccinellaMalta

6 GRAPE PICKING, ANYONE? As grape harvest time is fast approaching, local Meridiana Wine Estate are looking for grape pickers. Be a part of the lovely wine-making process! For more information, call them on 2141 3 DELICATA CLASSIC WINE FESTIVAL The 5301. Delicata Classic Wine Festival 2017 is back for its 16th consecutive edition this year, taking place over four nights at the Upper Barrakka Gardens nude food.

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WINE

Grapes + Stardust They say if you want to make a small fortune from a winery, start with a really big fortune. So it’s no wonder that a lot of celebrities are investing in their own vineyards. From vineyards owned by prolific film directors to professional golfers, Nude Food takes a look at some of the most successful ones. >>>

Fashion Designer Roberto Cavalli TENUTA DEGLI DEI Tuscany, Italy

Professional Golfer Ernie Els

Fashion designer Roberto Cavalli and his wine-maker son Tommaso make a great team with son producing reds with an intense bouquet and flavour, while designer father chooses patterns from his textile collection to create the labels. >

ERNIE ELS WINES Stellenbosch, South Africa

>

Former world number one professional golfer Ernie Els has a largely successful winery in Stellenbosch and has been quoted as saying that ‘wine is like golf - in both endeavours nature has the last ruling’. nude food.

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WINE Film-maker & Director Francis Ford Coppola

Actress and Producer Drew Barrymore and Carmel Road Winemaker Kris Kato partnered to create this fresh, lively offering. Inland from Monterey’s rugged coastline, yet still directly in the path of the ocean’s relentless influence, Carmel Road Winery creates vibrant Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Riesling. <

INGLENOOK Napa Valley, Rutherford

Francis Ford Coppola purchased the historic Inglenook property in 1975, intent on restoring the estate’s legacy of creating world-class wines equal to those that founder Gustave Niebaum and his grandnephew John Daniel Jr. made for decades. <

Actress & Producer Drew Barrymore CARMEL ROAD WINERY Soledad, California

Charismatic Zorro actor Antonio Banderas has always loved the history and culture of wine, right from his early days as a young actor. Anta Banderas began in 1999 under the name of Anta Bodegas. Banderas was introduced to the winery by a relative in 2002, and bought a 50% share in 2009, officially becoming co-owner and changing the name. > Actor Antonio Banderas ANTA BANDERAS Ribera del Duero, Spain

Actors Brad Pitt & Angelina Jolie MIRAVAL Côtes de Provence, France With outstanding wines vinified by the prestigious Perrin family, this vineyard owned by Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt has become highly successful. The rosé is the flagship wine, which is no easy feat in the Provence region, where the best rosés in the world are produced. > nude food. 73


WINE WINE Actor Sam Neill TWO PADDOCKS Central Otago, New Zealand

Rapper Jay-Z ARMAND DE BRIGNAC Champagne, France

Actor Sam Neill started his vineyard in 1993 with modest ambitions and first planted five acres of pinot noir at their original little vineyard at Gibbston, Central Otago in the deep south of New Zealand. Now, the original vineyard has now been augmented by three other small vineyards, sited in the Alexandra and Bannockburn districts of Central Otago. >

Now owned by rapper Jay-Z along with the wine-making expertise of the Cattier family, the Brut Gold is one of the most expensive Champagnes on the market, but is also amongst the highest rated. > When Sting and his wife Trudie first came across the Tuscan estate in 1999, it was in a state of disrepair. They lovingly restored the house, the outbuildings and the land to their former glory. Now, alongside the production of wine, they’re operating a farm shop, which is selling everything made or grown on the estate, including fresh vegetables and fruits, as well as the local salami. < Musician Sting TENUTA IL PALAGIO Tuscany, Italy nude nude food. food. 74

Actor Emilio Estevez CASA DUMETZ Malibu, California

‘Young Guns’ actor Emilio Estevez runs Casa Dumetz Wines with partner Sonja Magdevski. She makes the wines, he farms the vineyard and helps out inside. The pair focuses on handcrafted, smalllot productions that ‘reflect their creative energies to deliver a pure wine experience with pure intention’. <


WINE

Band AC/DC AC/DC WINES Australia

Train SAVE ME, SAN FRANCISCO WINE CO. California

Dave Matthews BLENHEIM VINEYARDS Charlottesville, Virginia

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TABLE

table talk. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer table settings: fun, crazy colour... and fish!

