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NEWS

TUESDAY / JUNE 21 / 2016

LIONS DAILY NEWS

BLIPPAR HELPS TO MAKE AR A REALITY FOR AGENCIES

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HEALTH UNLIMITED’S MATT LOWE: “OUTSIDE YOUR COMFORT ZONE”

Pharma hacks into innovation to help us breath more easily THE LEARNINGS gleaned from a series of open-innovation, crowdsourced and crowdshaped initiatives aimed at researching and developing treatments for, among other conditions, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were under the microscope at Sunday’s Health Unlimited session, Open Source Innovation: When Zeitgeist, MIT And Pharma Collide. Yossi Vardi, internet investor and entrepreneur, was joined on the Inspiration Stage by the brains behind the concept:

MIT Media Lab’s Tal Achituv, Sentrian/Remote Patient Intelligence’s Jack Kreindler, Novartis/Phorix’s Mark Lightowler and Health Unlimited’s Matt Lowe. In a global pharma first, Novartis’ COPD CrOwdshaPeD event gathered 50 innovators for a two-day investigative workshop, connected to patients via social media, to tackle many of the problems COPD patients face daily. Seven CrOwdshaPeD ideas were validated overnight by patient forums, with four then

taken into further development. Notably, global healthcare company Novartis did not request any right of first refusal to the resulting CrOwdshaPeD ideas. That, Vardi said, was integral to the success of the initiative and enabled an organic, goodwill community to connect and grow. It also kick-started subsequent Breathe Hackathons worldwide. “The term ‘play’ actually stands for doing an activity voluntarily that takes you outside of

your comfort zone without a predefined outcome,” Lowe said, adding that risk, innovation and disruption are key to phar ma and healt hcare remaining current and relevant. Kreindler said the CrOwdshaPeD event made clear that wearable tech providing personalised health data was no barrier for elderly COPD sufferers. Rather, there was a clear demand for consumer healthcare products “to be more Apple and Amazon than ICU”.   

So is curation an art or a science? ALGORITHMS or human beings: which is best at curating works of creativity for the public to enjoy? This question was the subject of an intense debate during Flipboard’s session The Art Of Curating. US writer and author Ken Auletta attempted to prize answers out of speakers Mike McCue, CEO of news-aggregation social network Flipboard, and Adam Weinberg, the Alice Pratt Brown director

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FLIPBOARD’S MIKE MCCUE: “PEOPLE ARE BEST AT MAKING JUDGMENTS”

of the Whitney Museum of American Art. McCue argued that algor i t h m s a r e r e l i a b l e fo r selecting the most thoughtprovoking and popular magazine articles for Flipboard’s subscribers. Yet, he also ag reed algor it hms without human input left something to be desired: “Silicon Valley thinks of algorithms as powerful so they are becoming smarter. But that leaves out the fact

LIPPAR has launched a new suite of DIY creation tools to help agencies tap into the rapidly expanding augmented reality (AR) market, boost their marketing firepower and shape the way people connect with the world, with brands and with each other. “AR is coming of age,” said Ambarish Mitra, Blippar’s co-founder and CEO. “With the launch of the Beta Programme, Blippar aims to democratise AR by putting it into the hands of agencies, and helping them drive growth through AR — a market forecast to be worth $120bn by 2020. It’s a unique opportunity for agencies to be at the forefront of innovation and drive this new behaviour.” The new Beta Programme will make AR more easily deliverable. It includes a new version of Blippar’s Blippbuilder tool, which enables the creation of AR content with no coding skills required, and the Blippar API suite, a tool for advanced programmers. This will enable agencies to apply creativity to everything from brand storytelling to shopper marketing, as well as to flex both their creative and commercial muscles to push clients into new areas of brand building.  

BLIPPAR’S NEW SUITE OF AR CREATION TOOLS LAUNCHED IN CANNES

that people are best at making judgments.” When it comes to art displayed in museums, algorithms should not get involved at all, Weinberg insisted. “Curation is about someone willing to put decisions to the test,” he said. “That can be a lonely thing to do, especially if people think those decisions are terrible.” He added: “Algorithms are definitive while art is about humanity and sometimes that means making decisions that will not bring the most number of people to the museum.”  

20/06/2016 10:09 PM

Lions Daily News 2016 Issue 4 Tuesday June 21  
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