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Football

’Cats shred the

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Puget Sound on

University of Oct. 9.

October 15, 2010

Linfield College

McMinnville, Ore.

116th Year

Issue No. 7

Campaign notes: Oregon’s political campaigns are in full swing, gearing up for the big Nov. 2 midterm elections. Whether you’re registered to vote in Oregon or you’re from out-of-state, the competition is worth following. Check inside for information on candidate backgrounds and platforms. — Turn to pages 8 & 9 to find out who’s who in Oregon state elections. • County Commissioner: “Battle of the Marys” • State Representative: “Mother of the vines vs. Straight-talking incumbent” • First Congressional District: “Sports advertiser vs. Businessman” — Read on page 4 about a discussion from campaign

Biology lecture

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Homecoming photos

Culture

News

INSIDE

Editorial .......................... 2 News ............................... 4 Features.............................7 Culture............................10 Sports .............................16

News

managers during Linfield’s “Pizza & Politics” event.

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Poetry reading

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2

www.linfieldreview.com The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Kelley Hungerford Managing editor Braden Smith Copy chief Septembre Russell Business manager Sarah Spranger News editor Joshua Ensler Sports editor Corrina Crocker Culture editor Jessica Prokop Features editor Jaffy Xiao Opinion editor Chelsea Bowen Photo editor Sarah Hansen Online editor Megan Myer Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla Illustrator Jenny Worcester Senior reporter Matt Sunderland Senior photographer Katie Paysinger Circulation manager Kyle Guth Columnists Matt Olson “Dear Bailey” Adviser William Lingle professor of mass communication The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists. The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Fridays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for 26 issues a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday to appear in the Review the following Friday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary. Go to www.linfieldreview.com for more information.

Opinions

October 15, 2010

EDITORIAL

Bullying acts show need for compassion Dean of Students Susan Hopp addressed, in an Oct. 11 e-mail, the recent bout of bullying problems and tragic suicides that have cropped up in the U.S. In the e-mail, Hopp asked students to stand up for victims of bullying. We should not be silent bystanders. She called for students to support and defend each other in these sad times and asked that harassment be reported to trusted officials. We at the Review could not agree more. We are saddened by the news of suicide and harassment and can only hope that Linfielders have trusted people they can talk to before taking drastic measures. It seems that a lot of people have an attitude of “things like that don’t happen to me” or “that never happens here,” but the truth

is that bullying can happen to anyone at anytime and anywhere. And, yes, just as recent incidents demonstrate, it can happen to college students, too. With the advance of the Internet, the concept of bullying has evolved into cyber bullying. For example, 10 or 15 years ago — before the days of Facebook, Twitter, Myspace, texting and blogs — a bully may have been depicted as shoving a classmate into a locker or stealing lunch money. However, in this day and age, bullies can take advantage of people in new ways. This could mean posting a degrading Facebook message or sending inappropriate or embarrassing photos of an individual via text message or webcam. Bullying was once limited to hallways and playgrounds, but

now bullies use the Internet to enter victims’ homes and create problems outside of school. This is especially true in college. The bottom line is that bullying is a serious issue, and it needs to be addressed. We ask that if you see someone being bullied, take a stand and confront the person or people who are involved. Confronting a peer may not be the most comfortable option, but it is important to do what is right. At least go and get help if you’re uncomfortable. Help put a stop to this issue before more people take their own lives because of it. As Hopp said, “When in doubt about how words or actions might be perceived, there’s nothing quite like the golden rule: Simply treat your fellow Linfield Students like you would like to be treated.”

Review office hours Editor-in-chief Thursday 8:00-9:00 a.m. Friday 2:00-3:00 p.m. or by appointment Managing editor Tuesday & Thursday 10:00 a.m-11:00am or by appointment Follow us on Twitter, @linfieldreview, and on Facebook.

-The Review Editorial Board

CORRECTION

Oct. 8 issue: Ben Karlin graduated in Spring ‘08 not Spring ‘05. Alessa and Ben Karlin met in 2007, not 2008.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

In regards to the October 9 article “Grade-point average causes job termination” by Septembre Russell regarding the termination of a music coordinator by ASLC representatives, I found the writing in general extremely biased and offensive to the representatives — in particular LAB vice president of programming Nicole Bond. Throughout the article Bond is continually harassed about the termination of Alyssa Hood, as if she personally was responsible for Hood’s termination

and hardship. By the end of the second page, the author’s writing goes from slightly journalistic in style, to blatantly spiteful “she said/she said” writing. Reading the article in its entirety was painful: I felt as if I was reading a note some catty 15 year old would pass in class, not a college newspaper. Journalism is supposed to be as unbiased as possible, and this piece clearly fails to meet that requirement. Secondly, the very content of

the article isn’t suitable for print, let alone a prime spot on the front page that could have been taken up by a worthwhile story regarding an issue pertinent to Linfield students. Clearly, this article was inspired by a bitter former employee, desperate to make someone pay for her own lack of ability to meet job requirements. The matter should have been settled between Hood and ASLC representatives, rather than shoved at the student population in hopes that…what? There would

be a public outcry for Ms. Hood’s job to be returned? Sorry guys, The only action this article should inspire is an apology from Hood and Russell to Bond for all the mudslinging done throughout. The Linfield Review has been a respectable college newspaper in the past, and everyone on staff has big shoes to fill. One sincerely hopes that this sort of article is an isolated mistake that will not be tolerated or repeated in the future. -Shauna Litts, junior

Cyclists should follow rules of the road

OPINION

Megan Meyer Online editor Dear cyclists, If you don’t get your act together you will soon end up nothing more than a bug on my windshield. I am growing tired of slamming on my brakes because you don’t have the common courtesy (or brain cells) to signal when you turn. I am growing irritated by the fact that you insist

on being treated like pedestrians, ya know, by just crossing the road with no concerns about cars. I’ve seen you ride bikes in the middle of the road, between both lines of traffic, and in the wrong lane. I’ve seen you cut blind corners and behave recklessly. You may not know this, but cyclists are expected to follow the same road laws as motorized vehicles. From what I’ve seen so far, the pedestrians follow more road rules than bikers do. These rules aren’t there to keep drivers from road raging on you (although it helps), but they are in fact there for safety. Headphones are another issue. You shouldn’t be wearing them while riding. Not only will you not

hear the cars around you, but if drivers aren’t allowed to wear them, I’m sure you can’t either! The same goes for talking on the phone and texting. Hell, a cyclist texting while riding terrifies me more than a driver does. Put the phone in your pocket, and keep it there until you get off your bike. Rules are there for a reason, and you should be following them. You are in college now. Rules are no longer in place to ruin your life or cramp your style but are for the safety of you and those around you. I can understand bending the rules if you are in an area with little or no pedestrian or vehicle traffic, but Linfield doesn’t fall into those categories. Linfield Avenue

is a public road with many people constantly driving on it. People tend to drive faster on that street than other places on campus. Also, it is more likely for a McMinnville resident to be driving through, which means they aren’t accustomed to maneuvering around college students like us. I know many drivers fly into a rage about the fact that bikers bother them. This is usually the result of a cyclist not following the road laws. If you follow the rules, people will like you more. You don’t need to be a rebel when your well-being is at stake. Stop it. Open your eyes. Don’t be stupid. Megan Meyer can be reached at linfieldreviewonline@gmail.com.


October 15, 2010

Opinions

www.linfieldreview.com

3

COLUMN

Majority opinions stifle minority views Matt Olson Columnist “Oh yeah, I’m very supportive of breast cancer,” I say to her with a big smile on my face, noting that the irony of the statement blew right on by her. I walk on, nodding at a pretty girl blabbering on about homosexuality. Speeding past signs and e-mails ranting about our sustainability efforts and banners promoting the latest disability awareness function. Sigh. The overload of

public opinion is numbing my mind. And they are everywhere. You can’t throw a Dillin banana 10 feet without hitting a sign promoting some cause or issue. The campus has ventured beyond social awareness into the land of forced awareness while constantly reminding us of how intolerable we are. I’ve probably heard about 10 different discussions this month about seeing other perspectives. In reality, we need to work less on diffusing uncomfortable situations, since students are now walking on eggshells everywhere they go to avoid offending anyone. They think, act, write and work as if we are all the same and have the same open views

about everything. People get strong-armed into supporting all sorts of causes simply to demonstrate that they’re not against them. Diversity has become a system of tiers in which everyone fights to climb higher while simultaneously raining hell on those below. The best way to dodge a hit is to keep climbing. And people do, ignoring the fact that they actually don’t care at all about any of the issues. Society makes them care whether they want to or not. In our efforts to promote acceptance, we’ve somehow managed to belittle anyone not directly in balance with our own views. Let me get one thing straight: Students do not

have an obligation to fix every societal problem in the world. There should be no guilt involved in your situation. Do what you can with what you believe in. Cultural awareness is a great thing. Respecting others is excellent. But neither of those concepts should or can be forced. They’re genuine perspectives that we choose consciously. And some people just don’t feel that way, which seems to put many people into attack mode. Diversity is not a weapon to swing at those who have alternative viewpoints. I had a friend here once tell me he “hated people who weren’t open-minded.” I was amazed at how sincere he was about the statement.

