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Football ’Cats meet defeat in Calif. >> page 16

September 17, 2010

Linfield College

McMinnville, Ore.

116th Year

Issue No. 3

Veteran journalist lectures on Constitution

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

Journalist Lyle Denniston (left) speaks with members of the audience, including Brad Thompson (right), chairman of the Department of Mass Communication and associate professor of mass communication. Dennistons lecture, titled “Future of the Supreme Court: Mirror of the Past?” was held Sept. 16 in Ice Auditorium. In his speech, Denniston expressed concern over the conservative move to “take the country back” to eras when certain groups were excluded from the rights of the U.S. Constitution.

Braden Smith Managing editor A seasoned journalist spoke about the U.S. Constitution, issues the Supreme Court of the United States is facing and whether the Constitution will remain what he calls an “inclusive document” in a

lecture Sept. 16 in Ice Auditorium. “We are talking about the future of the Constitution itself,” journalist Lyle Denniston said, in reference to the future of the Supreme Court in his lecture, titled “Future of the Supreme Court: Mirror of the Past?” Denniston’s lecture dovetailed

with Constitution Day, a day honoring the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787. “I thought [the lecture] was very insightful,” sophomore Kole Kracaw said. “It was nice to see some of the history of the Supreme Court tied in with a lot of the current issues being brought up.”

Denniston began the lecture talking about the history of the Constitution and the problems which arose from its opponents during its ratification and also how it ultimately rose to be our >> Please see Constitution page 4

Consultant brings decade of experience to hunt for new dean Ferrare had his first meeting with the selection committee Sept. 16. He said they discussed the criteria for how the new candidates would be selected. “The committee members are the ones who provide that information,” Ferrare said. “I’m here for these two days to go over that criteria and see what they’re hoping for.”

Men’s Soccer

>> page 16

He said that the committee is looking for a candidate that has a good teaching and scholarship record, has administrative experience, is an advocate of the faculty, understands the role of Linfield’s faculty programs. The candidate would also need >> Please see Dean page 6

Culture

INSIDE

Editorial .......................... 2 News ............................... 4 Features.............................7 Culture............................10 Sports .............................16

He said this previous experience will help him in his advisory role at Linfield. “I know Linfield well enough,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons they chose me to come.” McGillin stepped down to the surprise of many at the end of the 2010 spring semester (“Dean of faculty turns in unexpected resignation,” TLR, April 2).

Features

A consultant from the Association of Governing Boards of Colleges and Universities arrived at Linfield Sept. 16 to assist in the search for a new dean of faculty and vice president of academic affairs. Dr. Jamie Ferrare, senior vice

president of the Association of Governing Boards, is a search consultant who will help the administration select the new dean. Ferrare said he suspects the new dean will join Linfield sometime in June 2011. Ferrare is no stranger to Linfield, as he helped the administration pick Victoria McGillin to be Linfield’s dean of faculty and vice president of student affairs in 2008.

Sports

Joshua Ensler News editor

Volunteering

>> pages 8-9

Steamy Icebreaker >> page 10


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www.linfieldreview.com The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Kelley Hungerford Managing editor Braden Smith Business manager Sarah Spranger News editor Joshua Ensler Sports editor Corrina Crocker Culture editor Jessica Prokop Features editor Jaffy Xiao Opinion editor Chelsea Bowen Photo editor Sarah Hansen Online editor Megan Myer Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla

The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists. The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Fridays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for 26 issues a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday to appear in the Review the following Friday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

Go to www.linfieldreview.com for more information.

September 17, 2010

Senators need to take more initiative During the last school year, many students have felt that ASLC Senate was not living up to its expectations. For example, Senate reports weren’t being sent out, and it seemed as though some senators were more concerned with building a résumé than working toward better student life on campus. Obviously, we think that Senate can improve and become more connected with the student body. This seems like just the year to do that. Junior ASLC Vice President Katie Patterson has many improvements in the works this year. One improvement she mentioned was that there will be four committees

this year instead of seven, with 15 to 20 people on each committee. Patterson also mentioned three main goals for the year: increasing participation and discussion, having active committees, and communicating student body concerns through the senators. It’s great that Senate is attempting to revamp itself, but setting goals and meeting goals are two different things. We would hope that the senators of this school year remember that they are in Senate because they are committed to helping students, which takes time and dedication. It’s not something that can be accomplished by simply going through

the motions. We would like to encourage students to reach out to their senators and let them know their thoughts and concerns. Also, students should take the time to read the e-mails that their senators send out and senators should take the time to put relevant information in their e-mails. Senators need to attend the Senate meetings as well instead of sending proxies or not showing up. Remember that Senate exists for the advantage of the students. Let’s take the time to have our voices be heard and to have high expectations of our Senate. -The Review Editorial Board.

Review office hours: Editor-in-chief Thursday 8:00-9:00 a.m. Friday 2:00-3:00 p.m. Managing editor Tuesday & Thursday 10:00 a.m-11:00am Follow us on Twitter, @linfieldreview, and on Facebook.

CORRECTION Sept. 10 issue: The correct address to receive food stamps in Yamhill County is 368 N.E. Norton Lane.

OPINION

Residence hall rules need reconsideration

Senior photographer Katie Paysinger

Adviser William Lingle professor of mass communication

EDITORIAL

Illustrator Jenny Worcester

Columnists Hannah McCluskey Matt Olson

Opinions

Matt Olson Columnist Thump, thump, thump! That’s the sound of the RAs’ footsteps softly hitting the floor down the hall. That’s a reason to be watchful and a reason to be alert. They come at 9:45 p.m., then again at 10:15, then at 10:45, and make one last loop before midnight. We hear them conducting rounds and smile because a closed door and a hushed room is all it takes to remain invisible. The appearance of control is ever so subtle. In many cases enforcement on many rules is so lax anyway. Take the guest policy in the dorms: opposite gender parties can remain in your room until 2 a.m. on weekend, at which point people simply curl in bed. RAs’ aren’t going around with a bat looking

for boyfriends. Students in the suburbs have it better; gifted with an overnight guest policy because it was impossible to stop people from coming over late. They had to change the rule because it ruined Residence Life’s credibility when every Suburb RA actively ignored the rules. Honestly, if I had a nickel for every rule RA’s ignored … well, I’d stop taking out loans. And why do they ignore the rules? Let’s look at the average student: Most students have spent the majority of their lives under the rule of their parents. Yes, they love and they care for us, but they also impose a strict way of living. Now those chains are gone, and a new, independent life is being lived. Nobody wants to again be stuck following rules they don’t agree with, rules designed before they were born. The college experience is geared toward changing the student into a better, stronger person. Our world changes too, so the lessons we learn at college

must be continually evolving. The rules in place hold firm the myth that college students are the same as they’ve always been. In reality, students have adapted beyond the relevancy of the rules. These archaic ideas prohibiting gender interactions reek of a policy built on fear, not trust. We are a generation that takes critical thinking as fact, not as a radical new line of questioning. We can make our own decisions. We should be able to welcome people into our living spaces whenever we feel comfortable. Our decisions may lead to folly, but through failure comes adaptation and growth. It is not radical to suggest gender - neutral housing. If I feel more comfortable rooming in an apartment with two ladies, why should I be prohibited by rules that will prove irrelevant for the remainder of my being? I guarantee learning to live with both genders will prove useful to all of us. This is not a foreign concept. Now, I do think this should

come down to a decision. Random gender - neutral housing is likely very uncomfortable for everyone involved, although it’d be an invaluable learning experience. For those making their own decisions, having more options is a welcome sight and would give me hope that this college is adapting to meet student needs. We’re not children. We will go through college blindly at times, and we will make tons of mistakes. But we will learn; we will adapt. We get asked so much of us throughout this four year transition. We’re subject to lessons taught to us and the failures we bring on ourselves. Let us learn some more. It wouldn’t change much, truthfully. This is an open-minded generation of critical thinkers. We can handle anything college has to throw at us. I’d like it to throw a bit more.

