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Brand Profile Research: Zara Savannah College of Art and Design Leonardo Fonseca

 


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Table of Contents Executive Summary…………………………………………………………………………...…3 Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………....4 History………………………………………………………………………………………..…5 Mission statement, Vision & Values…………………………………………………………6-8 Company Overview…………………………………………………………………………...…9 v v v v

Brand Structure………………………………………………………………10 Financial Statements..…………………………………………………………11 Products and Services………………………………………………………….12 Fashion Level and Price Strategy……………………………………………...12

Distribution Channel Analysis…………………………………………………………………13 Operations…………………………………………………………………………………...14-15 Technology and Innovations…………………………………………………………………...16 Customer Profile………………………………………………………………………….17-21 Marketing and Promotion Analysis: v Advertising…………………………………………………………………..22-25 v Marketing……………………………………………………………………….26 v Competition………………………………………………………………….27-29 SWOT…………………………….……………………………………………………………..30 Merchandising Map: v Season Trends……..……………………………………………………………31 v Merchandise Mix……………………………………………………………32-37 v Store Visit…………………………………………………………………....38-39 v Sales Analysis…………………………………………………………………...40 v Merchandising…..…………………………………………………………........41 Recommendations……………………………………………………………………………....42 Conclusion…………………………………………...………………………………………….43 References.……………………………………………………..…………………………….44-46 Image References……………………………………………………………………………....47


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Executive Summary Zara, a world-renowned fashion retailer, has been known because of the wide variety of clothing offered for all publics. Aiming to please all their customers, the store ranges in selling apparel and accessories for men, women and children. The Company defined what is now known as “Instant Fashion”, a trend now trying to be followed by major retailers. Zara has learned to overcome the challenges faced of the fashion world, making them highly competent. They respond to the future trends to come about and influence current trends to another level. Their worldwide expansions are a great example of what they have achieved and what’s to expect. The report includes Zara’s beginnings and their approach to the retail industry. It states its mission, vision and values as Inditex’s most selling company. It also emphasizes on its strengths, brand structure, financial achievements and product inquiry. Included are also pricing, promotion, marketing, distribution, location strategies, merchandising mix and competitions. The information found from various sources gives a better insight into the company’s success and effectiveness, explaining how the company and their stores operate and how it continually stays active with its goal to offer the latest trends in the fashion industry at lower costs.


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Introduction Zara has been known for becoming the world’s largest retailer. With over 2,000 Zara Stores opening in more than 88 countries, Zara is renowned for offering budget interpretations of catwalk styles into its stores with incredible speed. Operating since 1975, Zara has been known as fast, fashionable, and it has been out to conquer the fashion world. The secret to its appeal is that, though shopping there is considered to be “cheap”, it doesn’t feel or look that way. They aim to bring added value to their customers through great, affordable merchandise and offer an excellent customer service. The Company concentrates on what they’re contributing in terms of design, price, store experience and exposing fashionable clothes in a prompt manner. Zara executes the latest trends in international fashion in a well thought manner. One of its most important matters is to challenge themselves to always meet the customer’s satisfaction. Zara’s foundation has been constructed upon creating a special ambience for their customers to embrace the pleasure of buying into fashion. Zara's history didn’t start with glamorous beginnings or instant international stardom. The first store offered low-price products of popular, higher-end clothing fashions; with its success, Amancio Ortega began to open more Zara stores throughout Spain. After the company became successful in Europe in 1980, it started to expand internationally. Like their stores, the Company looks to encourage innovation and progress. As well as the fashion industry, it strives to be in sync with the always-changing trends and taste. Being top retail seller of its group, Zara is always looking for innovations in its products to enhance shopping experience and provide new designs at affordable costs made from quality materials, which follow latest trends.