We’re getting to the point where we try so hard to be nice to each other, that we don’t even present our true nature. Or the fact that we have opinions about all these social issues. If I am against an issue, I should be allowed to speak my piece, right? On the contrary, if I expressed my views against homosexuality or Judaism or global warming or feminism, I would find myself crushed under a wave of public opinion. If I mentioned that wearing a T-shirt or a wristband doesn’t actually change anything for a public that has heard it 10 million times, I would receive more angry e-mails than I could read. This isn’t right. Being vocal about any viewpoint,

mainstream or not, should be Ok. This is the land of diversity; let us think whatever we wish and speak openly. Trust me, it’s better for the mainstream opinion anyway. If people actually believe it, they’ll become vocal. They’ll question what they actually believe. And if, as many of you so obviously contend, your opinion is the correct one, you have no reason to fear. We need to stop towing the line on every issue. We need to stand up and fight for anything we strongly believe in. And we need to stop telling people that the majority is always right. Public opinion changes quickly.

Matt Olson can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

OPINION

School should foster domestic-international student bonds

Jaffy Xiao Features editor Last Wednesday, I was invited to a meeting with President Hellie, Admission Director Lisa Knodle-Bragiel and associate professor of Japanese Chris Keaveney about their recent visit to China. During the meeting, they discussed people and schools they met and praised the Chinese cities that they visited. One of the cities is my hometown. I welcome Hellie’s devotion to building a long-term friendship with Chinese

schools. But after the short meeting with yummy but unauthentic dumplings and spring rolls, I was lost in thought and uncertainty. Shaik Ismail, director of International Programs, said, in a news story I wrote before Hellie’s trip to China, he was worried about an increase in Chinese students at Linfield. With China’s growing economic power, it’s not surprising that there is a trend of Chinese students studying in the United States. In Linfield’s history, a sudden increase of students from the Middle East occured in the 1970s and from Japan in the 1980s. As a student from China, I am aware of what happened behind China’s highest growth rate: It’s more than

Chinese whiz kids in the Ivy League. It’s more than global top 500 companies and “laowai” (Chinese term for foreigners) in Shanghai and Guangzhou. It’s more than a Chinese dissident winning the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. It’s more complicated than I can explain. However, as a Linfield student, I can offer advice for the school according to my experiences: 1. Be strict in the admission process and control the percentage of international students in diversity. I don’t know how different the process of admission for international students would be, but I know a large number of international students from a single country is not good for the long term. Also, we should

assume that all international students are satisfied with the standard of being a student at Linfield on the first day they come to Linfield. 2. Promote more connections between English language and culture program classes and foreign language classes. Taking ELCP classes, first year international students easily hang out with their own group, so it’s normal to see some international students from the same country speak their home language in class. On the other hand, intercultural conversation is also good to encourage more Linfield students to study foreign languages. 3. Encourage international students to observe the new milieu consciously and add more practical

knowledge about American folkways and everyday life situations into class plan. For instance, I am still curious why people say “bless you” when someone sneezes and wonder if I should say it when others sneeze. Two years ago, I thought it was because they believe in God. Now I think it might be a way to be friendly in American culture. OK, before you can’t stand that I chatter too much about “boring” advice, let me finish the last one. 4. Build a bridge between international students and American students. I notice a good thing is that international students from different countries have communicated well and even been good friends in

international culture events, such as the Cultural Show. So the next step is to involve the entire campus with its voice. Why did I say that having more international students from a single country is not good in the long term? It’s extremely easy for a group of foreign students who come from the same country to hang out as a group, like Linfield students who study abroad stick to a group in foreign countries. I believe the goal of having more international students is more international student communication and diversity on campus instead of each group “interacting” with itself. Jaffy Xiao can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.

Jenny Worcester/Illustrator


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News

www.linfieldreview.com

October 15, 2010

Professor discusses links in biology and physics Joshua Ensler News editor Professor and Chair of the Department of Biology Michael Roberts addressed the misconceptions about the physics of physiology in popular culture for students, faculty and staff Oct. 13. Roberts used a variety of media examples, such as “Gulliver’s Travels” and “The Little Prince,” to demonstrate how physics dictate the size and shape of land animals. “Most people are aware that giant spiders are impossible, at least the way Hollywood shows them,” Roberts said. “But it’s important that they know why giant spiders are impossible. Besides, it’s the little ones you need to look out for.” Roberts explained the effects of gravity on the construction of land animal physiology. Large animals have thick legs and robust skeletons to support their weight, he said. Hollywood spiders, he said, do not have the prerequisite leg diameter to support the weight of a giant thorax and abdomen. To illustrate his example, he showed the audience the thickness of the legs of the four land animals with a mass of more than 2,000 pounds. The elephant, rhinoceros, hippopotamus and the giraffe are the only living species whose members weigh more than a ton, and all have wide legs compared to other land animals, Roberts said. Gravity is not the only physical constraint on physi-

ology that Roberts discussed. The square-cube law and diffusion of atoms and molecules are two closely-related topics that he mentioned. The square-cube law is the relationship between surface area and volume. The most simplified explanation of the law is that surface area is squared every time an object doubles in size, and the volume is cubed. So, the volume grows faster than the surface area. This causes problems in nutrition, Roberts said, because molecules cannot diffuse fast enough to maintain an organism’s metabolism. Diffusion is the process by which molecules in an area of higher concentration move into an area of lower concentration until equilibrium is reached. Diffusion and the squarecube law affect organisms in two ways, Roberts said. First, they limit cell size. Cells tend to be about 10 micrometers in diameter on average, as this is optimal for the diffusion of molecules into and out of the cell. “Growth is not cells becoming larger,” Roberts said of animals, “but more cells being grown.” Multicelled animals can escape this limitation with distribution systems like respiratory and circular systems, but they face a different problem. The metabolism of an animal is also based on the square-cube law but does not behave in a linear fashion. A larger breed of dog with 125 times the mass of a smaller

breed does not have 125 times the metabolic activity. Metabolic activity is measured in watts. Roberts recently wrote a dissertation that argued against a recent finding in

physiology: a claim in a study that said the metabolism equation should be changed to W = m^(3/4). Currently, the metabolic activity of an organism is thought to be equal to two-

students. Unfortunately, neither could attend, but they sent their campaign managers. Ryan Mann represented Sokol Blosser and Sal Peralta came for the Stern campaign. The meeting lasted almost an hour, during which the managers were asked questions about their experiences. They passed out advertisements for their respective campaigns, too. A graduate of Oregon State University, Mann pioneered a petition effort to lobby Congress to help students with tuition and other education benefits. He went to Washington, D.C., with other students to present to Congress. He was also an intern in the state legislature before becoming Sokol Blosser’s campaign manager. Mann urged students to think about their votes and their voice in this and in all local elections and used his petitioning Congress as an example. He said he understood

that many people cannot make the 4,000-mile trip to Washington, D.C. to lobby, but pushed students to become involved at the local level. “It’s true that your one voice may not be able to change much in D.C., but Salem is only 35 minutes away, and you can make a difference there.” Sokol Blosser, who is running for the Oregon House of Representatives seat against Republican incumbent Jim Weidner, is a founder of Oregon’s wine industry and a successful Horatio Alger story: starting with little and working her way up to become a successful businesswoman. Peralta spent less time telling students how he became involved in politics and more time talking about Commissioner Stern and blasting her opponent. Stern has been a McMinnville local for a number of years and is currently in her second term as county commissioner. The election could have

been over on May 18, when the primaries took place and candidates are eligible to gain a majority of votes, which would result in no second election. This would have made November elections unnecessary. However, Stern lost the primary by nine votes. Peralta said he believes his candidate is the right woman for the job and that voters will know this as well. “The voters see a moderate county commissioner running against the national spokeswoman for the Constitution Party,” Peralta said. Mary Starrett, Stern’s competitor, is a member of the Constitution Party. “Faced with this kind of competition, if I can’t win this one, then I must be the worst campaign manager in the world,” Peralta said.

Robert Lisac/Freelancer Professor Michael Roberts lectured a packed room Oct. 13 in Riley Student Center. Roberts explained how physics restricts land animal physiology.

Campaign managers visit campus Matt Sunderland Senior reporter On Oct. 11, 50 hungry and impatient students crammed into Walker 203, waiting for the first “Pizza & Politics” meeting of the year to begin. But everyone running the event was a little late, and so was the pizza. Lead by Nicholas Buccola, assistant professor of political science, “Pizza and Politics,” is a program of events each semester that invites students to eat pizza and listen to guest speakers and lectures or watch movies about current political issues. The program was successful last year, with an average of 50 people attending each meeting. The first meeting this semester focused on local elections and invited Democrats County Commissioner Mary Stern and candidate for the Oregon House of Representative’s Susan Sokol Blosser to speak to

Matt Sunderland can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

thrids the power of the mass of an organism, or W = m^(2/3). W is watts, representing the metabolism, and m is mass. The study examined a wider range of land animals

than previous efforts, with organisms that fell below one once and above 2,000 lbs. Roberts said he found a flaw in the reasoning of the group study. In his dissertation, “A New Model for the Body Size-Metabolism Relationship,” he points out that there were two distinct groups in the study. Smaller animals were examined at their basal metabolic state, he said. This is when the animals are at rest, and no muscles are being used. Larger animals, such as horses, cannot sit longer enough for the measurements to be taken without dying, and therefore were measured when standing and fighting gravity. Roberts said this skewed the results of the study, and the two populations must be separated when averaging the metabolic rate of animals. The crowd sat in rapt attention during the lecture and stayed afterward to make suggestions to get better results from the study. One suggestion was to launch large animals into space, because they could be studied without the effects of gravity. “I would hope that students understand that size relationships aren’t linear,” Jeremy Weisz, assistant professor of biology, said. Weisz said he thought the lecture went well, and that students should be aware of the constraints physics place on physiology. Joshua Ensler can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


News

October 15, 2010

‘Bashing away breast cancer’

www.linfieldreview.com

Braden Smith /Managing editor

Two Japanese international students watch a peer bust out a car’s headlight in the parking lot across from Dillin Hall on Oct. 8. The event was part of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority’s “Think Pink Week,” which raised money and awareness for the fight against breast cancer. Students paid 50 cents a swing to take a whack at a clunker with a sledgehammer.

