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PEBBLE VS. CYPRESS • MASTERS BESTS & WORSTS • NICKLAUS TALKS DESIGN ®

The Best Of Golf

®

Trump’sTriumph HIS STUNNING NEW SCOTTISH LINKS MAY JUST LIVE UP TO THE BLUSTER

SPRING 2012 $5.00/$7.25 in Canada LINKSMagazine.com


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45 Holes of Caribbean Golf by Fazio and Dye


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Escape to the Eastern Shore

of the Dominican Republic Located just 5 minutes from PUNTA CANA International Airport, PUNTACANA Resort & Club .-,+*)(',)&,*()%.$#"%)! ,"(+,)")(',)!+&&,!" Luxurious suite accommdations await at .+(%!)!) ,*%", )&)*!+) ,)$!),"(!).+) +!(,)$$!*).-,+"%)&,!($),*).,+$.."% (',)!+&&,!"),!)!" ) !"+, )%.$).+*,*

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SPECIAL COMMUNITY ADVERTISING FEATURE

A Golf Community at 40: A Birthday Worth Celebrating By William Rhodes

M

MILESTONE BIRTHDAYS ARE oftentimes greeted

with disdain—who wants to celebrate (or even acknowledge) reaching a new age bracket? But in the realm of “destination” communities—those resort-style golf communities that prospered (and suffered) over the last decade—getting to a milestone birthday is something of an accomplishment. One such community turns 40 years old in 2012, but instead of bemoaning aches and pains, they are celebrating stability and growth.

The Landings on Savannah’s Skidaway Island saw more than 200 properties sell in 2011—roughly DOUBLE the volume of 2009. Their difference? In addition to a great location (who wouldn’t want to live on an island in Savannah with six golf courses?), the 4,000-acre island community is fully owned by its homeowners association, so there was no profit-driven developer who could cease operations or marketing when times got tough.


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SPECIAL COMMUNITY ADVERTISING FEATURE The Landings was one of the first high-end destination communities, having been created by a division of a paper company in the 1970s. The community had tremendous success early on—even winning the industry’s highest honor in 1986—due to the high-end golf and amenities, thousands of acres of wetlands and moss-draped oaks, and a location minutes from historic Savannah, the Savannah-Hilton Head airport, and Interstate 95. By the time most of the original land was sold in the 1990s, the residents had decisions to make. To maximize flexibility and control, three entities were transferred/purchased from the developer: • The Landings Club, a private club owned by members (the majority of Landings residents are Club members, but Club membership is not required), which owns and manages six golf courses (by Arnold Palmer, Tom Fazio, Arthur Hills and Willard Byrd), with four clubhouse and restaurant facilities, 34 tennis courts, five pools and a 48,000-square-foot wellness and fitness facility. • The Landings Association, which owns and/or manages common grounds that include 40 miles of walking and biking trails, two fullservice deep-water marinas that provide access to the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean, 150 lagoons, an athletic field, two playgrounds, an observation tower overlooking the marsh and river, and dog park. The Landings Association also wholly owns the third entity: • The Landings Marketing & Real Estate Company, mandated by the homeowners association to protect property values by promoting the community. Why is that structure important? Well, while profits in general are a good thing, long-term management of a community is not always consistent with driving short-term profits. Owners with “skin in the game” have that longer-term focus, so the community is managed differently. Both the Club’s and the Association’s financial stability stems from a strategy of remaining essentially debt-free, and being proactive with capital and maintenance projects has allowed for the amenities to remain world-class. The fun and culture of a world-class city, six superior golf courses, a private-island lifestyle, and favorable treatment of retirement income has helped to turn hundreds of northerners into “Savannahans.” The Landings offers solid real estate value for golfers looking to escape to

better weather and lower taxes. There is even a self-organized group of Landings Newcomers who help introduce other “newbies” to the myriad of social opportunities The Landings and Savannah provide. Visit LandingsNewNeighbors.com for a sample of what awaits. The Landings’ marketing and real estate firm (owned by their homeowners association) offers exclusive visitation packages for those interested in previewing the community. To request information on the community, visit TheLandings.com or call 800-841-7011


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The Most Difficult Course in America…

Just Happens to be the Best! Named “The Best New Private Course in America” for 2009 by GolfDigest, Pikewood National Golf Club is the ideal Club for the discerning player that values the traditions of this great game. With vistas of 60 miles and boasting a slope of 155, Pikewood National Golf Club winds its way through majestic limestone outcroppings, natural waterfalls, and mature hardwoods; Pikewood National Golf Club is the rare blend of strength, beauty, and privacy. Membership is by invitation only.

Private. Exclusive. Traditional. www.pikewoodnational.com


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CONTENTS

Features

42 I Trump Scotland He promised “the greatest golf course in the world� and The Donald has clearly given it his best shot by David J. Whyte

48 I On His Shoulders The Masters might never have evolved had Bobby Jones not made the painful decision to un-retire by David Barrett

53 I Gatefold: Winners & Sinners Bests and worsts from 75 years of the Masters

58 I Polished Jewel With nine more holes from Pete Dye and a $40 million renovation, Casa de Campo reaffirms its role as the best golf resort in the Caribbean by George Peper

The Links 66 I Classic Courses: Palmetto Golf Club One of the oldest clubs in the country becomes one of the hottest during Masters week by Tom Cunneff

68 I Great Courses of Britain & Ireland: Formby Golf Club A Jekyll & Hyde-style challenge awaits at this course that begins in the trees, then emerges onto classic linksland by John Hopkins

p.68 The 12th hole at Formby Golf Club in Formby, Merseyside, England ON THE COVER:

Trump International Golf Links, hole No. 13

KEVIN MURRAY

PHOTO BY DAVID J. WHYTE

SPRING 2012 LINKSMAGAZINE.COM

9


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FJ ICON™

U LT I M AT E F E E L & S T Y L E

PUT YOURSELF IN THEIR SHOES DRYJOYS TOUR™

M O S T A D VA N C E D D R YJ OY S E V E R


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CONTENTS

Spring 2012 Volume 25, Number 2

XPS-1™ E X T R E M E P L AT F O R M S TA B I L I T Y

More of the world’s top ranked players wear FJ golf shoes than all other brands combined. With an expansive collection of performance golf footwear styles to choose from, these players can easily select a specific model that fits their individual needs. Choose your style at footjoy.com

FJ SPORT

p.58

LIGHT WEIGHT PERFORMANCE

Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic

Departments 16 I Inside Links

30 I Which is Better?

38 I My Design

72 I Get in Gear

Kudos to My Locker Neighbor

Cypress Point or Pebble Beach

Jack Nicklaus

Swapping the 3-Wood for a 4-Wood

20 I Letter From St. Andrews

32 I Characters

40 I We Spy… Furman Bisher

The Marriott/ TPC Sawgrass Resort

78 I Fit to a Tee

Trump Tales

24 I A Simpler Game

34 I Been Here?

70 I Fore Sale

80 I Method

Mike Keiser

The Greenbrier Bunker

Fairways to Heaven

Making a Good Stroke

28 I I Was There

36 I The Best of...

82 I Where’s Millie?

Mize’s Miracle

Rain Suits

Three Hints

©COPYRIGHT 2010, LINKS®-The Best of Golf® (incorporating Southern Links® and Western Links®). All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. Titles LINKS®, Western Links® and Southern Links® registered U.S. Patent and Trademark office by Purcell Enterprises, Inc., its predecessors or its affiliates. LINKS® The Best of Golf (ISSN 1043-6375) is published Quarterly; Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall by Purcell Enterprises, Inc., 10 Executive Park Road, Suite 202, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928. Periodicals postage paid at Hilton Head Island, SC and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LINKS, P.O. Box 15099, North Hollywood, CA 91615. Canada Post International Publications Mail Product (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 40612608. Canada Post: Return undeliverables to Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2 Subscription services: 800-350-9301. Outside U.S. 818-487-2094. Subscription Rates: USA and possessions, one-year (5 issues) - $11.95. Canada $21.95 and all other countries (surface delivery) one year, U.S. $37.95. Advertising rates upon request: 843-842-6200. Editorial and advertising offices, P.O. Box 7628, Hilton Head Island, SC 29938. PRINTED IN USA

14

LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

L.C. LAMBRECHT

Food for Thought


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’ GOLFS GREATEST WALKS

A DV E RT I S E M E N T

THE KITTANSETT CLUB MARION , MASSACHUSETTS

A true New England classic, Kittansett juts out into Buzzards Bay which dominates a golfer’s thoughts while teeing off on the short par-three 3rd (pictured). The prevailing left-to-right wind, often underestimated, can easily carry an errant tee shot onto the beach. If you’re lucky enough to land outside of a footprint in the sand, par is still within reach. Photo: L.C. Lambrecht

SCREENSAVER DOWNLOAD

Make the FootJoy Golf’s Greatest Walks series part of your computer desktop. Visit LINKSMagazine.com/greatwalks


FOOTJOY_SPRING12v2_Layout 1 3/9/12 10:21 AM Page 1112

’ GOLFS GREATEST WALKS

A DV E RT I S E M E N T

THE KITTANSETT CLUB MARION , MASSACHUSETTS

A true New England classic, Kittansett juts out into Buzzards Bay which dominates a golfer’s thoughts while teeing off on the short par-three 3rd (pictured). The prevailing left-to-right wind, often underestimated, can easily carry an errant tee shot onto the beach. If you’re lucky enough to land outside of a footprint in the sand, par is still within reach. Photo: L.C. Lambrecht

SCREENSAVER DOWNLOAD

Make the FootJoy Golf’s Greatest Walks series part of your computer desktop. Visit LINKSMagazine.com/greatwalks


FOOTJOY_SPRING12v1_Layout 1 3/8/12 7:03 PM Page 1314

CONTENTS

Spring 2012 Volume 25, Number 2

XPS-1™ E X T R E M E P L AT F O R M S TA B I L I T Y

More of the world’s top ranked players wear FJ golf shoes than all other brands combined. With an expansive collection of performance golf footwear styles to choose from, these players can easily select a specific model that fits their individual needs. Choose your style at footjoy.com

FJ SPORT

p.58

LIGHT WEIGHT PERFORMANCE

Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic

Departments 16 I Inside Links

30 I Which is Better?

38 I My Design

72 I Get in Gear

Kudos to My Locker Neighbor

Cypress Point or Pebble Beach

Jack Nicklaus

Swapping the 3-Wood for a 4-Wood

20 I Letter From St. Andrews

32 I Characters

40 I We Spy… Furman Bisher

The Marriott/ TPC Sawgrass Resort

78 I Fit to a Tee

Trump Tales

24 I A Simpler Game

34 I Been Here?

70 I Fore Sale

80 I Method

Mike Keiser

The Greenbrier Bunker

Fairways to Heaven

Making a Good Stroke

28 I I Was There

36 I The Best of...

82 I Where’s Millie?

Mize’s Miracle

Rain Suits

Three Hints

©COPYRIGHT 2010, LINKS®-The Best of Golf® (incorporating Southern Links® and Western Links®). All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. Titles LINKS®, Western Links® and Southern Links® registered U.S. Patent and Trademark office by Purcell Enterprises, Inc., its predecessors or its affiliates. LINKS® The Best of Golf (ISSN 1043-6375) is published Quarterly; Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall by Purcell Enterprises, Inc., 10 Executive Park Road, Suite 202, Hilton Head Island, SC 29928. Periodicals postage paid at Hilton Head Island, SC and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LINKS, P.O. Box 15099, North Hollywood, CA 91615. Canada Post International Publications Mail Product (Canadian Distribution) Sales Agreement No. 40612608. Canada Post: Return undeliverables to Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2 Subscription services: 800-350-9301. Outside U.S. 818-487-2094. Subscription Rates: USA and possessions, one-year (5 issues) - $11.95. Canada $21.95 and all other countries (surface delivery) one year, U.S. $37.95. Advertising rates upon request: 843-842-6200. Editorial and advertising offices, P.O. Box 7628, Hilton Head Island, SC 29938. PRINTED IN USA

14

LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

L.C. LAMBRECHT

Food for Thought


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s h e wa s o n l y 8 w h e n we found common ground. That’s when my daughter became obsessed with the game. Naturally, I encouraged this behavior. After work, we’d go to the driving range. On weekends, we’d play the muni adjacent to the airport. It was our thing. And

s p r i ng / s u m m e r

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those quiet moments walking down the fairway were always something we could call our own. Now, she’s 17, with a 5 handicap, and thinks dearold Dad has nothing left to show her. Well, I can think of one thing.

• two nights at The Inn at Spanish Bay • one round on Pebble Beach Golf Links plus • one round on Spyglass Hill Golf Course or The Links at Spanish Bay

ASK FOR LINKSS12

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*Package is valid April 1, 2012 - Septermber 3, 2012. Quoted package price above is for two nights in a Garden View room at The Inn at Spanish Bay, plus one round on Pebble Beach Golf Links and one round on The Links at Spanish Bay, for one player. Packages which include Spyglass Hill Golf Course or other room types are a higher price; please inquire to learn what is available and obtain a specific price quote. Offer is subject to availability. Package price includes occupancy tax, County tourism assessment and service charge. Valid for new bookings only, and parties of 8 rooms or less. Not valid in conjunction with other offers. Some blackout dates apply. Rates are subject to change.

Pebble Beach®, Pebble Beach Golf Links®, Pebble Beach Resorts®, Spyglass Hill® Golf Course, The Links at Spanish Bay™, The Inn at Spanish Bay™, The Lone Cypress™, The Heritage Logo and their respective underlying distinctive images are trademarks, service marks, and trade dress of Pebble Beach Company. Photo Credit: Joann Dost.


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Inside Links

Kudos to My Locker Neighbor IN 1984, when I was working as a junior ad sales rep at Sports Illustrated, I had the good fortune of getting a membership to Winged Foot. On my first day I was assigned a locker in the upper locker room right next to Donald Trump’s. That afternoon, as I was changing after my round, he came in and we introduced ourselves. Despite his blustery public persona, he couldn’t have been friendlier. I knew he was passionate about the game, but I had no idea just how passionate. I’m amazed at the golf empire he’s built up 28 years later. He now owns 15 courses counting his recent purchase of the Doral Golf Resort & Spa, for which he paid $150 million just five years after Morgan Stanley bought it for $501 million (he might be a five-handicap golfer but he’s a plus-five businessman). What also amazes me about Donald is how handson he is with his golf portfolio. He returns phone calls and emails very quickly when they have anything to do with his courses. After I sent his executive assistant an email congratulating him on Doral, a return email quickly arrived from her with an attachment. He had written on a printed copy of the email with a black Sharpie, “JACK THANK YOU—IT WILL BE GREAT!” and signed it with his distinctive, EKG-like signature. And when none of his courses made our LINKS 100 lists, I heard from him quickly about that, too. But cracking our world rankings shouldn’t be a problem after the opening of his newest course, Trump International Golf Links, this July in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, the subject of our cover story. After talking to our editor, George Peper, about it and how big the dunes are, I’m really looking forward to experiencing it myself. For once, the reality should live up to his legendary hype. It really will be one of the best. “Because of those huge dunes, it really is breathtaking, both literally and figuratively,” says Peper,

16

LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

adding that the course might cause a seismic shift in the travel patterns of golfers visiting Scotland. “St. Andrews will continue to be No. 1, but with the opening of the Trump course—combined with Castle Stuart, Royal Aberdeen, Cruden Bay, Nairn, and a couple others—a trip to the northeast is now more enticing than one to Turnberry, Troon, and Prestwick in the southwest.” Some of you may be wondering where our Masters cover is, but rest assured, we have plenty of Masters coverage inside this issue. In fact, our main story is a book excerpt from Making the Masters: Bobby Jones & the Birth of the World’s Greatest Golf Tournament written by our colleague at the magazine David Barrett. And we have a number of other pieces related to the year’s first major sprinkled throughout the pages. You’ll also find a wonderful piece on Casa de Campo by George, as well as many of the regular departments like We Spy, Been Here?, Get in Gear, and Which is Better? where two heavyweights, former USGA president Sandy Tatum and Sun Microsystems co-founder Scott McNealy, duke it out over Cypress Point and Pebble Beach. Finally, I urge you to visit LINKSMagazine.com to vote for your top 100 courses, if you haven’t already. The lists are now automated so you can see courses inch up or down on a daily basis, as new ballots are cast. It’s the first living, breathing ranking ever. It’s also the only one that lets the golfing public have a vote. Note to Donald: Don’t even think about stuffing the ballot box.

Jack Purcell President and Publisher JPurcell@LINKSMagazine.com


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Every marsh-inspired tee box, every oak-lined dogleg, and every graceful sway of

Spanish moss will be a bridge between you and a round that won’t easily be forgotten. Three championship courses. Three of the top 50 teaching pros. A world-class learning center. And endless reasons you might want to keep all this a bit hush-hush. Feed your appetite at seaislandlinks.com.

54 HUNGRY LITTLE MOUTHS ARE JUST WAITING TO BE fed.

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The Southeast coast’s finest second-home choice on Hilton Head Island. With its extensive remodel, the Club is even more enjoyable than ever! Equity Members own an undivided interest in the Club’s Waterfront Real Estate, which includes 31 luxury suites & villas. • Preferred Golf privileges at 20 resort and private golf courses including the famed Harbour Town Golf Links • Daily cruises aboard the Club’s Private Yacht “Mystique” • Full-Service Concierge • Privileges at the Sea Pines Beach Club and Harbour Town Pool • Free Tennis at Sea Pines Racquet Club

Call today to learn more about the Harbour Town Yacht Club and ask about our $199 Discovery Package.

888-412-7375 or 843-671-5551 • harbourtownyachtclub.com


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®

The Best Of Golf

®

PRESIDENT / PUBLISHER

John R. Purcell

Nancy S. Purcell George Peper SENIOR EDITOR Tom Cunneff ART DIRECTOR Larry Hasak CONTRIBUTING EDITOR James A. Frank SENIOR WRITER Thomas Dunne COPY EDITOR David Barrett PHOTO / PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jennifer Lee WEB CONTENT COORDINATOR Ty Cordray SPECIAL PROJECTS COORDINATOR Robert Dagley RESEARCH ASSISTANT Tom Ierubino PREPRESS SPECIALIST Joe Sobczak EDITORIAL CONSULTANT Seth Bidwell EDITORIAL DIRECTOR EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Mike Blum, John Hopkins, Scott McNealy, Frank D. Tatum, David J. Whyte CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Thomas Abbott, Joann Dost, Brian Hoffsis, L. C. Lambrecht, Leonard Kamsler, Jim Mandeville, Kevin Murray, Brian Morgan, Iain Lowe, Evan Schiller, David J. Whyte CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS

Barry Ross, Keith Witmer, Michael Witte David Kefford Janet Uings DIRECTOR OF CONSUMER MARKETING Lori Masaoay ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Peggy Hurley VP / GENERAL MANAGER

VP CONTROLLER / OPERATIONS

ADVERTISING VP / EASTERN ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

John Swain 203-304-1927 Newtown, CT 06470 VP / SOUTHEASTERN SALES DIRECTOR

David Wynn 404-256-2266 Atlanta, GA 30319 VP NATIONAL INTEGRATED SALES / WESTERN ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Cris Hayes 310-798-4320 Redondo Beach, CA 90277 DIRECTOR OF SOUTHEASTERN SALES / NATIONAL DIRECT RESPONSE SALES

Jennifer N. Hanson 407-895-9151 Orlando, FL 32803 DETROIT/OHIO

Thomas A. Reiss 248-987-8484 Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302 PACIFIC NORTHWEST/ARIZONA

Tracy Herbst 602-738-5739 Phoenix, AZ 85018 WEST COAST

Lisa Sanchez 619-851-5472 Carlsbad, CA 92009 CANADA

Josef Beranek 450-538-2468 Québec, Canada J0E 2K0

Reader letters may be sent to the address below in Hilton Head, S.C., or to letters@linksmagazine.com. Readers can log on to LINKSMagazine.com featuring selected LINKS editorial content and spectacular photography, as well as surveys, sweepstakes, and articles from joint online partners. For reprint information contact: David Kefford 843-842-6200 (phone), 843-842-6233 (fax), or dkefford@linksmagazine.com Editorial and adver tising offices, P.O. Box 7628, Hilton Head Island, SC 29938. Customer Service: 800-350-9301, linksmagazine@pubservice.com


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George Peper

LETTER FROM ST. ANDREWS

Trump Tales one on the LINKS 100 lists anytime soon, I do think it will make its way onto those lists, maybe even at a high level. Whether it will ever hold an Open Championship, as Trump so dearly wants, is much more questionable. A decade ago, back in the days when The Donald was making news as much for his flamboyant social life as for his business acumen, I played with him at his then-new course in New York’s Westchester County. After the round he asked me my impression. “It has everything,” I said. “Interesting holes, great conditioning, a bit of flash, and plenty of difficulty.” “Do you think it can hold a PGA Tour event or maybe a U.S. Open?” he asked. “I doubt it,” said I. “Why not?” “Because it’s your golf course.” He thought for a moment, then delivered a line that could have come only from him. “You know, I’m a double-edged sword. People love me because everything I do is the very best quality,

MICHAEL WITTE

TALK ABOUT COINCIDENCE. I’m in the middle of writing this very column— about Donald Trump—when the phone rings and who is it? Donald Trump. He’d just seen the LINKS 100 lists of the top courses in the world and U.S and he wasn’t pleased. “I can’t believe none of my courses are on those lists,” he said. “I have the best course in Florida, one of the best in New York, two of the best in Jersey, and a spectacular course on spectacular land in California. They should all be on your lists and none of them are.” for this golf course. Everyone loves it. Then he proceeded to ask a series of Everyone. Did you see what [European pointed questions about how the LINKS Tour Chief Executive] George O’Grady lists were compiled, what courses were said? He walked the course with me for on the ballot, who had voted, what the more than three hours, then said it’s one selection criteria were, etc. The Donald, of the top three courses he’d ever seen.” despite his image as a guy whose only I didn’t need convincing. Having concern is headlines, is in reality a dewalked the course several times, I knew tails guy, especially when it comes to the Trump has something special—the improjects that are closest to his heart— mense natural dunes, the commanding his golf courses. sea views, and a restrained yet imaginaThen he launched into a self-love song tive routing by Martin Hawtree. Trump to his “greatest course in the world” (and International Golf Links has a surreal, subject of our cover article) the soon-tolarger-than-life quality, just like its owndebut Trump International Golf Links in er. Indeed, this is a course construction Aberdeen, Scotland. project perhaps only Donald Trump “George, of all the construction procould have pulled off, and while it won’t jects I’ve ever done—never have I heard be replacing Cypress Point as number advance reviews like the ones I’m getting

20


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LETTER FROM ST. ANDREWS

So inspiring your family will hardly remember a time before the lake house.