Colourful and fun tableware from La Coccinella. nude food. 76


TABLE

<

La Coccinella makes summer entertaining inspirational with their beautifully bright and fun ranges. 65 Main Street, St Julians. T: 2756 3031 F @LaCoccinellaMalta < If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like us... and forever in search of a quirky gift for yourself (or for him/her) check out the uniquely stylish and artistic range of figures and figurines at HENRI Luxury Gift Boutique. They offer a wide choice of other decorative items, tableware, furniture and much more. Outlets at Pjazza Tigneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Mdina. T: 2010 6306.

<

You can always trust Mdina Glass to come up with the most uniquely gorgoeous tableware. Above, vibrant handmade glass bowls, available in a range of sizes, colours and finishes < Dress your salads in style with handmade oil & vinegar bottles by Mdina Glass. Choose from a wide range of colours to jazz up your kitchen. See Mdina Glass items in-store or online at mdinaglass.com.mt

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TRAVEL Rena Sasaki focuses on fish this issue, bringing us her experiences of a Japanese fish market, a sushi restaurant, and what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like cooking at home in Japan.

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{fish} Rena Sasaki moved back to work in Japan six years ago after spending most of her life abroad in the US, UK and China. A lawyer by day, she has a penchant for eating, cooking, and all to do with food. Rena is currently taking a traditional ‘kaiseki’ cooking course in Tokyo, and brings Nude Food some striking images of her food adventures. This issue, Rena focuses on fish, bringing us her experiences of a Japanese fish market, a sushi restaurant, and what it’s like cooking at home in Japan. >> Words & Photography Rena Sasaki nude food. 80


TRAVEL

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TRAVEL

Being an island nation, Japan has always relied on the ocean for food. It is said that until about a hundred years ago, people in Japan were mostly pescatarian and ate much more fish and seafood than meat. The Japanese word for fish, sakana, actually comes from a word that sounds the same, but which refers to foods that accompany drinks: saka (i.e. sake, meaning rice wine or alcohol) and na (which can refer to food generally or a side dish). Until the Edo period, fish used to be called uo (another way to read the character for fish), but is said that because many of those sakana or otsumami (drinking snacks) — such as mentaiko (salted cod roe) and surume (dried squid) — were made of fish, the word for fish evolved to become sakana as we know it today.

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TRAVEL & WELLBEING

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TRAVEL

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Tuesday, 5:08am: A morning at Tsukiji Fish Market. The gateway for fish in Japan is Tsukiji Fish Market, which sits just past the glitzy neon shopping streets and Kabuki-za theater of Ginza in central Tokyo (...at least for now â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it will be moving to a new site in nearby Toyosu next May). Built in 1935, it is the largest fish market in the world at 23 hectares (or about the size of 13 football fields), and according to last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official pamphlet, it handles on average more than 480 types, 436,274 tons or 440 billion yen (US$4.01 billion) annually. This is about four times more in value than the Fulton Fish Market in New York City or the Paris Rungis Market. >> nude food. 85


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Around 3am on most days, as sozzled salarymen head home after a long night of drinking, Tsukiji Market opens and the auctioneers, wholesalers, middlemen and buyers prepare to trade in all kinds of fish caught in and around coastal Japan as well as around the world. 5am is when the auction area is opened up for buyers to inspect the day’s catch of tuna (referred to as oomono at the market, literally ‘big things’), which are laid out on wooden planks on the floor of the chilly refrigerated room. The buyers hover over the huge frozen tuna, examining the fish by shining a flashlight inside a flap cut into the tail, feeling the consistency of the meat between their fingers (the oilier the better) and generally confirming the tuna’s colour, marbling and texture.

At 5:30am, with the loud clanging of a cowbell, the animated auctioneer begins chanting the auction prices like a Buddhist mantra.