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Committee elicits student dining issues Chelsea Bowen Opinion editor

A student-run Sodexo Food Committee meets at 4 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month inside Dillin Hall to discuss campus dining issues. The Linfield Dining website, www.linfielddining.com, advertises the Sodexo Food Committee, but this year there’s a lot in the works to increase publicity and to re-vamp the committee. Campus Liaison Committee Chair junior Wesley Allegre said that he will promote the Sodexo Food Committee to the Associated Students of Linfield College Senate so that it can be included in the Senate reports. “Using ASLC will be influential because ASLC has a big presence on campus,” Allegre said. Senators can pass the

word to their constituents and receive input on changes they would like to see in Dillin Hall. “My ultimate goal is to be informed about what students do like and what they don’t like,” Allegre said. Director of Dining Facilities and Auxiliary Services Brad Sinn said that one of this year’s goals is to accommodate students. “I would like to see a lot more interaction on what meal plan fits students lives,” Sinn said. Sinn also said that he would like more input from students on dining hours. With sports and academics, students are on different schedules, he said. For more information about the Sodexo Food Committee contact General Manager of Linfield Dining Services Bill Masullo. Chelsea Bowen can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

ITS bars file sharing websites to decongest network Joshua Ensler News editor Information Technology Services has blocked a number of websites associated with BitTorrent downloads in an attempt to alleviate pressure on Linfield’s network. ITS finished upgrading the network’s physical components and digital organization, but students are overloading the network with downloads that use BitTorrent tracking protocols, Irv Wiswall, chief technology director, said. BitTorrents are a type of peer-to-peer download. When a file is selected for download, the program finds multiple computers of user that share the file. It then downloads part of the file simultaneously from each. “The most common use of peer-to-peer [file sharing] is copyright violation,” he said. The process takes up substantially more bandwidth than downloads that have one source, Wiswall said. BitTorrent uses tracking protocols to organize and sort the incoming information and reassemble it at the downloading computer. Tracking protocols can be compared to a tag or label on a file being downloaded. “We don’t have enough bandwidth,” he said. “We’ve got 100 megabits of band-

Graphic courtesy of www.mininova.org redirect Students who try to access websites for BitTorrent tracking protocols are redirected to this message. Information Technology Services has disabled these sites in an attempt to reduce BitTorrent traffic on the school’s network. width per second, and it’s full most of the day.” “What we’ve done is block, at the gateway, the BitTorrent trackers,” he said. “It’s what you need to make the BitTorrents work. It’s given some relief to the network.” Students attempting to reach a forbidden website are redirected to a website bearing a message from Wiswall. It tells students that they have been redirected because they are trying to download files using a BitTorrent tracking protocol, and it slows down the network and that they should contact Wiswall if it was reached in error. The policy of blocking trackers began during the last week of September, Wiswall said. ITS was using a device called a packetshaper to reg-

ulate BitTorrents. It ceased to regulate BitTorrent traffic effectively for reasons unknown, so the department decided to change its strategy. The packetshaper examines information coming and going from the server. It then assigns a percentage of Linfield’s available bandwidth to the data. The device is programmed to be especially vigilant in discovering peer-to-peer tracking protocols and assigning them a low priority for bandwidth space, Wiswall said. He said the packetshaper lost its ability to detect and block peer-to-peer file sharing sometime last year. “People that write peerto-peer protocols play a cat-and-mouse game with the people that program the packetshaper,” Wiswall said.

“They keep trying to get around it.” Wiswall said the packetshaper was initially installed to counter Napster, which was making Linfield’s network unusable at the time the device was purchased. The programmers of BitTorrent protocols may have written programs beyond the packetshaper’s ability to analyze, Wiswall said. “We don’t know if the packetshaper can’t figure out the protocols or if we don’t know how to make it do that,” he said. “We haven’t had a lot of time to look into this.” Using BitTorrent to download copyrighted material is illegal under federal law. Posters hanging inside Renshaw Hall warn of the consequences for illegally sharing copyrighted material.

Wiswall is unable to determine who is illegal downloads material on Linfield’s network. “Our network is set up in such a way that I can’t track back to the individual that downloaded the material,” Wiswall said. “I get notifications from people trying to protect their copyright all the time.” Wiswall is not against using BitTorrent protocols to download material even though it causes problems for the network. Anyone who wants to use BitTorrent to download material that is not copyrighted can ask the ITS support desk for assistance, he said, but no one has asked for help yet. Even with the blocks on BitTorrent tracking sites, students said they can still use the program to share files. One student, who

requested to remain anonymous, said he uses other programs and websites as proxies for the blocked ones, allowing him to stay connected to peer-to-peer networks. He added that he has had to change his proxies frequently because ITS kept finding and blocking the websites he was using but that it was more of an annoyance than an obstacle. ITS is making plans to troubleshoot the sluggishness. Wiswall said he hopes to increase Linfield’s bandwidth by 30 percent next year if the budget permits. If successful, Linfield will have 130 Mbit/s of bandwidth instead of 100 Mbit/s. Wiswall said he hopes this will help counter the slowdowns the network suffers during peak usage. “I think we will still reach those peaks because 30 Mbit/s isn’t enough to keep people happy,” he said. “But we should reach those peaks less.” Linfield pays $48 per Mbit a month. Wiswall said he does not expect that price to change if he does increase the bandwidth. Linfield purchases its Internet service from Online Northwest. The contract expires in one year, and Wiswall said he is looking at other providers for a better deal. Joshua Ensler can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


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News

www.linfieldreview.com

October 15, 2010

Homecoming week brings celebration

Joel Ray/Freelancer Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority and Theta Chi Fraternity paired up for the Song and Banner contest Oct. 13 for Homecoming week. The team placed first in the event, which promotes school spirit.

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Senior Tracey Major of Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority performs at the Mr. and Mrs. Linfield competition Oct. 14. Major tied with senior Joey Wan of Alpha Phi Sorority for Mrs. Linfield.

Tumult freezes repair process Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief The Catty Shack’s frozen yogurt machine broke down earlier this year, leaving its menu, which once displayed frozen yogurt treats, unlit. But the decision concerning whether Linfield will pay to fix it or to purchase a new one is up in the air. General Manager of Linfield Dining Services Bill Masullo speculated that repairing the machine would cost $6,000-$8,000 and replacing it could cost as much as $14,000. “I just report the facts: Here’s what it costs to repair; here’s what it costs to replace,” he said. “We’re at a crossroads where we say does it make sense to fix this machine and does it make sense to replace [it].” But the college owns the yogurt machine, which Masullo said makes treats similar to Dairy Queen’s blizzards. Sodexo simply uses it. Junior Wesley Allegre, Associated Students of Linfield College Senate campus liaison committee chair, said students don’t purchase enough frozen yogurt products to offset the cost of replacement or repair. “If we went to the administration and said we want a new yogurt machine, [Masullo] would give his perspective, and his is that it doesn’t make sense,” Allegre said. Masullo said he has statistics demonstrating its lack of use. Retail Supervisor Shawn Fisher, class of ’10, said the

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor The backlit menu contrasts the dark and lifeless sign that once held the prices and selections of frozen yogurt and other deserts. The administration hasn’t decide whether it will replace the machine yet. frozen yogurt machine sees seasonal use, but even when the weather is warm, it’s intermittent at best. He said it “just depends on the day.” “In my three years now at Linfield and my two years on the meal plan, I got a frozen yogurt once,” junior Rachel Coffey said. Coffey asked about the machine’s absence at the Sept. 27 ASLC Senate meeting as a proxy for the Math Club senator. She said she heard contradicting rumors circulating about the machine. She said she thought the machine had always been working, but others told her it had been broken for years. Coffey said more confusing rumors exist about the repair being Sodexo’s

problem because it didn’t actively turn in work orders to the school about fixing the machine; however, she said she’d also heard that the school just wasn’t doing anything about the issue. But Allegre and Masullo both said that the machine’s fate will depend on student voice and use. “People don’t realize that Sodexo, even though they are a company and are trying to make a profit, is trying to sort of appease us, and they are willing to do it,” Allegre said. “Students just need to make it known what they want. They just complain.” Allegre said Masullo is brainstorming ideas such as placing coffee options on the now unused menu hanging in Catty Shack.