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History Zara is a Spanish clothing and accessories retailer based in Arteixo, Galicia, and was founded in 1975 by Amancio Ortega and Rosalía Mera. It is the flagship chain store of the Inditex group, the world's largest apparel retailer. Based on an interview given by Mark Tungate (2008), Mr. Ortega and his wife saw a beautiful silk negligée with an expensive price tag. Ortega then decided to make a variation of the same number and enamored his wife with his creation. They then started their own small business of glamorous but affordable nightwear. He opened the first branch of Zara in 1975. Originally, the store was to be called Zorba, after the character played by Ortega’s favorite actor, Anthony Quinn, in the film Zorba the Greek. He couldn’t obtain permission to use the name because there was a local bar close by with the same name and he knew this would create some confusion. Ortega then started to play with the letters until he arrived at the name “Zara”, which to him and his wife sounded exotic and feminine. Although it is supposed to be correctly pronounced as “Thara” because of the Spanish language, its current pronunciation has become acceptable. The store became a success and grew through Spain steadily throughout the 1980’s. Its first store outside of Spain opened in 1989 in Oporto, Portugal. After this, Paris and New York followed and 10 years later Zara opened in London. In May 2001, the brand launched on the Madrid Stock Exchange and Amancio Ortega was sure to reach a status as a billionaire. Due to its rapid growth, Zara branched out and began offering clothes for men and children and now has other derivative shops like Zara Home, Zara Shoes and Zara accessories.


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Mission Statement, Vision and Values Zara views social and environmental variables as a strategic path. Sustainable growth is a value that the company shares and applies to all its relationship, both suppliers and customers. Due to the fact that Zara is the biggest seller for Inditex, the company states that their goal is to “offer products of the highest quality to all its customers at the same time as striving to develop a business that is sustainable”. Inditex also specifies that they have a “Code of Conduct and Responsible Practices that stipulates the binding principles that apply in each and every area of the Group's operations both within the company and with the partners we work with”. The mission of the company is to also give customers an exclusive choice of fashion. Zara’s Mission Statement, acquired from their homepage Zara.com, expresses the following: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: Through Zara’s business model, we aim to contribute to the sustainable development of society and that of the environment with which we interacts. The company's commitment to the environment is included in Inditex Group’s Corporate Responsibility Statement, published on our website: www.inditex.com. The following are some of the objectives and actions included in the framework of the group's environmental commitment and have a direct impact on our shops and customers: AT THE STORE • • • •

We save energy. The eco-friendly shop. We produce less waste, and recycle. Our commitment extends to all our staff.


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An environmentally aware team.

We save energy. The eco-friendly store. We are implementing an eco-friendly management model in our shops in order to reduce energy consumption by 20%, introducing sustainability and efficiency criteria. This management model sets out measures to be applied to all processes, including the design of the shop itself, the lighting, heating and cooling systems and the possibility of recycling furniture and decoration. We produce less waste and recycle. Recycling hangers and alarms, which are picked up from our shops and processed into other plastic elements, is an example of our waste management policy. Millions of hangers and alarms are processed each year and both the cardboard and plastic used for packaging are also recycled. Our commitment extends to all our staff. Increased awareness among our team members. We hold In-company awareness campaigns and specific multimedia-based training programs to educate our staff in sustainable practices, such as limiting energy consumption, using sustainable transport and modifying behavior patterns. WITH THE PRODUCT • •

We use ecological fabrics. Organic cotton.

We use ecological fabrics. Organic cotton. Zara supports organic farming and makes some of its garments out of organic cotton (100% cotton, completely free of pesticides, chemicals and bleach). They have specific labels and are easy to spot in our shops.


 

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IN TRANSPORT We use biodiesel fuel. Zara's fleets of Lorries, which transport more than 200 million items of clothing a year, use 5% biodiesel fuel. This allows us to reduce our CO2 emissions by 500 tons. ANIMAL WELFARE POLICY All products of animal origin sold in our shops, including fur and leather, come exclusively from animals raised on food farms and under no circumstances come from animals sacrificed exclusively for the sale of their hide. FRAGANCES Also, in line with our commitment, our fragrances are not tested on animals.