It’s time to dip your toe back in the water. This spring discover our new release of waterfront properties located in the heart of our Marina Village on one of South Carolina’s purest mountain lakes.

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A LINKS Magazine “Best for Boating” Community

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits of value, if any, of this property. This does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy where void by law.

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LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

Trump—charming and conning just about and they hate me because I like to date everyone he meets. super models.” When you’re charmed/conned by The It brought to mind a moment during an Donald, he knows he’s doing it and you AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. know he’s doing it but you both sort of enI was enjoying a Forrest Gump week joy it—he’s that good. Besides, you sense and at that moment found myself hitting that down deep, beneath the blather and balls at the far end of the practice range wink-and-nod bravado, he believes what beside my partner that week Curtis Strange he’s saying. There’s a strange sort of genand Tom Kite. We were the last three in a uineness about him—he never tries to be line of 50 or 60 other pros and ams (the anything other than what he is. Less known range used for the AT&T is actually a conbut more important, verted polo field, so it’s there’s a generous side— enormous). The Donald, a side that donates milAt one point the condespite his image lions to charities and selftinuous thwock of pracas a guy whose only lessly comes to the aid of tice balls ebbed and an those in need. odd quiet fell over the concern is headlines, There was a business range. I turned to see what is in reality a details executive whose job as had happened and noticed head of the division of a that every golfer in back guy, especially when large conglomerate was of me had done the same thing. One by one, they it comes to the projects in jeopardy. One day, a column in the business had turned their backs to that are closest section of the New York the range and stared at to his heart— Post contained an item something. It was like his golf courses. speculating on the execa synchronized chorus utive’s demise. That same line—or “the wave” at a morning, his phone rang—it was Trump football stadium—player after player pivand he was on a mission. oting and gaping. “What’s this b-s about you losing your The object of attention was Trump, job? Do they realize what you’ve done making his way down the range. Well, not for that company—do they realize what really Trump but the startlingly attractive will happen if you leave? Are they nuts? (and braless) young woman bouncing I’m going to make you an offer. If you along with him, his date for the week. will allow me, I will make a phone call As they neared us, I alerted Curtis who to my good friend Dick [the company alerted Kite, and the three of us played CEO] and in 15 minutes your problems our parts in the lecherous choreography, will be over.” smiling and chuckling as they passed by. Donald Trump barely knew this guy, “Did you hear,” I said to the two pros, and he had nothing to gain from making “Yesterday Trump made a hole-in-one on this gesture. He’d reached out simply bethe 12th at Spyglass.” cause he thought it was the right thing to Strange shook his head, but Kite took do. In the end, the fellow didn’t allow him on a sort of crestfallen look. to make that call, and things worked out “You know something,” he said. “It’s just fine. But he has never forgotten the just not fair…” gesture. Nor should he—after all, it may be Indeed, Donald Trump would seem to easy to forget those who chime in with have more than his share of everything. congratulations when things are rosy, but He’s an alpha male with an overload we never forget someone who reaches out of money, power, charisma, and chutzpah, to us when things are tough. I can attest to a hyperbole-spewing, self-promoting this because the guy Trump called that supersalesman whose greatest joy is in morning was George Peper. his performance art—playing Donald


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» ONLY A FEW

make this cut.

ROBERT TRENT JONES GOLF TRAIL’S ROSS BRIDGE NAMED ONE OF GOLF DIGEST’S “75 BEST NORTH AMERICAN GOLF RESORTS”.* NOW COMPARE PRICES. It’s a rare list indeed, sprinkled with the likes of Pebble Beach, The Cloister, Pinehurst and others. But Ross Bridge matches incredible play and luxury with an equally incredible price.

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A Simpler Game the 13-hole par-three Bandon Preserve, opens in May, all the WHEN MIKE KEISER was growing up in Upstate New net proceeds will go to the Wild Rivers Coast Alliance to help York in the 1950s, his father was always planting and prunprotect the pristine lands and waters of the South Coast. ing trees on an open plot of land near their home, turning “The more time I spent there the more I realized that the the two acres into a pine forest. Although Mike Sr. was a hundred-mile stretch from stockbroker by trade who Bandon to the California borserved as a bomber pilot in der is in many places primeval World War II, at heart he was and undeveloped, so why not an environmentalist before anystep in and make sure we keep one had ever heard of the term. it that way?” he says. “Most of “He liked to say, ‘You always it is state and federal park, but want to leave a place better than there are enough ranches that when you found it,’” says KeisGOLF ENVIRONMENTALISM IS NOT AN will come up for sale that I er. “That’s my short answer to OXYMORON TO MIKE KEISER, PARTICULARLY what is environmentalism. It’s WITH THE OPENING OF HIS NEWEST COURSE, thought this is a perfect opportunity for a significant that—always improve it.” BANDON PRESERVE BY TOM CUNNEFF amount of money, depending If there’s anyone in the inon how popular it is, going to South Coast conservation.” dustry who personifies LINKS’s Simpler Game ideals it’s Mike Chances are Bandon Preserve, built in dunes on the ocean Keiser. More than just the owner of the magnificent piece of side of Bandon Trails’ 1st hole, will prove very popular. Not Oregon coastline that is home to his resort, Bandon Dunes, only did minimalist masters Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore he considers himself the land’s steward. When the fifth course,

To Preserve and Protect

Golfers can decide how long to make a hole, like here at the 8th.

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IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, Smarter Planet and the planet icon are trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml. Š International Business Machines Corporation 2011.

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Phones can stop customers from roaming.

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A SIMPLER GAME

design it, every hole comes with a The 11th green is typical view of the Pacific. Featuring large, of the Preserve’s large, undulating greens, most holes can undulating greens built by Bill Coore (left) and play anywhere from 30 to 165 yards Ben Crenshaw (center), with golfers deciding themselves with Keiser. where to stick in the peg. Another attraction is that walking a full regulation 36 holes is just too much these days for aging Boomers. Keiser conservatively estimates that 14,000 golfers will play play in Peoria. “If it’s parkland, they expect green,” he says. it this year, and at $100 apiece that will net the alliance about “You can go lean, but the superintendents are very loathe to $700,000. “He’s an extremely strong friend of the environment be accused of not watering.” and it goes back to Recycled Greeting Cards where he made his That’s not an issue at Bandon, of course, where about the fortune,” says the group’s executive director, Jim Seeley. “He’s only use of an irrigation system is to grow in a course. The returning philanthropically some of his success from the resort fescue grass also uses 80 percent less chemicals than bent. With to the local area.” three buildings that operate on solar energy and its own When Bandon Dunes opened in 1999, Keiser was hoping internal waste-control to break even with 10,000 system, the resort is not rounds. Last year he did If there’s anyone in the industry who personifies only the model of envi130,000 (he’ll open his LINKS’s Simpler Game ideals it’s Mike Keiser. ronmental responsibility, first East Coast course, but has actually improved Cabot Links in Nova ScoMore than just the owner of Bandon Dunes, the fate of an endangered tia, in June). “It’s astonhe sees himself as the land’s steward. plant species, the Silvery ishing,” he says. “We have Phacelia. Invasive gorse remote, links, windy, was choking out the little jewel-like creeper, but every time walking only—how many people want that? Turns out a lot Keiser builds a course, the seeds take root in the newly of people.” disturbed dunes. Perhaps even more incredibly, he was also able to sell the “It seems to like golf,” he says. “Pacific Dunes is covered golfing public on the concept of “brown golf,” or at least with it.” “tawny,” the color he prefers, but only because it’s links golf His dad would be proud. on the coast where it looks natural. He doesn’t think it would

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Th e Pinnacle Ach ievem ent. The Virginian, an acclaimed 538-acre private country club community in the rolling hills of Southwestern Virginia, is about to unveil its newest neighborhood. Named Grandview, it consists of 30 carefully contoured homesites overlooking the 9th and 18th holes of the Tom Fazio championship golf course. The name is apt because each homesite provides spectacular view corridors of meadows, forests, fairways and the faraway Appalachian Mountains. This mature, successful community, named as one of the ďŹ nest and best planned in America, is already home to more than 100 families residing in charming estate homes. Talented architects and planners have been working on Grandview for several years, assuring its homes will be the pinnacle achievements in this distinguished community. Outside the gates of The Virginian are the historic towns of Abingdon and Bristol, the scenic Appalachian Trail and an unhurried, uncrowded and unparalleled living environment. We invite your inquiry.

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1987 MASTERS

Mize’s Miracle IT’S BEEN 25 YEARS, BUT I’LL NEVER FORGET THE MOMENT MY FELLOW AUGUSTAN PLAYED THE SHOT OF HIS LIFE BY MIKE BLUM

ONE YEAR AFTER what many consider the most memorable Masters ever— Jack Nicklaus’s sixth victory at the age of 46—an Augusta native provided a worthy encore with a shot that still resonates in golf history a quarter century later. Larry Mize won the 1987 Masters with his improbable chip-in from right of the 11th green, ending a sudden-death playoff that also included two of the greatest players of that time—Greg Norman and Seve Ballesteros. Mize was just 28 and a promising but unexceptional player who had won exactly one PGA Tour title while letting a handful of them slip away, earning the unfortunate nickname Larry D-Mize. Coming into the Masters he was among the hotter players on tour and was a factor in Augusta from day one. He and playing partner John Cook were 1-2 after the opening round, with Mize (70) trailing by one stroke. Mize remained one off the lead after 36 holes, tied for second with Cook at 142 behind Curtis Strange. A strong Saturday finish left him two in back of Ben Crenshaw and Roger Maltbie after 54 holes in a four-way tie for fifth at 214. On Sunday Mize took the lead with birdies at 12 and 13 but fell back with bogeys at 14 and 15, hitting his second shot at 15 into the pond beyond the green. Needing a birdie at the 18th to reclaim a tie for the lead, he rifled a 9-iron to six feet and nailed the putt, finishing in a tie at 285 with Norman and Ballesteros. The playoff began on the 10th with Mize seemingly overmatched by the two international superstars. But it was he who had the chance to win on the first extra hole after another superb approach left him only 12 feet for birdie. He came tantalizingly close but missed.

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Ballesteros had won both the 1980 and ’83 Masters in dominant fashion, and had had five excellent chances to add a third green jacket in the ’80s, including a year earlier when his back-nine collapse opened the door for Nicklaus’s charge. Now, once again, he faltered. A halting three-putt bogey on the 10th elicited a sympathetic chorus of moans from those ringing the green. While most of the crowd surged ahead, I watched Ballesteros and his caddie slowly trudge back up the 10th fairway to the clubhouse, wondering how a player of his skills could keep failing to capitalize on chances to win a tournament he’d captured so easily earlier in the decade. At 11 Mize appeared in serious trouble when he bailed out on his approach, leaving a pitch shot of roughly 35 yards, with Norman on the green putting for birdie. Standing well up the 11th fairway but armed with binoculars, I pressed against the gallery ropes to get a clear view as Mize crisply struck his pitch and then followed his ball as it landed short of the green and scooted toward the hole. From my angle, there was no way of telling how accurate the shot was, but when it squarely struck the flagstick and plopped into the hole, the crowd lining the edge of Amen Corner erupted. Shrieks, screams, all manner of flailing arms, and a general sense of incredulity emanated from the gallery which was divided pretty evenly between locals pulling for Mize and those on the side of the charismatic Australian. I looked at Norman who seemed to be in mild shock, similar to the previous year at Inverness when Bob Tway had holed out from a bunker on the 72nd hole to beat him in the PGA Championship. Of the four decades of Masters I’ve attended, it is the wildest finish I’ve ever witnessed. Having an Augusta native win it with a miracle shot made it just a little more personal, but the stunning conclusion did not need a local connection to make it an unforgettable memory. Mike Blum is a former sports writer for the Augusta Chronicle.

JOHN IACONO/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED/GETTY IMAGES

I Was There


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Which is Better?

Cypress Point

T

O ENGAGE in an argument pertaining to golf course superiority when your adversary is Scott McNealy who has Pebble Beach in his arsenal is daunting. Scott has had an extraordinary career and is a consummate golfer. My credentials include IT WAS DESIGNED BY A GENIUS ON TERRAIN having an understanding of Pebble Beach, which is especially THAT IS WITHOUT EQUAL—NO WONDER LINKS useful in this setting. I first played it more than 70 years ago and MAGAZINE RATES IT # 1 IN THE WORLD have played it since a wonderful lot of times including 20 years BY FRANK D. TATUM with Tom Watson in the Crosby and AT&T. Added to that is the experience of having been employed to renovate Pebble Beach in the 1960s in anticipation of the 1972 U.S. Open. I sought advice from Jack Neville who, with Douglas Grant, created the golf course and was living reclusively in Pacific Grove. The renovation was comprehensive. My credentials for evaluating Cypress Point include having reverentially played it countless times over a period of 70-plus years. The Cypress Point golf experience has incomparable features. It was designed by a genius [Alister MacKenzie] on a prime piece of the planet with stunning features he so effectively used. He routed the course so as to give those features their ultimate impact. It provides the player with holes in open space, holes in the forest, holes carved from a gigantic sand dune, eventually bringing the player to the brilliantly designed 15th hole alongside the ocean. It asks the player to execute a wonderful variety of golf shots in very stimulating environments. All that is a suitable preface to the experience of playing the 16th hole, a 220-yard par three with 200 of those yards over the ocean. This is the crescendo point of a Cypress Point round. If a player is enjoying an especially good scoring day, as the round develops he becomes increasingly aware that if his round is to realize its potential he will have to deal with the 16th hole. Each hole, however, has compellingly interesting shot values. MacKenzie’s holes both in their settings and in their details have significant aesthetic features that add considerably to the very special experience of playing them. The course is a work of art such that I identify it as The Sistine Chapel of golf. I do understand how spectacular are the features and setting of Pebble Beach and how stimulating, indeed inspiring, is the experience of playing it. Cypress Point, however, has virtually unique features which Pebble Beach does not. The subjective and objective conclusion, therefore, is that Cypress is the better course. That conclusion is reinforced by the LINKS 100 ranking, which has Cypress Point as the number one course in the world. Frank D. “Sandy” Tatum is a member of Cypress Point, a past president of the USGA, and a former NCAA golf champion.


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O

NE ROUND TO PLAY—Pebble or Cypress? The answer is obvious. Pebble Beach is the ultimate bucket list course. Now, you will get a much more literate and ornate advocacy of Cypress Point from my good friend, lifelong golf partner, and mentor Sandy Tatum. I’m just a computer guy who captained Harvard’s golf team (sort of like being captain of the Florida State ski team). But I will do my best to convey the truth. And I promise not to let envy, bitterness, or retribution color my message even though the CPC admissions process has denied me several times. Note to self: Why would I want to join a club that would have me anyway? Pebble is a national treasure, designed by amateur golfers for amateur golfers while hosting the best players in the best events year after year—a Tour stop since 1947, site of five U.S. Opens, four U.S. Amateurs, two U.S. Women’s Amateurs, and a PGA Championship. Cypress has hosted one Walker Cup and hasn’t hosted a Tour event in 20 years. You want an experience that reeks of golf history, play Pebble. You want something that reeks of old golf shoes, check out the CPC locker room. (Really, I am not bitter.) As far as beauty, grooming, and design, both courses are as good NINE SEASIDE HOLES VS THREE; FIVE U.S. as it gets. Pebble, however, has nine waterfront holes—Cypress has OPENS VS NONE; OPEN TO ALL VS SHUT only three. Cypress has always been a West Coast benchmark with TIGHT—C’MON, THERE’S NO CONTEST HERE respect to year-round conditioning. (I’ve never rolled into a divot in BY SCOTT MCNEALY my 50 or so rounds there. Come to think of it, I’ve never even seen a divot or even another group on the course.) Quite different from Pebble, which gets more play than a David Feherty analogy. But the current ownership, led by Clint Eastwood, Dick Ferris, Peter Ueberroth, and Arnie, has done a spectacular job of keeping the course in AT&T-ready condition every day. The designs are both well thought out and visually stunning. The biggest difference is that Cypress still rewards the long bombers who can carry the ball 235 yards off the tee while Pebble has been modernized against that assault. And I am not saying that size matters, but Pebble is several hundred yards longer. For the lower handicappers, shooting par at Pebble will evoke way more shock and awe with the gang at home. Most telling, though, is how they finish. Cypress’s 17th and 18th pale in comparison to the finishing duo at Pebble—and who can forget a happy ending? Important to me personally (did I mention I can’t get into CPC), Pebble is the only top-10 golf course in America that is open to everyone and has been since it debuted in 1919. And finally, call me non-traditional but I like more than just the 18 golf holes. Give me a driving range that does not double as the right rough on the first hole (see Cypress). And after the round, you can put on a coat and tie and try to remember the other members’ names in the CPC clubhouse or you can head to the Tap Room at the Lodge for maybe the best post-round burger and beer this side of the Atlantic. And meet your buddies and make new friends ’til 2 a.m. So there you have it. Two great golf experiences, one clear answer.

JOANN DOST; EVAN SCHILLER

Pebble Beach

Scott McNealy is the co-founder of Sun Microsystems and current chairman of Wayin.com and has a home on Pebble Beach.

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Characters Ben Hogan-Sam Snead 18-hole playoff won by the Slammer, WHEN THE CURTAIN RISES on the 76th Masters, the the final major title of his career. press tent will be without one of its most enduring charac“The other one,” Bisher continues, “was Nicklaus in 1986. ters. Furman Bisher, the longtime columnist for the Atlanta Coming into that week, his earnings were about $186 [actuJournal-Constitution, will be following the action on TV at ally $4,404]. I’d been with him earlier that week walking a golf home while recovering from a recent surgery, thus ending course he was building near Atlanta, and he’d hardly even an attendance streak that’s positively DiMaggio-esque—he’s mentioned the Masters. been to every Masters since One of our writers, Tom 1950. We caught up with McCollister, wrote a piece the Chapel Hill alum resaying ‘It’s past Jack’s time.’ cently to scare up a few of “We ran the story on the his Masters memories— NO ONE HAS REPORTED ON MORE MASTERS eve of the tournament and and at 93, Bisher remains a THAN THE VENERABLE COLUMNIST one of Jack’s housemates, charming and candid conFOR THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION John Montgomery, clipped versationalist. the piece to the refrigerator so every time Jack went to the Furman Bisher’s career followed the classic newsman’s upfridge he’d see it. the-ladder tale. Born in the tiny hamlet of Denton, North “I remember Jack walking into the press room after the fiCarolina, he began in 1938 at the local paper of the slightly nal round and saying, ‘Where’s Tom McCollister!?’ Tom tried larger town of Lumberton before moving on to Charlotte to hide but Jack said, ‘No, no, Tom, you really did me a fa(where he landed a massive scoop: the first and only intervor. Thanks a lot!’ I followed Jack for some of that final round, view with Shoeless Joe Jackson, of Chicago “Black Sox” inbut it was such a mob scene you couldn’t really see much. I’ve famy), and finally the big city, Atlanta. never seen a larger gallery, and they were just going berserk. His recollections of his first trip to Augusta suggest a very That was one that thrilled us all.” different event from the one we know as the Masters. “It just Here’s hoping this year’s Masters serves up some action to wasn’t that wondrous,” he says. “Back then, you could drive give an old newsman some fresh thrills. —Thomas Dunne right in—you didn’t need credentials if you could prove you were a newspaperman. The Masters was covered by baseball writers coming north from spring training—guys like Red Smith, John Kieran, and Shirley Povich.” When asked what he thought had been the best Masters he’d seen, Bisher offers two answers. “The first was 1954 with Billy Joe Patton,” he says, referring to the great career amateur who passed away in January of 2011. “Billy Joe was sort of a wild hare. He’d have won the thing if he’d just played a little more cautiously on the back-nine par fives on Sunday afternoon. “I was with him at a dinner a few years ago,” Bisher continues, “and we were recalling how all these people from his hometown in North Carolina came down on the weekend to pull for him—they just drove right up and bought tickets. He said, ‘We’d gotten to No. 13, I couldn’t make up my mind what shot to hit, so I wound up knocking it in the stream.’ On 15, there were all these people yelling, ‘Go for it, Billy, go for it!’ Well, he listened to ’em, and hit it in the lake. “Patton said, ‘It was probably just as well I didn’t win it. I could’ve handled the money and Furman Bisher relaxes the fame, but I’m not in one of his favorite spots, the big oak tree sure I could’ve handled near the clubhouse the women.’” He wound at Augusta National up one stroke out of a Golf Club. 46

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CURTIS COMPTON/ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION/AP IMAGES

Furman Bisher


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Designed by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw, Bandon Preserve is a unique 13-hole, par 3 course offering stunning views, exceptional challenge and unquestioned reward. Bandon Preserve joins four courses ranked by Golf Magazine in the Top 15 You Can Play. Together, they create what Golf Digest calls the #1 Resort in America.