He said this will increase awareness of the venue’s espresso machine. Allegre also said Masullo is increasing other ice cream novelty items in Catty Shack to compensate for the lack of frozen yogurt. But Masullo insisted that nothing is set in stone. “Unless we get any people that want to participate in these programs, we’re doing it for us,” he said, referring to Sodexo employees. “It’s up to you to play.” Students can discuss food services at Food Committee meetings at 4 p.m. on the first Wednesday of every month. Masullo said the best way to give input is to meet with him in person. Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


October 15, 2010

Features

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Pot policy:

Marijuana and Measure 74 by Septembre Russell/Copy chief

The 2010 Oregon Voter’s Pamphlet features a measure centered on medical marijuana. Surprisingly, the majority of the debate included in the pamphlet supports the issue. The Oregon Regulated Medical Marijuana Supply System Act, Measure 74, also referred to as Initiative 28, proposes licensing guidelines that would extend to dispensaries and producers to be included in a regulated supply system of medical marijuana. The measure aims to create nonprofit clinics for patients with doctor prescriptions, so they can have access to medical marijuana in a pharmacy-style setting. Under the measure, licensed at-home growth would be allowed and privately owned, nonprofit dispensaries and producers could possess 24 plants and 96 ounces of marijuana and would not be subject to most marijuana criminal statutes. Measure 74 also suggests an assistance program for cardholders with lower income among other provisions, such as statefunded marijuana safety research. The medical community is becoming the dominant segment of supporters. The voter’s pamphlet includes 11 favorable arguments, to which 10 doctors, three nurses and one physician contributed, and two unfavorable arguments. Twelve years ago, Oregon voters approved Measure 67, a medical marijuana law that permitted medical marijuana cardholders to grow and possess medical marijuana with a doctor’s prescription and registration from the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, OMMP. Current law allows an individual to fulfill specific criteria and become a registered medical marijuana grower. It also places restrictions on them. A grower may not be in possession of more than six marijuana plants and of 24 ounces of marijuana to distribute to cardholding clients. A grower’s clientele is not to exceed four cardholders. The current law doesn’t allow for a distribution system, but Measure 74 does. As it stands, criminal charges are being brought against ailing people who require medical marijuana, since they are forced to grow it or sup-

port the black market because there isn’t a functional and responsible method of medical marijuana distribution in place. Even defense lawyers support the measure. On Oct. 4, The Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association endorsed the measure. The group said it recognizes a pressing need to codify medical marijuana laws and provide specifics. Measure 74 is paramount to reducing ambiguities and making medical marijuana more accessible. The OCDLA isn’t the only group that lends its support for Measure 74. The Democratic Party of Oregon is on board, too. The Citizens Initiative Review Panel, an independent group of randomly chosen Oregon voters, endorsed the measure in September. Despite the number of groups backing the measure, there are opposing opinions. The problem lies with the recreational drug’s illegality for some people, and free availability for others. Also, the measure could potentially undermine drug law enforcement for noncardholders. How does the measure stack up in the public arena? Assistant professor of philosophy Kaarina Beam said that although she isn’t familiar with every detail of the measure, it could be a part of a broader conversation about drugs. “I also think we should be open to discussing what the research tells us about what marijuana does and does not do for and to people,” she said. “And until we have those serious conversations, I don’t think this should be a forgone conclusion either way. Marijuana was outlawed in the ’30s, junior William Bailey said. Since then, society has ignored its medical and economic benefits. “I think it should be legalized because any one of its uses would be enough of an asset to justify its role in America,” he said. “It’s taxable and can be used as paper, medicine and fabric. All the people who don’t want it legalized can still choose not to take part in it.” The success or failure of Measure 74 will be determined by Oregon voters in November. Septembre Russell can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

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County Commissioner: As evidenced by walking down just about any street in McMinnville, the “Battle of the Marys” is in full swing. Arguably, this could be because of the painfully close primary on May 18, when incumbent Mary Stern lost by nine votes to opponent Mary Starrett. A two-term County Commissioner, Stern is a Democrat who has shown that her focus is on planning ahead for her county through fiscal and economic responsibility. She chairs the Yamhill County Economic Development Forum, which Sal Peralta, her campaign manager, said helped to raise $2.5 million for the local food bank and more than $9 million in rainy-day funds for the county and state. And the recession being a top issue, this economic responsibility has gained for support of Stern. However, Stern has come under fire for her support of Measures 66 and 67. Measure 66 raised taxes statewide on families earning $250,000 or more, and Measure 67 raised the corporate minimum tax by $10. Regardless of her stance on the issue, Stern is supported by many Oregon law enforcement agencies. The commissioner’s job primarily focuses on criminal justice, and Stern has a long career in the field. She was selected in 1991 by the Department of Justice to serve in the Federal Bureau of Prisons’Western Regional Office as an honors attorney, worked in Portland in the U.S. District Court and became an independent legal consultant in 2001. ••• On the other side of the Mary fence is Mary Starrett, a former broadcast journalist who said she is tired of the disconnect between Stern and voters. Starrett said the need for change is what helped her win the vote

Features

October 15, 2010

Battles in Bea

in May and will come through for her again in November. The fact that Starrett is a third-party candidate is one of the more eye-catching aspects of the race. Normally, throughout the country, races come down to members of the Republican and Democratic parties, but this election season sees some changes. Stern has been quick to point out the fringe aspect of her party, claiming that the Constitution Party is a right-wing extremist group. Although she wishes to make clear that anyone can be a member of any party, she reminds voters that many in the Constitution Party are conspiracy theorists and that voters need to see exactly what they stand for. Starrett said she is fine with this, and reminds Americans that “most parties appeared as fringe movements at one time,” including the two popular ones. She said she wishes to affect change in the government and wants to do that by bringing a third party to office. This differentiation has been the major focus of the campaign, Starrett said. She reminds voters that she has been working with the public all her life, whereas Stern’s career has been almost exclusively in the government. Starrett believes it is this outside connection with politics that will pull her through in November, as voters can trust her to not make mistakes she has reported on all her life. According to a story recently published in the News Register, Starrett said she believes that the government could have been involved with 9/11 or the Challenger explosion and believes that big-budget spending and fiscal irresponsibility have gotten Americans in trouble in recent years. If elected, she said she vows to peel back on spending and bloated bureaucracy.

by Matthew Sunderland/Senior r

State Representative:

Stern

In a hotly contested race Republican incumbent Jim Weidner runs versus Democrat Susan Sokol Blosser. Weidner has made this an intensely personal campaign, using emotional appeals about his top issues on his website and straight-talking willingness to say exactly why he is the right candidate for the job. As a lifelong resident of Yamhill County, his message has been incredibly effective. He believes that putting taxes on businesses at a time when the economy is in a rough state is a recipe for disaster, as is evidenced by many businesses leaving Oregon. Rather, Weidner would repeal the taxes and work to impose a limit on government growth to 6 percent annually, thereby leaving funds open to support the municipal aspects that Measures 66 and 67 are funding. As for his opponent, no love is lost for someone he describes as a big-spending liberal. He is quick to compare his record of voting nay for tax increases and additional government spending, whereas he claims Sokol Blosser “is going to support the tax and spending agenda.” ••• Sokol Blosser, however, claims to know what taxes mean for businesses and what Oregon residents need from Salem to survive in this economy. Sokol Blosser styles herself as a candidate for small businesses and the economy. She was one of the founders of Oregon’s wine industry in 1971, and co-founder of Sokol Blosser vineyards, which opened in 1977. Thus, as her campaign pamphlets explain, she knows how to grow a business from the ground up. Her campaign manager, Ryan Mann, said the now internationally known company was a small struggling business for several years before the acclaim set in. She was directly affected by Oregon tax laws, small business restrictions and bureaucracy, and it is this knowledge that she claims makes her right for office. Further, Sokol Blosser labels herself as the candidate of bipartisanship. Although a Democrat, Sokol Blosser said her years of

uninvolvement in politics have taugh everyone and see all sides of an issue Mann admits that she has been Democratic actions lately. Although never having held a po has shown a history of fiscal and times almost conservatively, that he comes from her business background Unsurprisingly, Sokol Blosser has economics. When it comes to Measu did not have a vote on them in Janu Mann, if she had been on the floor, t ferent, with wanting to add more b she is elected, Sokol Blosser will w tax, which she said she is outrageo said, and will push for legislation that and helping them obtain what they o


Features

October 15, 2010

the aver State

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reporter

ht her how to get along with e. rather displeased by some

olitical office, Sokol Blosser economic responsibility, at er campaign manager claims d. s made her primary concern ures 66 and 67, she obviously uary. However, according to they would have looked difbusiness-friendly clauses. If work to cut the capital gains ously high right now, Mann t focuses on small businesses otherwise could not.

Top: County Commissioner candidate Mary Starrett (center) participated in Sheridan Days at a local parade with the National American Miss Oregon State Queens on June 26. Bottom: Jim Weidner speaks during the campaign.