Matt Olson can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.


September 17, 2010

Opinions

www.linfieldreview.com

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OPINION

Stop blaming others and take responsibility Braden Smith Managing editor “The conservative Tea Party movement has won several victories over mainstream U.S. Republicans in primary contests ahead of November’s midterm elections,” reads a Sept. 15 BBC story. I can’t help laughing when I read news like this. “Republicans are hoping to benefit from anger over the U.S. economy to win both houses of the U.S. Congress in November,” the story continues. President Obama was elected because people

blamed Republicans for economic problems. Now people are voting for more Republicans and “Tea Partiers” because they blame Democrats for the continued economic problems. At this rate we’ll just keep tossing the blame back and forth and bouncing between both parties. And, of course, the economy won’t get any better. Neither party can fix it anyway. But we have to blame somebody, right? OK, I blame you. And me. It’s everybody’s fault. America is democratic, isn’t it? Let’s take some responsibility. We screwed up the economy by letting it get to this point. The economy is driven by consumers (us). We are steered here and there by corporations who use us to manipulate the economy to give them the most profit. If you can control con-

sumers, you can control the economy. The rich kept manipulating the economy to get richer but eventually went too far by trying to take more money than people had to give, causing an economic meltdown. The government’s attempts to alleviate this collapse so far have been to throw money we don’t have at the problem, with bailouts and stimulus packages. Occasionally a big company will get a slap on the wrist too. What we actually need to do is revamp the entire system — something the government won’t just do on its own — and stop allowing ourselves to be manipulated by those who would try to control the economy. I’m no expert on economics, but it’s fairly easy

to see how it got out of hand and how pitiful our attempts to fix it have been. We got ourselves into this mess by allowing this economic circus to continue for so long. We’re the ones who are going to have to get ourselves out of it. And we certainly won’t do so by continuing to vote for Democrats and Republicans for national offices. No matter which of the two you vote for, you’re likely to get the same thing: an imperialist or capitalist who will accomplish just barely enough to keep his or constituents happy (a simple feat), but who will largely preserve the status-quo, and often in an attempt to get re-elected. Of course, not all elected officials fit this bill, but a majority of them do and so has practically every president.

So if you think voting will somehow have any real impact on the economy, think again. It’s going to take a lot more than that. All you need to do is open your eyes a bit and think more critically. Pay attention to those in power and to what’s happening around you. Be inquisitive. Inform yourself. Question the beliefs and statements of others. Question yourself; question me! Never accept anything at face-value; be skeptical. You have to get confused about an issue if you want to fully understand it. In short, think about how things are, and then think about how things should be. And, please, think long and hard. I’m not some political guru or anything, I’m just a pissed off teenager with strong beliefs who’s tired of

fake liberals, stupid conservatives and ignorant Americans. If I’ve offended you, then I’m glad. I’m so tired of everybody trying not to step on the toes of others. People’s views need to be offended every now and then, it gets them uppity, and that’s the only way to get shit done. So, please, get offended, but do something about it as well. Let’s argue a bit. If you can’t effectively argue (“I’m right; you’re wrong,” doesn’t count) for what you believe, maybe you had better do some re-evaluating. Let’s stop playing the political blame game and take some responsibility and figure things out ourselves, even if it means stepping on some toes. Braden Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.

OPINION

Linfield staff underappreciated, unrecognized by students

Joshua Ensler News editor It seems, in this nation, there is a lack of motivation. Thomas L. Friedman said in his Sept. 11 Op-ed column in The New York Times that the nation is not driven to succeed. Friedman gives us a timeline for this malignant decay, writing that it began with the baby boomers that grew up after the Great Depression and World

War II. This is true; Linfield students should be doubly thankful for the hardworking faculty and staff at the Portland and McMinnville campuses. Integrated Technology Services might be the most unjustly maligned, given how often students use the Internet. Irv Wiswall, chief technology officer for ITS, and his staff have worked unceasingly to improve Linfield’s Internet. “Internet falls short of expectations,” from TLR Feb. 19, and “ITS amps up school network,” from TLR Sept. 10, detail ITS’s work. Both show that ITS has

improved the Internet at Linfield every year. The work of the other faculty and staff cannot be ignored. Thomas Hellie, president of Linfield College, thanked in his State of the College Address many people who jump-started the Northup Hall renovation project. Praise from Hellie went to people such as Bruce Wyatt, vice president of college relations. Hellie credited Wyatt and his staff for the achieving what he called “one of the best fundraising years in Linfield’s history.” The recession that struck America caused many colleges to cut back on pro-

grams or reduce staff and faculty, but it did not strike Linfield, thanks to efforts by the administration. While colleges such as University of Oregon were planning to drop their educators and administrators (“University could lay off 68 positions to save $25M,” Daily Vanguard, Sept. 10, 2009), Linfield abandoned across-the-board pay cuts for its faculty, Hellie said. Friedman said that the baby boomers and later generations are unmotivated. Although such a statement is a sweeping generalization, Linfield’s faculty outdid itself to shatter this assution.

During the last two years, Linfield’s numbers dropped as students were unable to afford higher learning. But a record number of freshmen and transfer students, totaling 535, have chosen to learn at Linfield this fall. Even with this influx of freshmen, Linfield is still down 30 students from the 2008-09 academic year. On the surface, it doesn’t sound significant. Hellie himself cited reduced financial aid from public colleges and a student discount larger than he liked. Even so, he gave the greatest credit to Linfield’s faculty, admissions and financial aid staff.

“I thank and applaud all of you for making special efforts — in some cases phone calls and personal letters — to inform prospective students about our college,” he said. “Your personal efforts exhibit what is special about this place — they are, in fact, the driving power of Linfield.” This is why Linfield was able to hold strong against the tide of the recession and then swiftly recover: the hard work and perseverance of Linfield’s faculty and staff. Students should be thankful for them. Joshua Ensler can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Jenny Worcester/Illustrator


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News

Nursing student wins coveted scholarship Katie Barger Staff reporter A Hispanic Linfield student was one of only six in the U.S. to win a competitive scholarship from the National Association of Hispanic Nurses. Senior Karen Bastian, a student at Linfield’s GoodSamaritan School of Nursing in Portland, received a $1,000 scholarship. “There’s a minority — there aren’t very many multi-cultural nurses and there are barriers for many patients,” Bastian said. “Many nurses only speak English, but my family doesn’t even speak English. I want to help the minorities, and I want my patients to be confident.” The association provides its members with educational and career opportunities to aspiring Hispanic and Latino nurses. It also offers numerous scholarships and educational assistance to increase the number of bilingual

Photo courtesy of Bastian Bastian and multi-cultural nurses nationwide. “After I was introduced to the scholarship, I filled out an application and had to write a paper about why I wanted to be a nurse in the Hispanic community,” Bastian said. Bastian first learned about the NAHN and its opportunities through Linfield. She said that NAHN has chapters all

across the country and as soon as she discovered the benefits, she joined Oregon’s chapter. Leticia Hernandez, financial aid and scholarship outreach counselor, worked with Bastian to find the NAHN’s scholarship opportunities. “This scholarship helps put Linfield on the radar for a nursing school and shows how we care and assist our students,” Hernandez said. Linfield has been involved in increasing the amount of Hispanic nurses in the workforce over the past few years. The Office of Multicultural Programs was established in 2004 to offer support to multicultural nursing students. “We know that Linfield is a private school. This scholarship will assist [Bastian] with her studies and allow her to continue her education here at Linfield,” Hernandez said.