Open May 1, 2012.

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Been Here?

GREENBRIER

The Greenbrier Bunker LET’S GET the inevitable joke out of the way: The biggest bunker in the world is at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The joke is that the bunker—all 112,000 square feet of it— isn’t on any of the resort’s golf courses. In fact, it isn’t on anything. It’s under, as in underground, and it isn’t filled with sand but with beds and couches, a kitchen and infirmary, even an auditorium and television studio, enough room to accommodate 1,100 people. (That’s 275 foursomes if you’re still thinking it has something to do with golf. Which it doesn’t.) It’s that other kind of bunker, a hole in the ground designed for safety and protection, built during the Cold War when the threat of nuclear war hung over the country. If an attack came, the 535 members of Congress and their aides (but not their families and not the President and Vice President, who would hole up elsewhere) would leave Washington, D.C., by train and reconvene in a two-story cement box buried in a hillside under the hotel. From there the work of government—whatever work there was with Armageddon raging above—could continue. The Bunker (officially called The U.S. Government Relocation Facility) was constructed in top secret between 1958 and 1961. No one knew about it other than Greenbrier management, government planners, and some construction personnel: The story was that the resort was adding a new wing, and for more than 30 years, few people were the wiser. The lid was blown off in 1992 when journalist Ted Gup, working on a tip, booked a room at the resort and started asking questions. That spring, he wrote an article for the Washington Post revealing that The Bunker still existed and was still ready if needed. Once exposed, The Bunker ceased to have a 34

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purpose. The government stopped maintaining it and it became the resort’s responsibility. So now it’s open for daily tours, a slightly creepy look back at an era thankfully past. The tour—worth taking, especially if you are old enough to remember black-and-white TV, the Military Industrial Complex, and drills in which you cowered under your school desk— takes about 90 minutes and costs $30 per adult (about $4 in 1960 money). It goes through many of the rooms that our Senators, Representatives, and their staff would have lived and worked in, beginning with the massive, 25-ton steel-and-concrete doors, nearly two feet thick, that would have sealed out the world. Many of the rooms have been turned into exhibits, the walls lined with photographs and memorabilia. Some of the secret papers ordering the construction are on display, signed, in an act of bi-partisanship we might find hard to believe today, by the Democratic and Republican leaders of both houses of Congress. There are bunk beds and lockers, lounges with TVs (what would they have watched? Leave It To Bereaver?), medical facilities, a small auditorium where the chambers could meet, and whatever 1950s minds could come up with to ensure normality 60 feet down. One of the more interesting rooms is the communication center, which featured a television studio. It makes sense that the country’s leaders would need to be visible to whomever was left up top. But it’s a bit odd to see the large photo of the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building, meant to be a comforting backdrop when representatives addressed their constituents. Of course, there is a cafeteria, stocked with rations and other ready-to-eat meals. Today, retrofitted with modern appliances, the kitchen is used for cooking lessons. No fried-egg-in-a-bunker jokes, please.

BRIAN HOFFSIS

UNDERNEATH THE WEST VIRGINIA RESORT IS A COLD WAR-ERA RELIC DESIGNED TO KEEP SOME VERY IMPORTANT PEOPLE OUT OF A HAZARD BY JAMES A. FRANK


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The Best of…

ZERO RESTRICTION TOUR LITE 2 Gore-Tex fabric and patented technology offer comfort, while pleats on the back and elbows allow freedom of motion. Two-way zipper lets jacket lay flat when putting. Pants have an adjustable waist plus belt loops and besides coming in six lengths cuffs can be hemmed without losing quick open-and-close. Jacket (navy or black): $395; pants (navy or black): $295 zerorestriction.com

ADIDAS CLIMAPROOF STORM Both the new Storm SuperFast jacket and Storm pants are made of four-way stretchable polyester with a three-year waterproof warranty. The favorite of the company’s Tour pros, both garments are seam-sealed and feature a lightweight waterproof membrane. Jacket (black/ash, aquatic/ black, white/zone): $220; pants (black or white): $170 adidasgolf.com

SUN MOUNTAIN TORRENT Worn by the U.S. team at the last Presidents Cup, both pieces are constructed from a woven fabric over a waterproof membrane and protective liner. The jacket has expansion pleats in the back and adjustable hem and cuffs; elastic-waist pants can be shortened up to 2–1/2 inches with snaps. Jacket (black, titanium, or navy): $165; pants (navy or black): $150 sunmountain.com

Weather Beaters APRIL SHOWERS BRING...soggy golfers. Unless they’re wearing serious rain protection. Playing in the spring, in Britain, or while on that long-planned buddy trip (when the clouds are guaranteed to open up), a good rain suit is a necessity. The best suits—like the six featured here—share many of the same qualities, including a snug yet adjustable fit, freedom of movement, and fabric that breathes while repelling the raindrops. All prices are suggested retail. —James A. Frank GALVIN GREEN ARCH JACKET/ALF PANTS This Swedish brand is Europe’s best-seller, especially popular in Britain—but not sold in the U.S. Both the abrasion-resistant outer fabric and inner membrane are Gore-Tex. The jacket has reinforcement patches (for carrying a bag) and rain channels at the cuffs. Pants are available in 26 sizes. Limited-edition jacket (white with black/gunmetal/green): approx. $775; pants (black only): approx. $475 galvingreen.com

NIKE STORM-FIT ELITE Promising total coverage from both water and wind, the company’s top-of-the-line suit uses its proprietary Dri-FIT material that wicks moisture from the body. Seams are bonded instead of sewn to reduce weight and bulk and provide a sleek look. Fabric stretches for extended range of motion. Jacket (binary blue or black): $300; pants (black only): $200 nikegolf.com

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FOOTJOY TOUR COLLECTION The “It’s a Cinch” system allows easy adjustment through the pockets so there’s no getting wet while getting it to fit right. The four-way stretch polyester fabric allows full range of motion and has sealed seams, a waterproof front zipper, adjustable cuffs, and smooth inside liner. Jacket (black, black/white, white/black, navy, or charcoal): $250; pants (black): $180 footjoy.com


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My Design

JACK NICKLAUS

Sweet 16 JACK NICKLAUS STRENGTHENED A WEAK LINK AT MUIRFIELD VILLAGE

there will be more twos on the hole, but if TO SEE A PHOTO OF you hit a bad shot you’ll be more severely THE HOLE, PLEASE VISIT LINKSMAGAZINE.COM/ penalized, and if you bail out you’ll have MVGC16 a much tougher par.” The fact that the 16th will prove pivotal in next year’s Presidents Cup matches was another factor in redoing the hole. “Many matches finish around the 16th, 17th hole,” he says, “and I didn’t want to see those matches —T.C. finish on a weakish hole.”

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SOON AFTER Jack Nicklaus opened Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin, Ohio, in 1974, he took a poll of members to see which holes they liked best. He got back 14 different selections. “So that meant I had four holes to work on,” he says. One of those was the par-three 16th, but he only got around to redesigning it last year. “When you’re spending as much money as we did on 16 for only one golf hole, other priorities take precedence,” he says. “But I finally said, ‘I want to do 16 while I’m still here.’” A small pond in front and three bunkers now guard the 204-yard hole, which had just a bunker front and back before. The green also lines up better with the prevailing southwest wind, so balls don’t run through it as they did before. “There was really nothing wrong with the hole,” says Nicklaus, “but I just thought of 16 as a nice way to get from 15 green to 17 tee.” Ouch! Good thing the old 16th isn’t around to hear that. Truth be told, it was a fine hole but suffered by comparison with the fantastic holes that preceded it, the short par-four 14th with its crossing creek and narrow green and the roller-coaster par-five 15th. “At that point in the round I thought we could introduce some more excitement,” says Nicklaus. “Before there might be some birdies and bogeys but most people made par on the hole. Now if you hit a good shot, you’ll be rewarded. I think it’s an easier hole for a good shot. I think


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Edged by 23 miles of rivers and tidal creeks An established community with a coveted Charleston address Featuring an in-town private country club Golf courses by Tom Fazio and Rees Jones Host to the Nationwide Tour Championship With parks, gardens, biking and walking trails On-island shops, schools, restaurants and churches Convenient to beaches and international airport A diverse selection of homes and homesites A town. An island. A way of life.

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We Spy...

The Marriott/ TPC Sawgrass Resort MY HOPE OF REMAINING INCOGNITO got an immediate jolt when, while wandering through the cavernous clubhouse of the Tournament Players Club, perusing historic photos of Players Championships past—notably the first one on the TPC course in 1982 when winner Jerry Pate tossed architect Pete Dye and then Tour Commissioner Deane Beman into the lake beside the 18th green before diving in himself—whom do I bump into but Deane Beman, looking fit and on his way out to play. “What are you doing here?” he asked immediately. “Well, I’m on a quick break, staying at the Marriott, playing the TPC and Dye’s Valley—not as a press guy but as a legitimate paying guest.” After a bit of chitchat we parted and I headed to the range. “Mr Peper!” I was greeted rapturously by one of the earphone-equipped starters. “We have you playing Dye’s Valley at 12:45 but if you’d like to go out a little earlier—say 12:15—we’d be happy to accommodate you.” “Sure,” I said, a bit leery of the royal welcome. Had Beman outed me? Off I went to the tee only to find four golfers already assembled and not particularly interested in welcoming a fifth. Back to the range. “So sorry, Mr. Peper,” said the starter. “This almost never happens. I can assure you your 12:45 time will work, and if it doesn’t, you can play the TPC for free.” Now I knew they were onto me. Surely they didn’t treat everyone this way. Seems they did. On the practice tee the next morning I overheard starters helping other golfers with tee times, cheerfully replenishing range balls, and generally working hard to please. This is a resort where service is paramount. Likewise at the Marriott, the greeting was sincerely friendly, the attention swift, and the service solicitous whether at the front desk, the breakfast buffet, or the lobby bar. My room was fine but I must say I resent paying $13 a day for wi-fi and $10 for valet parking. Also, when the two-night golf package runs well over $1,000 everything should be close to perfect and it wasn’t—when I returned to the hotel after golf on the second day—at about 2 p.m.—the room had not been made up. As for the golf, although Dye’s Valley is a great layout, full of fun and challenge, especially on the water holes of the back nine, its bermuda greens were in less than top condition—mottled, slow (in the 9 range) and a bit tired looking. And although the TPC is one of my favorites, the Players Championship tail is wagging this dog. All play began at the 10th hole, the back tees were closed, it was

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WHAT I PAID: $1,250 WHAT I GOT: 2 room nights 1 round on the TPC Course 1 round on Dye’s Valley (practice balls, carts, and forecaddies included) 2 breakfasts at the Marriott 2 lunches at Nineteen 2 dinners at Augustine Grill Service: ACourse Quality: A Course Condition: B Accommodations: B+ Food: A+ Value: B+

cartpaths only, and the greens were slow. “They won’t let ’em get fast until tournament time,” said the forecaddie. Sorry, but that doesn’t wash—not when the main thing you’re selling is the experience of playing the same course the pros play. On the plus side, the pace of play was great—about four hours on each course— thanks in large part to the expert forecaddies at the TPC who do their best to coax players off the blue tees and onto the white markers—barely 6,100 yards (yet still sloped at 137). I was miffed when my group opted for the whites, but fortunately held my tongue since I played as if I needed an even shorter course. At the famed 17th, playing only 105 yards for us, I managed two—two balls in the water. The most satisfying courses were lunch and dinner. Nineteen, the dining room at the TPC clubhouse, has superb sandwiches (try the French Dip) and the Marriott’s Augustine Grill may be the best restaurant in Florida—lobster napoleon, prime filet, fresh fish bathed in delectable sauces, and homemade bread I couldn’t stop eating. Thank goodness there was a 24-hour gym. Of course, whatever the pluses and minuses, this resort has one cachet that no other can match—the chance you’ll bump into one of the locals—Vijay Singh, Fred Funk, Jim Furyk—or a card-carrying member of the PGA Tour. And that alone may be worth the price. —George Peper


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Champion Hills Club is a private, member-owned country club. Admission is member-sponsored and requires approval by the Board of Governors.


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BRIAN MORGAN (2)

Trump acquired a one-of-a-kind site and he and Martin Hawtree have made the most of it. This is the par-four 12th hole.

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TRUMP

SCOTLAND He promised “the greatest golf course in the world” and The Donald has clearly given it his best shot BY DAVID J. WHYTE

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So The Donald and I are chatting. On the phone. He’s on his cell

I’d arranged a pre-opening tour of Trump International Golf Links, about eight miles north of the City of Aberdeen, with John Bambury, the course’s Irish superintendent, an agronomy graduate of Penn State University who has worked on a number of grow-in projects in Ireland including Colin Montgomerie’s Carton House in County Kildare. We drove to an earthy platform overlooking the site. “This has surely got to be one of the most impressive golf views in the world,” Bambury enthused, switching off his engine as if to intensify my experience. To the right was a rolling, restless North Sea. To the left rose a

GARY LISBON GOLF PHOTOGRAPHY (2)

That was nice to know but not wishing to be held responsible for his entire round I asked if I could call back when he’d finished. “Yeah!” he continues three hours later. “The Scottish golf photographer Brian Morgan heard I was looking at Old Head in Ireland. It’s not a great course,” he opines. “It’s spectacular but too windy! Brian told me ‘If you want the greatest piece of golf land in the world, the best piece of land I’ve seen—ever in my life—it’s in Aberdeen.’ “I bought it because the dunes are the biggest in the world. We looked at 141 sites and at the end of the day there was nothing that came even close.”

BRIAN MORGAN

while playing a golf course somewhere in sunny Florida. I’m sitting behind a desk in not-so-sunny Scotland. “It was actually a countryman of yours who told me about this place,” he says. “Hang on a second.” The phone goes quiet, then I hear a dull thump, the unmistakable sound of clubhead meeting turf. Two seconds later Trump is back. “David, you’ve brought me luck,” he says.


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line of immense sandhills. Below us unfurled a driving range the size of several football fields. “The range is nearly 23 acres,” the superintendent went on, “with North and South tee boxes.” Impressive as that was, what drew my eyes were those formidable sandhills. In the oft-used phrase of Old Tom Morris, this was terrain “specifically designed by The Almighty for playing golf.” We drove to the front nine and carried on by foot, Bambury’s enthusiasm ascending with every step. “This is the greatest golf property on the planet,” he declared, emulating his boss’s skill for embroidery. “There is nothing like it! The size of the property is humongous—2.9 miles from north to south. There are 107 tee boxes. No course has that many tee boxes! The scale is amazing!” As passionate and charming as the Irishman was, I’d begun to drift into my own reverie. “The greatest golf course in the world” is what Trump and his organization have been touting ever since they commenced work on this prime linksland more than five years ago. Now let me tell you as a Scotsman, that’s not the kind of talk that wins over locals, least of all Aberdonians who may be the most dispassionate people on the planet. A big, brash, billionaire Yank blowing his

trumpet in their buttoned-up little corner is bound to get backs up. And of course it did. Assorted groups came out of the woodwork, pouring scorn. Campaigns like “Tripping up Trump,” complete with a feature-length film entitled You’ve Been Trumped tried to highlight the inequity of the coastal invader. The fracas came close to home (I live about an hour south of the project). Danny McDonald, a staunch Scottish socialist (I was best man at his wedding), went to see You’ve Been Trumped and came out incensed at the injustice Trump was perpetrating against local residents who didn’t want to move from their homes. Dr. Jim Hansom (I used to go out with his sister) was the principal geomorphology witness for Scottish Natural Heritage at a public inquiry on the development. He felt the dynamic dune system would be lost if it was planted with golf course grass—as indeed it would be. On the other side of the fence Ernie, my Dwarfed by the dunes golf-mad brother-in-law, was one of the and buffeted by the sea first to book a round on the course to- breezes, the par-three gether with thousands of other Scots ea- 6th exemplifies both the ger to sample the new links. And if the splendor and sternness blogs and comments on local websites of the course.


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simply the distance but the corridors and playing strategies of the holes. Luxurious, grassed walkways descend to the fairways, giving golfers the “green-carpet” treatment as they progress toward their shots. “Fescue tees, fescue walkways, fescue fairways,” Bambury was waxing on. “The greens are bent/fescue.” Nothing unusual in that, I thought, the obvious choice for free-draining Scottish linksland. “On a normal golf course you have one hectare of greens turf,” he told me. “Here we have 4.4 hectares, the same amount of greens turf as four normal golf courses.” They’d extravagantly applied the same seed to the green surrounds. Trump was clearly out to impress, but to be honest he couldn’t fail to impress on a site like this. Every hole is a pleasant surprise, a joyful, happy-slap to golfing sensibilities. As we walked along I became increasingly captivated, drawn in not only by the breathtaking The professorial Martin Hawtree was an unlikely partner for Trump, but they proved to be a good team.

BRIAN MORGAN (2)

were any indication, the people of Aberdeen were substantially more for the project than against, many stating that this is one of the best things to happen to Aberdeen since the discovery of North Sea oil. It’s all water under the bridge now. The course is built, settling in spectacularly, and set to open ahead of schedule on July 1. I continued my tour with Bambury and had to admit, as we stood on the first tee (I would be churlish or half-blind not to) the course-inprogress looked incredible. As a golf writer and photographer, I’ve made my way around a fair number of the world’s most notable courses, and I honestly couldn’t think of any that was so instantly, strikingly impressive. The opener will offer an interesting start, a tough par five when the wind is coming out of the southwest as it usually does. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th are almost surreal, with fairways and greens melting into the dunes. The multiple tee boxes perch like miniature lawns atop marram-tufted mounds and occupy diverse positions, changing not


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We made it to the stern conclusion of 18, an immense 617-yard battlefield generally navigated into the wind and surely the scariest hole on the course. There are 18 bunkers, most of them ganging up around the green. Yes, there are six tee boxes, but from all six of them this hole looks terrifying. We finished our tour and went off to “The Store,” a nearby farm shop, for a bite of breakfast. “How do you handle working for Donald Trump?” I asked Bambury, looking perhaps for a bit of gossip. “He likes things done a certain way,” he told me, “and not necessarily his way. He wants you to excel in what you do. The result was beauty of the place but by how the course had been entwined into it. that everyone raised their game—from the bottom to the top. The ultimate test, of course, will be how the course plays, but as a “You have this amazing canvas and you have the support of the turn-on to the imagination Trump International Golf Links has it Trump Organization to create something perfect. It’s been quite an exall—graceful, curvaceous fairways, wafting marram grass, refreshing perience. Even among the breezes, and beckoning, contractors it’s like, ‘Where beautifully proportioned, The ultimate test, of course, will be how the do we go after this?’” greens. And as an added course plays, but as a turn-on to the imagination I reflected on my transbonus, you see the sea on Atlantic phone call with nearly every hole. Trump International Golf Links has it all— Trump. I had to admit he Compared to the front, graceful, curvaceous fairways, wafting marram was a billionaire with few the back nine is even more grass, refreshing breezes, and beckoning, airs. “I’m a wealthy man, astonishing, the enormous primordial dunes creating a beautifully proportioned greens. And as an added David,” he told me as if sharing half a ham and spectacle of exaggerated probonus you see the sea on nearly every hole. cheese sandwich. His portions. But, Bambury aswealth was not his point. sured me, apart from the His message was that he had the funds to pull off what he has. planting of five million marram sprigs to stabilize the drifting sands, the “What about the real estate development?” I asked him, knowing dunes had not been invaded—the fairways and greens had been simit had come into serious question. ply and sympathetically draped among them. From the lofty perch of “The overall project including the hotel, luxury lodges, and housthe 14th tee, pointing north toward Cruden Bay, the contrast of wooling was never really important,” he told ly mammoth mounds and sinuously curving fairway is sensational. (continued on page 65) Left: No. 14 snakes naturally through a corridor of dunes. Above: The opening par five plays upwind to a split-level green.