First Congressional District: The race for the U.S. House of Representatives has heated up as well, with 12-year incumbent Democrat David Wu facing great challenge from sports advertiser and Republican activist Rob Cornilles. Wu has represented the first Congressional District of Oregon since a historic election in 1998, when he became the first Chinese-American member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Wu’s campaign spokesperson, Julia Krahe, said that Wu is primarily focused on middle class families and putting them back to work. She states that Wu is taking this campaign, like all elections, very seriously, and she wants voters to know the differences between her candidate and the opposition. The media have been filled with her candidate’s advertisements, which are also quick to point out the difference between Wu and Cornilles. Krahe said that Wu is dissatisfied with Washington, D.C., politics in regard to the economy and the lack of oversights. Wu hopes to change this in future sessions of Congress. He also said he wants to focus on ending big businesses’ rule over the economy and supporting Oregon small businesses while also ending wasteful governmental spending. Specifically for theYamhill county area,Wu has been a strong supporter of the Newberg-Dayton bypass, which would open up travel between Yamhill and Portland. Also, he introduced the “Rebuilding Local Business Act,” an act designed to adjust the Small Business Administration’s zones of aide throughout Oregon, to help provide businesses in economically distressed zones a chance to receive recognition and support at the national level. It is this kind of practical legislative support that Wu has became famous for. “Wu is really good at diving into legislation . . . and finding out what will really help the people of Oregon,” Krahe said. ••• On the Republican side of the aisle stands Wu’s competitor Cornilles. In all of the campaigns, the differences between these two candidates couldn’t be more striking. One element missing from Cornilles’ background is prior experience in politics. However, rather than viewing it as a negative quality that voters should be afraid of, Cornilles sees it as a positive. He prides himself throughout his campaign as being the candidate who will bring change toWashington and will not engage in divisive partisanship. When looking at his campaign against Wu, he believes he is showing his commitment to doing just that. “I am trying to focus on issues real and important to the electorate while . . . Wu is trying to change the subject,” Cornilles said. As for issues, he, too, is focused primarily on the economy and, like Wu, also focused strongly on education. He believes that his background as a businessman, and a local one at that, will make him the correct candidate for the job. He said he knows what Oregon residents need and what will work for them and believes he also knows what the trick to resorting the American economy really is: confident leadership from the top. Cornilles said he believes that for Congress to change and repair the economy, it has to show confidence in and to the American people. He believes that he, along with many Republicans running for office across the country, knows this and knows that legislators must stimulate the economy from the top before any trickle-down effect can be achieved. He also said he is committed to balancing the federal budget. Congress has been saying for months that it will pass a federal budget by the end of 2010 to cap spending but recently has said that this will not happen after all. Cornilles said he believes this to be inexcusable and vows to balance the budget while in Congress.

Matthew Sunderland can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.


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Culture

October 15, 2010

Pianist celebrates life and works of Chopin Jessica Prokop Culture editor Professional pianist Dean Kramer charmed audience members with a recital in celebration of the lifetime of the famous composer Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) on Oct. 11 in Ice Auditorium. Kramer opened the show with Chopin ballades, No. 1 through No. 4. “I have been playing this music for a long time, but I have never played all of the ballades together before,” Kramer said. “I think Ballade No. 2 is the most schizo[phrenic].” The ballades represent a summary of Chopin’s artistic ability and life work. His music, which has much to do with opera, has stood the test of time, Kramer said. The piece of music Kramer opened with, Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 23, began slowly but gained momentum. Each composition had varying rhythms that caused Kramer’s hands to move frantically up and down the piano keys and body to sway theatrically in time with the music. “Every pianist has their own physicality and body efficiency,” Professor of Music Jill Timmons, artistin-residence for the Vivian Bull Music Center, said. “It is about articulating and being in command of what you are doing and being fluent while doing it.” During the second half

Joel Ray/Freelancer

Dean Kramer, associate professor of piano at the University of Oregon, plays an all-Chopin recital in celebration of classical composer Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) on Oct. 11 in Ice Auditorium. Kramer showed his passion for the music through his facial expressions and movement. of the show, Kramer played other compositions by Chopin, such as his barcarolle and sonata. Kramer, who teaches piano at the University of Oregon, has been touring the region and performing his recital. He has played in Portland and Corvallis, Ore., and will perform Oct.

17 at UO. This was not Kramer’s first performance at Linfield. Kramer, who is a friend of Timmons, visited the school a few years ago to play an all-Beethoven recital, Timmons said. “All of the energy and emotion in Beethoven’s music has to be intrinsic. The

Orchestra auditions name concert soloists Chelsea Ploof Freelancer The Linfield Chamber Orchestra held auditions for its upcoming orchestra series Oct. 8 in Ice Auditorium. Winners of the Concerto Competition will perform with the LCO for its concert “Revel” on Dec. 3. The Concerto Competition takes place biannually in Ice. Auditions lasted 15 minutes and each participant introduced and selected a piece compatible with an orchestra accompaniment. Singers were required to perform an aria or duet while instrumentalists prepared one or more concerto movements. There were six participants. Junior Jeremy Moll won the voice competition and senior Ryan Dickman won over the judges with his saxophone playing. Orchestra conductor Michael Gesme, who has

headed the LCO for seven seasons, was one of three judges of the auditions. “We showed up to Ice all dressed up, and we performed our pieces,” Moll said. “We found out later that day who had won via e-mail.” Sophomore Jenaveve Linabary and senior Helen Kehoe were the other competitors for the vocal portion. Seniors Tracy Beaver and Audrey Rasmussen auditioned for the instrumental solo. Moll will sing “Bella siccome un angelo” from Donizetti’s Don Pasquale, and Dickman will play his saxophone in the concert with the LCO. Rehearsals with the LCO begin in November. Besides holding auditions, the LCO is performing its first orchestra concert, “Celebration,” at 8 p.m. Oct. 22 in Ice Auditorium. This year the LCO cel-

ebrates its 20th season. The orchestra allows talented musicians to enhance their musical skills and perform with famous musicians. At its first concert, the orchestra will perform a wide range of music including pieces by famous classical composers Franz Xavier Richter, Jean Sibelius and Antonin Dvorak. Concertmaster Steven Shepherd and Assistant Concertmaster Casey Bozell will play a piece together composed by Katherine Hoover. Freshman Lauren Pak is a member of the LCO. “I play the violin. We’ve had two practices. It’s a great experience to play among professional musicians,” Pak said. To find more information about the orchestra go to www.lcomusic.org/. Chelsea Ploof can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

strength comes from within; with Chopin, it doesn’t have to be,” Kramer said. “It’s about making those sounds in the moment.” Both composers’ music represents their personalities. For example, Chopin hated performing in front of large crowds, whereas Beethoven enjoyed it,

Kramer said. Chopin was one of the most central composers of the Romantic Era, Timmons said. He devoted all of his time to the piano. His compositions are directed toward more advanced pianists. “His repertoire is full of lyrical beauty, emotion

[and] virtuoso and is fun to play,” she said. Next year, Kramer will tour Oregon to perform compositions by the famous late Hungarian composer Franz Liszt (1859-1867).

Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


October 15, 2010

Culture

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Poetry and fiction unite in author’s new collection Sean Lemme Staff reporter Poet Christopher Howell read from his new collection, “Dreamless and Possible,” on Oct. 14 in the Austin Reading Room of Nicholson Library. The book features new poems and selected works from Howell’s eight books. Howell read 17 poems, telling stories with subjects as diverse as childhood, aliens, life, talking felines and returning from war. “He was one of the best poets I’ve heard in a long time,” senior Danyelle Myers said. Howell said he chose

pieces that provided continuity and contrast with each other. Assistant professor of English Anna Keesey said she enjoyed Howell’s diversity of language and detail. “You really don’t know where [the poems are] going to end,” she said. “They get long and complicated and take turns and then you say, ‘Wow! I didn’t expect to get here.’” After reading his poetry, Howell answered questions and talked with the audience, which asked about how he became a poet and the title of his new collection. Howell has received

several awards, including fellowships from the Oregon Arts Commission, the Massachusetts Council for the Arts, two Washington State Book Awards and two National Endowment for the Arts fellowships. His work has been featured three times in the “Pushcart Prize Anthology,” which annually recognizes the best writing published in small presses. Howell is on the faculty of the Master of Fine Arts Program in Creative Writing at Eastern Washington University. Professor of English Lex Runciman said Howell’s poetry is resourceful

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Poet Christopher Howell reads from his newest book, “Dreamless and Possible,” Oct. 14 in Nicholson Library.

Runciman praised Howell’s ability to “blend the efforts of poetry and fiction writing.” Runciman taught with Howell at Oregon State University. Howell also visited classes throughout the day and read several of his poems, including one called “At Midnight.” The event was part of the “Readings at the Nick” series, co-sponsored by the English Department and Nicholson Library, which brings contemporary writers to the Linfield campus. Next in the series is the new Oregon Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen, who will read in Nicholson on Nov. 30. For more information about Christopher Howell, visit www.ewumfa.com /howell.

and capable of using the straightforward and surreal,

Sean Lemme can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

resorting to any method to tell the truth.


