Page 1

Coming home to victory. >> page 16

October 10, 2011

Linfield College

McMinnville, Ore.

117th Year

Issue No. 6

Welcoming home Wildcat spirit

INSIDE

Celebrating TJ Day President Hellie speaks at the dedication ceremony of TJ Day Hall on Oct. 8. The ceremony celebrated the completion and dedication of the newly renovated building. >> page 4

Map to less stress With midterms looming, there are many helpful tips to de-stressing in this time of test anxiety. >> page 8 and 9

Music to ’Cats ears Shane Henry and Maggie

McClure play the piano and acoustic guitar, performing songs off their album on Oct. 6 in the Fred Meyer Lounge.

Joel Ray/Photo editor

The women from Phi Sigma Sigma and men from Pi Kappa Alpha’s team show off their spirit during the song and banner competition, which was one of the many homecoming week events that took place Oct. 4-8. Their team came in first place and their banner took second in the Oct. 6 competition. >> Please see Homecoming page 5

>> page 12

Forensics team speaks out about experiences Joanna Peterson Managing editor

Causing an upset

Women’s volleyball took no mercy on the Bruins, beating them at their own homecoming game Oct. 8. >> page 13

INSIDE

Editorial ...................... 2 News ........................... 4 Features........................ 7 Culture....................... 10 Sports ........................ 16

She didn’t think she was capable of competing with an award-winning forensics team when she began college, sophomore Clara Martinez said. But Martinez has been part of Linfield’s forensics team since the beginning of her freshman year. The team recently participated in the Steven Hunt Classic tournament at Lewis & Clark College on Oct. 6 and 7, which featured several Linfield finalists. Sophomore Stephanie Stovall was a finalist in the impromptu persuasion category, while Martinez was a finalist in the analysis communication section. Before that, at the United States Air Force Academy Forensics Classic on Oct. 1, junior Chris Forrer received a first place in Open Program of Oral

It will change your college life in a way you would never expect. -Linh Tang

Interpretation and second place in Open After-Dinner Speaking. Martinez placed third in Open Communication Analysis. Jackson Miller, associate professor of communication arts, coaches the team. Each tournament features individual events, such as extemporaneous speaking, impromptu speaking and performing literature. There are also British parliament

Junior

debates, which feature debates on controversial issues and current events. “We have debate topics related to current events,” Martinez said. “Not all of the topics are about current events, though. Some are aimed more toward engaging students in philosophical debates.” The team prepares for meets at weekly practices, where members catch up on news, write debate briefs

and practice speeches, said junior Linh Tang, who has participated in forensics since her freshman year. “You have to be well-versed in current events if you want to be able to compete and do well,” Martinez said. Being on the forensics team is time consuming and requires intense dedication, Martinez said. But the experience connects her to students at Linfield and from different institutions who are equally passionate about debate and the art of communication, she said. “I meet so many different students from colleges because you spend so much time in tournaments,” she said. “We all share this love for competing and public speaking.” >> Please see Forensics page 6


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Opinions

www.linfieldreview.com The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Jessica Prokop Managing editor Joanna Peterson Copy chief Kelsey Sutton Copy editor Samantha Sigler Business manager Jessica Pham News editor Andra Kovacs Sports editor Kaylyn Peterson Culture editor Sharon Gollery Features editor Ivanna Tucker

October 10, 2011

EDITORIAL

Be on the lookout for vandalism across campus The school is spending money on resistance repairs for the vandalized Linfield signs on campus, including the entrance signs on Booth Bend and Davis Street. “The cost of repairs including new letters and staff time for installation is just under $5,000,” said Brad Sinn, director of facilities and auxiliary services. The money for these repairs comes from the facilities services operating budget. While it is necessary to replace the Linfield signs, what is being done to prevent more vandalism from happening on campus? “College Public Safety (CPS) has enhanced patrols as part of targeted enforcement measures and is working closely with the McMinnville Police Department on this matter,” said Linda Powell, senior director of human resources and administration/risk manager.

With the facilities services operating budget at hand, it seems that it would be helpful to purchase additional security cameras near the entrance signs to catch the culprit behind these acts and to spot any other potential vandals that make their way onto the Linfield campus. CPS, with as few officers as it has, already has a lot on its plate to deal with without having to increase patrols around the Linfield entrance signs. CPS officers can’t possibly catch everything that happens on campus and that is where additional security cameras could help. In the long run, security cameras would help CPS become more efficient by saving extra time and effort. Security cameras can spot what CPS patrol officers miss while they are dealing with other issues. In the meantime, everyone on the Linfield campus can help keep

the school looking pretty and vandalism-free by being on the lookout for any suspicious behavior. “Such senseless vandalism wastes time and resources, and personally, I find it offensive and disrespectful to our Linfield community,” Powell said. “We ask that all members of our community be observant and report any suspicious behavior to CPS or the McMinnville Police Department.” Students shouldn’t simply take for granted what a clean and presentable campus Linfield has to offer. If everyone ignores vandalism when it happens, more and more money will have to be spent on replacing items on campus. The combination of purchasing additional security cameras and students reporting suspicious behavior to either CPS or the McMinnville Police Department

Review office hours Editor-in-chief Tuesdays 2:30-3:15 p.m. Fridays 12:00-1:00 p.m. or by appointment

Managing editor Mondays 10:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. Tuesdays 2:30-3:00 p.m. or by appointment Follow us on Twitter @linfieldreview and on Facebook will help to maintain the beauty and integrity of Linfield College. -The Review Editorial Board

Opinion editor Meghan O’Rourke Photo editor Joel Ray Online editor Jaffy Xiao Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla Illustrator Yura Sim Senior reporter Senior photographer Melanie Timmins Circulation manager Samantha Sigler Columnists Chris Forrer “Dear Bailey” Adviser Brad Thompson Associate Professor of Mass Communication The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists. The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Mondays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 12:00 p.m. on Friday to appear in the Review the following Monday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Give them a break: Greeks do love their ’Cats Hi Chris and editors: Chris, I know you are a provocative guy, so I would like to respond to your article about Greek Life. The article, which ran a couple weeks ago challenged Greeks to be spirited and respond. And now, I challenge you to post this letter to the editor in your next Linfield Review. I’m sure you will find many Greek members would like to see a rebuttal.