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On His SHOULDERS The Masters might never have evolved had Bobby Jones not made the painful decision to un-retire By David Barrett

M

on his fame in a way he couldn’t as an amateur golfer, signing a lucrative deal for film shorts with Warner Brothers and joining the A.G. Spalding Company to create a Bobby Jones line of golf clubs. His other significant post-retirement venture was launching Augusta National Golf Club, fulfilling a dream that he had confided to his friend Clifford Roberts in the late 1920s. Roberts took that dream and ran with it, finding the site through connections in Augusta and taking care of the myriad details required to get the club off the ground. There was one big problem: The Depression was precisely the wrong time to try to start a golf club. The financial underwriting efforts fell short of the club’s goals and the membership drive was also faltering. Not even the name of Bobby Jones was enough in those hard times to get a sufficient number of men to join Augusta National to sustain the club, which was unable to make its mortgage payments or pay its bills from course construction. Roberts had a solution. The Augusta National would hold a tour-

BETTMANN/CORBIS

MOMENTS AFTER HE WRAPPED UP the Grand Slam in 1930 by winning the U.S. Amateur, Bobby Jones told defending champion Jimmy Johnston in the locker room that he was through with competition. “The game of golf is wrecking my health, stunting me in my business ambitions, and I am sick of it all,” Jones confided. The greatest amateur golfer of his, or any, time had competed in only a handful of tournaments a year. But those tournaments had taken a lot out of him. He “blew up completely,” as he later wrote, after the 1926 U.S. Open, weeping uncontrollably in his room as he waited for the rest of the field to finish. And in 1930, after Jones had won the British Open and Amateur, writer George Greenwood observed, “I never saw a man closer to collapse than was ‘Bobby’ Jones.” So, even though he was only 28 years old, it was no surprise when Jones announced his retirement in November of 1930. He had other priorities in his life, including his family (a third child was on the way) and the Atlanta law practice he had started in 1927. It didn’t hurt that he was able to cash in

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nament. If orchestrated properly, such an event would generate publicity for the club—publicity that could lead to new members. If there was any way out of the hole Augusta National found itself in, this was it. Thus, the Masters was born primarily as a way of drumming up membership for a struggling new club. Of course, there was one way to maximize the publicity—by announcing that Bobby Jones would be a competitor. But would Jones agree to come out of retirement? Jones wanted his club to survive and he wanted to showcase the golf course. The tournament was a means to those ends. A tournament without him might not be enough to accomplish those goals; a tournament with him might. It would attract much more media attention and bigger headlines nationwide, and it would mean higher gate receipts. The one thing that probably made Jones hesitate was that he didn’t want this to become a Return of Bobby Jones story that would turn the event into a pressure cooker for him. In the back of his mind, he must have known that’s exactly what would happen. But the other points were too persuasive. If that’s the way it had to be, Jones would just have to deal with it. He was painted into a corner. The tendency decades later is to think of Jones’s appearances in his tournament as purely ceremonial. In reality, his 1934 appearance was anything but. The press angle going into the tournament was the same as at any open event in the 1920s—could the pros beat Bobby? Associated Press sports editor Alan Gould wrote that the pros entertained “more hope than convictions” that they could. “I would feel confident in [Jones’s] old competitive spirit asserting itself. No performer dominant for so long as Jones was could sensibly feel other than a strong urge to do his

absolute best in attempting even a transient comeback. “Championship golf . . . is not like boxing in respect to the angle that a long layoff is so costly in speed, stamina, and competitive edge,” Gould wrote. “I’ll be surprised if he doesn’t finish among the first three at Augusta.” If that seems overly optimistic for a player who had been retired for four years, it’s worth reviewing Jones’s record from 1922 through 1930. He played in 12 U.S. and British Opens during that time, winning seven and finishing second in four. Jones would be coming into the tournament cold in terms of competitive play, but he was taking his preparation seriously. Three weeks before the March 22–25 tournament, he set the course record with a 65 during a visit to Augusta. Bookmakers— yes, they were a part of the scene in those days—installed Jones as a co-favorite with Paul Runyan, the hottest player on Tour at the time, at 6 to 1. But there were troubling signs from Jones as tournament week dawned. On Monday he complained that he hadn’t been making any long putts in his practice rounds (he had arrived the previous Wednesday) and in the next two days his woes extended to the shorter putts. As the first day of the Masters dawned, one question loomed

Jones practiced for hours on the Augusta National putting green, but there was no preparing for the pressure that came with a return to competitive golf.

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Jones pulled no punches in describing his own putting woes in a conversation with famed sports writer and Augusta National member Grantland Rice after the round. “I had no putting stroke at all. . .I hope to be better, for I know I can’t be worse around the greens, not even if I use my shoe or an old rake,” he admitted. In preparing for the tournament, Jones had shot par or better in nearly all of his rounds at Augusta National. But when the bell rang he proved the dictum that he had earlier written in his book, Down the Fairway: “There are two kinds of golf: golf—and tournament golf. And they are not at all the same thing.” The stories in the newspapers briefly glossed over the leaders—eventual winner Horton Smith, Jimmy Hines, and Emmet French were tied at 70—and devoted most of their space to Jones’s disappointing round. The Augusta Chronicle later reported that more words were transmitted by telegraph from Augusta than at the previous year’s U.S. Open. That kind of coverage was attributable

Left: Jones and co-favorite Paul Runyan Above: The tee of the par-three 3rd (now the 12th) during the first Masters. Opposite: Horton Smith beat Jones by 10. Below: Jones’s beloved Calamity Jane

to interest in Jones’s return to competition. The saga of Jones and his putting continued on Friday. After a long practice session the previous evening, Jones came out on Friday morning and spent another hour on the practice green before his afternoon tee time. He raised the hopes of onlookers by holing putts with impressive regularity, but gave an indication as to his mindset by saying, “I hope I don’t leave this luck on the practice green.” That’s exactly what happened. If anything, Jones was worse on the greens in the second round than the first, taking 38 putts and even missing twice from a mere 18 inches. He hit the ball well enough and improved his score to a 74, but he was now eight strokes behind. Gould wrote that Jones’s “hands seemed to shake” and Jones’s biographer O.B. Keeler wrote that he “stabbed jerkily at the ball,” which sounds like the malady that today we know as the yips, where short putts become the thing of nightmares as hand control goes away.

LEONARD KAMSLER; AP IMAGES (3)

largest over the proceedings: Did the Emperor of Golf still have clothes? While the answer wouldn’t definitively come in a single day, this first round would go a long way toward showing what Jones still brought to the table as a player. The results were highly discouraging to Jones’s supporters: The Emperor was naked on the greens. While striking the ball nearly as well as ever, Jones was practically helpless with the putter. The result was a four-overpar 76, six strokes out of the lead and in a tie for 34th place. Having lost none of his prodigious power off the tee, Jones took advantage of his own course design by going for the green in two on all four par fives. He missed a 15-foot eagle putt on the fourth hole, known today as the famed 13th, and a four-foot eagle putt on the 11th, one of an astounding seven misses on putts of five feet or less.


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“I honestly have been afraid of even a foot himself. Jones’s putting improved in the third putt,” Jones told Rice after the round. “I almost round, thanks perhaps to an old, rusty putmissed three of those today. . .The minute I ter that a friend had brought from Atlanta walked onto the green I had the jitters. Even on Friday night. “Calamity Jane III” was a relthe sight of that cup made me sick. It looked ative of Jones’s old reliable Calamity Jane (unto be smaller than the ball I was putting. . . available to him since he had given it to SpaldWhen I got close to the cup I felt as if I was ing to use as a model) and was rescued from Bobby’s mother’s golf bag. looking at the fangs of a rattlesnake.” Gould wrote that the pros were galloping toward their biggest golfing “kill” since they routed Jones The 1934 Masters Final Results at the 1927 U.S. Open, where he 1 Horton Smith 70 72 70 72 284 -4 finished 11th. 2 Craig Wood 71 74 69 71 285 -3 T3 Billy Burke 72 71 70 73 286 -2 Such a perception of his play was T3 Paul Runyan 74 71 70 71 286 -2 the risk Jones took in taking his 5 Ed Dudley 74 69 71 74 288 E game out of mothballs for a return 6 Wille MacFarlane 74 73 70 74 291 +3 T7 Al Espinosa 75 70 75 72 292 +4 to the national stage. Gould did acT7 Jimmy Hines 70 74 74 74 292 +4 knowledge that Jones’s role as tourT7 Harold McSpaden 77 74 72 69 292 +4 nament host, and his long absence T7 MacDonald Smith 74 70 74 74 292 +4 T11 Mortie Dutra 74 75 71 73 293 +5 from competition, had taken someT11 Al Waltrous 74 74 71 74 293 +5 thing out of him: “So far he has T13 Walter Hagen 71 76 70 77 294 +6 played exactly like a perfect host, T13 Robert T. Jones Jr. 76 74 72 72 294 +6 T13 Denny Shute 73 73 76 72 294 +6 happy to see his old friends having a good time but quite unequal to the personal job of keeping pace “The club appeared out of place, along with with them after a lapse of four seasons.” Jones played with his old 1920s rival his other shiny instruments,” the New York Walter Hagen in the third and fourth rounds, Times report noted. “It was rusty and the shaft a pairing suggested by the 41-year-old Haig was of wood.”

Despite holing some long ones and finishing with 30 putts, Jones missed three times from four feet or less as a 72 left him 10 strokes back after 54 holes. No matter what his score, the Emperor was still king to the galleries. Walking down the fairway of the 2nd hole during the final round, he siphoned off a good portion of what was originally a sizable gallery following tournament leader Smith, who was just completing the nearby 5th hole (pairings were not made according to score in those days). Jones put on a good show, making five birdies in a round of 72 as he tied with Hagen for 13th, which would stand as his best showing in 12 Masters appearances. Remarkably, Jones had more subpar holes for the tournament than winner Smith, finishing with 17 birdies while Smith was notching 15 birdies and an eagle. But Jones finished 10 strokes behind, and six-over par, because he made 17 bogeys and three double bogeys. Rice asked Jones if he’d had fun. “Not a bit this time,” Bobby answered. “When you hit your drives and approaches and all your harder shots and can’t putt, you suffer, no matter what your handicap. It is the worst suffering in golf.” Jones had only agreed to play for the sake of keeping his club afloat in tough economic times. However, the nation’s writers weren’t aware of Augusta National’s financial woes, and thus didn’t know the real reason Jones had joined the field. Jones would be one of the favorites in 1935, only to finish 25th. By the end of that week it had dawned on everyone that Jones would probably never be a threat to win his own tournament. But the tournament was already past needing that. The writers initially drawn by Jones’s comeback would return each year to tell the story of the Masters. Adapted from Making the Masters: Bobby Jones & the Birth of the World’s Greatest Golf Tournament (Skyhorse Publishing).

Open for Gatefold

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“I honestly have been afraid of even a foot himself. Jones’s putting improved in the third putt,” Jones told Rice after the round. “I almost round, thanks perhaps to an old, rusty putmissed three of those today. . .The minute I ter that a friend had brought from Atlanta walked onto the green I had the jitters. Even on Friday night. “Calamity Jane III” was a relthe sight of that cup made me sick. It looked ative of Jones’s old reliable Calamity Jane (unto be smaller than the ball I was putting. . . available to him since he had given it to SpaldWhen I got close to the cup I felt as if I was ing to use as a model) and was rescued from Bobby’s mother’s golf bag. looking at the fangs of a rattlesnake.” Gould wrote that the pros were galloping toward their biggest golfing “kill” since they routed Jones The 1934 Masters Final Results at the 1927 U.S. Open, where he 1 Horton Smith 70 72 70 72 284 -4 finished 11th. 2 Craig Wood 71 74 69 71 285 -3 T3 Billy Burke 72 71 70 73 286 -2 Such a perception of his play was T3 Paul Runyan 74 71 70 71 286 -2 the risk Jones took in taking his 5 Ed Dudley 74 69 71 74 288 E game out of mothballs for a return 6 Wille MacFarlane 74 73 70 74 291 +3 T7 Al Espinosa 75 70 75 72 292 +4 to the national stage. Gould did acT7 Jimmy Hines 70 74 74 74 292 +4 knowledge that Jones’s role as tourT7 Harold McSpaden 77 74 72 69 292 +4 nament host, and his long absence T7 MacDonald Smith 74 70 74 74 292 +4 T11 Mortie Dutra 74 75 71 73 293 +5 from competition, had taken someT11 Al Waltrous 74 74 71 74 293 +5 thing out of him: “So far he has T13 Walter Hagen 71 76 70 77 294 +6 played exactly like a perfect host, T13 Robert T. Jones Jr. 76 74 72 72 294 +6 T13 Denny Shute 73 73 76 72 294 +6 happy to see his old friends having a good time but quite unequal to the personal job of keeping pace “The club appeared out of place, along with with them after a lapse of four seasons.” Jones played with his old 1920s rival his other shiny instruments,” the New York Walter Hagen in the third and fourth rounds, Times report noted. “It was rusty and the shaft a pairing suggested by the 41-year-old Haig was of wood.”

Despite holing some long ones and finishing with 30 putts, Jones missed three times from four feet or less as a 72 left him 10 strokes back after 54 holes. No matter what his score, the Emperor was still king to the galleries. Walking down the fairway of the 2nd hole during the final round, he siphoned off a good portion of what was originally a sizable gallery following tournament leader Smith, who was just completing the nearby 5th hole (pairings were not made according to score in those days). Jones put on a good show, making five birdies in a round of 72 as he tied with Hagen for 13th, which would stand as his best showing in 12 Masters appearances. Remarkably, Jones had more subpar holes for the tournament than winner Smith, finishing with 17 birdies while Smith was notching 15 birdies and an eagle. But Jones finished 10 strokes behind, and six-over par, because he made 17 bogeys and three double bogeys. Rice asked Jones if he’d had fun. “Not a bit this time,” Bobby answered. “When you hit your drives and approaches and all your harder shots and can’t putt, you suffer, no matter what your handicap. It is the worst suffering in golf.” Jones had only agreed to play for the sake of keeping his club afloat in tough economic times. However, the nation’s writers weren’t aware of Augusta National’s financial woes, and thus didn’t know the real reason Jones had joined the field. Jones would be one of the favorites in 1935, only to finish 25th. By the end of that week it had dawned on everyone that Jones would probably never be a threat to win his own tournament. But the tournament was already past needing that. The writers initially drawn by Jones’s comeback would return each year to tell the story of the Masters. Adapted from Making the Masters: Bobby Jones & the Birth of the World’s Greatest Golf Tournament (Skyhorse Publishing).

Open for Gatefold

SPRING 2012 LINKSMAGAZINE.COM

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Teeth of the Dog Hole No. 5

With nine more holes from Pete Dye and a $40 million renovation Casa de Campo reaffirms its role as the best resort in the Caribbean

JEWEL

by

L.C. LAMBRECHT

GeorGe PePer

58

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Winners & Sinners The best and worst performances from 75 years of the Masters

Worst stretch drive

Worst finish by a winner

1950 Jim Ferrier bogeyed five of the last six holes to lose by two

1961 Gary Player shot a 40 on the back nine but won by one

1961 Arnold Palmer double bogeyed the final hole to lose by one

1982 Craig Stadler shot a 40 on the back nine but won a playoff

1969 Charles Coody bogeyed the last three holes to lose by two 1979 Ed Sneed bogeyed the last three holes, lost a playoff 2009 Kenny Perry bogeyed the last two holes, lost a playoff

Best back-nine charge 1978 Gary Player shot a 30 on the back nine to win by one 1986 Jack Nicklaus shot a 30 on the back nine to win by one Jack Nicklaus, 1986

Best round (score) 63 Nick Price, 1986 third round 63 Greg Norman, 1996 first round

Best final round (score) 64 Maurice Bembridge, 1974 64 Hale Irwin, 1975

FINAL 36 HOLES, TOTAL

1985 Curtis Strange, 80 in the first round and 65 in the second round

Sam Snead, 134 (avg. 148.77), 1949

1989 Nick Faldo, 77 in the third round and 65 in the final round

Johnny Miller, 131 (avg. 145.16), 1975

1990 Mike Donald, 64 in the first round and 82 in the second round

Best nine holes 29 Mark Calcavecchia, 1992, back nine, fourth round 29 David Toms, 1998, back nine, fourth round

64 Gary Player, 1978 64 Greg Norman, 1988

Best front nine

64 David Toms, 1998

30 Johnny Miller, 1975, third round

Best round (compared to field average) FULL-FIELD ROUNDS Greg Norman, 63 (avg. 73.404), 1996, first round Cary Middlecoff, 65 (avg. 75.395), 1955, second round THIRD ROUND Jack Nicklaus, 64 (avg. 73.06), 1965 Johnny Miller, 65 (avg. 73.85), 1975 FOURTH ROUND Greg Norman, 64 (avg. 72.96), 1988

30 Greg Norman, 1988, fourth round 30 K.J. Choi, 2004, second round 30 Phil Mickelson, 2009, fourth round

Nick Price, 1986

Worst round 94 Doug Ford, 1997, 2000

Worst round by a player under 50 90 Frank Souchak, 1954

Best round since 2003 (lengthened course) 64 Jason Day, 2011, second round 65 Len Mattiace, 2003; Tiger Woods, Trevor Immelman, 2005; Chad Campbell, Anthony Kim, 2009; Nick Watney, Anthony Kim, 2010; Rory McIlroy, Alvaro Quiros, 2011

89 Doug Clarke, 1980; Frank Conner, 1982

Worst round by a player who made the cut 87 Calvin Peete, 1983 86 Lindy Miller, 1979; Jodie Mudd, 1983; Tommy Aaron, 2000

Don January, 66 (avg. 74.24), 1969

Most birdies in a round

Best round/worst round (same tournament)

Gary Player, 64 (avg. 72.17), 1978

11 Anthony Kim, 2009, second round

1936 Craig Wood, 88 in the first round and 67 in the second round

2004 Phil Mickelson shot a 31 on the back nine to win by one

Worst collapse 1956 Ken Venturi played the last 10 holes in seven-over to lose by one (shot a final-round 80 to lose a four-stroke lead) 1996 Greg Norman shot a 40 on the back nine for a 78 to lose by five (led by six through 54 holes)

1996 Greg Norman, 63 in the first round and 78 in the fourth round

2011 Rory McIlroy shot a 43 on the back nine for an 80 to finish T15 after leading by four through 54 holes

Best stretch drive

Greg Norman, 1996

1959 Art Wall birdied five of the last six holes to win by one 1960 Arnold Palmer birdied the last two holes to win by one 1986 Jack Nicklaus played the last four holes in four-under to win by one 1998 Mark O’Meara birdied the last two holes to win by one 2011 Charl Schwartzel birdied the last four holes to win by two

Best stretch drive no one remembers 1968 Bob Goalby went birdiebirdie-eagle on 13 through 15, overshadowed by the scorecard error that cost Roberto De Vicenzo a tie for first after 72 holes 1989 Nick Faldo birdied four of the last six holes to reach a playoff; overshadowed by Scott Hoch’s miss of a two-foot putt on the first extra hole

Worst start by a winner 1997 Tiger Woods shot a 40 on the front nine of the first round but won by 12

Best start by a winner, final round 1983 Seve Balleteros, birdieeagle-par-birdie on the first four holes

Worst start by a winner, final round 1990 Nick Faldo double bogeyed the 1st hole to fall five behind but shot a 69 and won a playoff

Best burst 1982 Dan Pohl, eagle-eaglebirdie-birdie starting at No. 13 of the third round (eventually lost a playoff) 1999 Steve Pate, seven straight

Charl Schwartzel, 2011 birdies starting at No. 7 of the third round (eventually finished T4) 2005 Tiger Woods, seven straight birdies starting at No. 7 of the third round (eventually won) 2010 Phil Mickelson, eagleeagle-birdie starting at No. 13 of the third round (eventually won)

Wild swings 1937 Byron Nelson made up six strokes on Ralph Guldahl in two holes with birdie-eagle to double bogey-bogey on the 12th and 13th holes of the final round (Nelson won by two) 1980 Seve Ballesteros’s 10stroke lead in the final round dwindled to two when he played the 10th through 13th holes in four-over and Gibby Gilbert, playing ahead of him, birdied four straight from the 13th through 16th (Ballesteros recovered to win by four) 1981 Jack Nicklaus went from two ahead to four behind to even with Tom Watson in the space of five holes during the third round. Nicklaus double bogeyed 12 and bogeyed 13 while Watson, playing ahead of him, birdied 13, 14, and 15. Then Nicklaus birdied 15 and 16 while Watson double bogeyed 17. (Watson won the next day) 2005 Tiger Woods started out four behind Chris DiMarco when the suspended third round began Sunday morning, but made up six strokes with birdies on the 10th through 13th while DiMarco double bogeyed the 10th

Best hole Double eagle 2 Gene Sarazen, 15th hole, 1935 Double eagle 2 Bruce Devlin, 8th hole, 1967 Double eagle 2, Jeff Maggert, 13th hole, 1994

Worst hole 10-over par 13 Tom Weiskopf, 12th hole, 1980 8-over par 13 Tommy Nakajima, 13th hole, 1978 8-over par 11 Herman Barron, 16th hole, 1950 7-over par 12 Frank Walsh, 8th hole, 1935

Best shot 1935 Gene Sarazen holed a 4-wood from 230 yards for a double eagle on the 15th hole of the final round to tie for the lead (won a playoff) 1954 Billy Joe Patton aced the 6th hole to highlight a front-nine 32 that moved him into a share of the lead (a back-nine 39 left him one out of a playoff) 1987 Larry Mize holed a pitch shot of about 35 yards from right of the 11th green to win a playoff on the second extra hole 2005 Tiger Woods used the slope of the green on the 16th hole for a chip-in birdie to take a two-stroke lead in the final round (won a playoff) 2010 Phil Mickelson threaded a 6-iron second shot through an opening in the trees on the par-five 13th hole of the final round to within four feet of the hole, keying his victory


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Winners & Sinners The best and worst performances from 75 years of the Masters

Worst stretch drive

Worst finish by a winner

1950 Jim Ferrier bogeyed five of the last six holes to lose by two

1961 Gary Player shot a 40 on the back nine but won by one

1961 Arnold Palmer double bogeyed the final hole to lose by one

1982 Craig Stadler shot a 40 on the back nine but won a playoff

1969 Charles Coody bogeyed the last three holes to lose by two 1979 Ed Sneed bogeyed the last three holes, lost a playoff 2009 Kenny Perry bogeyed the last two holes, lost a playoff

Best back-nine charge 1978 Gary Player shot a 30 on the back nine to win by one 1986 Jack Nicklaus shot a 30 on the back nine to win by one Jack Nicklaus, 1986

Best round (score) 63 Nick Price, 1986 third round 63 Greg Norman, 1996 first round

Best final round (score) 64 Maurice Bembridge, 1974 64 Hale Irwin, 1975

FINAL 36 HOLES, TOTAL

1985 Curtis Strange, 80 in the first round and 65 in the second round

Sam Snead, 134 (avg. 148.77), 1949

1989 Nick Faldo, 77 in the third round and 65 in the final round

Johnny Miller, 131 (avg. 145.16), 1975

1990 Mike Donald, 64 in the first round and 82 in the second round

Best nine holes 29 Mark Calcavecchia, 1992, back nine, fourth round 29 David Toms, 1998, back nine, fourth round