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Entertainment

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Beats take listeners on a trip through space, color Braden Smith KSLC 90.3 FM Rising electronic music talent Eskmo (Brendan Angelides) released his first full-length record this month. The self-titled album arrives after putting out a slew of singles and EPs since 2005, and gaining the favor of electronica giants, such as Amon Tobin, Flying Lotus and others. Exploring an array of sounds, beats and vocal effects, “Eskmo” invites the listener to dive deep into the world of what truly defines experimental triphop and down-tempo electronica. The album is rife with strange, imaginative

melodies and glitchy beats that envelop the listener in a rich, spacey atmosphere. For those willing to embark on an exploration of this odd environment, the album can be quite a bit of fun. The warm, colorful, synthy melodies are the most interesting aspects of most tracks. These are backed by crunchy beats and other random percussion that provide the listener with some incentive to move around, although it’s certainly not “dance” music in the modern sense. This combination is topped off by Angelides’ odd lyrics, such as “cloudlight/floating and magi-

cally colorful/pieces of sky,” with peculiar vocal effects that make the lyrics sound instrumental rather than lyrical. Most tracks, such as “We Got More,” “Color Dropping” and “Become Matter Soon, For You,” are conducive to body movement, whereas those looking for some more eerie soul-searching should check out “You Go, I See That” or “Siblings,” which features an enticing piano melodies. Altogether, the album sounds somewhat like a mix of Boards of Canada’s ambience, Flying Lotus’ electronics and melodies and Wagon Christ’s beats and percussion. Fans of

Strummin’ tunes

Photo courtesy of www.eskmo.com Eskmo’s self-titled debut album was released in October on Ninja Tune. Eskmo will be performing Oct. 22 at Rotture in Portland. any of the above will certainly find some appeal in “Eskmo.” The vocals are distinguished and can be an enjoyable or irritating experience, depending on the

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor

Junior James Testa sings and plays guitar along with senior Aaron Boehme and sophomore Mickey Inns at a student Cat Cab on Oct. 14.

is a bit of a letdown for the prominent DJ, who has gained a sizeable following. The album is good but isn’t Angelides’ best work. Luckily, this is only his first full-length album, and he doesn’t seem to be losing any steam when it comes to producing music. “Eskmo” was released on the influential, Londonbased electronic music label, Ninja Tune. Eskmo is an interesting addition to the label’s already outstanding lineup (Amon Tobin, Kid Koala) — assuming that he sticks with them. Either way, Eskmo is certainly an artist to keep track of in the future. Eskmo will perform Oct. 22 at Rotture in Portland. Tune in to KSLC 90.3 FM to hear tracks from the new album. Braden Smith can be reached at kslcmusic@gmail.com.

Pirating profits independent artists more than it hurts them Megan Myer Online editor

listener. They definitely add a personal feel to the music. While “Eskmo” is a fun and interesting romp through an ethereal realm of colors and starships, it

October 15, 2010

The illegal copying of copyrighted music has long been an issue. When music was on cassette tapes, it was easy to record songs from the radio. When CDs were invented, the issue was the same but at a higher quality of duplication. Today, we have files that are easily downloaded, copied, pasted, shared and deleted. There are many campaigns against this pandemic of illegal music downloading (pirating). There are even commercials, such as the famous “You wouldn’t steal a car...” campaign. However, these advertisements do little to deter society from downloading. It’s easy to download, and you’ll probably get away with it. At least, most people think they will. The main concern with pirating music is that the music is stolen. Those who make a living through selling CDs, such as produc-

ers and retailers, are losing money. However, the artists aren’t losing as much as you might imagine. According to InformationIsBeautiful.net, artists only make about 10 percent off of each album sold at $9.99 from a major record label. The only artists that actually make money from album sales are those who produce their own CDs or those who go gold or platinum. But only about 5 percent of albums released each year have a chance of selling 500,000 to 1 million copies. So, how do the other 95 percent of artists make their money? Artists acquire nearly all their profits from concerts and merchandise. Pirating music can help lesser-known bands become popular and increase concert attendance. If people have enough money for only one or two CDs, they are likely to buy an album they are certain will be decent. If people can download music for free, then they are more likely to explore and experiment in their tastes; therefore, they

will discover new bands. Many artists and bands today are offering some or all of their music for free or for donations to attract listeners. If they can gain a large mass of fans, they will profit quickly from concert and merchandise revenue. While it may be easy to pirate music, it is still best to actually purchase it. That way, you can help out involved parties other than the artist. You are bringing business to the company selling the CD, those who work at the company, the producer and those who sell to the producing company. If you discover artists you like through pirating, make an effort to legally purchase their albums, concert tickets and merchandise. In the end, downloading is a double-edged sword. However, pirating music is still illegal and best left undone. The chance of getting caught, no matter how big or small, is not worth it.

Megan Myer can be reached at linfieldreviewonline@gmail.com.


Sports

October 15, 2010

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Offense to be key to ’Cats’ success on road Jerry Young Freelancer The Linfield Wildcats volleyball team finished its first round of NWC conference games in good position. At the halfway point of the conference season, Linfield is in third place with a 5-3 record. Coach Shane Kimura said this record comes after hard work and winning tough matches. He said he is pleased with where his team stands but also that he knows the road ahead is going to be tough. “We have a winning record for the first half, so that is good,” he said. “[During] the second half of the season, we are going to be on the road more than we will be at home, which will be a good test for us.” The final two games of the first half of the conference season took place Oct. 9 and 10. The first match was against the George Fox University Bruins. Linfield jumped ahead quickly, winning the first two games. With two games under their belts, the ’Cats’ match resembled an Oct. 2 game against Whitworth in which Linfield won the opening two games and dropped

the following three. But the ’Cats finished strong this time. They completed the three-game sweep with a 25-21 game three victory. It was the first time during the season that Linfield won a match in three straight games. Junior defensive specialist Kelsey Franklin said that attitude was the key to finishing off the match. “You can’t let them think that they have a chance to win,” she said. ”Each set you have to come back stronger or the other team will take the momentum.” With its first sweep behind them, the team’s attention shifted to the Pacific Lutheran University Lutes, one of the top-ranked teams in the conference. The Wildcats were slow out of the gate, losing the first match 25-15, but gave a strong response in the second game. With the score tied at 22, Linfield reeled off three consecutive points to take the second game 25-22. Following the Linfield run, PLU hit its stride. They took the next two matches, 25-18 and 25-11, to seal the victory. Kimura said that he believed the team’s offense

was the key to winning the second game and losing the other three. “In the second game, our ball control was better, and because of that, we hit better,” he said. “ In the games we lost, we didn’t hit the ball well.” Now the team prepares for their second match against each of their NWC opponents. Freshman Kelsey Ludin said that these matches have a slightly different approach to them. “We know their tendencies. There are no surprises so that changes things a little,” she said. Kimura agreed, saying that there will be no surprises during the second round of matches. It is essential for the Wildcats to not beat themselves, he said. “We know what we are going to see so that won’t be a surprise,” Kimura said. “For us, the key is take care of our side of the net. We just want to be better on our half of the net.” As Linfield prepares for the second half of the season, both Ludin and Kimura say they understand that they have improvements to make. “Overall, we just need

Victor Zhu/Freelancer The Wildcats gather for a pep talk after scoring a point against George Fox University on Oct. 9. Linfield won the best of three sets, 25-20, 25-21 and 25-21. to play more consistent,” Ludin said. “Our team has great chemistry, and we just need to keep building on that.” Kimura said he is pleased with the defense so far but that the offense will be the key in the second half of the season. “Defensively we have been solid,” he said. “On the opposite side, our hitting percentage is not very high, and we are working to get better at it.” Linfield plays its next home match against the Willamete University Bearcats at 7 p.m. on Oct. 15. Jerry Young can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Victor Zhu/Freelancer Freshman Kelsey Ludin serves the ball on Oct. 9.

You know you’re a Heisman candidate when...

Sports Commentary Chris Forrer Freelancer Hey ’Cats. Once again I’ll be traveling to Duckland for another column about Chip Kelly and the boys down in Eugene. But rather than talking about the team, I want to focus on Oregon’s small wonder: its leading running back, the sparkplug of their offense and one of the nation’s leading Heisman Trophy candidates: LaMichael James. More specifically, this is why I think this is the year we’ll finally see a player wearing green and yellow hoist the ol’ stiff arm later in the fall. That’s right haters; not only do I think that James

will win the Heisman this year, but I’m also willing to spend an entire column outlining, in statistic-based academic terms, why I think he’s a lock to finish first. I’ve come up with criteria that I believe are the most critical things each candidate needs to fulfill in order to win. In no particular order, they are: • The candidate must continue to play up numbers consistent with the first half of the season’s output. • The candidate must have a “Heisman moment” game • The candidate must play for a nationally ranked team. • The candidate’s team must not be in the Western Athletic Conference. • The candidate’s team must continue to win. • The candidate must be a significant part of that victory. The top five Heisman candidates are Kellen Moore of Boise State, Terrelle Pryor of Ohio State, James of Oregon, Cam-

eron Newton of Auburn and Denard Robinson of Michigan. For the sake of space, I’m only going to address the first three can-

Dennis Dixon), and Ohio State has a tough schedule ahead. This weekend the Buckeyes are on the road against No. 18 Wisconsin

“James put on a clinic in the game

against Stanford, picking up 257 yards and three scores — both career bests. That, ladies and gentlemen, is a Heisman moment...