He speaks in a secret code that is only understood by Tsukiji insiders, and the bidders also use special hand signs representing numbers to communicate their offers to the auctioneer. The entire auction is over and done in about half an hour, and afterwards the prized tunas are carted off in a matter of seconds on dangerously fast turret trucks that zip off and disappear into the narrow inner roads of the market, ready to be carved up and distributed to the best restaurants in Japan and the world. >>

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TRAVEL

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Wednesday, 7:32pm: From market to countertop – Sushi! What better way to enjoy freshly sourced fish from Tsukiji than as sushi? Tonight I’m sitting at the counter of one of my favourite sushi restaurants in Tokyo. It’s a tiny little hidden gem in an area of east Tokyo called Shitamachi (literally, ‘downtown’ during the Edo period), just past Tokyo Station and west of the Sumida River which winds through this part of town. This mom and pop sushi restaurant has been a local institution for many generations, now run by Aniki (‘Bro’) the sushi master and his wife, Kaasan (‘Mother’). We start with a bakudan (literally, the bomb!): a colourful bowl with chunks of sashimi (usually tuna, squid, ikura (salmon roe) and crab), together with fragrant shiso (perilla leaf),

scallions, takuan (daikon pickle), kinpira gobo (sauteed burdock root with carrots), natto (fermented soy bean) and egg. You need to put in a bit of work to complete this dish — the salty sweet mixture full of umami is whirled into a gooey yummy mess and spooned onto perfectly crisp fresh nori (dried seaweed) and eaten by hand. The omakase (chef’s selection) dinner then proceeds, including everything from delicately marbled melt-in-your-mouth toro (medium fatty tuna) to parcels of sushi bejeweled in ikura (salmon roe) and uni (sea urchin), an intra-course snack of salted grilled prawn heads, and komochi kombu or herring eggs on kelp. Gochisousama-deshita! (Thanks for the great meal!) >>

Far left, The ‘omakase’ (chef’s selection) dinner includes everything from delicately marbled melt-inyour-mouth ‘toro’ (medium fatty tuna) to parcels of sushi bejeweled in ‘ikura’ (salmon roe) and ‘uni’ (sea urchin), an intra-course snack of salted grilled prawn heads, and komochi kombu or herring eggs on kelp. Left, Bakudan (literally, the bomb!): a colourful bowl with chunks of sashimi (usually tuna, squid, ikura (salmon roe) and crab), together with fragrant shiso (perilla leaf), scallions, takuan (daikon pickle), kinpira gobo (sauteed burdock root with carrots), natto (fermented soy bean) and egg. The salty sweet mixture full of umami is whirled into a gooey yummy mess and spooned onto perfectly crisp fresh nori (dried seaweed) and eaten by hand.

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Hamaguri no osuimono {Clam broth} TRAVEL

Serves: 2-3

{

These young sansho pepper leaves were foraged in the mountains of Myoko Kogen in Nagano. The little buds in the centre of the leaves are sansho peppercorn beginning to form.

200-250g hamaguri (common orient clam), if available, or any other clams • 500 ml water • 10cm cut of kombu (kelp) *see page right, number 2 for types of kombu • 1 tbsp sake (Japanese rice wine) • 1-2 pinches of salt to taste • A few leaves of ki no mé (young leaves of the Japanese sansho pepper tree) if available, or any other garnish such as chopped green onions, mitsuba (Japanese celery leaf or honewort) >

}

Thursday, 6:10pm: ‘Hamaguri no osuimono’ – The Clam Broth of Love. Clams are often seen as a symbol of good marriage and relationships in Japan, because each pair of shells fits together perfectly and uniquely, and no other clamshell will fit another clam’s half shell. In particular, the broth made from hamaguri (common orient clam) is typically served for the Hinamatsuri (Girls’ Day) festival, in the hopes that a girl will one day find her soulmate. These types of delicately flavoured and nourishing light broths, called osuimono or ushiojiru (literally, seawater broth), are also quite typical in formal kaiseki cuisine (a multi-course meal served as a part of the tea ceremony), but they’re also equally loved and served at home. >

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TRAVEL

1

3

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1. To prepare the hamaguri (or any clams) for cooking, rest them in a covered bowl of salt water (around 3%, to mimic sea water) for around 20 minutes to an hour. This will encourage them to spit out any sand or grit. The hamaguri clams pictured are fairly small at around 2cm wide, but some of the larger hamaguri can be wider than 10cm!