64 Gary Player, 1978 64 Greg Norman, 1988

Best front nine

64 David Toms, 1998

30 Johnny Miller, 1975, third round

Best round (compared to field average) FULL-FIELD ROUNDS Greg Norman, 63 (avg. 73.404), 1996, first round Cary Middlecoff, 65 (avg. 75.395), 1955, second round THIRD ROUND Jack Nicklaus, 64 (avg. 73.06), 1965 Johnny Miller, 65 (avg. 73.85), 1975 FOURTH ROUND Greg Norman, 64 (avg. 72.96), 1988

30 Greg Norman, 1988, fourth round 30 K.J. Choi, 2004, second round 30 Phil Mickelson, 2009, fourth round

Nick Price, 1986

Worst round 94 Doug Ford, 1997, 2000

Worst round by a player under 50 90 Frank Souchak, 1954

Best round since 2003 (lengthened course) 64 Jason Day, 2011, second round 65 Len Mattiace, 2003; Tiger Woods, Trevor Immelman, 2005; Chad Campbell, Anthony Kim, 2009; Nick Watney, Anthony Kim, 2010; Rory McIlroy, Alvaro Quiros, 2011

89 Doug Clarke, 1980; Frank Conner, 1982

Worst round by a player who made the cut 87 Calvin Peete, 1983 86 Lindy Miller, 1979; Jodie Mudd, 1983; Tommy Aaron, 2000

Don January, 66 (avg. 74.24), 1969

Most birdies in a round

Best round/worst round (same tournament)

Gary Player, 64 (avg. 72.17), 1978

11 Anthony Kim, 2009, second round

1936 Craig Wood, 88 in the first round and 67 in the second round

2004 Phil Mickelson shot a 31 on the back nine to win by one

Worst collapse 1956 Ken Venturi played the last 10 holes in seven-over to lose by one (shot a final-round 80 to lose a four-stroke lead) 1996 Greg Norman shot a 40 on the back nine for a 78 to lose by five (led by six through 54 holes)

1996 Greg Norman, 63 in the first round and 78 in the fourth round

2011 Rory McIlroy shot a 43 on the back nine for an 80 to finish T15 after leading by four through 54 holes

Best stretch drive

Greg Norman, 1996

1959 Art Wall birdied five of the last six holes to win by one 1960 Arnold Palmer birdied the last two holes to win by one 1986 Jack Nicklaus played the last four holes in four-under to win by one 1998 Mark O’Meara birdied the last two holes to win by one 2011 Charl Schwartzel birdied the last four holes to win by two

Best stretch drive no one remembers 1968 Bob Goalby went birdiebirdie-eagle on 13 through 15, overshadowed by the scorecard error that cost Roberto De Vicenzo a tie for first after 72 holes 1989 Nick Faldo birdied four of the last six holes to reach a playoff; overshadowed by Scott Hoch’s miss of a two-foot putt on the first extra hole

Worst start by a winner 1997 Tiger Woods shot a 40 on the front nine of the first round but won by 12

Best start by a winner, final round 1983 Seve Balleteros, birdieeagle-par-birdie on the first four holes

Worst start by a winner, final round 1990 Nick Faldo double bogeyed the 1st hole to fall five behind but shot a 69 and won a playoff

Best burst 1982 Dan Pohl, eagle-eaglebirdie-birdie starting at No. 13 of the third round (eventually lost a playoff) 1999 Steve Pate, seven straight

Charl Schwartzel, 2011 birdies starting at No. 7 of the third round (eventually finished T4) 2005 Tiger Woods, seven straight birdies starting at No. 7 of the third round (eventually won) 2010 Phil Mickelson, eagleeagle-birdie starting at No. 13 of the third round (eventually won)

Wild swings 1937 Byron Nelson made up six strokes on Ralph Guldahl in two holes with birdie-eagle to double bogey-bogey on the 12th and 13th holes of the final round (Nelson won by two) 1980 Seve Ballesteros’s 10stroke lead in the final round dwindled to two when he played the 10th through 13th holes in four-over and Gibby Gilbert, playing ahead of him, birdied four straight from the 13th through 16th (Ballesteros recovered to win by four) 1981 Jack Nicklaus went from two ahead to four behind to even with Tom Watson in the space of five holes during the third round. Nicklaus double bogeyed 12 and bogeyed 13 while Watson, playing ahead of him, birdied 13, 14, and 15. Then Nicklaus birdied 15 and 16 while Watson double bogeyed 17. (Watson won the next day) 2005 Tiger Woods started out four behind Chris DiMarco when the suspended third round began Sunday morning, but made up six strokes with birdies on the 10th through 13th while DiMarco double bogeyed the 10th

Best hole Double eagle 2 Gene Sarazen, 15th hole, 1935 Double eagle 2 Bruce Devlin, 8th hole, 1967 Double eagle 2, Jeff Maggert, 13th hole, 1994

Worst hole 10-over par 13 Tom Weiskopf, 12th hole, 1980 8-over par 13 Tommy Nakajima, 13th hole, 1978 8-over par 11 Herman Barron, 16th hole, 1950 7-over par 12 Frank Walsh, 8th hole, 1935

Best shot 1935 Gene Sarazen holed a 4-wood from 230 yards for a double eagle on the 15th hole of the final round to tie for the lead (won a playoff) 1954 Billy Joe Patton aced the 6th hole to highlight a front-nine 32 that moved him into a share of the lead (a back-nine 39 left him one out of a playoff) 1987 Larry Mize holed a pitch shot of about 35 yards from right of the 11th green to win a playoff on the second extra hole 2005 Tiger Woods used the slope of the green on the 16th hole for a chip-in birdie to take a two-stroke lead in the final round (won a playoff) 2010 Phil Mickelson threaded a 6-iron second shot through an opening in the trees on the par-five 13th hole of the final round to within four feet of the hole, keying his victory


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to extend the playoff (lost on the second extra hole)

Best eagle feats 1974 Bruce Crampton made four eagles in the tournament 1995 Jack Nicklaus eagled the par-four 5th hole twice 2009 Dustin Johnson made four eagles in the tournament 2010 Tiger Woods made four eagles in the tournament

Best performance on the par fives 1995 Greg Norman 15-under

Fred Couples, 1992

Worst shot

Best putt

1961 Arnold Palmer bladed a shot from the right greenside bunker over the green on the 18th hole of the final round for a double bogey that turned a one-stroke lead into a onestroke defeat

1955 Cary Middlecoff, 85-footer for an eagle on the 13th hole of the second round on the way to a four-stroke lead through 36 holes (he won by seven)

1986 Seve Ballesteros’s 4-iron second shot to the par-five 15th in the final round didn’t come close to landing on dry land, diving into the pond for a bogey that dropped him into a tie for the lead (he finished two back) 2003 Jeff Maggert was one stroke off the lead in the final round when he knocked a shot from a back bunker on the 12th into Rae’s Creek, then repeated the shot after a drop, making a quintuple bogey eight 2011 Rory McIlroy pull-hooked his tee shot on the 10th hole of the final round, hitting a tree and ricocheting into a spot among the cabins, setting up a triple bogey that sent him reeling out of the lead

GETTY IMAGES (8), CORBIS

Best shots/worst shots (same tournament) 2005 Tiger Woods, putted into the water on the 13th hole of the first round; used the slope of the green for a spectacular chip-in birdie on the 16th hole of the final round (he eventually won)

1975 Jack Nicklaus, 40-footer for a birdie on the 16th hole of the final round to tie for the lead (he won by one) 1984 Ben Crenshaw, 60-footer for a birdie on the 10th hole of the final round to take a twostroke lead (he won by two)

Worst putt 1946 Ben Hogan, missed a twoand-a-half-foot putt on the 72nd hole to lose by one 1978 Hubert Green, missed a three-foot putt on the 72nd hole to lose by one 1989 Scott Hoch, missed a twofoot putt on the first playoff hole

Best performance on the par fives by a champion 1976 Ray Floyd 14-under

Worst penalty 1962 Dow Finsterwald was penalized two strokes for practice putting on the 5th green after holing out during the first round. The extra strokes ultimately put him in a playoff, which he lost.

2nd Tony Lema, 1963 2nd Dan Pohl, 1982 T2 Jason Day, 2011 *Doesn’t include inaugural Masters of 1934

Ben Crenshaw, 1995

Sam Snead & Ben Hogan, 1954

Spain, two players, four titles

Mark O’Meara won in his 15th Masters appearance

*Based on number of natives who have won

Best amateur showing

Worst countries for champions*

T2 Frank Stranahan, 1947

Australia

2nd Ken Venturi, 1956 T2 Charles Coe, 1961

*Most PGA Tour winners but no Masters titles

Best states for champions*

Most career categories led 6 victories 15 top-five finishes

1986 Jack Nicklaus hugged his caddie/son Jackie

Best cut-made streak

Georgia, three players, three titles

1995 Ben Crenshaw, overcome with emotion after winning a week after the death of teacher Harvey Penick, was comforted by caddie Carl Jackson

1954 Sam Snead defeated Ben Hogan, 70-71

2010 Phil Mickelson hugged his wife Amy, who was recovering from cancer

2003 Mike Weir won on the first extra hole with a bogey to Len Mattiace’s double bogey

Best perseverance

Jack Nicklaus

2009 Angel Cabrera’s second shot caromed off a tree into the fairway on the first playoff hole (he stayed alive with a par and won on the second extra hole)

1989 Scott Hoch and Nick Faldo both bogeyed the first extra hole, Hoch missing a two-footer; Faldo won with a birdie on the second extra hole

United Kingdom, three players, five titles

California, five players, 10 titles

1997 Tiger Woods hugged his father Earl

1982 Craig Stadler won on the first extra hole when Dan Pohl three-putted from the fringe

South Africa, three players, five titles

Texas, seven players, 12 titles

1942 Byron Nelson defeated Ben Hogan, 69-70

Worst playoff

Best countries for champions*

T6 with a 283 total, four back, at age 58

Best playoff

2005 Tiger Woods defeated Tiger Woods, 2005 Chris DiMarco with a birdie on the first extra hole

*Highest population states with no native champions

Best post-round moment

1992 Fred Couples’s ball stayed on the bank on the 12th hole of the final round instead of rolling into the water (won by two)

1987 Larry Mize defeated Greg Norman and Seve Ballesteros, chipping in on the second extra hole

Michigan

Florida

2nd Lloyd Mangrum, 1940

Best performance on the par fives without going for any in two

1985 Bernhard Langer’s second shot on the 13th hole in the third round landed short of the creek but bounced over it and onto the green, from where he holed a putt for an eagle (won by two)

Won Gene Sarazen, 1935 2nd Ralph Guldahl, 1937

2003 Jeff Maggert was leading by one stroke when his second shot on the par-four 4th caught the lip of a fairway bunker, the ball ricocheting back and hitting him in the chest on the way to a two-stroke penalty. He finished five back after a 75 that included five birdies, no bogeys, a triple bogey and a quintuple bogey on the 12th (see “Worst Shot”).

Best break

Worst states for champions*

Won Fuzzy Zoeller, 1979

1968 Roberto De Vicenzo signed for a par on the 17th hole of the final round instead of the birdie he actually made, an extra stroke that cost him a spot in a playoff.

2007 Zach Johnson 11-under

Best Masters debut (tournament*)

23 Gary Player (1959-82) 23 Fred Couples (1983-2007) 21 Tom Watson (1975-95) 19 Gene Littler (1961-80) 19 Bernhard Langer (1984-2002)

Tiger Woods, 4-for-4

1968 Roberto De Vicenzo had to take a score one stroke higher than he made because of a scorecard error, thereby missing a playoff

Arnold Palmer, 4-for-5

1963 Sam Snead finished T3 with a 288 total, two strokes back, at age 50 1967 Ben Hogan shot a 66 in the third round to move within two of the lead at age 54 (finished T10) 1998 Jack Nicklaus finished

22 top-10 finishes 29 top-25 finishes 37 cuts made

*Based on number of natives who have won

Best at converting 54-hole lead

Worst post-round moment

Best moment for a player over 50

Missouri, three players, five titles

Jack Nicklaus, 4-for-5

Worst at converting 54-hole lead Ben Crenshaw, 1-for-4 Ray Floyd, 1-for-4 Sam Snead, 1-for-4

Best Masters debut (first round) 64 Lloyd Mangrum, 1940 64 Mike Donald, 1990 65 Chris DiMarco, 2001

Roberto De Vicenzo, 1968


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to extend the playoff (lost on the second extra hole)

Best eagle feats 1974 Bruce Crampton made four eagles in the tournament 1995 Jack Nicklaus eagled the par-four 5th hole twice 2009 Dustin Johnson made four eagles in the tournament 2010 Tiger Woods made four eagles in the tournament

Best performance on the par fives 1995 Greg Norman 15-under

Fred Couples, 1992

Worst shot

Best putt

1961 Arnold Palmer bladed a shot from the right greenside bunker over the green on the 18th hole of the final round for a double bogey that turned a one-stroke lead into a onestroke defeat

1955 Cary Middlecoff, 85-footer for an eagle on the 13th hole of the second round on the way to a four-stroke lead through 36 holes (he won by seven)

1986 Seve Ballesteros’s 4-iron second shot to the par-five 15th in the final round didn’t come close to landing on dry land, diving into the pond for a bogey that dropped him into a tie for the lead (he finished two back) 2003 Jeff Maggert was one stroke off the lead in the final round when he knocked a shot from a back bunker on the 12th into Rae’s Creek, then repeated the shot after a drop, making a quintuple bogey eight 2011 Rory McIlroy pull-hooked his tee shot on the 10th hole of the final round, hitting a tree and ricocheting into a spot among the cabins, setting up a triple bogey that sent him reeling out of the lead

GETTY IMAGES (8), CORBIS

Best shots/worst shots (same tournament) 2005 Tiger Woods, putted into the water on the 13th hole of the first round; used the slope of the green for a spectacular chip-in birdie on the 16th hole of the final round (he eventually won)

1975 Jack Nicklaus, 40-footer for a birdie on the 16th hole of the final round to tie for the lead (he won by one) 1984 Ben Crenshaw, 60-footer for a birdie on the 10th hole of the final round to take a twostroke lead (he won by two)

Worst putt 1946 Ben Hogan, missed a twoand-a-half-foot putt on the 72nd hole to lose by one 1978 Hubert Green, missed a three-foot putt on the 72nd hole to lose by one 1989 Scott Hoch, missed a twofoot putt on the first playoff hole

Best performance on the par fives by a champion 1976 Ray Floyd 14-under

Worst penalty 1962 Dow Finsterwald was penalized two strokes for practice putting on the 5th green after holing out during the first round. The extra strokes ultimately put him in a playoff, which he lost.

2nd Tony Lema, 1963 2nd Dan Pohl, 1982 T2 Jason Day, 2011 *Doesn’t include inaugural Masters of 1934

Ben Crenshaw, 1995

Sam Snead & Ben Hogan, 1954

Spain, two players, four titles

Mark O’Meara won in his 15th Masters appearance

*Based on number of natives who have won

Best amateur showing

Worst countries for champions*

T2 Frank Stranahan, 1947

Australia

2nd Ken Venturi, 1956 T2 Charles Coe, 1961

*Most PGA Tour winners but no Masters titles

Best states for champions*

Most career categories led 6 victories 15 top-five finishes

1986 Jack Nicklaus hugged his caddie/son Jackie

Best cut-made streak

Georgia, three players, three titles

1995 Ben Crenshaw, overcome with emotion after winning a week after the death of teacher Harvey Penick, was comforted by caddie Carl Jackson

1954 Sam Snead defeated Ben Hogan, 70-71

2010 Phil Mickelson hugged his wife Amy, who was recovering from cancer

2003 Mike Weir won on the first extra hole with a bogey to Len Mattiace’s double bogey

Best perseverance

Jack Nicklaus

2009 Angel Cabrera’s second shot caromed off a tree into the fairway on the first playoff hole (he stayed alive with a par and won on the second extra hole)

1989 Scott Hoch and Nick Faldo both bogeyed the first extra hole, Hoch missing a two-footer; Faldo won with a birdie on the second extra hole

United Kingdom, three players, five titles

California, five players, 10 titles

1997 Tiger Woods hugged his father Earl

1982 Craig Stadler won on the first extra hole when Dan Pohl three-putted from the fringe

South Africa, three players, five titles

Texas, seven players, 12 titles

1942 Byron Nelson defeated Ben Hogan, 69-70

Worst playoff

Best countries for champions*

T6 with a 283 total, four back, at age 58

Best playoff

2005 Tiger Woods defeated Tiger Woods, 2005 Chris DiMarco with a birdie on the first extra hole

*Highest population states with no native champions

Best post-round moment

1992 Fred Couples’s ball stayed on the bank on the 12th hole of the final round instead of rolling into the water (won by two)

1987 Larry Mize defeated Greg Norman and Seve Ballesteros, chipping in on the second extra hole

Michigan

Florida

2nd Lloyd Mangrum, 1940

Best performance on the par fives without going for any in two

1985 Bernhard Langer’s second shot on the 13th hole in the third round landed short of the creek but bounced over it and onto the green, from where he holed a putt for an eagle (won by two)

Won Gene Sarazen, 1935 2nd Ralph Guldahl, 1937

2003 Jeff Maggert was leading by one stroke when his second shot on the par-four 4th caught the lip of a fairway bunker, the ball ricocheting back and hitting him in the chest on the way to a two-stroke penalty. He finished five back after a 75 that included five birdies, no bogeys, a triple bogey and a quintuple bogey on the 12th (see “Worst Shot”).

Best break

Worst states for champions*

Won Fuzzy Zoeller, 1979

1968 Roberto De Vicenzo signed for a par on the 17th hole of the final round instead of the birdie he actually made, an extra stroke that cost him a spot in a playoff.

2007 Zach Johnson 11-under

Best Masters debut (tournament*)

23 Gary Player (1959-82) 23 Fred Couples (1983-2007) 21 Tom Watson (1975-95) 19 Gene Littler (1961-80) 19 Bernhard Langer (1984-2002)

Tiger Woods, 4-for-4

1968 Roberto De Vicenzo had to take a score one stroke higher than he made because of a scorecard error, thereby missing a playoff

Arnold Palmer, 4-for-5

1963 Sam Snead finished T3 with a 288 total, two strokes back, at age 50 1967 Ben Hogan shot a 66 in the third round to move within two of the lead at age 54 (finished T10) 1998 Jack Nicklaus finished

22 top-10 finishes 29 top-25 finishes 37 cuts made

*Based on number of natives who have won

Best at converting 54-hole lead

Worst post-round moment

Best moment for a player over 50

Missouri, three players, five titles

Jack Nicklaus, 4-for-5

Worst at converting 54-hole lead Ben Crenshaw, 1-for-4 Ray Floyd, 1-for-4 Sam Snead, 1-for-4

Best Masters debut (first round) 64 Lloyd Mangrum, 1940 64 Mike Donald, 1990 65 Chris DiMarco, 2001

Roberto De Vicenzo, 1968


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Teeth of the Dog Hole No. 5

With nine more holes from Pete Dye and a $40 million renovation Casa de Campo reaffirms its role as the best resort in the Caribbean

JEWEL

by

L.C. LAMBRECHT

GeorGe PePer

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NOT LONG AGO I CLICKED ONTO THE LINKS Magazine website [LINKSMagazine.com] to check the ballot I’d submitted for the LINKS 100—the lists we launched a couple of months ago ranking the best courses in the world and U.S. (lists you too can vote on, and I urge you to do so). Anyway, looking over my ballot I was struck by something. Twenty-four of my top 25 courses were located in either the U.S. or the British Isles. But that wasn’t what struck me—what struck me was the 25th. I then checked the LINKS 100 ranking on that day (ours is the world’s only living, breathing list, shifting constantly as golfers cast their ballots). There it was—the same course—standing alone, the only “tropical” entry among the top 50—indeed the top 100—courses in the world: the jewel of the Caribbean known as Teeth of the Dog. I’d fallen in love with this siren 34 years earlier, when her charm and beauty competed with that of my wife, a tough assignment inasmuch as we were there on our honeymoon. (Libby, for no particular reason, had fancied going to Haiti, and I, for a very good reason known as the Casa de Campo Golf Resort, had convinced her to try the other side of Hispaniola.) Three and a half decades later, we’ve still never been to Haiti but have returned to the Dominican Republic several times. It had been several years, however, since the last visit to Casa de Campo, and this time I’d returned on my own, to see whether the course I remembered so fondly was as good as ever and whether the resort had aged as gracefully as had my good wife. One of the allures of the DR, especially for East Coasters, is its easy accessibility, just a four-hour flight from New York and barely two hours from Miami to the La Romana airport a few minutes from the resort. The last time I’d been to that airport it was little more than a thatched-