September 17, 2010

Senate meets, revamps

Joel Ray/Freelancer

Senior Colin Jones, president of the Associated Students of Linfield College, addresses senators at Senate’s first assembly Sept.13. ASLC vice president junior Katie Patterson discussed committee restructuring. There are now four committee groups, down from seven in past years. The groups are campus liaison, governance, club support and finance. ASLC also assumed control of the Sustainability Council. ~Complied by Katherine Schmidt

Katie Barger can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Constitution: Speaker worries about rhetoric of exclusion << Continued from page 1 national document. He continued to talk about the modern Supreme Court and some of its recent decisions and went into detail about the case of Bush v. Gore (2000). He said that although the decision was disappointing to many, he firmly believed that the Court made the right decision in regard to the law. “[It was] a court in the midst of a political circus, trying to be a court,” Denniston said of the TV coverage of the case which he described as frenzied, inaccurate and disrespectful. Denniston concluded his lecture by talking about his concerns that the Constitution may become a document of exclusion because of a strong, conservative political movement. He said he felt that Constitution is a document of inclusion. “[It is] one that retains the openness necessary to include the Other,” he said. He described “the Other” as those who are different from “us,” Americans who share dominant cultural traits. “One of my perceptions as a citizen, I guess as well as a journalist, is that we are going through another period in history, we’ve had them before, where

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

Journalist Lyle Denniston speaks about the future of the U.S. Constituton and of his worries about a growing movement to exclude those who are different from its basic protections at a Sept. 16 lecture in Ice Auditorium. there is a strong movement to exclude people from the accepted and approved community,” Denniston said. “We are dealing now with a very strong political movement against people who are different.” He proceeded to give a number of recent examples of exclusion in America such as Florida pastor Terry Jones’ threat to hold a mass burning of the Quran on Sept. 11, the country’s refusal to hold detainees of Guantánamo Bay in American prisons even after courts had ruled the detainees presented no danger to

Americans and proposed legislation to take away the birthrights of children born of illegal immigrants in America. He cited the rhetoric of the Tea Party and conservative movements, which aim to “take the country back,” as reasoning behind the title of his lecture. “Taking our country back to what?” he asked. “What is it in our past that you want us to relive?” In his lecture, he said he wondered if perhaps the members of the conservative movement wanted to return to a time before

the civil rights movement, before workers formed unions or back to 1910, when then-Supreme Court Justice David Josiah Brewer declared America to be a Christian nation. “Where would the Constitution go ... if the Supreme Court were to become a mirror of some past?” Denniston asked. He also talked for a short while about mass media today and how the quality in its coverage of law has declined sharply in recent years. He claimed it was if the style of sports coverage had

taken over public affairs coverage. While Denniston expressed disappointment in traditional news reporting, he also felt there was hope in the movement of journalism to the Internet. Internet-based journalism can be a form of citizenjournalism, he said. At the end of his lecture, members of the audience asked questions about the personality of Chief Justice John Roberts, more on his opinion of Bush v. Gore and his predictions for what would become of Proposition 8 in California if the case came to the Supreme Court. Kracaw expressed concern that the Constitution may become a document of exclusion. “He’s right, that almost all of our social issues today can be boiled down to that one ... question: Who’s excluded from the rights that our Constitution guarantees?” Kracaw said. “You can see it in everything from immigration, to gay marriage, to the new mosque and Muslim controversy. That was really cool that he identified that.” Assistant Professor of Political Science Nick Buccola, who helped arrange Denniston’s visit to Linfield, also enjoyed the lecture. “I thought it was fantastic,” Buccola said. “Because [Denniston]’s been cover-

ing the court for so long, it’s almost like he’s a part of the institution.” Buccola said he thought Denniston was the perfect speaker for Constitution Day because of his reverence for the document and because of how critical he is of trends he finds troubling. Denniston has more than 60 years of journalistic experience, 52 of those covering the Supreme Court, since he first started reporting for his local newspaper at age 17. He’s reported for major newspapers along the East Coast, including The Wall Street Journal and The Baltimore Sun. Still an active reporter, Denniston writes for a blog, called SCOTUSblog, that covers the Supreme Court, and he acts as moderator for Supreme Court and Constitution programs at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. Denniston received a degree from the University of Nebraska and a Master of Arts in political science and American history from Georgetown University. He was also inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Washington, D.C., chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists in 2005. To read more of Denniston’s work, visit www.scotusblog.com Braden Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.


News

September 17, 2010

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Poli sci department showcases fresh talent Matthew Sunderland Freelancer Two Linfield political science professors received faculty awards for their dedication and scholarship. Three faculty rewards are given out each year to three different professors, usually in different departments, to award those who have proven their dedication to Linfield’s students and fellow staff This year, however, two of them went to assistant professors of Political Science Patrick Cottrell and Nicholas Buccola. Prestigious as it is that two professor’s from the same department won the awards, the acknowledgment is made even more notable given the fact that both professors have been at Linfield for less time than the majority of their students. Cottrell, who has only been teaching at Linfield since 2008, won the Allan and Pat Kelley Faculty Scholarship Award before the start of the Fall Semester. He said that he felt particularly honored, as the Kelley scholarship does more than simply provide a plaque and bonus. It also relieves the recipient of his or her course load for the following semester.

For a professor who is as focused on research as Cottrell, this comes as a huge advantage. “Time for faculty is a massive commodity … you need time for research, but, of course, teaching always comes first,” Cottrell said. Without classes to teach this semester, Cottrell plans on spending all his time focusing on research, and on the books and articles he is working to publish. Already an accomplished name in academia, he has had articles published in Foreign Policy Analysis, the European Journal of International Relations and International Organization. In addition, he is finishing a book on the legitimacy of international institutions and weapons-ban treatise. Cottrell credited the award to his ability to use his experiences from the professional world in a classroom setting. Before graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a doctorate in political science in 2007, Cottrell served in the State Department’s Bureau of Non-Proliferation and with then-Deleware Senator Joe Biden on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. “Though my experience was a decade ago, it still informs my research and

helps me provide students with connections between the classroom and the world they live in,” he said. Nicholas Buccola, who has been teaching American politics since 2007, also

now bringing in more than 50 people, on average, to each session. This program has been instrumental in increasing campus awareness of politics and international

Our guys winning these awards shows that the department is just as strong as it used to be ... and show we’re on a strong trajectory.

-Dawn Nowacki, chairwoman of the Political Science Department

felt fortunate to receive the Samuel H. Graf Faculty Achievement Award. While not offering a course load relief, the Graf Award will provide him with a monetary bonus and acknowledgment of his extracurricular work in spearheading several new programs at Linfield. Pizza and Politics, a political lecture program that meets a few times a semester, has been Buccola’s brainchild during the last two years, and he is

issues, according to Chairwoman of the Political Science Department, Dawn Nowacki, who said she was thrilled that Buccola took the lead on getting it started. Further, Buccola has also been organizing meetings for the faculty of various departments to come together and share their research with each other. “He kind of knows how to just pick up the ball and run with it,” Nowacki said.