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Company Overview As mentioned previously, Zara is part of the world’s largest apparel retailer, Inditex. The Company, also founded by Amancio Ortega, is a Spanish multinational clothing company headquartered in Arteixo, Galicia. It is made up of almost a hundred companies who deal in undertakings related to textile design, production and distribution. The current chairman of Inditex is Pablo Isla. The company also operates other chains like Massimo Dutti, Bershka, Oysho, Pull and Bear, Stradivarius, Tempe and Uterqüe, and also a low-cost brand Lefties. Inditex is a pioneer among “fast fashion” companies, which essentially imitates the latest fashions and speed their cheaper versions into stores. Every one of Inditex’s brands follows the Zara template: trendy and decently made but inexpensive products sold in beautiful, high-endlooking stores. Ortega sought to break the mold by creating apparel that quickly responded to the changes in his consumer’s tastes. He also developed a distribution model the changed the global clothing industry. More than half of Inditex’s manufacturing takes place either in the factories it owns or within proximity to company headquarters, which is to say in Europe or Northern Africa. Inditex owns factories in Spain and outsources production to factories in Portugal, Morocco and Turkey. The rest of its clothes are produced in China, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Brazil, among other countries. Inditex makes about 840 million garments a year and has around 5,900 stores in more than 88 countries. Zara makes about 80% of total profit for Inditex, officially making it the largest selling chain of the Inditex group.


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I. Brand Structure: Zara stores carry three main woman lines: Zara Woman, Zara Basic and TRF. They also have Zara Men’s and Kids. •

Zara Woman is their higher-end line and features the above retail model. It is located in the front and against the walls of the store, it’s a more expensive but its merchandise has a more edgy feel and its own European style.

Zara Basic, true to its name, features more basic items with fabrics of lower quality. This line still has the European touch, but is less stylish than Zara Woman. It is found on the racks in the middle and back of the store.

Zara TRF is similar to a junior’s section, with clothing geared to a teen audience and quality much like the Zara Basic line. It’s usually in the back or tucked into a corner. Creative teams rather than groups of designers develop design collections. These consist

of designers, sourcing specialists and product development personnel. The teams work simultaneously on different products, building on styles that were previously successful. Designers are trained to limit the number of reviews and changes, speeding up the development process and minimizing the number of samples to be made.


 

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II. Financial Statements

Figure 1


 

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III. Product and services Zara is considered to present the newest and highest fashion concepts at affordable levels. It offers products from apparel, accessories, footwear and even miscellaneous merchandise for women, men and children, including newborns. Usually the merchandise is aimed at customers from the age of 0 to 40+. The store divides itself in 2 basic product lines: men and women’s. Each of the lines has 5 sub-categories in which they are distributed. The categories consist of: Lower Garment, Upper Garment, Shoes, Cosmetics and Complements.

IV. Fashion Level and Price Strategy Zara implements a low price strategy for the quality of clothes that they offer, making affordable products and selling them at a lower cost. They are able to offer it because of their own in-house merchandising and distribution system. Focusing on taking advantage on what a customer of a certain region would pay; Zara bases the price of their products through a supply and demand type of method. The Company changed its method of printing the different prices by country on one tag. This simplified the process of moving merchandise from store to store instead of having to retag all merchandise. Now it uses a device that reads bar code and prints the appropriate local price.

Figure 2


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Distribution-Channel Analysis Using employees for distribution isn’t Zara’s main way to ensure that the merchandise reach their destinations. A distribution facility used by the company has devices and machines that distribute more than 60,000 items an hour. Since they have their own centralized distribution system located in Spain, most of the garments move through the center weekly. The location receives shipment constantly of finished clothes from suppliers and inventory is sent to every Zara store at least twice a week. The shipments are delivered through Trucks and airplanes to ensure delivery. Zara creates artificial scarcity and lowers the risk of having stock it cannot sell by reducing the manufactured quantity of each style. The company reduced its design-to-distribution process to work ranging from 10 to 14 days. They also developed in-house team of designers, who began creating the clothes. Ortega’s focus on customer’s satisfaction was shaped through phases of the processes of his model. Design, production, logistics and distribution would be specific for the needs of each store. Zara is a vertically integrated retailer. Unlike similar apparel retailers, Zara controls most of the steps on the supply-chain, designing, manufacturing, and distributing its products its destinations.