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roof hut on a landing strip, staffed by a handful of somnolent customs officials. Now it’s a bustling international terminal. My American Airlines flight arrived moments after two jumbo jets—one from Europe, the other from Canada—and several hundred passengers descended on the terminal simultaneously. In the old days, that would’ve meant an exasperating hour plus in the thatched-roof hut. This time, I was out the door and on my way in 15 minutes. That happy experience was the harbinger of a thoroughly updated Casa de Campo. Each of the resort’s 265 rooms has been refurbished and redecorated in a sort of urban-chic style with enormous bathrooms and all the digital-age necessities—high-speed wi-fi, plasma TVs and Blu-ray players, clock radios with iPod docks, even espresso machines. It’s all part of a $40-million dollar facelift that also brought a new indoor/outdoor bar and lounge, three swimming pools, a fine-dining restaurant, business center, library, and fitness center. One thing that has not seen much change over the years—thank goodness—is Pete Dye’s seaside masterpiece. Oh he’s lengthened a few tees, reshaped a couple of greens and bunkers, added a shouldering mound or two, but Teeth of the Dog remains just as it was at birth— one of the world’s most beguiling places to play golf. Accompanied only by my caddie JJ, a polished Dominican grandfather with more than 30 years of looping at the resort, I set out on a warm cloudless morning, brimming with optimism that the course would inspire my best golf. That didn’t happen. But no matter—this is one of those rare courses—Pebble Beach, Pacific Dunes, Turnberry, and Castle Stuart also come to mind—that is a wonderful place to play badly. No amount of ineptitude can lessen the rapture. In no time, I was five over, thanks to some crisscrossing of Dye’s evil little plateau green at the par-five 3rd. When I came to exquisite little No. 5, the first of seven holes that skirt the Caribbean, a honeymoon memory returned. This was where Libby had made the first par of her life—her comprehensively yanked 5-iron, which had seemed headed out to sea, instead bounced off a foam-frothed rock and onto the green. After hitting her 20-footer 10 feet past the hole she sank the comebacker. Smiling at that recollection, I managed to find the green myself and

L.C. LAMBRECHT (3)

Above: Dye Fore (Chavon Nine) No. 1 Left: Minitas Beach Below: Teeth of the Dog No. 8

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got through the rest of the front nine with just one bogey. The stretch from Nos. 5 through 8—two par threes and two par fours played with the sea literally splashing at your ankles—is about as exhilarating as golf gets. There had in fact been one major change to Teeth of the Dog. The green surfaces had improved tremendously. Years ago, they’d ripped up the old bermuda grass and introduced seaside paspalum, the droughtresistant strain that thrives on saltwater and provides a surface almost as smooth and fast as bent or rye. Once furry, slow, and full of pockmarks, the greens now were worthy of a Tour event. Like the front nine, the back starts a bit slowly and builds to a crescendo. My memory blessedly failed me at the 14th—not until after I’d hit a good downwind drive and squeezed a 5-wood onto the front of the green did I realize the hole was a par five and not a long four. This would be my only birdie of the day, as on the next three holes—stretched spectacularly along the sea—I let my focus and golf ball wander a bit. 62

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In addition to Teeth of the Dog there is another 45 holes of Pete Dye golf at Casa de Campo. The Links—an unfortunate misnomer since it neither looks nor plays like one—is an inland layout where Dye created plenty of interest, with stern and occasionally brutal bunkering, lakes and lagoons in play on five holes, and humpy-hollowy green complexes that test the short game relentlessly. Sadly the course was under renovation during my February visit, but is open now, and the best news is that now The Links also has those velvety paspalum greens. Speaking of odd names for courses, the other 27 holes are known collectively as Dye Fore. The original 18 debuted in 2001 and is comprised of two very distinct nines. The Chavon sits on high ground beside Clockwise from top left: the main lobby, the marina, the Altos de Chavon church, the new pool and bar. Opposite: The Chavon Nine of the Dye Fore course


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L.C. LAMBRECHT

Altos de Chavon, a hilltop village built by stonemasons to resemble a Tuscan medieval town. Seven of its holes run alongside a cliff that drops 300 feet to the Chavon River. Although completely different, the experience here is almost as enthralling as Teeth of the Dog. The heaving fairways are enormous and so are the greens, a bit like the Kapalua Plantation course in Hawaii and for good reason as the wind is generally strong— stronger than beside the sea—especially in the afternoon. Which is why I played in the morning. Still I had my hands full, even from the 3,320-yard blue tees (the tips stretch to a mind-warping 3,921). The best and toughest holes are surely the par threes, Nos. 3 and 6, each calling for a courageous shot across a chasm, and the most vexing may be the 9th, a roller-coaster par five with a volcano green that’s about as welcoming as a Parisian waiter. I won’t divulge what I made on that hole, but I will say that a smile returned to my face at the 1st hole of the Marina Nine, a short (520yard) par five where the score I wrote down was precisely half the number I’d recorded moments earlier. The Marina, as its name suggests, meanders down toward a harbor packed with obscene-size yachts and ringed by restaurants and shops. The views are arresting, especially at

the 4th and 5th, a pair of downhill doglegs, but my favorite was the parfive 8th which winds uphill toward a classic Pete Dye green, half hidden among hillocks. Remarkably, there is no water in play on either of these nines, but never is it needed to enhance the challenge or aesthetics. Where it was needed was in the third nine, opened just a few months ago, and Dye delivered, crafting the ominously named Lakes. On difficult terrain—rocky flatland that could be in the Arizona desert—the Lakes makes its case immediately with a rightward dogleg that hugs a man-made lake from the landing area to the green, then follows up with a par three where the tee shot must be struck well and truly or the likely result will be a splash. Variety marks this nine. Hole No. 3 snakes 590 yards from the back tee through a minefield of bunkers to a devilish semi-blind green; No. 5 plays downwind to a tiny tabletop—another one of those coneshaped greens that strike fear whether approached from 200 yards or 50 feet. The 6th is a lakeside par five where the green is tantalizingly within reach after a big drive, but so is disaster. Those who escape that hole unscathed will do well to also survive the par-three 7th where the assignment is anything from a mid-iron to fairway wood over water,


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invariably against a stiff crosswind. Indeed, when the breeze is up, the For my last night I opted for room service, and for a very good new Lakes Nine is surely the sternest stretch of the Dye Fore triathlon. reason. It was Sunday night—Super Bowl Sunday night—and my New Battling the Casa de Campo courses, one can work up an appetite, York Giants were about to take on the Patriots. So after a 36-hole day and as with the golf there is plenty of variety, whether within the stone I hunkered into my man cave, flipped on the 42-inch flat screen, and walls of Altos de Chavon, alongside the busy marina, or at Minitas settled in for what turned out to be a very satisfying three hours, inBeach where the Maccione family of New York’s Le Cirque fame serves terrupted only by a waiter delivering nachos and a cheeseburger. gourmet cuisine amid the swaying palms. In all there are 20 different My return flight was late the next afternoon so I had time for one places to eat and drink. more round, and there was never a quesOn my first night I stayed close to tion where it would be. With JJ providhome at La Caña, the new restaurant a ing encouragement and reading the 9-iron from my room, and was also ungreens, I managed to squeak in with a adventurous with my choices—Caesar 79 on Teeth—by several strokes my best salad and a steak. I didn’t expect them effort of the trip—thanks to a tee shot to be up to Manhattan standards, and at the par-three 16th that stopped less they weren’t, but they weren’t far off than two feet from the hole. either. It was the perfect finale for a trip that The 19th Hole, overlooking Teeth of had confirmed Casa de Campo had lost the Dog’s final green, offers a selection of none of its luster, indeed had added to excellent sandwiches which I would recits allure as the best golf resort in the ommend washing down with a cold Caribbean. As for Teeth of the Dog, well The Beach Club by Le Cirque restaurant Presidente, a local Dominican beer when I first played it 34 years ago I which happens to be superb. deemed it one of the 10 best courses I’d ever played. Back then, I’d played The Le Cirque restaurant seemed just about the most romantic spot about three dozen courses, all but a handful of them in the U.S. Now (and possible to have dinner, but since I was solo I went instead to La Casita yes, I’ve kept count) the list is 652 in 35 countries. at the marina and enjoyed excellent Spanish-style cuisine while watchSo where does Teeth of the Dog rank on that LINKS 100 ballot of mine? ing various members of the international mega-rich berth their yachts. Solidly at number nine.

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TRUMP SCOTLAND

continued from page 47

to Scottish golf, and a certain boost to the Aberdeen economy. Once the stature of Trump International Golf Links is established, golfers from all around the globe will be queuing up to play here. I’d been determined not to jump on the bandwagon, determined not to fall prey to the hyperbole, but the realist in me had no choice. Donald Trump has gone and built his “Greatest Golf Course in the World” and I can sleep soundly at night knowing that I won’t be the last one to say it.

me. “The important thing was the dunes. We have 2,000 acres and we’re using 600 acres for one golf course. The rest of the project will follow, depending on what happens with the world economy. The thing that was most important to me was building the greatest golf course in the world. Somebody had to do it!” I had asked him about finding an architect sensitive enough to do the site justice. “I hired Martin Hawtree, which was one of the great moves I’ve made,” said Trump. David J. Whyte is one of Scotland’s best-known golf travel writer/photogHawtree Limited, the longest continuous practice in golf archiraphers and is the creator of www.go-golf.tv. tecture, was established in the UK a hundred years ago by Martin’s grandfather Fred who went into partnership with Open Champion J.H. Taylor. Martin is now at the helm of a three-generation dynasty. “I first saw the site in about 2007,” Hawtree told me from Rio de Janeiro, where he was among the finalists vying for the job recently awarded to Gil Hanse of designing the course for the 2016 Summer Olympics. “I was very enthusiastic on first seeing it. Certainly it was the most dramatic stretch of duneland I’d ever seen. I just soaked myself into those dunes and felt the (continued on page 70) layout as I walked the site.” I asked him about the bent/fescue surrounds which had somewhat baffled me. “Yes,” he said, “they are different but they look terrific and the tight lies should inspire great play.” Now that the course was finished, which were his favorite holes? “All the holes were favorites as we were building them,” he said diplomatically, “but I do particularly love the par threes. More generally, I like and have worked hard to achieve a sequence of surprises. Every visit to the site brings some new treat, because the site Hole #17 “Alcatraz” is so extraordinary. My work has simply been a modest exercise in midwifery.” Hawtree is unassuming, a kindly professor, diffident about his talent. One would be hard pressed to find two more contrasting characters than Hawtree and Trump, and yet they have Golf Digest called it the “Eighth Toughest Course in America” — meshed. “I get on well with Mr. Trump,” said Hawtree. and now is a great time to put your game to the test. Our Desert “Our characters are very different but we have Links Package allows you unlimited golf on the five resort courses intriguing ways of coming to agree with each at La Quinta Resort and PGA WEST® with daily resort credit. other. I have come to respect his judgment and understanding and have thoroughly enjoyed Call 888-424-7964 or visit laquintaresort.com/LINKS working with him.” I had decided to change my mind about Trump too. Talking with him helped me understand he walks the walk and certainly talks the talk. Like the rest of us he’s a keen golfer so perhaps it really is all about the golf course. He has pulled off something hugely significant here in the Home of Golf, an historic move, a boon

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Classic Courses

Palmetto Golf Club ONE OF THE OLDEST CLUBS IN THE COUNTRY BECOMES ONE OF THE HOTTEST DURING MASTERS WEEK BY TOM CUNNEFF

TTENDING THE MASTERS is one of the great privileges in golf, but there’s only one problem with seeing the world’s best golfers at the world’s grandest cathedral: they’re playing and you’re not. That’s why Masters goers in the know—corporate chieftains, USGA muckety-mucks, even some pros—book a tee time at another course touched by Alister MacKenzie, Palmetto Golf Club. One of the oldest clubs in America, Palmetto was founded in 1892. It’s located about 20 miles northeast of Augusta in Aiken, South Carolina, and opens one week a year to non-members. The $195 green fee has endowed the club’s capital fund with enough money over the years that members haven’t been hit with an assessment in more than 20 years. It also financed a recent restoration of the course by Gil Hanse, just chosen to design the course for the 2016 Olympics. “It is such a special design with great details in the green complexes, holes that fit the topography perfectly, wonderful vegetation, and it is such a great walking course,” says Hanse. “The combination of the terrific golf course and the understated nature of the club and clubhouse is perfection in my mind. It’s one of the unquestioned hidden gems in American golf, and I always try to get friends and fans of golf course architecture to go and see the course.” Although Augusta and Palmetto share a MacKenzie connection, that’s about where the similarities end. One is as lush and polished as possible, while the other is much more rugged and unadorned. That’s clear from the moment you pull into the oddly shaped dirt and stone parking lot and catch a glimpse of the clubhouse. Although the great Stanford White designed it, it’s no Shinnecock Hills. Containing just an upstairs apartment and small men’s and women’s locker rooms separated by a common area, the building, which dates to 1902, has a dollhouse-like quaintness to it. Even older and more charming is the cramped and homey building next door that houses the pro shop, grill, and trophy room where longtime pro Tom Moore keeps the club’s impressive collection of

A

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memorabilia, starting with the oldest USGA membership certificate in existence. It dates to 1896 when Palmetto became the 30th club to join the organization. Other prized possessions include letters from Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan, and the 41st president, whose grandfather, George Herbert Walker, was an early member. Many items stem from the prestigious pro-am the club hosted from 1945–1953 the Tuesday of Masters week where the pros often made more money than they did at Augusta. The club began as a rudimentary four-hole course before expanding to 18 holes a few years later with Herbert Leeds, who designed Myopia Hunt Club, collaborating with the founder, Thomas Hitchcock, and first head pro, Jimmy Mackrell. At the behest of some members who were involved with the development of Augusta National,


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L.C. LAMBRECHT; THOMAS ABBOTT

After a drive on the 388-yard 4th that must carry a ravine, golfers are usually left with a sidehill approach to the raised green.

MacKenzie paid a visit in 1933 to convert the sand greens to grass, reshape bunkers, and lengthen the course from 5,833 to 6,370 yards. The club even used the same construction firm that built Augusta National to do the work at Palmetto. Over the ensuing years, the bunkers lost much of their shape or disappeared altogether, while the greens became lifeless ovals. Using aerial photographs from 1938 the club unearthed at the National Geological Survey, as well as some old photos from multi-generational members, Hanse started a restoration project in 2005 that also included re-exposing sandy scrub areas. The course can play as long as 6,695 yards, but most members, like those in the daily “Dogfight,” play it at around 6,100. Although there are a few cross-bunkers to watch out for, the fairways are wide enough

to hit driver on all the two- and three-shotters. The course’s main defense is its small, slippery greens with many featuring big mounding right out of Augusta. On the uphill, 423-yard 13th players aim their approaches for “Dolly Parton” on the left side of the green. About the only knock on the course is the short par-four finishing hole, which doesn’t offer any risk-reward or thought-provoking options. The 19th hole sure is good, though, as members sit on the porch of the clubhouse in rocking chairs enjoying a beverage or two and solving the world’s problems. Oh, there are other more fancy private clubs around Augusta that also welcome outsiders the week of the Masters—Augusta Country Club and Champions Retreat come to mind—but none with the charm or history of Palmetto.

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Great Courses of Britain & Ireland

Formby Golf Club A JEKYLL & HYDE-STYLE CHALLENGE AWAITS AT THIS COURSE THAT BEGINS IN THE TREES, THEN EMERGES ONTO CLASSIC LINKSLAND BY JOHN HOPKINS

W

HEN CONSIDERING Formby Golf Club it is important to realize that while its pedigree cannot match those of Open Championship venues Royal Birkdale and Royal Lytham & St. Annes up the road or Royal Liverpool (Hoylake) to the south, this nevertheless is an important member of the aristocracy of British golf clubs.

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It is shorter than Birkdale, less bunker-strewn than Lytham, less severe than Hoylake. Yet few clubs have golf of such a high standard. Formby measures 7,061 yards from the back tees, with three par fives, three par threes, and 12 par fours, six on each half. It meanders, broadly speaking, in a counterclockwise direction, starting with two holes alongside a railway line,


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then turning toward the sea before coming back inland. Whereas most of Great Britain’s courses owe allegiance to a single type of terrain, be it linksland or parkland, upland or downland, Formby is two in one, as pine and fir trees coexist with dunes on the early holes. Later on the course opens up, becoming more classically linksy. “My personal favorite is the 12th,” says head professional Andrew Witherup of the 420-yard par four. “It is pleasing to the eye and the undulations in the fairway look stunning in the afternoon sun. It is a tough hole because the drive has to be straight, the second shot very precise as the green falls away on the left and right with a deep bunker left of the green. Believe me, you do not want to be in that.” Dr. David Marsh, whose skillfully flighted iron to the 17th green of the Old Course at St. Andrews was the final thrust that won Great Britain & Ireland the 1971 Walker Cup, has been a member of Formby for some years. “My own feeling is that the

15th hole is the best,” he says. “It heads out toward the sea, is not too long [just over 400 yards from the back tee] but usually plays into the prevailing west wind. There is a step in the green, too. It is a very natural hole.” Founded in 1884, Formby has a course that has stood the test of time and may now be playing at its best. However, as good as the course is, the clubhouse is not to be overlooked. The original was a small thatched hut with a bar that consisted of a loose floorboard concealing a bottle of whisky. It burned down in 1899, the replacement completed two years later. The distinctive clock tower was added in 1909. From old money to new, from then to now, there has been something of a transformation. The current structure is the very model of a contemporary golf clubhouse, four-square, three-floored, and sturdy. John Hopkins recently retired after 30 years as golf writer for The Times and Sunday Times of London.

KEVINMURRAY (2)

Early-evening shadows accentuate both the beauty and the sternness of the 11th, a 422-yard par four.

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Fore Sale

THESE SEVEN PREMIER PROPERTIES THAT STRETCH FROM THE DR TO OR ILLUSTRATE THE GOLF LIFE AT ITS BEST

Desert Mountain SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. This 6,126-square-foot Italian villa at Desert Mountain comes with unique appointments like an onyx vessel sink and countertops, mosaic tile inlays, and travertine stone flooring. Other features include a wood-paneled office, formal dining room with wine room, media room, and negative-edge pool with long valley views. $2,249,000

The Colony at Bandon Cove BANDON, ORE. Located five minutes from Bandon Dunes, Bandon Cove is about as close as you’ll get to living on the country’s No. 1 golf resort. The 18 three-bedroom units offer unobstructed ocean views, quality craftsmanship, and an on-site management team. $455,000–$880,000

Grand del Mar CARLSBAD, CALIF Appointed with more than $500,000 worth of fine furnishings and accessories, the Villas at The Grand Del Mar feature the same striking Mediterranean style as the resort. Fractional owners have membership in The Grand Golf Club with its Tom Fazio course for five weeks a year. $450,000+

PuntaCana DOMINICAN REPUBLIC With golf and ocean views, “Plantation Walk” embodies the grand spirit of the Caribbean mansions a century ago. Amenities of the 13,815-square-foot home include a tropical garden entry, wraparound verandas, spectacular pool, ponds, Jacuzzi, and outdoor living spaces. $2,950,000

Shooting Star JACKSON HOLE, WYO. Located within walking distance of the Tom Fazio-designed course, this 3,300-square-foot, three-bedroom cabin was built with reclaimed timbers and Montana Moss Rock. The open floor plan includes marble and granite finishes and an outdoor Jacuzzi. $4,200,000

Kiawah KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. Overlooking the famed Ocean Course, this 8,300-square-foot home features a workout area with outdoor shower in the third-floor master suite which is accessible by elevator. Wraparound porches and multiple decks enhance the marsh and ocean views. $10,500,000

Windsor VERO BEACH, FLA. Sophisticated detailing and quality construction distinguish this country estate at Windsor. The five-bedroom home overlooks the Robert Trent Jones Jr. course and features an elevator, temperature-controlled wine cave, and two-bedroom carriage house with kitchenette. $4,495,000

Fairways to Heaven

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GEAR_SPRNG12_LAYOUT 1 3/8/12 7:33 PM Page 72

Get in Gear

CLUBS

ers, the launch angle of a 3-wood is only about seven or eight degrees,” says Olsavsky. “That’s definitely too low and not optimal for distance. It needs to be near 10 degrees, which is about what a 4-wood gives you.” Johnson isn’t the only tour player with a 4-wood in his bag these days. At the Northern Trust Open at Riviera in February, eight pros had 4-woods in play, according to the Darrell Survey, including Bubba Watson, who uses a 16.5-degree Ping G20. “It just gives him the best launch conditions and versatility,” says Ping senior design engineer Marty Jertson, noting that a 4-wood produces 300 to 400 more RPMs than a 3-wood for an average player. “Because the modern-day golf ball doesn’t spin as much as it used to, getting golfers into the right loft in fairway woods is crucial. For a good chunk of the golfing community, a 4-wood will give them the potential Dustin Johnson to hit it the farthest because they’re getting the best launch angle and spin rate.” In fitting players, Titleist does a longgame set configuration to provide the right clubs between the longest iron and the driver and often will recommend a 4-wood instead of a classic 3. “For many moderate ball speed players in particular a 4-wood is the way to go,” says Chris McGinley, Titleist’s vice-president of marketing for clubs. “A 4-wood is easier to release or WITH THE GOLF SEASON GETTING UNDERWAY, IT’S A GOOD square and allows the player to stay in posTIME TO RETHINK YOUR SET, STARTING WITH A 4-WOOD ture when hitting off the turf.” The other benefit of putting a 4-wood in your bag is that you can drop the 5-wood, if you carry one, alPERHAPS THE HARDEST SHOT IN THE GAME—next to a lowing you more flexibility in the rest of the set. One option is long bunker shot—is a 3-wood off the deck. With the club’s low to rotate a couple of different clubs in its place depending on the loft and long shaft, the swing has to be pretty close to perfect for course and conditions. Playing a shorter layout with hard greens? a good result. And given that most golfers use the club off the Stick in a 60-degree wedge that will have more bite. Windy day? fairway only a couple times a round, it’s no wonder the shot Carry a second driver with less loft. instills more fear than a letter from the IRS. “I had a good experience at Bandon,” says Olsavsky. “My norThe solution? Swap your 15-degree 3-wood for a 17-degree mal driver is nine degrees, but I put in a second driver that was 4-wood. You might not think that just two degrees more loft and seven-and-a-half. I used it on holes played into the wind and I a half-inch shorter shaft would make that much of a difference, picked up 40 yards versus the guy I was playing with. It was a but it does. “We’ve done a number of player tests and we’ve game changer.” definitely seen an increase in launch angle and more distance for With the Masters upon us, it also helps to remember that perhaps players who struggle to hit fairway woods off the ground when the most famous shot in the history of the tournament was Gene they make the switch,” says Tom Olsavsky, senior director of Sarazen’s 4-wood for double eagle from 230 yards at the par-five 15th metalwood creation at TayorMade. “We found that even Tour during the final round in 1935. It became known as the Shot Heard players struggle with hitting a 3-wood, but you have to be a fairRound the World and closed a three-stroke deficit, getting Sarazen ly sophisticated player to understand that a 4-wood is better for into a 36-hole playoff with Craig Wood that he won the next day. you and not fall into that gotta-have-a-3-wood mentality.” You may not make any albatrosses with a 4-wood, but replacIf TaylorMade staff players like Dustin Johnson don’t see a stiging your 3-wood with one can help your game take flight. —T.C. ma in using a 4-wood, neither should you. “Even with better play-