Like Cottrell, Buccola also juggles his teaching and extra-curricular programs with his own research and outside projects. He is finishing up his first book about the prominent 19th century AfricanAmerican orator and abolitionist movement leader Frederick Douglass. In addition, he has been working collaboratively with students on various research projects to both increase the students’ knowledge of research methods as well as his own on various topics. “Linfield doesn’t have a grad program in ‘poli sci,’ so it’s a cool thing to be able to share these collaborative research projects with students,” Buccola said. The two winning professors also stressed that neither of them would have won their awards without the steadfast leadership of Nowacki. Never having won a faculty award herself, Nowacki often comes across as a silent leader, more interested in seeing her students and faculty succeed then winning awards for herself. “If the students are successful then I feel successful,” she said. In 2008, political science department was dealt

a double blow when thenchairman of the department Howard Leichter retired, and former professor David Gutterman left to teach at Willamette University in Portland, Ore. While concerns were raised as to what the losses meant for the future of the department, Nowacki said she believed these concerns have been put to rest with the successes of the department over the last few months. “Our guys winning these awards shows that the department is just as strong as it used to be ... and shows we’re on a strong trajectory,” she said. All three professors hope that the success of Buccola and Cottrell will help the department gain more prestige in the college and across the country. “Hopefully this sends a message that we’re a small but sturdy department excited about teaching and helping students’ work,” said Buccola. The third faculty award, the Edith Green Distinguished Professor Award, went to Garry Killgore, chairman of the Health, Human Performance and Athletics Department.

Matthew Sunderland can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Fall Gathering

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor (Top Right) Freshmen Marissa Cole busses a table after Fall Gathering. Faculty and students were served by Sedexo employees from the catering division. The event was free and held at the Oak Grove. Fall Gathering is an annual event, this, year falling on Sept. 10.

Brianna Reichelt/Freelancer (Top Left) Entertainment was provided by Gil Reynolds and his band. Notable Linfield faculty and staff like Jeff Mackay, associate dean of students and director of Residence Life, attended the get-together.


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Dean: Ferrare’s office to check backgrounds

<< Continued from page 1

to understand the accrediting process, be approachable and have a passion for global arts and Linfield students. Ferrare said that the criteria were not yet prioritized. “Whoever sees the list will probably have different priorities,” he said. “We’ll probably build a list that makes sense for the majority of the people here and use that as our template.” Ferrare and the committee will assemble a pool of candidates — he thinks roughly 40 to 50 to start — and then whittle away the less promising ones until there are only 10 or so. The committee has the final say in any decision. “I don’t get to vote,” Ferrare said. “They do. Of the 40 or 50 candidates, here are 10 we really like. Let’s see if we can get to know them better.” The candidates will then be reduced to three or four in number and invited to campus. President Thomas Hellie will make the final decision. Ferrare said he will be present for the interviews, but his responsibilities are primarily preparation on behalf of the committee.

“I help the committee get ready for these interviews,” he said. “What questions do we ask? I provide them with background information on the candidates. I will have done reference calls and due diligence. I’d have a good understanding of who these people are, what their strengths are, if they have any weaknesses and what they might be, and what their reputation is. That’s my responsibility.” The Association of Governing Bodies will also conduct an extensive background check, including criminal and records and credit checks. “We make sure they are citizens of good standing,” Ferrare said. Ferrare, in addition to being the senior vice president of the Association of Governing Bodies, is a senior consultant at Academic Search, Inc. He joined in 2000, according to the association’s website. He is a graduate of Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, where he earned a doctorate in educational administration before becoming the dean of education at Drake University. Braden Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.

News

September 17, 2010

News in brief Police seek potential witness in assault McMinnville police are looking for a vehicle whose occupants may have witnessed an assault of a 10-year-old girl. An e-mail from the police, forwarded to the McMinnville campus, describes the witness’s vehicle as a gray or black truck that come from the direction of Fellows Street. The witness’s vehicle was forced to stop until the girl removed herself and her bicycle from the road, according to the e-mail. The assault was allegedly carried out by two males in their late teens wearing hooded sweatshirts who abandoned their assault when the witness’ vehicle arrived, the e-mail said. The suspects were driving a gray or black four door sedan or similar vehicle with damage on the driver’s side and rear fender. No similar incidents like have been reported in McMinnville recently. The girl was on Westvale Street. Anyone in the area with information is encouraged by the police department to contact detective Bill Christensen at 503-435-3495.

Pop-Tart perils Senior Frank Martin caused a stir in Dana Hall Sept. 16. At 10 p.m., he said he accidently cooked a Pop-Tart for a full minute, causing the fire alarm to go off and unleashing billows of smoke in Rm. 21 of Dana Hall. Junior Joshua Rives said students evacuated the room, and Linfield College Campus Public Safety officer James Dossett arrived within five minutes. He said that Dossett checked the building for other students. Martin said that Dossett was unable to access Dana 22 to verify if there were students still in the building. Dossett said he had difficulty opening the door at first because he was using an utdated key. He said he figured out which key to use and confirmed that no students remained in Dana 22. Sophomore Karen Cole said that the McMinnville fire department arrived at approximately 10:10 p.m. and checked the building for fire hazards before letting students back in at approximately 10:20 p.m.

Linfield graduate joins Teach for America Continuing her work with children and the homeless, Nadia Abraibesh, class of ’10, will join Teach for America, an organization founded in 1990 by Princetop University undergradute Wendy Kopp. The organization seeks to end poverty and homelessness

in the U.S. by educating those who could not normally acquire an education. Abraibesh will first spend a year in Libya to further her study of Arabic and forge ties with her father’s family. Abraibesh, a psychology major, competed against 46,359

applicants to seize one of 4,500 available positions. The application process included an online application, a telephone interview, the presentation of a lesson plan, a personal interview and a written test. There was also a monitored group discussion.

~ Complied by Joshua Ensler


September 17, 2010

Features

Photo courtsey of Megan Bahrt Freshmen Natalie Groat and Angela Taylor, sophomore Briana Brewer, Associate Director of the Counseling Center Dawn Williamson, Office Coordinator for the Office of Career and Community Sevices and the Counseling Center Tami Harrell and sophomore Megan Bahrt clap in sign language at the “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” build at Oregon School for the Deaf on Sept.13.

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Photo courtsey of Megan Bahrt Sophomore Briana Brewer, “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” host Ty Pennington, sophomore Megan Bahrt and and Office Coordinator for the Office of Career and Community Sevices and the Counseling Center Tami Harrell snap a quick photo together before hurrying back to work Sept.13.