Figure 3


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Operations Zara’s stores function as the companies face both the world and information sources. The stores are typically located in highly visible locations, often including the premier shopping streets in a local market (e.g., the Champs Elysées in Paris, Regent Street in London, and Fifth Avenue in New York) and upscale shopping centers. The size, location, and type of Zara store affect the number of employees in it. The number of sales assistants in each store is determined on variables such as sales volume and selling area. The store manager in consultation with the Section manager concerned and also Human Resources select personnel. Training is the responsibility of the section manager and is exclusively on-the-job. In addition to overseeing in-store personnel, store managers decide which merchandise to order and which to discontinue. They also communicate customer data and their own sense of selling points to Zara’s design teams. In particular, they provide the creative teams with a sense of latent demand for new product that could not captured through an automated sales-tracking system. Store managers receive a fixed salary plus variable compensation based primarily on their store’s performance. Since prices are fixed centrally, the store managers’ energies are concentrated primarily on volume and sales.


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Figure 4


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Technologies and Innovations Zara executives have invested in high-tech equipment and extra capacity that allows their factories to accommodate sudden production increases or changes. At the beginning of a season, a typical retailer would have placed orders for at least 80 percent of the garments it will offer, according to the Harvard Business School case study on Zara. Once the team selects the garments, the designers use computer aided design systems to refine colors and textures. Zara also used Hybrid Model Information. Information from stores to headquarters comes from combined human input and information technology. Store managers input the requested order of what the store needs through PDA’s and in return another group of “commercials” decide whether to allocate the inventory on that particular store or send it to retails where there’s a greater movement of goods. Such decisions are based on calculations from an application that tracks “theoretical inventory” of each SKU available. Inside the factories, IT is used for the production of goods such as large computer-controlled cutting equipment that cuts fabric in pattern using the most of all the fabric available. Distribution centers use much of automation and computerization that locates the products in the warehouse and supplies such orders. The IT department exclusively for the use of Zara created applications used in the DC. Then it relies on a global network of shopper-feedback to slightly alter their designs.


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Customer Profile The Zara Company identifies its customer as a person who is updated with the fashion world. Their customer has a strong desire to be fashionable and trendy at affordable prices. They can be a man, woman, teen and children who want to be up to par with what shows on the runways for the season. Since Zara’s beginnings come from Spain, its main influence does come from European fashion and their intention is to portray it to and through their customers. Like many companies, they determine what customers to aim to using segmentation strategies. They subdivide the segmentations to a customer’s sense of style; such as contemporary, classic, grunge, basic, etc. Zara also uses the typical approaches with customer demographics like gender, age and psychographics.

1. Demographics: •

In their company profile presentation, Inditex has an age target for Zara that goes from 0 years to 40+ years because they produce clothing for every age. Zara’s main targets are women, and their primary age group is from 25 to 40. They are looking for women that like low cost fashion. Their social status can be middle or upper class. The everyday woman that wants to go well dressed to work, be it either casually or professionally. They can be single, married, mothers or have no children yet. And they tend to browse through the store weekly or bi-weekly to see the new arrivals.

The company’s secondary target customer are the men who range from the same ages of 25 to 40, but this does not limit itself from selling to younger crowds for men and women. It aims at classic men who like to have intermediate fashion sense and learn


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how to mix casual and elegant. Included in this secondary target would also be babies and children who reflect their parents or guardians taste.

2. Psychographics: •

Zara customers can range from spending their weekdays working or having a lot of free time. They buy clothes that can be used for multiple occasions like going out after work or on weekends with friends and family. The feeling is classic but not too exaggerated. What they like about having Zara in their closet is the variety of options they have to wear for any instance. They are fashion conscious and they love it.

3. Sociographic: •

Based on the article “Social media and target analysis from a sociographic point of view” written by Stefano Maggi on his blog, the author explains that “The sociographic approach also highlights unique micro trends and people who are the main reference for the final target”. He also expresses what he feels is the right questions to ask when one studies a company’s sociographic target. These are:

1. Starting from core target, what are the main clusters (or the niches) we can split it into? 2.

Which channels does the target interact in?

3.

Does the target already have any kind of relationships with the brand's

competitors

and with industry?

4.

How does the target behave on social media?

5.