72

LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

GETTY MAGES

Spring Cleaning


GEAR_SPRNG12_LAYOUT 1 3/8/12 7:33 PM Page 73

LOFTY ASPIRATIONS These five 4-woods will help you get the ball off the deck with better results

CALLAWAY RAZR X BLACK ➤ With a larger footprint than most 4-woods, the Razr X Black features a deep face with precision shaping of the thickness to increase the size of the sweet spot for higher ball speeds. Also appealing are the traditional look of the club, full-length hosel, and resonating sound at impact. $200

TOUR EDGE EXOTICS CB4 TOUR This Chicago-based company might fly a bit under the radar, but it makes some of the nicest fairway woods out there—one reason why a lot of pros have them in their bags even though they’re not paid to use them. The allblack CB4 Tour has a higher center of gravity (CG) for less spin, while the titaniumcupped face produces the maximum trampoline effect. $300

TITLEIST 910F There’s just something about a smaller, more compact head like the one on the 910F that makes it seem easier to hit off the turf. Also helping to get the ball up is a thin crown that moves the CG lower. The adjustable hosel allows for 16 different loft-and-lie combinations, from 16.25 to 18.5 degrees of loft and from 56.75 and 59 degrees of lie. $250

TAYLORMADE ROCKETBALLZ TOUR Unlike drivers, it’s hard to a get a trampoline effect from the small face of a fairway wood, but TaylorMade, which built its reputation on metal woods, gets around that on the RBZ Tour with a deep slot on the sole that helps the face flex, increasing ball speed and making the club more forgiving on off-center hits. $230

PING G20 ➤ An external weight pad gives the G20 a low and deep CG that produces optimal launch and spin, while the 164cc stainless steel head increases moment of inertia for consistent ball speeds across the face. Choose between the higher-launching TFC 169F shaft and the TFC 169F Tour version for a lower trajectory. $200

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NEBRASKA 29. Prairie Club Valentine, 888-402-1101

TEXAS 15. Comanche Trace Kerrville, 877-467-6282 16. Enchanted Hill Lewisville, 972-899-1923 210. SEND ALL TEXAS MEMBERSHIP INFO

WEST VIRGINIA 40. Pikewood National Golf Club Morgantown, 304-864-3312

>> PACKAGE VACATIONS 305. SEND ALL PACKAGE VACATION INFO HAWAII 22. Kaanapali Golf Courses Lahaina, 866-454-4653 23. Kapalua Lahaina/Kapalua, 877-527-2582 24. Makena Beach & Golf Resort Wailea-Makena, 800-321-MAUI 211. SEND ALL HAWAII PACKAGE VACATION INFO

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NEBRASKA 29. Prairie Club Valentine, 888-402-1101

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>> GENERAL 306. SEND ALL GENERAL INFO 41. E*TRADE Financial, 877-929-2434 42. Jitterbug/First Street, 888-810-8530 43. Paul Fredrick, 800-247-1417

>> EQUIPMENT & APPAREL 307. SEND ALL EQUIPMENT & APPAREL INFO 44. FootJoy, 800-224-8501 43. Paul Fredrick, 800-247-1417 45. Ping, 800-4-PING-FIT

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FITNESS_SPRNG12_LAYOUT 1 3/8/12 7:46 PM Page 78

Fit to a Tee

Food forThought

Want to start your day off with a birdie before even getting to the course? After waking up, skip the coffee and drink two glasses of water. Next, get in a 15-minute workout with something as simple as a vigorous walk or lightly bouncing on a $39 mini-trampoline. For breakfast, eat a whole-grain cereal with fruit. If you’re on the move and like to stop at Starbucks, skip the muffin and get the oatmeal with fruit—hold the brown sugar.

1

Hydration is key toward stabilizing your hunger and energy levels. Many times when we think we are hungry, we are actually thirsty, but we eat instead of drink. After your warm-up on the range,

2

drink two glasses of water. Skip the sugary sports drink because it destabilizes your blood sugar and can actually make you more tired in the long run. Continue to sip water throughout the round. Also, don’t ride every step of the way; alternate walking holes with your cart partner. Beware the cart girl and halfway house. Both are full of hazards that can lead to food bogeys or worse, like cheese crackers, energy bars, burgers, and hot dogs. Look for fruit and nuts or better yet carry your own baggy full of “Larry’s Trail Mix”—a combination of unsalted almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and a light sprinkling of raisins. Not only will you save money, you’ll be storing energy for the back nine.

3

If you followed these tips, chances are you’ll not only have maintained your energy to the final putt, but you won’t be famished at lunch and overeat. Since you’re not dying of hunger, a simple turkey sandwich on wholegrain bread with mustard rather than mayo should do (hold the bacon and cheese) with a side of fruit or veggies. White flour is like white sand on a golf course—stay away. It has no fiber and all the vitamins and minerals are stripped away. These are simple carbs that quickly release sugars into the bloodstream and can add inches to your waistline.

4

While the above tips can definitely improve your golf stats, this one can improve your life stats: anytime you’re facing a menu and about to order chicken, beef, or pork, don’t. Choose fish or seafood. Here’s why: meat, even chicken, has omega 6 fats and oils that create inflammation, a cause of any number of maladies, while fish and seafood have omega 3 fats and oils that are antiinflammatory. They’re great for your brain and memory, which may just help you think your way around the course better, too.

5

BARRY ROSS/BARRYROSSART.COM

HOW MANY TIMES have you played a terrific 12 or 14 holes, only to peter out at the end, lose focus and shots? Chances are it wasn’t your Handicap Index that did you in but your glycemic index—the effect of carbs on your blood sugar levels. With his “Thin for Life” program, Larry Jacobs has been helping people eat right since 1983 after being plagued for years by severe stomach pains, which a nutritionist finally traced to intolerance for albumin, or the whites of eggs. Five years ago he combined his lifelong passion for golf (he’s a four handicap) with his career as a food and weightloss coach (thingolfer.com). Here he offers LINKS readers five tips to drop strokes— and pounds—with the right food choices on game day as well as the rest of the week. “If you do it right,” says Jacobs, “you’re going to have as much energy coming up the 18th as you do going down the 1st.” —T.C.


layout_Layout 1 3/7/12 6:11 PM Page 1

T ranquility to a tee...

Bald Head Island

Challenging play and environmental sensitivity make this one of North Carolina’s most aesthetically pleasing and desirable golf courses. Skillfully created by renowned golf course architect George Cobb and remarkably renaturalized by Tim Cate in 2011, this course is invigorating to play and compliments the island’s unspoiled coastal feel.

G olf is simply one of the many pleasurable activities available to you for a vacation or a lifetime. Whether you’re coming for a week’s getaway or for a lifestyle change of pace, Bald Head Island has it all.

The Bald Head Island Club www.bhiclub.net

(866) 657.7311


METHOD_SPRNG12GP_LAYOUT 1 copy 3/8/12 7:54 PM Page 80

Method

JIM BARNES 1925 Aim at cultivating the movement of a man driving a tack or nail with a hammer. Keep the eye and the attention on striking the ball, and all the time aim at acquiring a steady, smooth, rhythmic stroke motion in swinging the club. This smooth steady striking is the basic essential of consistently good putting. A Guide to Good Golf PERCY BOOMER 1946 To putt well we must be supple and loose. We must not be flabby; we must be conscious of our body being held up by its braces, yet not so braced as to impede movement. All our muscles must be mobilized but they must be mobile. Do not sway to and fro but on the other hand do not be fixed; there is a great deal of difference. On Learning Golf MAX FAULKNER 1972 No follow-through, that’s the heart of good putting…The reason why you have to stop the through swing is that, if you follow through the putter has to come off the ground, that is common sense. Follow-through putters three-putt far more often than those who do not follow through. Play Championship Golf All Your Life JIM MCLEAN 1994 If your direction and distance control are both off, chances are your stroke is too wristy. To assume a very secure grip and take the wrists out of your stroke, drop your left forefinger over the last three fingers of your right hand. This type of grip is used by a high percentage of Tour professionals. The Putter’s Pocket Companion NIBLICK 1902 A good rule is to putt with the right thumb down the shaft, as it better keeps the face of the club at a right angle with the line of the hole. If, because of the slope of the putting green, it is desirable to putt to the right of the hole, hold the thumb more to the right on the shaft, and if to the left of the hole more to the left of the shaft. Hints to Golfers

80

LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

JACK NICKLAUS 1964 Startling as the thought may be, practice does not make you a good putter. Putting is strictly a matter of feel, touch, and timing. I practice only until I achieve a constant rhythm, with the blade hitting the ball firmly and the ball coming squarely off the putter head. When I feel this rhythm six or seven times in a row, I quit. If you practice past that point you will become mechanized and lose your sense of touch. So practice until you feel you are putting well and then stop before you spoil your stroke. Take a Tip from Me HARVEY PENICK 1992 You should make it a habit to carry your putter in your left hand. Or in both hands if you wish. But never carry it in your right hand alone. Your left hand and arm are extensions of the putter shaft. That is the feeling you want to have. Little Red Book PHIL RODGERS 1986 The pace of the stroke is the same for all putts. Distance is achieved by increasing or decreasing the size of the stroke. I found that, in my case, if I swing the putter an inch back from the ball and an inch past it, the ball goes one foot. If I swing it six inches back and six inches through, the ball goes six feet. Therefore, I step off the footage from my ball to the hole to determine how long my stroke will be, and after setting up and aiming, make the stroke by the numbers. Play Lower Handicap Golf TOM WATSON 1983 This is probably the most important mechanical element in putting, and yet almost no one mentions it. The angle of the left elbow remains constant throughout the stroke, eliminating unnecessary extending and retracting of the arm. If I keep the angle of the left elbow constant, my shoulders must move as a unit with my arm, providing a consistent guide for the stroke and producing a perfect arc time after time, like a pendulum. Getting Up and Down

KEITH WITMER/GOLFILLUSTRATION.COM

Making a Good Stroke

JOHN JACOBS 2005 The shortest route to an authoritative strike, I believe, is to hit the ball against the left wrist, never past it. On short putts the left wrist never quits nor bends at any stage of the forward stroke. Some golfers may interpret this as a stiff-wristed action. It isn’t. There is a wrist break going back but none going forward, so that the clubface never gets ahead of the hands until well after impact. 50 Years of Golfing Wisdom


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The fund’s prospectus contains its investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other important information and should be read and considered carefully before investing. For a current prospectus, visit www.etrade.com/mutualfunds or visit the Exchange-Traded Funds Center at www.etrade.com/etf. E*TRADE credits and offers may be subject to U.S. withholding taxes and reporting at retail value. Taxes related to these credits and offers are the customer’s responsibility. 1. You can invest in the mutual funds available through E*TRADE Securities’ no-load, no-transaction fee program without paying loads, transaction fees, or commissions. To discourage short-term trading, E*TRADE Securities will charge an Early Redemption Fee of $49.99 on redemptions or exchanges of no-load, no transaction fee funds that are held less than 90 days. Direxion, ProFunds and Rydex mutual funds, funds held at least 90 days, or funds purchased before September 1, 2006 will not be subject to the Early Redemption Fee. All fees and expenses as described in the fund’s prospectus still apply. Please read the fund’s prospectus carefully before investing. 2. You can buy and sell the exchange-traded funds (ETFs) available through the E*TRADE Securities commission-free ETF program without paying brokerage commissions. For margin customers, the ETFs purchased through the program are not margin eligible for 30 days from purchase date. To discourage short-term trading, E*TRADE Securities may charge a short-term trading fee on sales of participating ETFs held less than 30 days. 3. Credits for cash or securities will be made based on deposits of new funds or securities from external accounts made within 45 days of account open, as follows: $250,000 or more will receive $600; $100,000-$249,999 will receive $250; $25,000-$99,999 will receive $100. Your account will be credited within one week of the close of the 45-day window. Excludes E*TRADE Financial Corporation associates, and non-U.S. residents. This offer is not valid for existing E*TRADE retirement accounts. New funds or securities must remain in the account (minus any trading losses) for a minimum of 6 months or the credit may be surrendered. One promotion per customer. E*TRADE Securities reserves the right to terminate this offer at any time. Accounts must be opened by December 31, 2012, the offer expiration date. Securities products and services are offered by E*TRADE Securities LLC, Member FINRA/SIPC. System response and account access times may vary due to a variety of factors, including trading volumes, market conditions, system performance and other factors. ©2012 E*TRADE Financial Corporation. All rights reserved.


MILLIE_SPRNG12GP_LAYOUT copy 3/7/12 10:42 AM Page 82

Where’s Millie?

3 Hints... •• It’s It’s an an “Island” “Island” par par three. three. •• Pete Pete Dye Dye made made it, it, Jack Jack Nicklaus Nicklaus helped. helped. •• Boo Boo Weekley Weekley holed holed back-to-back back-to-back par par chips chips here here and and at at the the next next hole hole to to get get his his first first Tour Tour win. win.

L.C. LAMBRECHT/IAIN LOWE

For For the the answer answer go go to to LINKSMagazine.com/wheresmillie LINKSMagazine.com/wheresmillie

82

LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012


BOW_ADV_SPRING12A_LINKS REPRINT 3/9/12 8:54 AM Page W1

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Red Ledges

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BOW_ADV_SPRING12A_LINKS REPRINT 3/9/12 8:54 AM Page W2

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CostaBaja, Marina-Golf-Residences

“and I’ve never seen a course with better views. It’s

La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico

paspalum greens that aren’t punishingly quick, the layout

Toll Free: USA (866) 409-9940

is pure Player: enjoyable with plenty of challenge for

Canada (866) 453-9172

every level of player. The course is in excellent condition,

ocean all the time.” With dramatic elevated tees, generous fairways, and

too. Troon Golf operates the resort’s course, clubhouse, ABOVE: Stunning views of the Sea of Cortez are found on nearly every hole of the Gary Player Signature course. BELOW: Everything at CostaBaja blends in with the surrounding environment.

O

PENED in December 2010, Gary Player’s first

This is Mexico at its very best. The southern tip of

its inaugural year of play at CostaBaja on the Baja

the Baja California Sur, an extraordinarily beautiful slice

California Sur.

of land between the Pacific and the Sea of Cortez, is

Designed and built to preserve the surrounding del-

one of the world’s safest regions. And the resort, 90

icate ecosystem and blend seamlessly with the five-star

miles north of Cabo San Lucas, is located in the quiet

development’s unique desert-by-the-sea landscape, the

coastal town of La Paz. Fittingly, La Paz translates as

course has been exceptionally well received by Mexico’s

“peace.”

golfing public. The country’s popular Golf and Spa Magazine named it the seventh best course in Mexico. The views alone are worthy of the award. Sit-

ocean playground that Jacques Cousteau called “the world's aquarium.” The recently remodeled, 120-room hotel with a

the private community’s

full-service spa is a great place to stay. Its guestrooms

double-basin marina and

include private, furnished balconies with views of the

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marina, surrounding mountains, or the sea. The marina,

panoramic vistas of the

with its million-dollar yachts, is a big draw as well.

every hole.

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In this seaside setting, you get all the benefits of the region’s great climate, spectacular views, and an

ting on the hillside above

Sea of Cortez from nearly

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and pro shop.

Signature course in Mexico recently celebrated

Ready-to-deliver, luxury oceanfront condos and villas, as well as hill and golf townhomes, are on site.

“I’ve built more than

The luxurious life here also includes an exclusive Beach

300 golf courses around

Club with a palm-fringed freeform pool, fine dining and

the world,” says Player,

a state-of-the-art fitness center.


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION views and unfurls across natural geographic formations and pineapple plantation fields. The Bay Course is the perfect complement to Plantation and better than ever after a multi-year renovation. Designed by Arnold Palmer and Francis Duane, it is regarded as Hawaii’s favorite resort course. Bay has a long history of hosting professional golf events dating back to 1982. Its signature holes are the par-four 4th and parthree 5th, which take golfers to the edge of the Pacific.

Maui’s Golf Coast

KA’ANAPALI GOLF RESORT

MauiGolfCoast.com

brating 50 years of golf history, many will be familiar

(800) 525-6284

with its Royal Ka’anapali Course from 2008’s Big Break

Though Ka’anapali, also on Maui’s west coast, is cele-

Ka’anapali on the Golf Channel. But the course (one

O

N THE “MAGIC ISLES” of Maui, Hawaii’s second

of only two Robert Trent Jones Sr.'s Hawaiian golf

largest island, the golf course settings are as mem-

designs) has also played host to the Champions Tour,

orable as the rounds played on them. Blessed with some

LPGA, and Shell's Wonderful World of Golf.

of the world’s most celebrated beaches, intoxicating trop-

The first planned resort destination in Hawaii,

ical views, and a very dramatic sunrise (viewed from the

Ka’anapali features two championship courses: Royal

10,000-foot peak of Haleakala), Maui is a spectacular golf

Ka'anapali and Ka'anapali Kai. Royal plays the longer

destination. From affordable munis to magnificent private

of the two because of the prevailing trade winds. Though

clubs, from volcanic slopes to stunning beaches, its courses

it is fairly forgiving off the tee, its undulating greens

offer diversity and an abundance of premier golf.

make it a challenge even for avid golfers. A little narrower off the tees and with large bunkers protecting the

KAPALUA GOLF

greens, strategy comes into play on every hole of Kai.

Troon-managed Kapalua Golf on Maui’s west coast is

The family-friendly facility has keiki (kid’s) tees and

the ultimate Hawaiian golf destination and includes two

special keiki scorecards on Kai year round; Juniors play

world-renowned golf courses, an award-winning golf

free from June 1–September 30.

academy, family golf programs, and tennis facilities. season opening Hyundai Tournament of Champions is

THE KING KAMEHAMEHA GOLF CLUB

ranked number one in Hawaii and number 17 in Amer-

Maui’s only 18-hole private golf club, King Kamehameha

BELOW: Kapalua’s

ica’s Top 100 Public Courses by Golf Digest. The Bill

Golf Club is a pure golf experience without homes, streets,

Plantation Course 18th

Coore and Ben Crenshaw design offers breathtaking

hotels, or condos around any of the holes. The course,

The Plantation Course, home of the PGA Tour’s ABOVE: The 18th hole at King Kamehameha Golf Club

which opened in May 2006, is perched 700 feet above sea level on the slopes of Mauna Kahalawai (an extinct volcano) with dramatic panoramic views of Maui’s south shore and Haleakala. Designed by Ted Robinson Sr. in 1991 and refreshed in 2005 by his son, Ted Robinson Jr., the course is known for the best greens on Maui and is the site of the local U.S. Open Qualifier. Golf Digest described its Frank Lloyd Wright-designed clubhouse as “Golf’s Guggenheim.” The club’s international mix of members


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION comes from all parts of the United States and the world. Though this is a private facility, non-members can enjoy

WAILEA GOLF CLUB Hawaii’s only 54-hole golf resort, Wailea offers more

BRANDON LaRUE

the course with their “Guest for a Day” option.

golf than any other destination in the islands and is

much a remarkable nature walk as it is an unforgettable

home to Hawaii’s only David Leadbetter Golf Academy.

golf outing.

Wailea’s three courses, renowned for their super con-

The Robert Trent Jones Jr. design overlooks the

ditioning and spectacular vistas from every hole, have

Wailea-Makena coastline and the neighboring islands.

garnered more than 80 regional, national, and interna-

Signature holes on this captivating course include the

tional awards.

6th, a challenging hole split in half by a natural ravine,

Old Blue is the club’s original

offering spectacular views; an

layout, a classic Hawaiian design

elevated par-three 12th with

ical foliage, serene lakes, cooling

Maui Golf Courses SOUTH MAUI

Makena Golf Course MakenaResortMaui.com; 800-321-6284

fountains, and coral sand bunkers. The layout offers relatively wide fairways, but challenging greens. The former host of both Champions Tour and LPGA Skins Games, Gold is the most challenging of the trio. Its rugged design takes advantage of the terrain’s natural undulations. The Robert Trent Jones Jr. course has been hailed as one of the world’s best designed. Emerald has been recognized multiple times as one of the country’s most women-friendly courses.

Wailea Golf Club WaileaGolf.com; 888-328-MAUI Gold Course • Emerald Course • Old Blue Course CENTRAL MAUI

panoramic views of the ocean, and the 14th, a double dogleg that is the second longest hole in all of Hawaii.

ABOVE: The 4th hole at Royal Ka’anapali

For a complete listing of Maui’s golf resorts and courses, plus helpful travel information, visit MauiGolfCoast.com.