I am a proud Phi Sig who knows that Rush is an important part of  Greek Life, and every Greek member would agree with that. But using football to get recruits? Let me start by explaining our recruitment schedule. We practice  for months in advance for Rush. Your assumption of correlation between Rush ending and  Greeks not attending the game is fair, but your

causality is flawed. The cause of sisters not being at the game? I wasn’t able to go home weeks prior to rush because we had practices, so when I was able to go home after Rush ended, I did. Many other sisters did the same thing. Combine that with the horrible weather and the sickness spreading  across campus, and it’s fair to say that most of Linfield wasn’t feeling very spir-

ited for that game. Also, if we just wanted to put “butts in the seats” at meetings we wouldn’t  require  high standards  for sisterhood, such as  GPA, community service and involvement in campus activities. I am sure there were some enthusiastic  Greek members  who wanted to get freshmen excited about Rush at these football games, but assuming that we’re all  just try-

ing to “pick them up” is insulting to new members and Greeks alike. Finally, I would like to say that Greek members were alive and well at the homecoming game this weekend, and it would’ve been that way with or without your article’s challenge. Because the Greeks love their ’Cats, but sometimes even the best fans deserve a break. - Leanne McCallum


October 10, 2011

Opinions

Politics

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Society

Become an informed student Clothes serve as freedoms of expression Between elections, Occupy Wall Street, the death of Steve Jobs and the uprisings in Libya and the middle east, this is an important time for the up and coming generations to be informed. Many can find it difficult while away at school to be as informed as they were back home. Students are without parents’ influencing opinions and current events (whether welcomed or not), and have less access to daily newspapers and less time to watch news programs. Whatever the case may be, it’s certainly unwar-

Andra Kovacs News editor ranted for students to be uninformed with all the resources available in this time of technology. Many turn to Twitter or Facebook or word of mouth for their news, which at least allows them to know what’s being discussed in the news, but these things

don’t quite help them understand enough to form opinions or ideas regarding the issues. Not to make a generalization, because this obviously doesn’t apply to all students, however, the lack of knowledge about certain aspects of today’s news has come as a shock to me lately. In many classes, topics like Occupy Wall Street and the elections have been brought up, and when students have been asked to volunteer to explain the reasoning or speak about the candidates, the norm has been shy, unbroken silence.

We are all guilty of this response from time to time, and this is not to say that I, too, don’t remain silent and unconfident in my knowledge of Libya politics or Rick Perry’s campaign. I’m a firm believer that once a problem is addressed, it is that much easier to solve it. And with all the resources available, the current generation simply needs to make a conscious effort to stay informed—for these issues are important to our lives and crucial to our country.

Andra Kovacs can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Economics

Protesting can help spur change If you’ve been following the coverage of “Occupy Wall Street,” you know that the people are angry. The people are so angry that the protest has continued all across the country. It has spread both to large and small cities. Cities all over the country organized mass gatherings. On Oct. 6, about 10,000 people gathered in downtown Portland to peacefully protest the corporate corruption that our country has been suffering through for years. The parks were covered in signs saying things like, “If you’re not angry, you’re not paying attention,” “End the war, End the Fed,” “We are the 99%,” and “Close your bank account.” Many people spoke of their financial struggles and lack of well-being. Even a policeman took the stage to express his concerns about the corporate greed. Our generation, the people born between the years of

Kelsey Sutton Copy chief 1980-1995, is bigger than the “Baby Boomers.” We are the strongest group of people in the nation right now, and we have the power to make the government listen. We want justice from the 1 percent (the corporations). We want political and social equality. We want democracy back in America. What happens when we have children? What happens when we want to buy a house but can’t because we’re strapped with student loans? These are the loans that we have to pay to get an education to get a good job to barely keep us afloat in this suffering economy.

The current administration has sent the next three generations into a downward spiral. When the big banks, such as Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo, go down, where is your money going to go? The wealthy and corporations pay less money in taxes than the middle and lower classes do. According to the Declaration of the Occupation of New York, the government and corporations have spent and donated large amounts of money on politicians and their campaigns instead of programs that fund the people. These large entities keep us dependent on oil and throw us around with the prices. The government makes laws that benefit the banks. They purposely keep the people misinformed and fearful through control of the media. They have undermined the farms of America because of monopolization.

And through animal cruelty, torture and confinement, the government has profited and kept these practices secret from us. These are only a few of the grievances listed in the Declaration. The government privatizes everything. Water bottles, for example, privatize a worldly resource and turn it into something that we pay for and think we “need.” While we can get water for free through our taps, we continue to purchase plastic water bottles that are a giant waste and threat to the environment. Why does the government do this? For a profit, of course. Protests alone won’t change or solve the financial problems that our country is having, but they can spur a change. To begin our reform, we need to cleanse the government of corrupt leaders and restore democracy to America. Kelsey Sutton can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

Women dressed in clothing showing more than the social norm wander down the streets in multiple cities. They clutch signs with the words “Slut Pride.” “Slut” is written on their bodies. The term “slut” has been used bluntly throughout history to identify a woman who is thought to allow men to take advantage of her. In Toronto, five women started a protest against the argument that rape occurs because of a woman’s appearance. They started a protest series that spread rapidly throughout the world called “SlutWalks.” Most people may think that this is just another way to show extreme feminist beliefs. However, this protest is more about the fact that women are being judged about the way they dress because they are seen as “targets for rape.” The idea of this protest is not technically trying to get rid of the term “slut.” It is more about trying to fight against society’s expectations of what a woman should dress like. Women are not the only ones fighting for this cause. Men are also participating to help encourage the idea. According to the Washington Post, SlutWalks has become “one of the most successful feminist actions in the last 20 years.” Rape is a sensitive subject that has been becoming an issue all across the country. There should not be an attachment to what a

Ivanna Tucker Features editor person wears to consider them a “target.” Freedom of speech and expression exist. If a woman wants to go around and bare it all, then she should go ahead. Society should not try to blame what they wear for an issue as big as rape. These protests are doing more then just promoting feminism. They are informing society of the ignorance that has risen over the centuries that involve the appearance of women. The information that the SlutWalks has exposed has opened the eyes of millions with all the attention it is getting. This fight is not just for feminists, it is for all that are being judged because of the way they look. If a person wants to look a certain way, it is not right for someone else to criticize their appearance. What they do is their business. Society does not need to attach some stigma because a girl wears a lot of make up or likes showing a little leg or stomach. Everyone has their own idea of what a woman should look like and what a man should look like, but attaching rape to it is too extreme. Ivanna Tucker can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.

Column

Don’t wait to report sexual assault Corrections The Linfield Review publishes corrections from the previous week’s issue in this spot every week that a correction is needed. To submit a correction, email linfieldreviewmanaging@ gmail.com.