didates, in no particular order, and show you why James is a shoo-in to win this season. In my opinion, Pryor is the only guy poised to challenge James for the trophy this season. He’s put up great numbers so far — to the tune of 1,349 yards, 15 touchdowns and only three picks, and also got it done with his feet, racking up 354 yards and 3 TDs. However, he’s got gimpy knees (torn posterior crucial ligament at the end of last season that stuck around for a while ... ask

and No. 15 Iowa later in the season. Also, don’t ever count out Michigan to spring the upset; its rivalry is one of the great ones, and it’s always a toss-up. Pryor also has yet to turn in a dominating performance against a tough opponent. (Ohio State always front-loads with patsies early in the season.) He may have one yet, but I don’t see it happening. And of course there’s Kellen Moore. The guy is having a killer season. His TD to interception ratio is

14-1, his team is ranked No. 3 in the country, and it doesn’t look like BSU is going to lose any time soon. But none of this can dissuade me from the notion that a quarterback playing in the Western Athletic Conference is incapable of winning the Heisman. I’m sorry Boise lovers, but your conference sucks. Boise may win by 50 points every single game, and Moore may pile up 250 yards or more a game, but it’s against New Mexico, San Jose State and Louisiana Tech. Any moderately talented quarterback could rack up ridiculous numbers and lead his team to a BCS bowl as long as he had at least a decent supporting cast behind him. BSU just doesn’t have the weight in major voting because its strength of schedule is one of the poorest in the nation. That brings us to James. He’s picked up a solid 848 yards (second in the nation) and eight touchdowns this season while leading the nation with 169.6 per game. He shows no signs of slow-

ing down and has stayed completely healthy so far. Plus, Oregon has only Arizona and Oregon State left to get through, and Arizona showed just how porous its defense is in a loss last weekend to the Beavers. The OSU game is always a trap, especially in Corvallis, Ore. but with James Rodgers out for the rest of his senior season, this one is going to be a cakewalk for a Duck defense smothers teams in the second half. But above all else, James put on a clinic in the game against Stanford, picking up 257 yards and three scores — both career bests. That, ladies and gentlemen, is a Heisman moment, and when you consider that the last three Heisman winners have all been sophomores, it’s almost eerie how serendipitous this season seems to be for James. All the Ducks have to do is keep winning, and LaHeisman will be carrying the stiff arm to Eugene come December. Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


14

Sports

www.linfieldreview.com

October 15, 2010

’Cats axe Loggers in 28-point felling Chris Forrer Freelancer

Riding the momentum that began in a 35-7 statement win against Willamette University a week ago, the Linfield Wildcat football team took care of business on the road in Tacoma, Wash., with an emphatic 55-14 drubbing of the University of Puget Sound on Oct. 9. Senior quarterback Aaron Boehme racked up 311 all-purpose yards with four touchdowns, and senior tailback Simon Lamson rushed a career-high 100 yards with another two scores. Lamson, who sat out for the majority of the 2009 season because of a broken collarbone, was elated at the end result. “My dad always told me things happen for a reason,” Lamson said. “To be able to battle back this season and set some marks I have been working for — it really makes me appreciate the process I went through.” The offense and defense had opportunities to dominate the ball early. On the Loggers’ opening drive, junior defenseman Kalae’ Parish snatched a pass from Puget Sound senior quarterback Duncan White. On the following Linfield drive, Boehme rocketed 26 yards from scrimmage and into the UPS end zone for a

score. The point-after kick was blocked to leave the score at 6-0. Overall, the Wildcat defense intercepted Puget Sound quarterbacks six times and picked up four sacks. “We felt like we had a few mismatches on the line,” senior defensive end Eric Hedin said. “We took full advantage exploiting that weakness and letting them playing into our hands.” With the second quarter just 1 minute old, sophomore kicker Josh Kay added a chip-shot 27 yard field goal, Boehme found senior receiver Chris Slezak 37 yards downfield for a score, and Lamson picked up his first touchdown on a 1-yard dash into the end zone. “The win against UPS was a statement game,” Lamson said. “I have to credit every yard I earned to my offensive line. They opened up running lanes and really dominated the line of scrimmage for four quarters.” The second quarter played out much like the first. White was intercepted twice, once by junior rover Kole Kreiger and once by junior cornerback Nate Dixon. Both turnovers led to Linfield scores, the first on another run by Boehme in which he hurdled a defend-

Danyelle Myers/Freelancer Senior runningback Taylor Avritt powers by Willamette University defense. The Wildcats won the conference opener 35-7 at home against Willamette on Oct. 2. er en route to the end zone, and the second Lamson’s final score. At the half, the Wildcats were on top 35-0. “It feels really good to be gelling again like we did last season,” Dixon said. “We knew we could be good if we worked extremely hard, and that’s what we have done throughout spring and fall camp and are continuing to do so now.  Our coaches put in a lot of time

with our defense, and our success has a lot to do with their effort.” Boehme and the offensive starters would see only one more series of action before heading to the bench for some much-needed rest, and it still yielded a touchdown on a 33-yard strike to junior receiver Deidre Wiersma. Senior Taylor Avritt and sophomore Steven Nasca added touchdowns for the ’Cats in mop-up

time. Senior backup quarterback Cole Bixenman had a pass picked and returned 80 yards for a score, and backup Puget Sound junior quarterback George Ka’ai lobbed a short scoring pass in the final minutes to round out the final margin at 55-14. The ’Cats return home on Oct. -16 to battle Pacific University in the annual Homecoming game at 1 p.m. Pacific, which has not had a

football program in almost 20 years, is still looking for its first win and isn’t likely to spring an upset. Nevertheless, the Wildcats continue to improve and prepare for their next opponent. “It’s just another game to get better and improve on doing the little things right,” Hedin said. “Doing the common things in an uncommon manner.” Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Soccer:Team sets sights on winning streak << Continued from page 16 difficult on ourselves.” Swain agreed with Donato. “In the second half, we kind of fell apart and had a lot of fouls in a short period of time, which is not what we want to do,” he said. With the win, the ’Cats hold a 4-3 conference record

Sport

going into next week’s game against George Fox University on Oct. 16. Linfield defeated the Bruins 7-0 on Sept. 26. George Fox has endured a rough season, holding an 0-9 overall record with an 0-7 conference record. But Tipton said the team can’t expect an easy game, and he drew a comparison from last season.

“We beat Willamette 5-1 in our first game last year and lost to them in our second. We don’t want that to happen this year with George Fox,” he said. Swain agreed with Tipton, advising that the team not relax against a motivated George Fox. “They are definitely looking to come back at us because of our win last

time,” Swain said. The ’Cats will square off with Pacific University for a second time this season Oct. 17. The game will allow Linfield a shot at redemption, after losing its first game to Pacific 1-0. The Boxers hold a 9-1-2 overall record and a 5-1-1 conference record. The ’Cats have a chance to win their third game

in a row and climb up the conference standings this weekend. The opportunity is not lost on Swain. “We’re trying to get some momentum going,” he said. “These games this weekend are super important to win, to keep the streak going.” With the ’Cats entering the second half of the season, Donato said that,

Wildcat sports schedule

Date

Opponent or event

compared with last year, this season was going well so far. “It definitely feels a lot better. It’s been more enjoyable, and we’re seeing better results,” he said. The Wildcats’ next game at George Fox on Oct. 16 and at home Oct. 17 at 2:30 p.m. Matt Bayley can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Location

Time

Volleyball

Oct. 15

Willamette

McMinnville

7 p.m.

Cross country

Oct. 16

Concordia/ Puma Classic

Portland

10 a.m.

Football

Oct. 16

Pacific (Homecoming)

McMinnville

1:30 p.m.

Men’s golf

Oct. 16

Whitman Invitational

Walla Walla, Wash.

All day

Men’s soccer

Oct. 16

George Fox

Newberg, Ore.

2:30 p.m.

Women’s soccer

Oct. 16

Lewis & Clark

Portland

Noon

Men’s golf

Oct. 17

Whitmman Invitational

Walla Walla, Wash.

All day

Men’s soccer

Oct. 17

Pacific

Forest Grove, Ore.

2:30 p.m.

Women’s soccer

Oct. 17

Pacific

McMinnville

Noon


Sports

October 15, 2010

www.linfieldreview.com

15

High expectations, focus fuel ’Cats’ fury Katey Barger Staff reporter Corrina Crocker Sports editor

Victor Zhu/Freelancer Senior Rachel Miles battles for the ball against Lewis & Clark College senior Catherine Kitts on Sept. 26. The Wildcats won at home 3-0 against the Pioneers.