Signing in salem:

Students help out at reality tv build by Kelley Hungerford/Editor-in-chief

It

was a weekend of hard hats, plastic skeletons, Ty Pennington and Deaf culture for some Linfield students, who travelled to Salem on Sept. 26 and 27 to participate in a project for “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition,” a reality TV series that provides renovations for the less-fortunate, at Oregon School for the Deaf. Armed with hard hats and bright blue T-shirts, a group of about 10 Linfield American Sign Language students joined nearly 1,000 local volunteers working around the clock at OSD, hustling to build a new boy’s dormitory and refurbish the school’s popular fundraiser, a haunted house called The Nightmare Factory. “We ended up just actually using our signing abilities to help the actual work staff of [‘EMHE’] and the Deaf volunteers,” sophomore Megan Bahrt, ASL Club president, said about their Monday evening trip. The students mostly worked interpreting ASL for workers and directing Deaf people at the reveal Monday night trip. Part of the Linfield group also witnessed the haunted house reveal, where community members bought $50 tickets to get into the house, in total raising $12,500 for the nonprofit organization Friends of OSD, according to a Sept. 14 article in the Statesman Journal, Salem’s local newspaper. Linfield volunteers also spent Sunday and Monday mornings from midnight to 6 a.m. helping construction workers clean up, guarding entrances to the site and performing miscellaneous touch-ups. As a matter of fact, the students drove south without knowing whether they’d be allowed in. “So many people had tried to volunteer and then couldn’t and were turned away,” Dawn Williamson, associate director of the counseling center and a student of the ASL conversation class, said. Williamson said they were able to volunteer because of their knowledge in ASL, which enabled them to interpret instructions for the Deaf community. One Deaf woman that she was directing around the site actually thought Williamson was Deaf, too. “She turns around and says, ‘Thank you. It’s so nice to see a Deaf volunteer,’ and then she turns around before I can get her attention and say, ‘No, no, no, no, no!’” Williamson said, laughing. Junior Greg Larson arrived in Salem at midnight on Monday. Although not an ASL student, Larson was invited to volunteer by a friend in an ASL class. He said he didn’t know what to expect. “I didn’t know how long the project had been going on, so I didn’t know if we would be digging holes for pipes or putting pillows on couches,” Larson said. “When we got there, the guy pointed to a building and said, ‘Four days ago, this was a field.’” But volunteers and “EMHE” staff had transformed the vacant lot. The sustainable dormitory featured a solar-panel roof and was already painted and furnished. The field was landscaped with trees and other plants, and bike racks were scattered

about the area. All materials for the project, which cost more than $1 million, were donated, according to a Sept. 14 article in the Statesman Journal. Larson said he painted planters made from recycled tires and moved plastic skeletons and a car full of taxidermic animals. A student in Elementary ASL I, freshman Angela Taylor, said she brought clothes into the dormitory and organized the closets. “You’d walk into trailers and get stuff and there would be people passed out, just sleeping, taking these 30-minute power naps,” Taylor said. Fred Farrior, Linfield’s adjunct professor of ASL, has a personal connection with the project. He lived in the old OSD boy’s dormitory during middle and high schools and taught at the school for 28 years. “The dorm looked like a hospital because there was too [much] white wall to wall and no carpets,” he said in an e-mail. “[The new dorm] should affect the Deaf boys [with] feeling more comfortable and learning and studying better.” Farrior alerted his classes of the event as a means of completing an assignment requiring students to participate in a Deafrelated event. But homework aside, he said this was an excellent experiential opportunity for students to learn about Deaf culture. “[Students] have definitely been inspired to look further into ASL arts in the realm of music, comedy, acting and performance poetry,” Farrior said in an e-mail. “These will only serve to enrich their ASL education.” Taylor said helping people communicate was the most significant part of the experience. She described a situation with a Deaf woman named Connie. “She was really sweet and saying how people couldn’t understand her there, and she was happy to have us just to say where she grew up and [have] random conversation,” Taylor said. As for Larson, he said the experience gave him a bit of hope. “It was nice to go out and meet a whole bunch of people who I didn’t know and see that they were nice and intelligent and helpful,” Larson said. “My faith in just the general public was restored.” Bahrt said she hopes to use the experience as a springboard to other ASL events. “You gain from those people who aren’t your teachers,” she said. Bahrt said she also plans to learn “The Star-Spangled Banner” in sign and have the club perform it at a football game. All the volunteers said they are excited to visit the haunted house and watch the episode, which airs on Halloween night. Williamson said she hopes to organize a screening of the show through ASL Club. You can also experience The Nightmare Factory on Oct. 8-9, 15-16 and 22-31. Admission is $10. Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


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Features

September 17, 2010

Giving back in Mac

by Jessica Prokop/Culture editor Linfield College’s Community Service Center received good news this year with the awarding of 30 AmeriCorps Students in Service (SIS) member slots, which is three times more than last year, to distribute for the 2010-2011 school year. The aim of the SIS program is to appoint college students as parttime AmeriCorps members to engage in volunteer service in an attempt to create a group of students concentrated on strengthening their own leadership skills while making positive contributions to the community. SIS will give 30 students the opportunity to obtain an educational scholarship worth $1,132 to go toward tuition, loans, graduate school, etc., if they complete at least 300 hours of community service during the course of one year. Students who are eligible for SIS include regular basis service volunteers, those working in community service positions through Federal Work Study, part-time or full-time student teachers and service-related academic interns as well as those completing service learning projects with nonprofit organizations. SIS is not the only way that students can get involved with community service opportunities. For students that already have a lot going on, dedicating as little as one hour a week to one organization has an amazing impact on the community, Community Service Coordinator Jessica Wade said. Another benefit of community service is that it can be done individually or in a group. In fact, Linfield has several clubs that dedicate

Linfield students volunteer in a community garden.

time to different community service projects. Some of these clubs include Circle K, an international community service club; Global Action, which focuses on local and international poverty and hunger; and Habitat for Humanity, which collaborates with the local Habitat chapter. The Community Service Center also has specific days of the month set up with community organiazations for students to volunteer. In addition, service days such as Global Youth Day, Taste of Service and Martin Luther King, Jr., Day are organized throughout the year for students to participate in. “Service provides students with a good hands-on opportunity outside of the classroom with real world experience, and at the same time gives back to the community,” Wade said. “It’s mutually beneficial.” Other ways to get involved in group community service are through membership in Greek Life and honors societies, such as Service Patriotism Understanding Sacrifice (SPURS) and Alpha Lambda Delta. “We aren’t just focused on producing students and workers. We want them to develop civic and leadership skills to become positive contributors to the community,” Wade said. To learn more about coming service opportunities visit www.linfield.edu/ccs/. To learn more about SIS, attend an informational session at 4 p.m. Sept. 22 in Walker 203 or contact Wade in Walker 124. For a full list of SIS positions visit www.linfield.edu/ccs/community-service/.

Photo courtesy of Lizzie Martinez


Features

September 17, 2010

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Photo courtesy of Lizzie Martinez The 2010 Alternative Spring Break Team served in Tacoma, Wash., with the Tacoma Area Habitat for Humanity.

SOLV Beach Clean Up

SMART Program

When: Sept. 25 Where: Oregon beaches, lakes and rivers What: Oregon volunteers spanning from the Washington to California borders will be participating in the fall Stop Oregon Litter and Vandalism Clean Up, picking up debris along the waterways. This is the program’s first clean up expansion. SOLV has a clean up every fall and spring, but this is the first time that it is moving it inland. How to get involved: Sign up in the CIC in the Riley Student Center. Transportation to the event will be provided.

When: Times will be scheduled after the application has been approved. Where: At Newby, Buel, Grandhaven and Columbus elementary schools. What: Start Making a Reader Today is a program that aims to improve elementary students’ reading skills. Volunteers will dedicate a couple of hours a week to read to a few children. How to get involved: Visit Wade in Walker 124 and fill out the online application at www.getsmartoregon.org/. Click on the “Volunteer” tab, then “Volunteer Now.”