What bond is there between have with brand and product?

6.

What social elements can add value to product and service offered?


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Regarding the social media trend development, Zara has established a social media relationship to satisfy customer’s demands due to change in generation choices and the use of technology. It’s learned to provide direct social contact to the customers as per Newsletter, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, Flickr, mobile apps and customer accounts. Most people look to Zara for new clothes because of the constant use of technology, they are opting to use the newest outlets to find out what the company has brought to them. Social media is a very important part because it creates an interpersonal relationship. The stronger the interaction, the more they would be swayed to pay less attention to Zara’s competitors.

4. Geographic: •

With more than 2,000 stores in 88 countries, Zara has looked to dominate worldwide. Their strategy is to offer the same merchandise in all stores but emphasize what each stores customers mostly buys and what they are looking for. This is achieved through their operating systems. What also impulses their customers is where the stores are located in each country. They’re mostly situated in prime and prestigious locations, and high-traffic areas and well known malls. In Inditex’s 2013 annual report, it was established that Europe was the highest selling geographical area for the company. It can be inferred that this was mostly achieved thanks to Zara.

Figure 6


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5. Customer Lifestyle Board: •

The customer Lifestyle board below is a representation of what I believe makes a Zara customer, ranging from clothing, accessories, magazines, personal items and even lifestyle choices such as places, beverages, food and technology. The image below is a screenshot of a personal Pinterest page made for the Zara Customer Lifestyle.

If

you’d

like

to

see

a

better

view,

you

http://www.pinterest.com/lionidass/zara-customer-lifestyle-board.

can

access:


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Figure 7


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Marketing and Promotion Analysis I. Advertising: Zara has a unique approach when it comes to advertising and marketing. They use minimum expenses on ads and marketing strategies because they believe in “word-of-mouth” advertising. It’s a form of attracting customers and they prefer to use the revenues on store layouts and production. They don’t find it necessary to advertise when so many people already maintain brand awareness. Zara gets 85 percent of the full price on its clothes, while the industry average is 60 percent to 70 percent, according to the Harvard case study. The marketing Inditex does consist all about real estate. The company invests heavily in the beauty, historical appeal and location of its shops. By locating Zara stores in close proximity to well-known labels, the brand matches in the design, converting this into a method by which Zara sustains the perception of high quality, fast fashion. In a publication by marketingmag.com, the author, Belle Kwan expresses that in an interview with Mr. Ortega, the founder expresses: Different brands have different business models, and I’m sure there is not one that is better or worse than the other, but rather what works best for each brand. For Zara, I believe that we have found a model that works very well for us, and this does not include heavy investments in advertising. Advertising is about building up expectations, and telling customers what they can expect and what we can deliver. At Zara, we want expectations to come from the in-store experience, and to come from the customer’s personal journey and satisfaction from shopping at Zara. That way, there is no opportunity for disappointment and false promises.


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Zara Ad Campaign for Fall 2011

Figure 8

Zara Ad Campaign for Fall 2012

Figure 9


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Current Ads Woman

Figure 10

TRF

Figure 11


 

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Man

Figure 12

Kids

Figure 13


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II. Marketing: According to Marketingmag.com, Zara refrains from employing international marketing agencies in its different locations, and prefers to generate the majority of its corporate communication via its Spanish headquarters. Zara mainly promotes by placing marketing signs with the price or sales area. They have opted to use social media as a way to promote when there is a sales special. It also uses E-commerce to sell their merchandise. The Zara website utilizes photographic images of the clothing to show the product. There is also a lookbook online and a “campaign” which shows the clothes depicted in a more street-style sensibility. On the website, there is a link to “apps” which Zara has for a multitude of smart phones. Of course, the brand also controls a Facebook page, Twitter account, Pinterest board, YouTube channel, and Flickr and Instagram.