2 despite being very fragrant and full of flavour. Cut a section of kombu to about 10cm and lightly wipe its surface with a wet cloth to remove any dust or debris. There is no need to remove any white marks on the kombu, as this is simply some salt and umami that have risen to the surface.

heat. It is important to cook the clams slowly so that as much flavour as possible is extracted from them.

4. Remove the scum and bubbles that will rise to the surface as the kombu and clams are heated. The clams will begin to pop open. Remove the kombu from the pot. Once the clams have all opened, lower the heat 3. Soak the kombu in the pot with 500 ml of cold water. (If further. (Overcooking the clams 2. Pictured is dried kombu time allows, soak the kombu for will toughen their texture, so harvested from Rishiri, Hokkaido about 30 minutes before cooking remove and place them into the at the northern tip of Japan. so that the flavours and umami serving bowl before serving the Rishiri kombu is particularly are drawn out.) Add the desoup.) Add the sake and a pinch suitable for this broth and other gritted clams into the pot of or two of salt to taste. Serve in delicate dishes in kaiseki cuisine, kombu and cold water and boil a bowl and garnish with ki no as it is nearly transparent, slowly on low to medium mĂŠ. Meshiagare! (Bon appetĂ­t!) nf.

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Yasmin de Giorgio at The Grassy Hopper on St. John Street, Valletta. 92


PEOPLE

PEOPLE YASMIN DE GIORGIO STARTS OFF THE FIRST OF NUDE FOOD’S ‘THE INTERACTION SERIES’, ANSWERING QUESTIONS THAT WE’RE ALL ASKING, WHILE CLAUDE CAMILLERI TALKS TO US ABOUT HIS BABY - PALAZZO SANTA ROSA IN MISTRA. >> 93


PEOPLE

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Claude. Chef-Patron of the former fine dining Palazzo Santa Rosa, and then the notorious local Neapolitan pizza-making Margoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chain, and now the glorious Palazzo Santa Rosa yet again, Claude Camilleri is bringing us the best of both worlds. >> Interview Lisa Borain Photography Alan Carville

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;My job involved a lot of travel; there were many times that I had to fly to New York twice or even three times a week. It was hell. I hated it. My only consolation was a collection of Michelin and Zagat books. I chased every recommendation, every star, and as such, I gained valuable exposure to the finest food the best chefs had to offer.â&#x20AC;?

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Left & right: Cooked and raw seafood platters at Palazzo Santa Rosa, with giant prawns, razor clams, fresh Scottish scallops, organic Dublin mussels, and clams.

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“Creating Margo’s was a bit like Nirvana and Kurt Cobain doing an acoustic set. I thought it was going to be easy but it turned out to be so tough. It was a huge success from the go, and we simply did not expect the success. Pizza is probably the simplest of foods, the most humble, yet it requires such skill, such accuracy in everything that you do, that it’s really a discipline far removed from running a normal restaurant.”

Where were you in life when you first started Palazzo Santa Rosa? I was a lead Merges and Acquisitions Specialist in a boutique investment bank. I specialised in media takeovers, mostly cross border radio stations, network sales, and acquisitions. Not exactly a fine culinary pedigree. My job involved a lot of travel; there were many times that I had to fly to New York twice or even three times a week. It was hell. I hated it. My only consolation was a collection of Michelin and Zagat books. I chased every recommendation,

every star, and as such I gained valuable exposure to the finest food the best chefs had to offer.” I remember having this ‘moment’ sitting at Union Square Café eating this amazing tuna. I think at that point I realised that I was on the wrong path and had to go into the kitchen and prepare this food for others. From then on it was a very steep learning curve. I still hold on to my passion, my naivety and my innocence in the kitchen. I even fight with my staff on a daily basis (and vice versa) to always achieve the best, always challenging our routine. nude food.

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What was your approach to Palazzo Santa Rosa?