St. Barnabas Soup Kitchen

Grand Families of Yamhill County

When: 3:40 to 6:15 p.m., Sept. 29 and Nov. 3 Where: St. Barnabas Episcopal Church. The church is located at 822 S.W. 2nd St, McMinnville, Ore. What: Students will serve dinner at the soup kitchen from 4 to 6 p.m. on the first and fifth Wednesdays of the month. The kitchen needs six to eight volunteers to help serve the hot meals that they prepare. How to get involved: Visit Wade in Walker 124 or call Howie Harkema between noon and 6:00 pm on Monday, Wednesday or Friday at 503-472-3711. Volunteer sign up forms can be found on the church’s website: www.stbarnabasmcminnville.com/soup.htm.

When: Every second Tuesday of the month from 6 to 8 p.m. Where: The Newberg Chapter located at Newberg Christian Center, 2315 Villa Rd, Newberg, Ore. What: Grand Families of Yamhill County is a chapter of the Grand Families program. It is a support group that is open to grandparents and other relatives that are raising children. It meets once a month for an information session and potluck. Volunteers watch the children in the church’s playroom, while the group meets. How to get involved: Contact Lilly or Jim Pinneo at 503-537-0458 for more information.

Taste of Service

Homeward Bound Pets

When: 8 a.m. to noon, Sept. 18 Where: Meet in the Fred Meyer Lounge What: An opportunity for freshmen and transfer students to fulfill their Colloquium Final Project requirement while serving the local community at the same time. Upperclassmen are welcome to participate as well but will be used as project group leaders. No community service experience is necessary to lead a group. Service project locations include: Salvation Army Community Garden, Linfield Community Garden, Yamhill Community Action Partnership (YCAP) Regional Food Bank, YCAP Food Drive at local grocery stores and three different farms. The event runs on a schedule so students can only choose one project for the day. Breakfast will be provided. How to get involved: Sign up at the Taste of Service website: www. linfield.edu/ccs/community-service/tasteofservice.html.

When: Individual volunteer times are scheduled. Where: Located at 10605 SE Loop Rd. Dayton, Ore. Highway 18, a half mile east of the Evergreen Aviation Museum. What: Homeward Bound Pets is a nonprofit organization that serves Yamhill County. Volunteers can participate in an array of tasks including cleaning and sanitizing, social work grooming and interacting with the animals, or taking part as a regular basis worker. How to get involved: Volunteer applications are available at the Homeward Bound Pets website: www.hbpets.org/volunteer.phponline. Applications must be submitted and approved before volunteering. Orientations are regularly done and require the volunteer’s attendance.

Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


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Culture

September 17, 2010

Icebreaker tries to shatter awkwardness Gabrielle Nygaard Staff reporter The Department of Theatre and Communications Arts kicked off its 2010-11 theater season with its annual Student Icebreaker, which features two plays remounted from last spring’s Advanced Directing Scenes. The scenes are from “The Vagina Monologues,” written by Eve Ensler, and “Dutchman,” a one-act written by LeRoi Jones. “We thought these two pieces from the advanced directing showcase were not only representative of good student work but also were plays that needed to be seen by more of the student population at Linfield,” Janet Gupton, associate professor of theatre arts and resident director, said via e-mail. “Both are ground breaking pieces of theater for their time and still manage to surprise, shock and, hopefully, educate audiences today.” Gupton said that an additional reason for this decision was because all of the actors from the scenes would be returning in the fall, allow-

ing for the Icebreaker to occur earlier in the semester and show incoming students what the theater program has to offer. The Icebreaker opens with 16 scenes from “The Vagina Monologues,” directed by senior Steven Stewart. The scenes feature senior Bree Adams and sophomores McKenna Peterson, Laura Haspel and Ellen Hubbs. The scenes run the gamut of the female experience, Stewart said, using the vagina as a metaphor for femininity and the female in the modern world in scenes dealing with topics from genital mutilation to the production’s pinnacle scene about the power of birth. Other than reworking the lights and costumes for the scenes since the spring production, the actresses have grown into their characters as well as grown as individuals, making for deeper connections and stronger messages, Stewart said. “I hope it gets men to understand more about the female experience and women to be more comfortable talking about these

things,” he said. “Once we get people to share they have a heightened sense of self when we get past the awkwardness society has placed on [the subject].” Following “The Vagina Monologues” is the one-act play “Dutchman,” directed by 2010 Linfield graduate Will DeBiccari. “Dutchman” depicts a scene in a subway car with a white woman, played by senior Grace Beckett, and a young black man, played by senior Tristan Patin. The woman makes vulgar advances toward the man, and when they’re unsuccessful, she resorts to insults and humiliation. The man’s veneer of decency then shatters as the scene dissolves into racially charged anger and, ultimately, violence. “Dutchman” and “The Vagina Monologues” are both connect with the audi-

Danyelle Myers/Freelancer Top: (Clockwise from far left) Sophomores McKenna Peterson and Ellen Hubbs, senior Bree Adams and sophomore Laura Haspel perform in “The Vagina Monologues” at a dress rehearsal. Bottom: Seniors Tristan Patin and Grace Beckett rehearse for a scene from “Dutchman.” ence and aim to expose the audience to things that people feel uncomfortable talking about, but need to talk

about, Stewart said. The Student Icebreaker runs at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 16-18 in Marshall Theatre. Tick-

ets are $5 and all seating is general admission. Gabrielle Nygaard can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


September 17, 2010

Culture

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Professor discusses gender and Buddhist nuns Jaffy Xiao Features editor All seats were filled in Riley 201 for an anthropology professor’s Sept. 15 speech about gender identity of Buddhist nuns. “Buddhist nuns believe in reincarnation and, through instruction and meditation, strive to become males in their next lives,” Hillary Crane, assistant professor of anthropology, said Sept.15 in her lecture called “The Gender Identities of Taiwanese Buddhist Nuns.” She described her field work in Taiwan.

She said she had meditation class in Taizhong, retreats at various monasteries and lived with a large monastic community. A total of 75 percent of the monastery was made up of nuns, 25 percent were monks and there were 60 children, whose parents were also Buddhist but lived apart elsewhere. Crane explained one of her field work questions: Why are Buddhist nuns who have renounced the world “becoming” men? In the lecture, she explained an example of why males are better at being Buddhist. One day,

in a 100-person meditation class, an abbot asked the class members if they had children. Almost everyone raised their hands. Then the abbot asked if they remembered their children’s birthday. Only half of them — all women — raised their hands. all women. The abbot said women are easily bogged down by details, such as this. Crane said there are a lot of negative stereotypes in Taiwan about women “at home.” The reason a lot of young women become nuns and renounce the world or became “chujia” (and leave home) is that they want

a meaningful life. At the same time, these women notice that life in the “outside world” is not harsh to women, and it requires too much work to be a woman. In contrast, Buddhism encourages masculinity as a goal and lets those women behave like men, which means having male characteristics in a female body. “I can see why it can be a pressure to exchange sex, but it’s still sad leaving home,” junior Denisse Chacon said. “No one should be forced into an identity.” Within anthropology theory, Crane said gender

is a cultural construction based on perceived sexual differences. “In pre-modern China, there was only a woman category at home, such as mother and daughter, and the general woman term Nuxing appeared in recent centuries,” Carne said. “Nuns and monks call each other ‘Shixiong’ (dharma brother) without sexual significance.” After the lecture, Christopher Keaveney, associate professor of Japanese and co-chair of the Department of Modern Languages, said this non-mainstream topic is unique for him as the

number of attendees surprised him. He also said Crane did a good job on the presentation, which was knowledgeable and understandable for different audiences who are interested in anthropology and East Asian culture. Starting this fieldwork as graduate school project, Crane has been in Taiwan three times and for more than two years. After receiving a doctorate in anthropology at Brown University, she is still involved in the topic with several publications. Jaffy Xiao can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.