Dear Bailey, “How does someone know when sexual assault has occurred and what should they do if it occurs?” - Anonymous Dear Anonymous, Sexual assault is present any time a sexual act takes place that involves force, the threat of force, coercion or lack of consent. Feeling physical or emotional powerlessness are good indicators that you are in that situation. This also includes voyeurism and pornography. Just being placed in a situation where you fear

that an act of sexual assault will take place can be considered a crime. The intent during sexual assault is almost always violence, not desire. As long as there is no verbal consent, it is considered assault. Both partners need to agree to the sexual act. Sexual assault is a

broader definition than rape because rape can be different depending on the state. In Oregon, rape is any unwanted sexual intercourse with any amount of penetration. Most sexual assault cases happen with someone that the victim knows. Also, most assaults could be stopped if the victim simply screamed for help. When either rape or sexual assault occurs, do not clean up at all. Don’t wash, change your clothes, brush your teeth or tidy up where the incident took place. If you decide to, report it to

law enforcement first. Call 9-1-1 if you are injured. The sooner you get it reported the more available evidence there will be. The next step is to get medical attention at immediate care or the E.R. right after calling the police. After receiving medical help, when you are ready it is important that you receive counseling. All of these are of course optional but highly recommended. Reporting the assault could prevent it from happening to another person. What is important is your safety and the safety of those around you. - Bailey


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News

www.linfieldreview.com

October 10, 2011

TJ Day Hall dedication celebrates history, future Kaylyn Peterson Sports editor Applause erupted as the ribbon to TJ Day Hall was cut, leading to the festivities inside. Alumni, community members, students and faculty all gathered for the dedication ceremony of the recently rennovated TJ Day Hall on Oct. 8. President Thomas Hellie opened the ceremony by thanking everyone for being there. He then gave special thanks to other individuals, such as Vivian Bull, a former Linfield president, Marvin Henberg a former dean of students, McMinnville Mayor Rick Olson and Jamie Watson, the head architect for TJ Day Hall. Formerly known as Northup Hall, the establishment was built in 1936, named for Linfield’s first president, Emanuel Northup.

The hall served as the library until 2003 when Nicholson Library opened. It was at that time that ideas were being made for what Northup Hall could become. TJ Day Hall was named for Professor TJ Day, who “had a passion for this school.” He has shown decades of support by helping with the fundraising for many other halls on campus, such as Renshaw Hall, Riley Center, Vivian Bull Music Center and others. With the building containing about 25,000 square feet, TJ Day Hall houses the departments of English, Business, Economics and Philosophy, as well as the Writing Center. Classroom capacity has increased by 27 percent with the addition of TJ Day Hall. Along with the building increasing classroom numbers, TJ Day Hall will also

be Linfield’s first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified building. “This is a special building,” said David Haugeberg, chair member on the the Board of Trustees. "It stands for Linfield’s mission statement about the importance of a liberal art education.” Though the hall will no longer be called Northup Hall, there is a memorial plaque inside for Northup. The building embodies both history and the future. The south side appears new and modern, while the north side stays true to its original state. TJ Day and his family attended the ceremony and thanked the audience for being part of such a special day. TJ Day received the honor of cutting the ribbon before the reception occurred. Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Joel Ray/Photo editor

TJ Day cuts the ribbon to finalize the dedication of TJ Day Hall during a ceremony celebrating the completion of the newly renovated building on Oct. 8.

DigitalCommons@ Linfield completes successful first year Sharon Gollery Culture editor Linfield’s recently launched online repository has received a satisfying amount of attention in the first year of its existence. The archive collects scholarly and creative works by Linfield faculty and students, displaying the works online at digitalcommons.linfield.edu. According to its website,

the archive has had 1,105 works submitted to date, and more than 7,000 works have been downloaded in the past year. Since its creation, DigitalCommons@Linfield has had visitors from 61 countries and 48 states. The online archive, which was organized one year ago, organizes contributed works into digital compilations. A visitor to the site can browse by col-

NewsBrief The News-Register in McMinnville won 18 awards during the 125th National Newspaper Association convention in September in Albuquerque, N.M. According to the newspaper’s Sept. 24 article, it received more awards than any other non-daily newspaper in the country. Three awards were firsts in the National Newspaper Association’s Better Newspaper Contest. These wins were Best Editorial Pages, Best Serious Column and Best Obituary. Other awards included second and third place for Best Feature Story, Best Sports Photo, two third-place wins for Best Photo Essay, Best Breaking News Photo and second in the Best Weekend Edition category. The National Newspaper Association recognizes daily and non-daily newspapers in about 36 states.

~ Jessica Prokop/Editor-in-chief

lection, discipline or author. The DigitalCommons@ Linfield homepage also provides collections of the top 10 downloads, the 20 most recent additions and a featured “Work of the Day.” The repository is also home to collections like the archive of campus publications and peer-reviewed journals, and the Linfield Authors gallery, which lists faculty who have published books.

However, literature is not the only thing featured in DigitalCommons@ Linfield. For example, the 2011 Student Portfolio Exhibition features the works of art from the 2011 Thesis/ Portfolio exhibition. In the section titled, “Student Scholarship & Creative Works,” site visitors can read about collaborative sculptures and toothpick structures, and

they can see pictures of the sculptures built by the Introduction to Studio class during the 2011 January Term. DigitalCommons@ Linfield provides opportunities to find information that may not be included in the repository with links to Linfield department websites, the Linfield library website, the Linfield magazine and the International Programs website.

Students and faculty can contribute content to the archive by contacting the Digital Commons coordinators Carol McCulley and Kathleen Spring at digitalcommons@linfield.edu or by submitting work online by clicking “Submit Research” on the DigitalCommons@ Linfield homepage.

Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

2010 Security and Fire Safety Report released Cassie Wong Staff writer Linfield College’s 2010 Security and Fire Safety Report was released. Among other things, the report showed an increase in liquor law violations and both forcible and non-forcible sexual offenses on campus. The report included the statistics from 2008 to 2010 and links to institutional policies concerning campus security. The crime statistic concerns the reported crimes that occurred on-campus, in off-campus buildings It also covered property owned or controlled by the college or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campuses. In the McMinnville Cam-

pus, there was no report on criminal homicide, robbery and aggravated assault, arrests or referrals for disciplining on weapons violations last year. For burglary, the report cases were reduced to zero last year from 2008’s 15 cases on and off-campuses. However, there is a slight increase in the cases of arrests for liquor law violation. As for drug violation, larson and motor vehicle theft categories, reported cases re-appeared last year after having no record in 2009. It also showed an increase in both forcible ad non-forcible sexual offenses on campus, with six out of 11 incidences happening in residence halls, though

there is a drop in non-campus property. The cases of referrals for discipline for liquor law violations and drug violations also surged on campus, especially in residence halls. For the Portland Campus, the number of reported cases in all categories is significantly smaller, with one forcible sex offense and motor vehicle theft in public property as well as two oncampus burglaries. For the adult degree program, there was no report on crime at all. The report also covered the methods of reporting incidents and emergencies, misconduct and missing persons. It outlined the college’s system of notifying and

being notified of emergencies. It also contained a brochure on how to respond to emergencies. The report was prepared by the college’s College Public Safety (CPS). Along with CPS’s work, other organizations collaborated to create the report. This included local law enforcement agencies, the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Environmental Health and Safety. For more information or the full version of the report, go to www.linfield. edu/college-public-safety/ annual-report.html or by contacting CPS at (503)883-7233. Cassie Wong can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


News

October 10, 2011

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Homecoming: Showing off Wildcat pride

Above: Dan Fergueson, director of College Activities, leads the relay race, held Oct. 4 on the IM Field. The teams competed in a three legged race, soccer kick, logic challenge, eating contest, Linfield trivia and football throw. Sigma Kappa Phi and Theta Chi’s team came out on top in the end.

Above: Alpha Phi and Kappa Sigma’s team belts out “Last Saturday Night,” a parody of Katy Perry’s “TGIF” during the song and banner competition on Oct. 6. Left: Zeta Tau Alpha and Delta Psi Delta’s team show off its banner during the song and banner competition.

Above: Senior David King and junior Ashley Burgess share a dance after being crowned Mr. and Miss Linfield on Oct. 7 in Ice Auditorium. Left: Senior David King dances in a glowing frog costume for his talent portion of the Mr. and Miss Linfield competition on Oct. 7 in Ice Auditorium.

Right: Linfield students show off their spirit in the student section of Maxwell Field during the homecoming game against Puget Sound University on Oct. 8. Far right: Junior Stephen Nasca and junior Mickey Inns celebrate their success after the Wildcats beat the Puget Sound University Loggers 73-7 on Oct. 8 at Maxwell Field.

Photos by Joel Ray/Photo editor

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News

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October 10, 2011

Change Corps encourages service, roundtable discussions Andra Kovacs News editor Even just between the eight girls sitting in an oddshaped circle, the passion and excitement during the first community service roundtable meeting of the year was contagious. The group met Oct. 4, mainly discussing the outcomes of Taste of Service and also brainstorming community service activities. This was the first of the monthly meetings, which, just like in years prior, invites all students interested in community service to discuss ideas for ways to get involved. However, there has been a change since last year concerning community service at Linfield. Change Corps has been initiated, bringing a new student perspective to the office of Community Engagement and Service. A group of five students comprises the Change Corps, with two directors and three coordinators who are all dedicated to organizing community projects and engaging students in service. One of the corps’ directors, sophomore Shelby Hollenbeck, said that the Change Corps has been an empowering change for Linfield. “I think there’s a really big interest in community

Junior Lori McEwen and sophomore Tianna Muniz participate in the discussion during the Community Service Roundtable on Oct. 4 in Mezzanie on the second floor of Riley Hall. service from students, but we didn’t have the staff to really make everything happen,” Hollenbeck said. “So now [we can] help provide the school with more

Forensics: Members share undebatably positive experiences << Continued from page 1 Tang said the team has impacted her life in a variety of positive ways, from sharpening her public speaking skills to improving the way she balances school and extracurricular activities. “I would highly encourage students from all major and experience in public speaking skills to join Linfield Forensics Team,” Tang said. “You will get the kind of experience you have never had before. It will change your college life in a way you would never expect.” Martinez said that at age 16, she never would have dreamed of being so engaged in public speaking. “I didn’t know what to expect from college,” Martinez said. “Neither of my parents went to college and I couldn’t picture what type of experience it would be for me.” Martinez discovered the Linfield’s forensics team at

Joel Ray /Photo editor

the activities fair during her first few weeks on campus. And even though she said she thought of herself as a shy student, she went to the first meeting and joined the team. “I remember that the day before my first tournament, I was still hesitant to attend the tournament,” she said. “But [Miller] told me that the draft of my speech was ‘speechy,’ so I told myself I could do it. Now, after seeing how terrifying public speaking can be at first, I feel like I can do just about anything related to public speaking.” Tang said she attributes much of her positive experience to Miller and his wife, Kathleen Spring, for their dedication to the art of public speaking and to their investment in the group. “[Miller and Spring] have really been there for us, helped us to get great experience, “ Tang said. “They have become our forensics mom & dad.” Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.

opportunities and give the students more responsibility to make things happen.” The Change Corps works on projects, such as Taste of Service, Make a Difference

Day, Global Youth Day of Service, alternative spring break and others. “We’re very broad,” Hollenbeck said. “We have everything from environ-

mental issues and sites to the youth and reading, to hunger and homelessness, we cover a lot of different projects and opportunities.”

The core group meets weekly to coordinate new project ideas, discuss how they can improve, and come up with new ideas of how to engage more students in the community. “[The Change Corps] are passionate about what they’re doing and they’re students who want to be involved and get other students involved in the community,” Hollenbeck said. “Many people don’t know we exist because we’re a new program, but we are here and we’re here for students. We love to have other students involved and helping and volunteer in here or just give their input.” Because having student involvement is such a huge part of their jobs and community service as a whole, Hollenbeck said that having the once-a-month roundtable meeting will help gain valuable input on how students feel about the projects and activities and to inform them of upcoming events. “It’s important to have monthly meetings to keep the students aware and engaged on what’s happening in our office—it helps let the students know what’s going on and get their opinion,” she said. “It helps us help them get involved.”

Andra Kovacs can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Alumna tells NASA stories

Photo courtesy of Laura Davis

Lora Koenig, class of ’99, informs students and alumni about her ventures as a NASA scientist Oct. 7 in Nicholson Library. Koenig received the 2011 Outstanding Young Alumna Award for her work with polar ice sheets and climate change. Her lecture focused on the state of the ice sheets and how NASA teams spend months in Antarctica, testing the rate that ice sheets melt and determining contributing factors to this problem.