Figure 14


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III. Competition: 1. H&M •

Hennes & Mauritz AB (H&M) is a Swedish multinational retail-clothing company known for its fast-fashion clothing for men, women, teenagers and children. There are stores in 53 countries and as of 2013 employed around 116,000 people. In 1946 the company's founder Erling Persson was on a trip to the United States and came up with the business idea of offering fashionable clothing at attractive prices. In 1947 he opened his first shop Västerås, Sweden "Hennes", which exclusively sold women's clothing. "Hennes" is Swedish and means "for her" and/or "hers". In 1968 "Erling Persson" acquired the hunting apparel retailer Mauritz Widforss, which led to the inclusion of a menswear collection in the product range and the name change to "Hennes & Mauritz" (H&M).

H&M and Zara are at a more or less same price level and when in the same country, they are usually within the same radius, automatically becoming competition. The Brands are both European based companies and have the same ethic of having a fashion forward company at low prices and have a strong international expansion strategy. What they do differ from is that H&M outsources all of their production. H&M has slightly lower prices than Zara. It’s most noticeable through their advertisements and marketing around their store. Unlike Zara, H&M has adopted a more focused approach, entering one country at a time and building a distribution center in each one. Also, H&M operates a single format, although it markets its clothes under numerous labels or concepts to different customer segments. Zara benefits from a very strong style identity strengthen by one of its main touch points,


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its stores, so that it easily gathers a community a psychological level. In contrast, customer relations with H&M seem to be more functional, since the store appears to be less “serious”.

2. Mango •

Founded in 1984 in Barcelona by two Turkish brothers, Isak and Nahman Andic, who had immigrated to Spain. Mango launched in London in 2000 and there are now 150 stores in the UK, with plans to open another 350. In 2012, the company signed up Kate Moss to be the new face of Mango, making them gain more recognition internationally. Mango currently triumphs over Zara, having more than 2,000 stores in 103 countries.

Both

Zara

and

Mango

are

Spanish

high-street

stores

known

for

offering accessible fashion at realistic price points, though there’s a clear-cut difference when to comes to merchandise. Traditionally, Mango’s aims at dressier and nightwear apparel, while Zara brings high-end, runway styles that shoppers look for. •

According to their financial report, Mango has slashed prices by about 20%, bringing them closer to Zara’s prices. Mango also made it a point to cut back on party-ready clothing and is starting to introduce more daytime-friendly options.

It was also reported that Mango has bumped up expansion outside Spain and placed more emphasis on the rapid-fire production model that Zara utilizes.


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Figure 15


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SWOT

Strengths •

• •

• •

• •

• •  

Fast delivery of products and trends Strong research and development for customer satisfaction Affordable Prices Good customer service Advanced technology Unique business model Own production site Low inventory creates a sense of exclusivity Beautiful stores Occasional marketing and advertising Use of social media Global outreach

Weaknesses • •

Cannibalization Research and Development costs more because of the constant introduction of new products One center of distribution and manufacturing can hurt the business if the center was to have technical problems.

Opportunities •

Continuing expansion of stores throughout the world More distribution centers The use of advertisements is always to be considered Outlet stores

Threats •

Inability to breach the American market due to their European taste. More marketing strategies for sales to increase in other parts of the world instead of “competing ” with Europe. Expansion of their competition Lawsuits because of the imitation of goods


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Merchandising Map I. Season Trends: As previously mentioned, Zara has become known for presenting new merchandise constantly. As a result of this advantage, it’s expected that their products reflect the current trends of the season. The constant changes with the products in their retail stores have come as a success, increasing the preconceived notion of Zara as a "fashion imitator" company. What also reflects Zara’s “Fast fashion” outlook on retail is to not only emulate tendencies, but also furthermore add their own twist and remain true to their brand. Due to the fact that fashion is always looking for what’s new, trends on the runway and in the streets are always being looked out to see what innovative ideas designers and stylists offer. This year Fashion Week is currently being represented in retail stores, and Zara is expected to sell the new trends. Major magazines like Elle, Glamour and Vogue published their 2014 Trends for the Fall season on their webpages. Shared trends between the three magazines consisted of animal print, Army inspired colors and silhouettes, quilted apparel, knit and woven, pastel colors and sixties prints. Other online pages like wwd.com, GQ and style.com indicated what men could expect to see in stores this season. Fall season for men meant wearing trench coats, colored trousers, quilted jackets, black and white ensembles, and flannel. All publications also offered trends in accessories and shoes. All Zara Brands, Women’s, Men’s and Kids all follow important season trends which they believe appeals to their clientele. The following chart is an analysis of major items found in the store and which were emphasized more than other apparel, supporting Fall trends for 2014.