This weekend the women’s soccer team competed against University of Puget Sound and George Fox and Willamette universities. UPS and Whitworth University are the top-ranked teams in the conference. Linfield sits in the third position. “We didn’t play as well as we’d hoped to,” senior midfielder Rennika Doty said about the Puget Sound game. Freshman forward Emily Fellows scored Linfield’s only goal off of a free kick, and at the half, the score was tied 1-1. But the Wildcats lost their momentum during the second half of the game. Puget Sound scored two goals within the last 15 minutes of game play to win 3-1. As for its game against George Fox University, the team played up to its potential. Before the game, the coach changed up the field formation. Despite the change, the team pulled together to beat the Bruins 2-0, with goals from

Fellows and sophomore midfielder Anna Sours. During the weekend, Fellows scored her 17th goal of the season, which broke Linfield’s 16-goal season record that was set by Kathleen Wochnick, class of ’05, in 2003. The Wildcats competed against Willamette on Oct. 13. With strong performances from Fellows, freshman defender Christine Tamamoto and senior midfielder Emily Grachek, the Wildcats conquered the game with a 2-0 lead at the half and a final score of 4-0. “We dominated every aspect of the game,” Doty said. “It was fun to see all of our hard work pay off.” Senior midfielder Sara Blake had simliar thoughts. “We dominated,” she said. “They had two shots on goal the whole game. We kept the ball really well. I feel really good about yesterday’s game. We connected really well as a whole and from that we got the result we wanted. It felt good to win at their place.” As for the rest of the season, the ’Cats plan to reach their goal: first place in the Northwest Conference.

“It’s within our capability to win conference,” Doty said. “But it’s definitely going to be a fight.” Blake agreed. “We have very high expectations,” she said. “We are taking every game as it comes and focusing on what we need to do to be successful.” Senior forward Brittany Willis had an assist to Grachek for her first goal of the season against Willamette and explained what the Wildcats have been doing to prepare for the ending weeks of the conference season. “We come out to practice everyday with the mentality of wanting to get better,” Willis said. “We focus on the little things we know will win us games. We’ve worked really hard this year to prove to people that we should be at the top and that means winning one game at a time.” This weekend, the Wildcats take on the Lewis & Clark College Pioneers at noon on Oct. 16 in Portland and the Pacific University Boxers at noon on Oct. 17 at home. Barger and Crocker can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Freshman has her head in the game Corrina Crocker Sports editor She’s the freshman that could. With a record total of goals in a season so far, she seems to have it all figured out. Emily Fellows is in her rookie year at Linfield and is rapidly making a name for herself on the women’s soccer team. She has earned the Northwest Conference Women’s Soccer StudentAthlete of the Week for the third time this year. “I feel really good about all the success we have been having this season,” Fellows said. “It shows how we have prepared ourselves up to this point.” The women’s soccer team stands in third

place in the Northwest Conference after the women defeated Willamette University on Bearcat turf Oct. 13. The Wildcats won 4-0, and Fellows scored two of the goals, which brought her 17-goal record up to 19. She comes from Jesuit High School in Beaverton, Ore., where she earned varsity letters in soccer all four years there. While at Jesuit, Fellows was a twotime second team all-metro league selection, and she was on the first team allmetro league honors. She also earned second team all-state honors. Fellows played for the Lake Oswego Soccer Club on the Dynasty throughout the off-season in high school.

“I have basically been playing my entire life,” Fellows said. “I can’t even remember a time when I wasn’t playing.” She has earned the starting position as a freshman. She said she began playing club soccer when she was 10 years old. She started at defense, but then she moved up to the midfield.

Hovde and freshman Hannah Christianson made the top 10 with Hovde in sixth place and Christianson in seventh place. “[I was] ecstatic that we were able to turn it around after the first day and give it our best the following day to win the tournament,” Christianson said. The team won the tourna-

ment with a combined score of 677, beating Whitworth by one point. Puget Sound obtained third place with 729. “Whitworth won conference last year, so to beat them on their home course really illustrates the growth we’ve had in this season alone and illustrates what we are capable of,” Hurdus

Fellows

Since seventh grade, she has been in the forward position. “I have learned a lot about the game and other aspects of playing [since being at Linfield],” she said. “The next three years, I just hope that we can become more successful each year and hopefully make it to playoffs,” she said about her ambitions for the team in the future. For someone who has the game all figured out, she has yet to decide on a major. “I am deciding between athletic training or education,” Fellows said.

Corrina Crocker can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Hovde, Christianson make top ten << Continued from page 16

her career best with a solid back nine and received medalist honors. “Hurdus had four birdies in the second half of the day, and nearly had a holein-one on the 17th hole,” according to the Linfield athletics website.

said. The women’s team plays at the Northwest Conference Fall Classic on Oct. 23 and 24 at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend, Ore. The men’s team plays in Walla Walla, Wash. at the Whitman Invitational on Oct. 16 and 17. Tim Marl can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


16

sports

www.linfieldreview.com

Catline

October 15, 2010

Wildcats balance NWC record Matt Bayley Staff reporter

Northwest Conference standings Football Pacific Lutheran

2-0

1.000

Linfield

2-0

1.000

Lewis & Clark

1-1

.500

Willamette

1-1

.500

Whitworth

1-1

.500

Puget Sound

0-2

.000

Pacific

0-2

.000

Pacific Lutheran

7-1

.875

Puget Sound

7-1

.875

Whitworth

7-1

.875

Volleyball

Linfield

6-3

.667

Lewis & Clark

3-5

.375

George Fox

2-6

.250

Willamette

2-6

.250

Whitman

2-6

.250

Pacific

1-8

.111

Women’s soccer Whitworth

8-1

.889

Puget Sound

7-1

.875

Linfield

7-2

.778

5-3-1

.611

Willamette

4-5

.444

Whitman

3-6

.333

2-6-1

.278

Pacific Lutheran

2-6

.250

Lewis & Clark

0-8

.000

5-1-1

.786

5-2

.714

Pacific

George Fox

Men’s soccer Pacific Pacific Lutheran Whitworth

4-2-1

.643

4-3

.571

Puget Sound

3-2-2

.571

Whitman

3-3-1

.500

Willamette

1-5-1

.214

George Fox

0-7

.000

Linfield

Victor Zhu/ Freelancer

’Cats take on Bearcats Volleyball plays at home Oct. 15 against Willamette University for the team’s only weekend game. See page 13 >> Women’s soccer take third The Wildcats lose the No. 1 spot in the Northwest Conference, although they beat Willamette University on Oct. 13. See page 15 >> Wildcats come home Football revs up for the Homecoming game for the Wildcats at 1:30 p.m. on Oct. 16 against the Pacific University Boxers. See page 14 >> Homecoming weekend events Missed out on the sporting events last weekend? Check out the sports schedule to see your favorite teams play this weekend with several home games. See page 14>>

Follow The Linfield Review on Twitter for Wildcat sports updates: @Linfield_Review.

Freshman Tyler Repic (center) dribbles the ball as senior Carter Elhabbassi runs for the pass as Whitman College senior Connor Bottomly defends on Oct. 3. Linfield won at home 2-1.

Men’s soccer evened its overall record to 5-5 last weekend, defeating Willamette University 2-1 on Oct. 9. After an early goal by Bearcat freshman midfielder Brandon Shiluk, Linfield’s defense took over, holding Willamette scoreless during the final 86 minutes of play. Freshman midfielder Michael Swain scored the first of his two goals on a pass from senior midfielder Kevin Donato, tying the score at 1-1. Swain’s second goal — his third of the season — came during the 21st minute off of an assist from freshman forward Harper Taylor. Swain’s goal was the game-winner, putting Linfield ahead 2-1. The ’Cats held off the Bearcats despite being outshot 12-8. Sophomore goalkeeper Cody Tipton finished the game with two saves. Tipton relieved senior goalkeeper Joe Locascio, who finished with six saves in the first 64 minutes of play. Tipton said he was satisfied with the win but knew the team could have played better. “I felt like we were a little slow to begin with, and that’s how they got their goal,” Tipton said. “I think right now it is all about fine-tuning what we do to limit mistakes.” The game was plagued with fouls; 35 were called. In the second period, the ’Cats committed 19 fouls, a number which Donato was not pleased with. “I don’t feel we played well at all, especially in the second half,” he said. “Our performance just wasn’t there, and we just made it >> Please see Soccer page 14

Golf takes first place in tourneys Tim Marl Staff reporter

The Wildcats continued their success last week when the men’s and women’s golf teams both took first. The men’s tournament at the George Fox Invitational at the Chehalem Glenn golf course took place on Oct. 9 and 10. The team saw positive results on the first day, beating Pacific University and placing first with a combined score of 302. Senior Yutaro Sakamoto shot a 72, which shot him to first place, and junior Alex Fitch tied for second place, with Pacific senior Max Bonk at a score of 74. On the second day, despite the rain, Sakamoto remained in the lead with a score of 75 and received medalist honors. Other Wildcats placed in the top 10. Fitch placed third, and senior Evan Wallace held a two-way tie for fourth with 13 over par 157. Freshman A.J. Taylor tied for sev-

enth with 19 over par 163. In the end, Linfield won with a total score of 620. Pacific came in second 18 strokes behind. Pacific Lutheran University came in third with 649. “We were not surprised by the results because we expect to win every time we play,” Sakamoto said. The women played at the Whitworth Invitational at the Spokane Country Club on Oct. 10 and 11 in Spokane, Wash. Senior Brynn Hurdus led the Wildcats, placing second with six over par 79. “I really look up to Brynn as a player and teammate, and I am so proud of her performance at this tournament,” sophomore Brinn Hovde said. “She had an outstanding round, and I know she has many more to come.” By the second day, Hurdus shot >> Please see Golf page 15

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Junior Alex Fitch makes a putt at the Linfield Invitational on Sept. 21. The men’s team came in first out of eight teams.


TLR Issue 7 10-15-2010