October 10, 2011

Features

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Features

Road to success d

Midterms are here and the stress hours of additional studying Classes begin to seem overwhe know how to cope with exams them. Here are some ways

Ivanna T Features

Do: Use the library as a place to study. It is

Do: Spread out studyin

Don’t: Watch TV while studying in your

Don’t: Put it off until th

a quiet location for people to gather and avoid distractions.

room. It will be too much of a distraction. Log out of your Facebook account, or get a friend to change your password so you can’t log on until you’re finished studying.

Do: Eat healthy foods. Make sure your

sections throughout the week.

to grasp half of a seme night will not help lighte cause a student to stre

body is getting all of the right vitamins so you remain healthy and your brain is active during the exams. Good snack options include fruits, yogurt and nuts.

Do: Make sure to take

Don’t: Spend countless nights eating junk

fun. Your studies should

food because your brain won’t have all the nutrients it needs.

little fun from studying. fun in their lives when s

Don’t: Neglect your w


Features

October 10, 2011

during midterms

s level of students is rising from g added to their workload. elming because people do not and the stress that comes with s to help with those issues.

Tucker s editor

ng sessions into small e duration of the

he night before. Trying ester of material in one en the load. It will only ess even more.

e time out to have a . Students need some stress starts to pile up.

work so you can have d be your first priority.

Do: Spend some time in the gym. Yoga is

the way to go to relieve stress in a calming matter. Right before studying, just sit down and do some stretches, mentally and physically preparing yourself for work.

Don’t: Stress too much about exams. Take on each exam one at a time, and study subjects in order of importance.

Do: Have a study group. It will allow you to be engaged by others and help you acknowledge the fact that you are not alone when it comes to studying.

Don’t: Allow people to be a distraction from actually getting things done.

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Culture

October 10, 2011

Portland Fashion Week presents art on the runway Sharon Gollery Culture editor

On a trip sponsored by the Linfield Activities Board, Linfield students went to Portland on Oct. 8 to experience Portland Fashion Week. Students who signed up in the CIC were provided with transportation to see the last night of the fashion week’s featured runway shows. “It was a really cool event,” sophomore Kyra Rickards said. “The venue was really industrial and modern.” According to the Portland Fashion Week website, the event is the biggest fashion week in the Pacific Northwest and one of the biggest in the U.S. The week is known for its emphasis on sustainability and for bringing together designers from all over the world. “I have been to the fashion week in different places in the world such as Hong Kong, Vietnam and Singapore,” junior Tina Chau Le said in an email. “Portland fashion week is very unique and interesting in terms

Photos courtesy of Kyra Rickards Models move down the runway during Portland Fashion Week on Oct. 8. Linfield students attended the Linfield Activities Board-sponsored event, which featured sustainable pieces from a variety of international designers. of organizing and fashion inspiration. I really enjoyed it because I am interested in designing and events.” Five fashion designers, Jay Sario, Helen Sharp, Cardi Wrap, Michael Costello and Bryce Black: An Avant Garde Introduction, showed off their collections on that night of Portland Fashion Week. “The collection I liked

the best was the black and white collection because of its unique ideas,” Le said in an email. “The sophistication of the designer’s ideas was illustrated by the simplicity of black and white color scheme.” Rickards said that her favorite piece was from Bryce Black. “It was very couture, high-end. It had all this

black leather and feathers. It wasn’t something you’d actually wear, but it was more like an art,” she said. “It had all this interesting texture, and you could just see the craftsmanship. That’s really what couture is. It’s like fashion art.” About 11 Linfield students attended the event, filling up all of the available spaces on the trip. Accord-

ing to Rickards, the group from Linfield got to sit in the third row. In all, around 200 people were in the audience. “It was located near the waterfront, which brought a really cool and unique atmosphere,” Le said in an email. Le said that she was also impressed with the way that LAB’s off-campus cultural events are handled.

“I want to add one more sentence about Nicole Szanto,” Le said in an email. “I am impressed with her international background and her perception about culture. She is not doing obvious culture events, but she thinks outside of the box about fashion and other things.” Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


October 10, 2011

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Entertainment

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October 10, 2011

Piano and guitar duo pleases audience Breanna Bittick Staff writer A piano and acoustic guitar duo from Oklahoma serenaded the audience at the Oct. 6 Pro Cat Cab. Shane Henry and Maggie McClure are both solo artists, but also perform as a duo. The two of them came together musically after McClure opened a show for Henry when she was only 16 years old. They continued opening shows for each other, with McClure occasionally doing Henry’s backup vocals and vise versa. Three years ago, they

made the decision to come together as a duo. “They were really good. Shane’s voice reminded me of a mix of John Mayer and Adam Lavigne, and her voice was just absolutely beautiful,” freshman Linnea Caso said. The audience seemed to love Henry and McClure. They listened very attentively, clapped, danced in their seats and even sang along when Henry performed a cover of “The Way You Make Me Feel” by Michael Jackson. “Linfield was such a fun crowd; they were all so sweet and attentive,” Henry said. “Sometimes you

get crowds that just don’t care and talk through your whole performance, it was nice to have a crowd that cared.” Both artists played original and personal songs from their albums, including a song off Henry’s album called “Portland,” about his sister leaving Oklahoma and moving 2,000 miles away to Portland. “I loved them so much,” freshman Lexi Heredia said. “They’re both super talented. One of their songs really hit home with me and made me cry.” Breanna Bittick can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Victor Zhu/Staff photographer Shane Henry performs one of his songs during a Pro Cat Cab on Oct. 6 in the Fred Meyer Lounge.

Albuquerque band’s latest album does not disappoint Brinn Hovde KSLC Music Director Of God and Science has recently released an album that will surely keep the anticipation high. If you are looking to add some variety to your music library, “Black Rabbit” will not leave you short of this goal. The band is made up of Julian Martinez, Jeremy Fine (bass) and Matt Dominguez (songwriter), all who have collaborated to create a unique sound that is comparable to Radiohead and Pink Floyd. However, their sound is certainly their own in a new way. After making their pres-

Of God and Science album art. ence known through a circuit of local coffee shops in the South in 2001, their name became more common and

recognized. As they continued performing, they developed their sound and have

released their most recent album, “Black Rabbit,” in Albuquerque N.M. Since its release last year, it has been making an impression on campus radio stations around the nation. Every song on this album brings something new and refreshing to the table. Tracks such as “Wasteland” are made up of dramatic tones and rich instrumentals. It embraces chill beats that could almost leave you in a trance, while the simple lyrics allow the rich melody to sink in. Other songs have a much lighter feeling with uplifting vocals and sounds that flow through in a pleasantly peaceful manner.