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II. Merchandise Mix:

Zara Women’s Apparel Product

Style No.

Color and/or Fabrics

No. Of Sizes

Price Range

Quality Level and Origin

7717/071

Grey/Tan

3

$59.90 USD

High

Polyester

Origin: Spain

 

8048/642

Ecru

1

$149.00 USD

High Origin: Spain

 

4886/241

Pink Polyester & Cotton

 

4

$59.90 USD

High Origin: Spain


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4479/243

Viscose

4

$79.90 USD

High Origin: Spain

 

5454/301

Cow Leather Elastane

6

$139.00 USD

High Origin: Spain

 

6002/301

 

Polyurethane Goat leather Polyester Vulcanized rubber

6

$189.00 USD

High Origin: Spain


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Zara Women’s Accessories Product

Style No.

Fabrics

No. Of Sizes

Price Range

Quality Level and Origin

4219/211

Acrylic

1

$29.90 USD

High Origin: Spain

8585/304

Light Pink

1

$35.90 USD

Acrylic Cotton Polyester

8405/304

Mink Polyurethane Polyester Jute

High Origin: Spain

1

$79.90 USD

High Origin: Spain


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Zara Man Apparel & Accessories Product

Style No.

Color and/or Fabrics

No. Of Sizes

Price Range

Quality Level and Origin

3717/300

Black/White

4

$59.90 USD

High

Cotton

5475/354

Khaki

Origin: Spain

4

$119.00 USD

Polyester

7248/301

Mustard

Origin: Spain

4

$99.90 USD

Cotton

5071/302

Cow Leather Cotton

High

High Origin: Spain

6

$99.90 USD

High Origin: Spain


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5310/302

Brown

6

$169.00 USD

Cow Leather Acrylic Polyester

High Origin: Spain

Black 6535/305

6 Polyurethane Polyester

$89.90 USD

High Origin: Spain

Zara Kid’s Apparel Product

Style No.

Color and/or Fabrics

No. Of Sizes

Price Range

Quality Level and Origin

6229/788

Bottle Green

8

$45.90 USD

High

Cotton Viscose Polyester Polyamide 3791/704

Ecru Modacrylic Polyester

Origin: Spain

8

$65.90 USD

High Origin: Spain


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4815/761

Dark Grey Marl

8

$17.90 USD

Cotton Nylon

5644/762

Grey Marl

Origin: Spain

8

$39.90 USD

Cotton

6060/303

Brown

Polyurethane Polyester Cow Leather

High Origin: Spain

14

$49.90 USD

Cow Leather Vulcanized rubber

7550/303

High

High Origin: Spain

14

$45.90 USD

High Origin: Spain


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III. Store Visit A store visit was conducted to observe if Zara was emphasizing on these fall trends. The results were the following: •

Both in store mannequins and those on window displays reflect a mix of the current trends, but concentrating on how Zara would style it. It’s used to draw attention to the shoppers and allows them to see how the merchandise would look like on a person.

The merchandise at the entrance of the store is divided by color stories but also follows some of the trends. Zara’s merchandise is placed strategically to expose the most elegant and dressier products and higher prices upfront and gradually work their way back to the more casual apparel.

In the entrance it was clearly noticeable that earth tones, black and white, and bright colors were separated, all presenting styles appropriate for the Fall. Such as trench coats, knits and more elegant silhouettes.

Zara mainly focuses on displaying their most sellable items on walls and freestanding fixtures to be instantly displayed to their customer.

Shelves above and below the apparel were filled with Zara Shoes suitable for the concepts the stores were trying to display. These also included Zara Bags all the concepts also.

Due to copyright and trademark laws, the Store Manager did not give permission to take photographs of their displays and merchandise. The image below is a better example, which explains what Zara merchandising consists of. These strategies used so the client can locate the clothes while seeing it displayed.


ZARA : Brand Profile Research