I always wanted a Michelin Star. Just one. It will be good for the island, good for the industry and good for local cuisine. Yet, when I was so close, I got cold feet and closed Palazzo. I know that we can get a Michelin Star. Maybe now that I am more mature, more aware, more informed, we can start that process again. We have set ourselves a journey plan that we are very excited about.


PEOPLE

“I remember having this ‘moment’ sitting at Union Square Café eating this amazing tuna. I think at that point I realised that I was on the wrong path and had to go into the kitchen and prepare this food for others.” Why did you decide to close Palazzo Santa Rosa and focus on Margo’s instead? Creating Margo’s was a bit like Nirvana and Kurt Cobain doing an acoustic set. I thought it was going to be easy but it turned out to be so tough. It was a huge success from the go, and we simply did not expect the success. Pizza is probably the simplest of foods, the most humble, yet it requires such skill, such accuracy in everything that you do, that it’s really a discipline far removed from running a normal restaurant. We’re not talking about something cobbled up in an afternoon, defrosted for the evening service. We fly in buffalo mozzarella from Caserta. We do a sourdough base that’s a blend of 7 different flours. It takes us weeks to prepare the dough to be ready through various

fermentation processes. We make our own ham, pancetta, sausages, smoke and cure our own meats and fish. The devil is in the detail. All of this required all my attention, especially at the conception stage. I could not dedicate my time to Palazzo anymore. I did not build a team to help me with Palazzo. No one spoke my language. What then led you to decide to reopen Palazzo Santa Rosa? Margo’s now is a mature franchise. I was able to put people in different roles and we have been doing so well. This allowed me to dedicate more time to my dream for Palazzo. I have had three false starts over the past years. So many people drive past, they come in and tell me, “I want to buy this restaurant”. It’s a gorgeous place with a very good vibe, surrounded by beautiful nature. We are

blessed. Meeting Willie (the Head Chef), I have met someone who not only shares my determination, but who is willing to make the personal sacrifice, who is willing to risk everything to achieve the fulfilment that this job offers. What can we start looking forward to with regards to the food at Palazzo? We have mapped out a journey plan for ourselves. Willie was a bit like a wild mustang at the prospect of haute cuisine; I wanted to enjoy the journey and take my time. Get everything just right. So we are starting off by being, to all intents and purposes, a fish restaurant. Our menu is divided into two sections: The Raw and The Cooked. I was inspired by the album by the Fine Young Cannibals of the same name. >>

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My kitchen principle is that if it can be served raw, do not interfere with nature. So I am a big fan of tartars, carpaccios, and raw seafood platters. We will be cooking any fish in front of the guests over a fire pit. We want to serve the finest fish, both local and flown in. Some of the seafood we are getting is simply amazing. It makes me want to gorge on it as it arrives. We have a very simple and short menu.

As always with my menus, I want people to laugh and share the humour. We really do not take ourselves too seriously. One night I woke up and thought, when I got to London for the first time in the 80s, the big dish was Surf ‘n’ Turf. What was that? It’s a man dish. Surely women don’t do Surf ‘n’ Turf? So we reinvented it with lots of humour for our dish. Still working on a Knickerbocker Glory for our dessert menu. No. We are not. Once the team gels, then we can evolve into our next part of the journey and evolve a style (which we already have developed) that will lead us to our

goal. We have this belief that food is a social thing and for that reason we will have only one table in the restaurant where everyone sits together. From there we will create a dining experience that is captivating and innovative without betraying our roots. We have posted some pictures on social media of some of our experiments and evolution of dishes and the response was amazing. If you were stuck on a deserted island and could only have 2 ingredients apart from the fish and the fruit, what would they be? Amazing extra virgin olive oil and vanilla (but please, do not forget the coffee). What is your single most favourite ingredient of all time? Chocolate. I do not like chocolate in the same way in which a woman likes chocolate. For me, it’s an anthropological journey to try to understand the relationship women have with chocolate. I am jealous of it. We use Valrhona chocolate and nude food.