Win Win vs. Everything Must Go Hayden Mace For the Review It’s another edition of Watch This, Not That. I’ll compare “Win Win” and “Everything Must Go.” Usually when I do Watch This, Not That, I’ll compare movies that have something in common, like actor, genre or new release. This week, I decided to review two new indie films. Indies aren’t usually overly exciting, but movie fans of character relationships and drama tend to enjoy these films more than others. “Win Win” stars Paul Giamatti and Amy Ryan (Holly from The Office). It’s the story of Mike (Giamatti) and his struggles to keep his law firm open, while still coaching the high school wrestling team and supporting his family. Things take a turn for the better when the grandson of one of his clients

shows up. Mike decides to take him in and allows him to wrestle on his team. It turns out that the kid is an amazing wrestler and, in the end, helps bring out the best in Mike. I wasn’t sure what to expect here, but I was pretty happy with “Win Win.” I thought Giamatti did a great job and the story was strong. “Everything Must Go” stars Will Ferrell and Rebecca Hall. It’s the story of Nick (Ferrell) and an unfortunate turn of events. On the same day that he’s fired from his long-time job, his wife changes the locks and puts all of Nick’s belongings out on the front lawn. Nick hires a kid to help him set up a yard sale in exchange for minimum wage and teaching the kid how to play baseball. Nick has a strong drinking problem and must overcome that and several other

Left: “Win Win” movie poster Right: “Everything Must Go” movie poster personality defects to move on. I liked Rebecca Hall in “The Town” and was excited to see her in this. I also like that Ferrell can still have a serious role in a movie. Overall, I was really excited to see “Everything Must Go” and was slightly let down. “Win Win” was a solid movie from start to finish,

and it kept me interested throughout. “Everything Must Go” has an interesting story and had a few laughs with it as well. At the end of the day, I would recommend that you watch “Win Win” (8.0/10) and not “Everything Must Go” (7.4/10). Hayden Mace can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

The diversity within the tracks themselves will certainly keep you on your toes as well. A unique track, “Bugs are Good,” enhances a strong harmonizing of the group member’s voices. Their vocal tones, in addition to the prevalent anticipation that it makes you feel, embrace you. Extensive instrumental components compliment lyrical parts seamlessly. The simplicity that is conveyed is a pleasurable surprise for this album. With the alternating pace and energy that is demonstrated you could find yourself playing this song on repeat.

Overall, this album embraces variety throughout while maintaining a consistent sound, which says a lot about Of God and Science. Smooth, trendy beats find themselves confiding in rich classic sounds, bringing a new experience to a common, comfortable genre. Their original tones accent a mesmerizing array of lyrical and harmonious delights that this album has to offer. For some refreshing new melodies be sure to check out “Black Rabbit” on KSLC 90.3 fm. You can also listen online on our recently updated web page at www.linfield.edu/ kslcfm.

Brinn Hovde can be reached at kslcmusic@gmail.com.


Sports

October 10, 2011

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Second half leads to comeback for ’Cats Kelsey Sutton Copy chief The Linfield volleyball team had a split weekend, losing its first match but coming back to the top with a win on the second match. The Wildcats lost to Pacific Lutheran University on Oct. 7 in Tacoma, Wash. They beat George Fox University on their home court Oct. 8 in Newberg, Ore. The win improved the Wildcats to 8-9 overall and 3-5 in the conference standings. Pacific Lutheran, with a nine-win streak under its belt, beat the Wildcats on Friday 25-17, 25-19 and 25-14. The Lutes and Wildcats played a back and forth game to fight for the lead. The game started with a 4-4 tie but the Lutes pulled ahead again to a 12-6 lead. Linfield came back with six points in a row, but the Lutes came back for the win. In the second game, the Wildcats started strong with a five point lead. Freshman Victoria Thompson and senior Tara Hill spurred the quick start with kills. The women struggled for the lead, but PLU pulled ahead in the end after tying the score again. The third set remained close, but the Lutes delivered 12 out of the last 14 points of the game, taking the Wildcats out early. Senior libero Samantha Lau performed well with 16 digs, freshman Audrey Frazier contributed 17 assists

Score by Quarters: Linfield ........0 1 - 1 George Fox....0 0 - 0 and freshman Kailana RitteCamara had eight kills. In five sets, the Wildcats beat the Bruins 19-25, 18-25, 25-21, 25-19 and 15-8 on their homecoming weekend. Benefitting from the moves of Ritte-Camara, Thompson and sophomore Kelsey Ludin, the frontline had 17 kills, 10 kills and three assists, and 10 kills and six assists, respectively. Defensively, the Wildcats impressed as Lau dug 23 balls, freshman Courtney Wanamaker had 13 digs, and Frazier dealt out a whopping 43 assists, as well as four block assists. “This weekend’s matches showed how well we can work hard and push through,” Ritte-Camara said in an email. “Although we weren’t successful Friday night, we tried even harder Saturday to be the team we know we can be. By working together, having energy and having fun, we pulled through Saturday night and won in five sets. I think it really shows how much character we have. We will not give up until the game is over.” The Wildcats are back at home Oct. 12 and 15 facing off against Willamette University and Puget Sound University. Kelsey Sutton can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

Kaylyn Peterson/Sports editor

Freshman Victoria Thompson and sophomore Kailana Ritte-Camara block the ball set by the Bruins on Oct. 8 in Newberg, Ore.


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Sports

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Loss will not get Wildcats down Samantha Sigler Copy editor This past week, the men’s soccer team played against Willamette University and lost 0-3. With this being the Wildcats eighth loss after playing 10 games (one win and one tie were made as well), the team still isn’t ready to give up hope yet. “Everyone has to get on the same page in order for us to be successful,” head coach Ian Lefebvre said. The Wildcats, although the team as individuals are talented players, aren’t playing as a unit which is beginning to effect their performance on the field. Along with having difficulties playing together as a team, a contributing factor to the excess amount of losses appears to be the fact that the Wildcats are still a young team. “[We’re] definitely good

Score by Quarters: Linfield .......0 0 - 0 Willamette....1 2 - 3 enough, and definitely talented enough,” Lefebvre said. The only thing the Wildcats need to work on now has become “finishing their chances” and making the goals that they intend to make on the field. At the moment, the biggest problem with the team is building confidence. “We must have confidence in ourselves and one another in order to unite and start playing up to our potential,” senior Wil Hiles said in an email. “Obviously something has to change,” Lefebvre said. “[We need to] focus on things that we need to focus on.” With this in mind, the Wildcats plan on fixing the issues this week

that they keep continuously running into such as communication and working together as a team as opposed to playing as individuals. In addition to working on playing together as a unit, a plus for the Wildcats is that injuries are beginning to heal which allows more players to return to the field. With all of these factors in mind, the Wildcats aren’t giving up and are continuing to push forward in an attempt to win the last few games of the season. “We remain optimistic about the remainder of the season,” Hiles said. “We have too much pride in ourselves, each other and the program to throw in the towel.”