Gathering to see ‘Greek’

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor Students gather in the IM Field to watch “Get Him to the Greek,” the first successful outdoor movie Linfield has held in years, Sept. 11.


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Entertainment

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September 17, 2010

2010 VMAs Punk band displays Mac talent attract record audience Philip Yovetich KSLC 90.3 FM

Timothy Marl Staff reporter It started with pure blackness, the crowd cheering, and then the spotlight started to shine. Eminem began rapping “Not Afraid,” and the crowd went wild. What appeared to be an enclosed club soon turned into a huge stage filled with thousands of people. It wasn’t long before Rihanna joined him to sing “Love the Way You Lie.” The Video Music Awards had begun. According to MTV.com, this year’s VMAs were viewed by 11.4 million people, making it the biggest audience on MTV since 2002. This year’s host was Chelsea Handler, who is known for not being afraid to say what is on her mind. Let’s just say that she put vagina and Justin Bieber in the same sentence. Of course the host’s words were not the only shocking thing that happened. There were also Lady Gaga’s outfits. One appeared to be a re-imagining of a peacock. One was long and black and included a thorny headpiece. Although it was at the end of the awards ceremony, when she accepted Video of the Year, where she wore a dress made out of meat. Yes, you read it right: meat. Still, Lady Gaga was the big winner of the night, walking away with eight awards including Best Female Video, Best Pop Video and Best Choreography. Other winners included, Justin Bieber for Best New Artist, Eminem for Best Hip-Hop and Male videos and 30 Seconds to Mars for

Best Rock Video. This year’s performances included an awesome trio of B.O.B., Paramore and Bruno Mars. Taylor Swift sang a new song inspired by what happened between her and Kanye West last year. Linkin Park’s performance at Griffith Observatory was also screened at the VMAs. Usher sang two hits featuring multiple dance numbers. Then Justin Bieber “sang” and did a solo drum set, which, I admit, was a little impressive. There was also a performance by Florence + The Machine, which was interesting to watch, despite them not being known by a big audience. No one could forget the ending performance by Kanye West, who debuted his new song “Runaway.” The lyrics included, “Let’s have a toast for the douche bags, let’s have a toast for the [explicit word], let’s have a toast for the scum bags.” This song could be interpreted in many ways and some considered it West’s comeback to the music industry although others probably still hate him. This year’s VMAs had its share of humor, shock and glamour. Compared with the other years, this one was more entertaining and definitely more talked about considering it had a great deal of views on television. If you are already excited for next year’s VMAs (some might be), there is a chance to win tickets, just check it out on MTV.

It is our duty at KSLC to provide you with a quality radio experience. Along with bringing you top-notch music and information around the clock on 90.3 FM (listen to it, it’ll change your life), it is also our job to keep you up to date with new, rising and regional musical artists through weekly music reviews. Now, I know some of you are startled and, yes, may be even scared. Local music? Like, McMinnville? McMinnville, Ore.? No. Never. Not possible! Music is a cultural thing, and the closest we get to culture here is 3rd Street, a statue of a deadbeat Ben Franklin and a parade about UFOs. Yes, this maybe true, but doesn’t Jack Ruby Presents count as a McMinnville band? Or how about current Linfield sensation, singer/ songwriter Jeremy Moll, a fine musician always eager to collaborate with musicians in the area? To those of you who are still skeptical, today I prove you wrong. Good music can come from McMinnville. Today, it comes in the form of Pete Deegan, who left the area more than a decade ago. But I promise you, ladies and gentlemen of Linfield College, tomorrow, he’s coming back. (Break for thunderous applause) That’s right, folks, today’s CD review is not unlike the great vineyards of our area — got roots right here in Yamhill County. The band is a female-

Photo courtesy of www.cdbaby.com Hooray For Everything will be performing at the Deluxe Billiard Parlor on 3rd Street at 8 p.m. Sept.18. fronted, melodic punk trio from Oakland, Calif., called Hooray For Everything (HFE) featuring singer and guitarist Faith Gardiner, drummer Jamie Sanitate and McMinnville’s own Pete Deegan on bass. They will be playing at 8 p.m. Sept. 18 at the Deluxe Billiard Parlor on 3rd Street. (Told you, 3rd Street is happenin’.) Our involvement with this band started about a week ago when KSLC was sent a CD, accompanied by a note describing the band’s connection to the town and how it will soon be going out of its way to play the Mac (McMinnville not being the regular stop on punk circuits). Included in the note was a request to do a bit of promoting for the CD and the upcoming show. So we did just that. Over the past week, HFE has been getting some decent airplay on our dear radio station, and hopefully this article will shed some light on the band and perhaps convince

some of you more stubborn Linfield kids to get off your “tuckuses” (tucki?) and go out and see some stuff. The CD in question is HFE’s 2009 self-titled debut. The band was created when Faith, Jamie and then-bassist Oscar joined forces and combined their musical talents (and taste for quirky “Simpsons” jokes), resulting in the recording of their lessthan-30-minute, power-pop record. Female-fronted punk acts always seem to have a leg up on the competition, and HFE is no exception. Faith’s voice conjures up memories of Sleater-Kinney. Although cute, smug and comfortable (“I Don’t Agree With Me”), her voice also commands attention, whether in the lethargically sultry pleadings of “Get A Life,” or in the strained shouts of “Cronander.” Although she may not have the “Two-PackOf-Camels-a-Day-BrodyArmstrong” voice, she still has listeners’ full attention

the whole way through the album. While the guitar work may just be there to support the vocals and the music may be fairly standard punk, the drums are intricate and imaginative and the bass does a stellar job moving the music onward in fun and exciting ways. Although not the original bassist, Pete has had more than enough experience in rock music. He listened to KSLC growing up in McMinnville, which is how he was first introduced to alternative rock acts such as The Cure and The Clash. He then attended Mac High and started listening to punk, branching out to classics such as Minor Threat and Poison Idea. He graduated from McMinnville High School with the class of ’92, but not before putting on one of the first punk shows in McMinnville. After spending time in Portland, where he moved upon graduation, he moved down to California with his wife. It was there that he heard HFE on the UC Berkeley radio station, KALX (see, isn’t college radio a beautiful thing?), and eventually was introduced to the band. When Oscar left the band, Pete took up his mantle. See Pete along with the rest of the band play Sept. 18 at the Deluxe Billiard Parlor. In fact, while you’re at it, pick up a CD. HFE’s more than worth it, and that way, you can prove that, yes, good music can come from McMinnville.

Philip Yovetich can be reached at kslcmusic@gmail.com.