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always have. It’s the most amazing chocolate, where you can choose from different estates from across the world and each estate has its own nuances, flavours, aromas. It’s a bit like wine, but chocolate. Favourite dish to make? Of course, I enjoy making pizza, but I do not have much opportunity to do that these days - though if I get the opportunity I take it. It’s fun, full of emotion, drama, and almost instant gratification.

Yet in the kitchen I certainly enjoy making bread and ice cream – no one does ice cream the old fashioned way like we do with egg yolks, milk, vanilla, fresh cream and sugar. It’s so rewarding. I like to do all the old style things – curing and smoking and making sausages. I love all that. I enjoy making baked rice for my kids – they love it. What are you best at in the kitchen? Screaming, shouting expletives... and desserts. nf.


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“For me, it’s an anthropological journey to try to understand the relationship women have with chocolate. I am jealous of it.” nude food. 101


The Interaction Series PEOPLE

Nude Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sequence of interviews answered by leaders in the wellbeing industry and the general public to help us gain a better understanding of the state of our mental and physical happiness. >> nude food. 102


Yasmin de Giorgio Founder of The Grassy Hopper, Sanya and Theobroma Cacao Collective, Yasmin de Giorgio leads the first of The Interaction Series. >>

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Interview with

Yasmin de Giorgio

Has the way you’ve thought about health changed since you were younger? Massively. When I was younger it was something boring, or for old people who had to worry about health. Now it’s all about my health as a tool to maintain my passion, commitment and enthusiasm for life. At what point did it change?

What is your approach to health in one sentence? Health is caring for our body, mind and soul so that we can be the best version of ourselves. What does “living a healthy lifestyle” mean to you? It means so many things. But ultimately I want to wake up every morning feeling good, strong, resilient and with enough energy to put into the projects that really matter to me. What’s one food trend that you wish would go away immediately? Juice fasting. What’s one that you’re glad is here?

It changed when I travelled to South America and experienced the jungle, superfoods and the creativity and inspiration that we can bring to the way we eat. What sources do you turn to in order to get updates or learn more about wellness? In the beginning I read lots of books, but now I try to keep things simple. For me, a high quality and varied vegetarian diet with some supplements works well and is in line with my yoga philosophy. Luckily my sister is doing a masters in nutrition, so I turn to her when I have questions. What’s one thing you do to make yourself feel better when you’re feeling flat?

Vegetarianism

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Mostly I feel flat due to overworking so I just rest and do more yoga and meditation. But I also love the Flu Fighter shot at The Grassy Hopper for when I need a physical boost. What do you eat to make your body feel better? It depends on the problem; going vegetarian made me much more aware of the variety that the plant world has to offer. You can literally eat a rainbow, so depending on whether I need more fire, or need to chill out, I adjust my choices. The Ayurvedic Dosha system is an incredible structure for understanding when to eat what; it’s my main framework for making food choices. Saying that, cacao is one of my favourite superfoods and go-to pick me-ups. Are there any old wive’s tales or remedies that you swear by? I swear by vitamin C to cure everything! But I love experimenting and giving my body a variety of foods. I make my own thyme tinctures, harvest aloe vera from my garden, and love picking fresh medicinal herbs from the Maltese countryside. nf.


PEOPLE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ultimately I want to wake up every morning feeling good, strong, resilient and with enough energy to put into the projects that really matter to me.â&#x20AC;?

W hat about you? we want to hear your answers to the above questions. Click on the below box to answer this issue's interaction series INTERVIEW questions, and you'll be entered to win a complimentary day spa for 2 at Sanya. CLICK HERE TO ANSWER nude food. 105


Organic and Biodynamic Viticulture.

“Green citrus nose. Grapefruit sharpness and bite, a saltiness and intense citrus fruit on the mid palate. Some fresh herbs. Super fresh and crunchy crisp. Like salad in a glass... you almost feel virtuous drinking this!” - 17/20 - Tamlyn Currin jancisrobinson.com

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Nude Food Magazine July 2017 issue  

The ‘fissue’ takes you up, down, and all around fish and shellfish, with dishes to dedicate yourself to, super informative articles that’ll...

Nude Food Magazine July 2017 issue  

The ‘fissue’ takes you up, down, and all around fish and shellfish, with dishes to dedicate yourself to, super informative articles that’ll...