Samantha Sigler can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

October 10, 2011

Wildcat sports schedule Wednesday, Oct. 12 Women’s soccer

@ Lewis & Clark

Noon

Volleyball

vs. Willamette

7 p.m.

Men’s soccer

@ Forest Grove, Ore.

2:30 p.m.

Women’s golf

@ The Reserve

all day

Cross country

@ Portland, Ore.

10 p.m.

Women’s Soccer

@ Salem, Ore.

12 p.m.

Football

@ Forest Grove, Ore.

1:30 p.m.

Volleyball

vs. Pugent Sound

7 p.m.

Women’s golf

@ The Reserve

all day

Women’s soccer

vs. George Fox

12 p.m.

Men’s soccer

@ Newberg, Ore.

2:30 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 14

Saturday, Oct. 15

Sunday, Oct. 2

GO Wildcats GO!

Football: Younger players get playing time << Continued from page 16 backs, the latter setting up a 45-yard dash to the end zone by junior tailback Stephen Nasca to put Linfield ahead 31-0. “I pride myself on making the best of every opportunity I’m given,” Nasca said. “When my name’s called I always want to be prepared.” Senior cornerback Christian Hanna sparked a scoring frenzy in the final six minutes of the first half by picking off a pass by Loggers quarterback James Korn and returning it 33 yards for a touchdown. Senior rover Taylor Skore picked off another Korn throw on UPS’ next series, and Inns fired a 37-yard touchdown pass to Poppen on the next play. Senior defensive tackle Tommy Patrick fell on a fumble by UPS receiver Ross Zuhl to set up Inns’ final touchdown throw, a 25-yard bomb to junior Lucas Jepson. Robitaille added to the Loggers’ struggles by blocking a punt that was run in 3 yards for a touchdown by sophomore safety Colin Foreman. At the half, the ’Cats already lead 59-0. “With a veteran secondary, it’s a lot easier to keep the pass coverages up,” For-

rest said. “Turnovers are always something we want to improve on in-game.” The starters left the field in the second half and gave way to the younger Wildcats, but the scoring continued nevertheless. Sophomore quarterback Josh Yoder had a 10-yard touchdown pass to freshman receiver Colin Nelson and freshman tailback Trevor Gomez scooted in for a score on a four-yard run, making it a 73-0 margin. The Loggers finally found the end zone with third-string quarterback Braden Foley tossing a 7-yard score at the end of the third quarter. Neither team scored in the fourth to leave the score at 73-7. “You just love seeing the young guys get a chance to go play,” Smith said. “They get to enjoy the fruits of their labor after working so hard for us.” Next week, the ’Cats travel to Forest Grove to compete against the Pacific University Boxers, a team still seeking its first victory of the season. “We need to strive for perfect technique,” senior center Hayden Mace said. “Coach Smith preaches that it’s not who we’re playing, we’re playing ourselves.” Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Joel Ray/Photo editor

Sophomore cornerback Brandon Funk tackles the Loggers’ ball carrier, sophomore Tieler Souza on Oct. 8 at home.


Sports

October 10, 2011

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Goal in final minutes earn Wildcats win Meghan O’Rourke Opinion editor The Linfield Wildcats played two intense games Oct. 8 and 9, beating both the Pacific Lutheran University Lutes and the Pacific University Boxers. This week, the women had “lots of energy,” junior Christine Tamamoto said. The Oct. 8 game against the Lutes had a rough start for the Wildcats, as Lutes player Sarah Gamache scored the first goal of the game. The first half ended with a score of 0-1. The women stepped up their game during the second half. Junior Anna Sours scored Linfield’s first goal, her second goal of the season. This first goal was the beginning of Linfield dominance on the soccer field. Freshman Zoe Langsdorf scored the Wildcats’ second goal, assisted by Sours. Linfield proceeded to score another goal less than 10 minutes later, this time scored by senior MacKenzie Doty, assisted by Tamamoto. Both teams attempted to score another goal, but no more shots made it into the net. The game ended with a 3-1 victory for Linfield. While the girls clearly won the game, “we could’ve played harder,” Doty said. The match against the Pacific University Boxers on Oct. 9 proved to be a closer game than the match on Saturday. No goals were scored in the first half, though several attempts were made by each team. Linfield goalie Apolonia Martinez and Pacific goalie Brittany Hartmann each saved five goals during the

Score by Quarters: Linfield ........0 1 - 1 Pacific.............0 0 - 0 first half. No goals were scored in the second half of the game until less than 10 minutes left, when Tamamoto scored the first and only goal of the game. “It felt really good to score,” Tamamoto said. The women’s soccer team has played eight conference games now and as the season reaches the halfway mark, training “gets harder,” sophomore Megan Kearns said. Practices are two hours long on Tuesday through Friday. With all of these practices and games, bodies can get worn down, resulting in injuries. Doty said that injuries challenge the team’s strength and change field dynamics. “We have a boatload of injuries,” Doty said. “Six or seven starters are out with injuries, but it gives other players the opportunity to step up.” In addition to the two weekend games against Willamette University on Oct. 15 and George Fox University on Oct. 16, the Wildcats also have a game against Lewis & Clark on Oct. 12. “This is a really important week,” Doty said. “It’s vital for our well-being in the conference.” The games on Wednesday and Saturday are both away and Sunday’s game against George Fox University is a home game.

Meghan O’Rourke can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

Joel Ray/Photo editor

Freshman forward Zoe Langsdorf out runs Pacific University freshman defender Taylor Gillespie during the Wildcats’ Oct. 8 game at home.

Football prepares for next level Hey ’Cats. For those of you who have never had a chance to speak with him, head football coach Joseph Smith is a man of very few words. Players have described him as a blue-collar, strong, silent leader and an inspiration to them every time he teaches them on the field. In two full seasons of covering the football program for The Linfield Review, I’ve gotten a chance to speak to coach Smith frequently about football and learned a few of his standard lines when it comes to talking to the press.