MIDDLE: Wailea Golf Club, Emerald Course, 17th hole BELOW: The 15th at Makena Golf Course

The King Kamehameha Golf Club KamehamehaGolf.com; 808-243-1025 WEST MAUI

Kapalua Golf GolfatKapalua.com; 877-527-2582 Bay Course • Plantation Course Ka'anapali KaanapaliGolfResort.com; 808-661-3691 Royal Ka'anapali Course Ka'anapali Kai Course

ARTIN AHMADI

by Arthur Jack Snyder with trop-

Though the Robert Trent Jones Jr. course offers relatively fewer forced carries, accurate shot placement is essential. Colorful blossoms, panoramic ocean views, and carpetlike fairways enhance every round.

MAKENA BEACH & GOLF RESORT The Makena Golf Course, in South Maui, is a natural test of golf. Winding up, down, over and around the verdant foothills of the dormant Mt. Haleakala volcano, it is unique among Maui golf resorts. One of the last on Maui to remain in its original, natural state, the course offers panoramic views of native kiawe forest and indigenous wili wili trees, ancient Hawaiian rock walls, natural streams and gullies, and abundant wildlife. It's as SPRING 2012 LINKSMAGAZINE.COM

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Rainmakers Golf Community

Broadway show at the world-renown Spencer Theater

Ruidoso, New Mexico

to the world’s richest quarter horse race) and the Inn

(866) 700-8439, RainmakersUSA.com

of the Mountain Gods Resort and Casino.

I

T’S TEMPTING to describe Rainmakers Golf Com-

the spectacular golf course with its mountain views and

in the evening. For those who like to wager off the course, there is nearby Ruidoso Downs Race Track (home

The centerpiece of the club experience, though, is munity, just north of the mountain village of Ruidoso,

dramatic elevation changes. With membership (and

as an undiscovered gem. But, truth is, this boutique com-

ownership) limited to just 540, members often feel as if

munity has been attracting quite a bit of recognition.

they have the course to themselves. The setting helps

Located on the southern-

set the mood as the course wanders through native grass

most tip of the Rockies, where

meadows and stands of Ponderosa pines, pinons and

the skies seem eternally blue

junipers, and through arroyos and canyons.

and the clouds perpetually

In a region where rain has always been both scarce

puffy, Rainmakers’ Robert Trent

and sacred, this ecologically friendly community has placed

Jones II golf course was ranked

a premium on water conservation. Rain-capture systems

among the country’s best new

are required for every home. The golf course, New Mexico’s

courses when it opened in

first Audubon International Signature certified, uses an

2008. The whole community

on-course weather station to monitor watering needs. A

was featured that same year in

special water-retaining polymer under the course further

Where to Retire magazine, which

conserves water use. In this place where paradise and con-

also singles out Ruidoso in its

servation co-exist, a 25-acre Wildlife Corridor (home to

current edition. The region’s four-season temperate cli-

deer and elk) connects the course to a 135-acre wildlife

mate and its alluring combination of authentic Wild

habitat complete with walking trails.

West past (this is Billy the Kid’s home county) and modABOVE: The Spencer

ern culture impressed the editors.

Living options range from spacious Pueblo townhomes to single-family residences. Right now they are

This beautiful region seems to offer everything except

breaking ground on new patio homes. If you want to

big city lights and big city congestion. Outdoor pursuits

check out Rainmakers and those beautiful blue skies,

like hiking, camping, horseback riding, hunting, fishing,

call them for a special members’ rate. You can fly in

hallmarks of the golf

and Nordic sports are popular. You could conceivably

through Roswell (about an hour away) or Albuquerque

experience.

ski in the morning, golf in the afternoon, and take in a

or El Paso (about two-and-one-half hours each).

Theater BELOW: Mountain views and dramatic elevation changes are


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Red Ledges

nounced, including a Nicklaus Design nine-hole short

Heber Valley, Utah

facilities, and the Village Center, with expanded swim,

(877) 733-5334, RedLedges.com

fitness, and tennis amenities.

course, an equestrian center with indoor and outdoor

When the snow falls, this is truly a winter wonder-

T

HE MOUNTAIN VIEWS in this part of Utah,

land. In addition to sleigh rides and dog sled rides, mem-

just outside the resort town of Park City, aren’t

bers enjoy Red Ledge’s preferred relationship with The

just beautiful, they are among the most dramatic, in-

St. Regis Deer Valley Hotel and its private Deer Crest

spiring and majestic anywhere. In the heart of this

Club. This elite ski-in/ski-out club—just 10 minutes

fascinating Western landscape, Red Ledges has created

away—gives members access to the number-one ski

a four-season, premier private mountain community that

resort in North America.

takes full advantage of its surroundings.

ABOVE: The Jack

The focal point of this celebrated mountainside

For outdoor enthusiasts, this is a recreational

community, though, is golf. The spectacular Jack Nicklaus

paradise. Award-winning golf, high-altitude tennis,

Signature Course, which winds along dramatic rock

world-class skiing, plus hiking, horseback riding, snow-

cliffs, elevated ridges, and open meadows was named

Nicklaus Signature

shoeing, fishing, and boating make daily adventures avail-

the Best New Private Course in America by GOLF Mag-

Course winds along

able year round. All of it set against a mountain backdrop

azine in 2009. Last year the course was named the top

dramatic rock cliffs and

that changes inspiringly with each of the seasons.

course in Utah for the second straight year by Best of

elevated ridges. BELOW: The St. Regis Deer Valley Hotel

In a highlight-filled 2011, Red Ledges enjoyed record sales of homes and homesites. The year also welcomed

Complementing the course is the Jim McLean Golf

Cliff Drysdale Tennis

School that has proved so popular they expanded by

School (his first high-

adding a new certified teaching professional. This past

altitude tennis school in

year Director of Golf Jon Paupore was named one of

the U.S.) and a Swim

Golf Tips Magazine’s Top 25 instructors.

& Fitness Club with a

Red Ledges offers a wide range of luxury home

heated pool, deluxe

ownership options on its 2,000 acres. The options start

dressing rooms and a

from $495,000, with homesites priced from $195,000.

treatment room for per-

Tempting discovery packages are also available, including

sonal spa services.

several that combine instruction at the Jim McLean

ties have been anLINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012

ranking of the top residential courses in America.

the opening of their

And more ameni-

W-10

State, and jumped up to the 41st spot in GolfWeek’s

Golf School with rounds of golf and lodging at The St. Regis Deer Valley.


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Discover Mountain Golf Living. Homes from $495,000. Homesites from $195,000. Enjoy Red Ledges with a two night Stay & Play Package from $475 per couple. Package includes two luxurious nights at The St. Regis Deer ValleyÂŽ, a private tour of Red Ledges and your choice of a round of golf on the award winning Jack Nicklaus Signature Course, golf lessons, tennis lessons, or a horseback ride for two.

REDLEDGES.COM

877-733-5334

Park City

Scan the code for more package information.

Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. All descriptions are provided solely for illustrative purposes and are subject to change. This does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy in any jurisdiction in which registration or any other legal requirements have not been fulfilled. Warning: The California Department of Real Estate has not inspected, examined or qualified this offering. Red Ledges reserves the right to cancel or change this offer at any time without prior notification. Tax, tip, gratuity and caddie fees are not included in package price. Blackout dates may apply. Hotel cancelation policy applies. Š2012 Red Ledges Land Development, Inc.


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Comanche Trace Kerrville, Texas (877) 467-6282, ComancheTrace.com

J

UST ABOUT everyone knows that Texas, with its

healthy economy, low cost of living, and no state in-

come tax, is a favorite for homebuyers. Golfers also know that some of the best golf in the country can be found in abundance here. For all that the Lone Star State has to offer, the Texas Hill Country—with cooler weather, magnificent views, and a booming economy—has even more to attract homebuyers.

ABOVE: Comanche Trace offers 27 holes of championship golf. BELOW: The Texas Hill Country location ensures beautiful views and affordable real estate options.

But what you may not know is that the region that

Kerrville. Residents love it for its local cuisine, vibrant

is home to Comanche Trace is also home to a blossoming

arts scene, and great medical facilities. The downtown

wine culture. In recent years, a growing number of winer-

is undergoing a $20 million renovation that will add

ies (more than 70 to date) have taken advantage of the

new stores and restaurants, plus a six-mile hiking/biking

rolling landscape and ideal growing conditions to produce

trail along the Guadalupe River.

highly acclaimed wines.

Comanche Trace, just 45 minutes from San Antonio

As an alternative to Sonoma Valley, the Texas Hill

is a perfect example of all the positives of life here. This

Country offers more affordable real estate prices, stunning

well established master-planned community is welcoming

vistas, and a great economic climate, in addition to the

new club members, planning new neighborhoods, and

quickly growing reputation of its wineries.

reaping the benefits of sustained, steady growth.

One of the perks of living here is the town of

The reasons for its success are as abundant as the sweeping views of the Guadalupe River Valley. There is plenty to boast about in this idyllic community that perfectly blends the charm of small-town living with big-city convenience. The natural beauty of the Southwest landscape and the best year-round climate are a good start; add in a club with 27 holes of championship golf, lighted tennis courts, fitness center, clubhouse, and pool and that just might be the best value in the state. Two new hilltop neighborhoods— one featuring green building, the other high-end Italian hillside lock-and-leave homes—are in the works. Both offer long-range vistas from some of the community’s most desirable property. Homes at Comanche Trace start at $250,000, with homesites beginning at $59,000. Call 877-467-6282 or visit ComancheTrace.com to learn more or to book a Stay-and-Play package.


...with our Stay and Play Package visit comanchetrace.com for details

Great value, Growing, and Green! One of 50 Best Master-Planned Communities in the United States, by Where to Retire magazine The Best Value in the South The Best Bentgrass Greens in Texas Located in the Beautiful Texas Hill Country

Kerrville, Texas comanchetrace.com 877.467.6282

Simply The Best

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Enchanted Hill Lewisville, Texas (972) 899-1923, EnchantedHill.com

The luxurious, private neighborhood of Enchanted Hill is surrounded by a

P

RIVACY, luxurious living, and premier golf await

you just 30–45 minutes north of downtown Dallas.

The guard-gated neighborhood of Enchanted Hill, surrounded by The Lakes at Castle Hills (and its stunning

Jay Morrish-designed

Jay Morrish-designed course), provides its residents an

golf course (below).

idyllic lifestyle in a master-planned enclave. Enchanted Hill offers its own trails, formal garden,

the site of the Texas State Open. If you purchase a

and private park behind its

homesite at Enchanted Hill, a full first year’s member-

gates. The surrounding Cas-

ship (not transferable), including first year’s dues, is

tle Hills community en-

part of the package. You’ll also have access to Castle

hances that privacy with its

Hill’s 18-hole championship course, clubhouse, and

abundance of parks, lakes,

fitness center. Call 972-899-1923 for all the details.

trails, and swimming pools.

Enchanted Hill features an elite group of custom

The newly renovated golf

homebuilders for plenty of options to build the home of

course is home to the Hank

your dreams on oversized homesites with views of the

Haney Golf Academy and

lakes, private park, and golf course.

La Quinta Resort & Club

stellar reputation, but today it is also revered as a sen-

La Quinta, California

sational golf getaway and family destination.

(760) 564-4111, LaQuintaResort.com

Resort guests can take advantage of five distinctively different courses. Two of them, Pete Dye’s Mountain and

A favored escape of Hollywood’s elite since

T

HIS TIMELESS RESORT, with its stunning desert

Dunes courses, are at La Quinta Resort. Just three and

landscape, majestic mountain backdrop and un-

one-half miles down the road at PGA WEST are courses

waveringly perfect weather, has been a favored escape

by Jack Nicklaus, Greg Norman, and Dye. All in all, you

also a great golf and

for Hollywood’s elite since the 1920s. La Quinta—just

will have priority access to 90 holes of golf (plus the

family destination.

two hours from L.A.—has all its original charm and

Jim McLean Golf School), the greatest variety at any

the 1920s, La Quinta is

Western resort. You will also find a new kidfriendly, nine-hole course (incorporated into their existing Mountain course). The resort’s 23,000-squarefoot Spa La Quinta received a makeover this past year, and the Havana Club Cigar Lounge and Barber Shop debuted to great acclaim. In addition to 796 guestrooms and villas, La Quinta’s superb amenities include 41 swimming pools, 53 hot spas, 8 different dining venues, and casitas with fireplaces.


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION Originally only 12 holes were planned, but as course architect Bill Coore and owner Mike Keiser walked the property they recognized a great spot for a green. They simply couldn’t pass it up and another hole was born. Make no mistake, this Coore and Ben Crenshaw design is no pitch-and-putt course. The holes range from 80–165 yards uphill. While the focus is on the short game, you

Bandon Dunes Golf Resort

will be using a good selection of clubs during your round.

Bandon, Oregon

on any of the holes.

(888) 345-6008, BandonDunesGolf.com

It’s no cakewalk, either. Par is going to be a great score From a “feel good” perspective, the scale and location of the course is also helping to preserve a threatened

T

HE OPENING of any new golf course in the U.S.

coastal dune plant, the Silvery Phacelia. In addition, all

these days is cause for celebration. But when

net proceeds from the course will benefit The Wild

Bandon Dunes Golf Resort, which has already delivered

Rivers Coast Alliance—an organization that supports

four of the world’s best courses (all of them in LINKS

projects that protects the rich lands and waters of the

Magazine’s new Top 100 U.S. and world rankings),

Oregon South Coast.

debuts a new course, the news is especially welcome.

Pre-opening reviews have been terrific. If things

The Bandon Preserve, which opens May 1, veers

hold true to form, Keiser will be at the first tee on opening

from the acclaimed designs of Bandon Dunes, Pacific

day (as he has for all the courses) to greet golfers and

Dunes, Bandon Trails, and Old Macdonald by delivering

present them with a commemorative coin.

a 13-hole, par-three layout. In all other aspects, Bandon

For opening day tee times at Bandon Preserve,

The 7th (above) and

Preserve is as spectacular as its 18-hole neighbors.

or reservations year round at any of the courses,

9th holes at Bandon

“Why 13 holes?” you might justifiably ask.

call (800) 742-0172. Representatives will also be able

The simplest answer is that the beautiful piece of

to help you with availability in The Lodge and Inn or

offer stunning ocean

the Grove Cottages.

views.

land begging to become a golf course wasn’t big enough for a traditional layout. The course, which rolls toward the beach, is adjacent to the first tee at Bandon Trails. That means stunning Pacific Ocean views (from every hole), but also massive sand dunes. The size and location of the dunes weren’t conducive to par fours, but perfectly situated to accommodate par threes. The beauty of this smaller scale course is that, in conjunction with Bandon Dunes’ other courses, it opens up so many options. With quicker rounds, you can easily add the course to your schedule. If 36 holes in a day aren’t enough—or too much—the option of playing 13 seems just about right.

Preserve, like every hole on the course,


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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Pebble Beach Resorts Pebble Beach, California (800) 654-9300, PebbleBeach.com

founder Samuel F. B. Morse was intrigued by the legend and chose the course name from the classic novel. The scorecard at Spyglass Hill shows that the Robert Trent Jones Sr. signature course also pays homage to Stevenson’s book. Each hole is named for a character or place in the novel. (The par-four 2nd is Billy Bones; the par-five 14th is Long John Silver.) The course itself, which opened in 1966, is legendary for both its breathtaking beauty and its well-earned reputation as one of the toughest on the PGA Tour. In 2011 its 8th hole was rated the 11th toughest on the Tour. (The par five has been described as “the longest hole under 400 yards in the world.”) It’s important to remember that those ratings are from the championship tees. Step up to the gold or white tees and it becomes much more manageable—

PHOTO BY EVAN SCHILLER

and enjoyable—for mere mortals. One of the novelties of the landscape here is that there are two distinctly different terrains. Robert Trent Jones Sr. put both into play beautifully. The first five holes take you through sandy seaside dunes; while the The first five holes of Spyglass Hill, like the 172-yard 3rd (above) and the 349-yard 2nd (below), roll through sandy seaside dunes.

W

HEN PHIL MICKELSON stormed from behind

remaining holes meander through pine forests. There

to capture his fourth AT&T Pebble Beach

is one constant, though: Every hole requires you to

National Pro-Am in February, he added to the legend

carefully choose the safest strategic route to the green.

of what it takes to win the storied tournament.

While Pebble Beach Golf Links naturally garners

Turns out the secret to success is playing one of the

more attention, no trip here is complete without a round

toughest courses in the world—Spyglass Hill Golf Course

on Spyglass Hill. For more than 40 years it has ranked

at Pebble Beach Resorts—at 2-under or better. Every

among the Top 100 courses in America. This year,

winner since 2003 has followed that formula.

LINKS Magazine included it in our inaugural ranking

Spyglass Hill, part of the AT&T Pebble Beach Na-

of the Top 100 courses in both the U.S. and the world.

tional Pro-Am rotation since 1967, is the place of legends.

Pebble Beach Resorts, with its luxurious hotels,

Local lore has it that Robert Louis Stevenson sought

exquisite dining experiences, rejuvenating spa, upscale

inspiration from the sandy dunes of Pebble Beach and

shops, and four fabled golf courses, is the perfect setting

hilly terrain while writing Treasure Island. Pebble Beach

to create your own legendary golf experience. PHOTO BY EVAN SCHILLER


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S P E C I A L A DV E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

The Northeast’s Hidden Gems Unspoiled landscapes, thrilling courses, delicious local food, and vibrant cultures make these favorites well worth the drive

T

ucked in the uppermost reaches of the Northeast and along the farthest eastern coastline of the Canadian Maritimes are some of the most scenic and challenging courses on the continent. These unspoiled destinations—covered by snow in winter—seem even more majestic when their classic layouts are revealed each spring. What’s more, there is great value for your money on these courses (you won’t find $100 green fees at any of them) and off. While the golf is terrific, these are also places Jay Peak you will want to linger for a while after your round. All offer unique things to do—from breathtaking aerial tram seafood, this rugged land is also home to rides to whale watching to world-class mu- The Cabot Trail, one of North America’s seums—in small-town settings. The vast most scenic drives. Along (or nearby) the scope of things to do off the golf course trail, you will find six excellent courses, including Canada’s number-one public makes these trips worthy in themselves. While masterpieces are spread all course, Highlands Links, in Cape Breton across Canada, you won’t find a better Highlands National Park. Three courses, all with commanding views concentration of courses than on the beautiful, pastoral island of Cape Breton of the water, are gathered around the shores off the northeastern tip of Nova Scotia. In of the Bras d’Or Lakes, including Bell Bay addition to being home to a renaissance Golf Club, Golf Digest’s 1998 Best New of foot-stomping Celtic music and fresh Course in Canada. The Lakes Golf Club at

Cabot Links

Leatherstocking

Ben Eoin, with its changing winds, and Dundee Resort & Golf Club, with its elevation changes, both offer challenging and pleasurable play. Canada’s only authentic links course, Cabot Links, is set in Inverness on rugged oceanfront landscape. Farther up the west coast, in the shadow of the Cape Breton Highlands, Le Portage Golf Club offers stunning views of the mountains on one side and views of the Gulf of St. Lawrence on the other. SPRING 2012 LINKSMAGAZINE.COM

NE-1


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S P E C I A L A DV E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N Back in the States, located at the very top of Vermont is the small, scenic town of Jay. This is home to the world-class ski mountain Jay Peak. When the snow melts, the ski trails give way to the Jay Peak Championship Golf Course. Voted the best public course in Vermont by Golfweek the last two years running, Jay Peak flows through the beautiful mountain terrain. Five sets of tees make this course playable for everyone. The tees adjust not just the

length (from 5,000 to almost 7,000 yards), but the angle of the holes as well. A great place to bring the whole family, Play-&-Stay packages start at $155 per person and include lodging, daily Tram rides, free daycare for kids ages 2–7, and unlimited golf. You’ll want to save some time to explore the traditional country stores, bed and breakfasts, and local swimming holes. Home to one of the most scenic layouts you’ll find in the Northeast, the high-

ly ranked Leatherstocking Golf Course is set on an absolutely perfect piece of land on the western shore of Otsego Lake in central New York State. The course climbs mid-round to provide beautiful views of the lake. The three-hole finish along the lake makes for a memorable close to your round. The par-five 18th begins on an island tee, doglegs around the lake, and ends right in front of The Otesaga Resort Hotel’s spacious veranda, reminding you a bit of Pebble Beach. Though you don’t have to stay in the lakefront Resort to play, it is well worth it. Along with attractive golf packages, you can enjoy the exceptional service, accommodations, and atmosphere that has made this award-winning destination a favorite for over a century.

Northeast Guide to Golf UPSTATE NEW YORK Name: The Otesaga Resort Hotel Location: Cooperstown, New York Course: Leatherstocking Phone: 800-348-6222 Website: Otesaga.com Fun Fact: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, open year round, is within walking distance, just about three blocks from the resort. CANADIAN MARITIMES Name: Golf Cape Breton Location: Cape Breton, Canada Courses: Bell Bay, Cabot Links, Dundee, Highlands Links, The Lakes, Le Portage Phone: 866-404-3224 Website: GolfCapeBreton.com Fun Fact: Alexander Graham Bell had a summer home in Baddeck complete with his own double-ended golf hole that he enjoyed playing. VERMONT’S NORTHEAST KINGDOM Name: Jay Peak Resort Location: Jay, Vermont Course: Jay Peak Phone: 802-988-GOLF Website: JayPeakResort.com Fun Fact: Vermont’s only aerial tramway provides breathtaking views of four states, the province of Quebec, and on clear days, Montreal and Mount Washington.

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LINKSMAGAZINE.COM SPRING 2012


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IN A WORLD OF CLUBS THAT LOOK BETTER THAN THEY PERFORM, AN EXCEPTION. The new i20 Series. Already a winner on Tour. Already the talk of the tour. Engineered with a powerful combination of workability, distance and forgiveness to lower the scores of passionate golfers of any ability. Get custom fit for yours today.

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