Sports Commentary

Chris Forrer Sports columnist He never talks about injuries, always pushes players to reach their potential and encourages them to focus on the game at hand. It’s always a safe bet that in the course of any

given interview, these three things will come up at least once. But last Saturday, I was surprised to find one of those cardinal rules was broken during my postgame talk with Smith. When I asked him about a few new trick plays the team had tried to incorporate, a reverse on a punt return and an on-side kick, rather than giving the team line about playing to potential, he said something completely different. After only four games in the season, Coach Smith said that the team is begin-

ning to try to elevate their level of play to match that of national powers Mount Union and University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. These two teams have met in the Division-III title game for the past several seasons and consistently produce Arena League and sometimes NFL prospects, so their talent and quality of play is self-evident. But the fact that Smith is thinking to those teams this early in the season and breaking the “focus on the next game” rule means that he knows how special this team is, and he’s hungry. I’m hungry, too, to see the

potential of this team when it clashes with national powers. Coach Smith knows the game of football intimately, and if he has that magic feeling with the this team, then I damn well do too. Elevating their game will be difficult and require constant attention, but I have no doubt this program is capable of it. In case you missed it, this team just set a post-World War II record for points in a single game, PATs kicked in a single game and scored touchdowns on offense, defense and two

different special teams scenarios. Wow. I shudder to think what next week’s game at second-year program Pacific is going to look like. Does their scoreboard go up to three digits? In any case, this is one season that you folks are not going to want to miss. Magic is in the air, and Coach Smith, like the silent Jedi he is, can sense it. Can you?

Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


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Catline

sports

October 10, 2011

’Cats chop down Loggers, 73-7 Chris Forrer Sports columnist

Northwest Conference Standings Volleyball Whitworth

7-1

.875

Puget Sound

6-2

.750

Pacific Lutheran

6-2

.750

Pacific

5-3

.625

Linfield

2-4

.333

Lewis & Clark

3-5

.375

Willamette

3-5

.357

George Fox

2-6

.250

Whitman

0-8

.000

2-0

1.000

Pacific Lutheran

1-0

1.000

Lewis & Clark

1-0

1.000

Willamette

1-1

.500

Whitworth

0-1

.000

Puget Sound

0-2

.000

Pacific

0-2

.000

Football Linfield

Women’s Soccer Puget Sound

6-1

.857

Linfield

5-1-2

.750

Willamette

5-2-1

.688

Whitworth

3-2-2

.571

Pacific

3-4-1

.583

Whitman

3-5

.357

George Fox

2-4-1

.250

Lewis & Clark

1-5-1

.333

1-6

.167

Pacific Lutheran

Men’s Soccer Pacific Lutheran

6-1

.857

Whitworth

6-1

.857

Puget Sound

5-2

.714

Whitman

4-3

.571

Willamette

3-4

.429

Pacific

3-4

.429

George Fox

0-6-1

.071

Linfield

0-6-1

.071

Wildcats come out on top Volleyball team finishes with a win against the George Fox University Bruins during homecoming weekend, 1-0. See page 13>>

Women’s soccer going strong Adding another win to its belt, the women’s soccer team walks away with a 1-0 win against Pacific University. See page 15>>

Struggling to kick off season Men’s soccer faces another loss, this time against Willamette University, 0-3. See page 14>> Sports schedule Missed out on the sporting events during the weekend? Check out the sports schedule to see when your favorite teams play this weekend. See page 14>>

Playing for a packed Homecoming-day crowd at Maxwell Field on Oct. 8, the No. 05-ranked Linfield Wildcats put on a clinic in a 73-7 rout with the University of Puget Sound Loggers. The ’Cats dominated every aspect of the game, amassing 490 yards of offense while limiting the Loggers’ high-octane passing game to only 201 yards, four interceptions and two fumbles. The Wildcats did not surrender a turnover. Score by Quarters: Wildcats ..17 41 14 0 -73 Loggers.... .0 0 7 0 - 7 “I was really pleased with how our guys prepared all week,” head coach Joseph Smith said. “They had great focus. This was certainly as good a performance as a team as we’ve had in a long time.” The scoring started early and continued at a staggering pace for the entire contest. Junior tailback Josh Hill darted 12 yards for the first Linfield touchdown to cap a drive that only took 1:01 off the clock. On UPS’ next drive, sophomore linebacker Dominique Forrest sacked Logger quarterback George Ka’ai and caused a fumble, which was scooped up by sophomore linebacker Tyler Robitaille. A handful of plays later, junior tailback Aaron Williams scampered in for a fouryard touchdown to make the score 14-0. “Our coaches did a good job of telling us where the holes would be,” sophomore receiver Charlie Poppen said. “They called the right plays at the right times.” After another sack of Ka’ai gave Linfield another opportunity to score, junior kicker Josh Kay hammered a 49-yard field goal to boost the lead to 17-0. Kay also set the all-time Linfield record for extra points in a single game by finishing with a perfect 10 for 10. Junior quarterback Mickey Inns added a one-yard touchdown toss to sophomore tight end Jacob Priester at the start of the second quarter, his first of three on the day. Robitaille and Forrest each had interceptions of Logger quarter>> Please see Football page 14

Joel Ray/Photo editor

Junior running back Stephen Nasca celebrates after scoring a touchdown during the first half of the Homecoming game against the University of Puget Sound Loggers on Oct. 8 at Maxwell Field.

Golf team scores low and wins Kaylyn Peterson Sports editor The men and women’s golf teams hosted their three way tournament Oct. 8 at Michelbook Country Club. The teams went up against Willamette University and Pacific University. Both teams finished first. The men’s golf team finished on top with a total of 305, which was only 17 strokes above par. Senior Alex Fitch finished first

in the competition with only 69 strokes, three below par. Two other top competitors for Linfield were freshman Ryan Nolan and sophomore A.J. Taylor, who tied for third with Willamette freshman Johnathan Ross. All together, the Linfield men had seven players in the top 10. The women’s team had similar results, placing them in first with a total of 339, which was 51 strokes above par. The women’s team had six of its competitors place

in the top 10. Sophomore Danielle Lungren placed highest of the Linfield women coming in third with a total of 83. Sophomore Alexandria Smith placed fourth with 84 strokes, while sophomore Hannah Christianson and junior Brinn Hovde tied for fifth only two strokes behind her. “It’s at our home course so we were all comfortable with the holes, which made things easier on us,” Hovde said. “This really allowed us to focus on making

good shots and help us score low as a team.” The women’s team will be playing at the George Fox Invitational on Oct. 14 and 15 in Newberg, Ore. The men’s team will have the weekend off, but will play again Oct. 22 and 23 at Heron Lakes Golf Course in Portland, Ore., for the NWC Classic. Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

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