Timothy Marl can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Jenny Worcester/Illustrator


Sports

September 17, 2010

Fellows pulls another hat trick for Wildcat win Corrina Crocker Sports editor The women’s soccer team dominated its first conference game against Willamette University on Sept. 15. The women ended the game with a score of 4-1, as Willamette sophomore Irene Vazquez scored a goal off of a pass with 8 minutes left in the game to keep Linfield from handing the Bearcats a shutout. Freshman Emily Fellows took the lead for goals scored as well as shots on goal for both teams. Fellows had a total of eight shots on goal and also earned her third hat trick for Linfield. “I feel good about having success this early in the season, but I couldn’t have done any of it without the rest of team,” Fellows said. Senior Kelsey Hassleblad agreed with Fellows

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about a team effort. “We have some awesome freshmen that have picked up the level of play on the field,” Hassleblad said. “Our team chemistry is awesome and even half of our starters being newcomers — it seems as though we’ve been together for years.” This year the women’s team has high expectations with a large senior class and a talented freshman class. “This is the most talented freshman class to come through the Linfield Women’s soccer program,” head coach Dominic Doty said. “The future of our women’s soccer program is very bright.” Doty is in his second year with the women’s team. With such success after last year and a turn around from the year prior, Doty said he knows what the team should strive to

achieve. “Last year’s team set the stage for this year. As a program, we have changed the culture of soccer at Linfield,” Doty said. “Because

of that, our team this year is very hungry. They realize what they are capable and won’t settle for anything less.” After displaying suc-

cess as a team throughout preseason and the conference opener, the women’s team still faces the rest of Northwest Conference. The women will be traveling

Now wait just a sheepstealing minute. What? Man am I sick of fans, players and coaches running their mouths when they don’t have the stats or skill to back it up. Maybe I’m just touchy after hearing so many of Rex Ryan’s baseless Super Bowl predictions for his team which is led by a quarterback that couldn’t even slide without being taught by a major-league baseball coach. Or maybe I’m just incredibly partisan, seeing as I’ve bled yellow and green since I was old enough to say, “Go Ducks!” But in any case, let’s compare and contrast these two teams for a second. Let’s begin on defense, shall we? The Ducks delivered a shutout in their season opener in the ever-raucous Autzen Stadium. In their second game, on the road in a stadium that seats more than 100,000 people and is one of college football’s most difficult venues, they shut out Tennessee in the second half. This is a team that has the potential to finish in the top half of its division in the SEC, mind you. The Ducks

amassed six turnovers in those two games and gave up only 13 total points. The Beavers got beat on a neutral field. They gave up 453 yards of offense and 30 points while only collecting two turnovers. “But Chris,” I can hear the OSU fans cry, “our game was against a team ranked fourth in the country! That’s not even comparable!” Yeah, OK, the team ranked fourth in the country ... that plays in the Mountain West Conference. How can you not go undefeated every season when you have even half a decent team and you get to play Southern Methodist and San Diego State every year? Got to watch out for Colorado State; they could spring a big upset any year now! Sorry, let me get a mop for all the sarcasm dripping from my mouth right now. What about offense? In case you missed it, “Beaver Believers,” if you look up “offense” in the dictionary, Chip Kelly’s name is the first definition. The Ducks have put up 1,167 yards of offense in their first two games. You could maybe hit those num-

bers in two contests if you were playing a video game with cheat codes on. The Beavers, meanwhile, mustered only 255 yards against Texas Christian. “But Chris,” the critics cry out again, “we’re breaking in a rookie quarterback this year! That isn’t fair to say!” Um, two words for you: Darron Thomas. You know, that Oregon quarterback who made his first start this season? Yeah, he’s passed for 422 yards and four touchdowns with only one interception so far. The rookie argument doesn’t hold water when you remember both teams are starting fresh boys under center. Oh, and Ryan Katz, the OSU quarterback? He was last seen blowing a snap count with the game on the line against TCU and failing to stop the football from rolling into the end zone for a safety. Whoopsie! But all of this ignores an important, obvious issue that OSU has this year. Here’s what I’ve been building to thus far — the reason why I think the Beavers are a sinking ship this season and

why the Ducks are a total lock to blow out the Civil War in Corvallis this year: All the teams have to do to stop OSU is to stop Jacquizz Rodgers. The Beavers are the most one-dimensional offensive team in the Pac10; with an untested quarterback under the gun and not taking charge like Sean Canfield did last year, Quizz is the workhorse. Sure, his brother James Rodgers is a boss and without question and should be first team AllPac 10 this year, but he has to catch passes from Katz to get those yards and scores. The Horned Frogs smothered Quizz and the OSU running game, allowing them only 73 yards on the ground, and forced the Beavers to beat them in the air. They didn’t. Conversely, look at the Ducks. LaMichael James is our No. 1 back. Last season, he smashed the rookie rushing record in the Pac-10 that Quizz set a year prior. This season, with James out for the first game, our No. 2 back Kenjon Barner scored five touchdowns and amassed 225 all-purpose yards. The Ducks are so

13

Victor Zhu/Freelancer Freshman Danielle Scott takes on a Willamette University player in the women’s conference opener at home Sept. 15. The Wildcats won, 4-1. to Tacoma, Wash. to play Pacific Lutheran University on Sept. 19. Corrina Crocker can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Earth to Beaver fans: Ducks are for real

Sports Commentary Chris Forrer Freelancer In the week following Oregon State’s 21-30 loss to No. 4 Texas Christian University and again after the now-No. 5 Ducks’ 48-13 victory over Tennessee last weekend, I’ve seen nonstop hate pour from the Beaver faithful around me. The Ducks, these fans say, aren’t legit; they don’t deserve their ranking; heck, they even say the Beavers are the better team. Somehow, despite their own team getting soundly beaten by a much better opponent (sort of...more on that later), these ignorant folks have the stones to call out the Ducks as being the worse team of the two.

stacked on offense that our fourth-string quarterback, Daryle Hawkins, was running in touchdowns against New Mexico’s first-string defense in the season opener. Translation: Watch out OSU. The hurt is coming, and it’s coming fast. Dec. 4 probably seems like it’s too soon already. Prediction time! Considering Oregon’s conference schedule will present only two true tests, the first hosting Stanford with the red-hot Andrew Luck under center, and the second on the road against USC, I’m betting Oregon walks into Reser Stadium in December with a 10-1 or 11-0 record and will likely be ranked in the Top 3. OSU, which goes on the road against No. 3 Boise State, No. 24 Arizona and No. 19 Stanford and hosts No. 18 USC, will probably be a four-or-five loss team by then. My projected final score? 48-14, Ducks. Get your handkerchiefs and comfort food ready, Beaver fans: This one’s gonna be ugly. Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


14

Sports

www.linfieldreview.com

Football: Firsthalf drive halted by Kingsmen << Continued from page 16

and Kingsmen running back Bobby Rodriguez blasted in for a touchdown on the following play to go up 7-0. Boehme finished the day with 361 yards in the air and four touchdowns, but was intercepted three times and lost a fumble. These are uncharacteristic numbers for the defending Northwest Conference Offensive player of the year, who went several games at a time last season without surrendering a turnover. “I’m very disappointed with my performance. I just need to get the job done and take care of the football,” Boehme said. Linfield answered with a 71-yard drive of its own, capped by a 1-yard charge into the end zone by senior running back Taylor Avritt to tie the score at seven apiece. Boehme’s woes continued with another interception on the ’Cats’ next drive, but junior cornerback Taylor Skore picked off a CLU pass shortly after to bring the offense back on the field. From there the Wildcats took control of the half. Linfield scored on three successive drives, capped by 18-, 21- and 27-yard touchdown strikes to junior Deidre Wiersma, Avritt and junior Buddy Saxon, respectively. After Moser scored his first touchdown, a 1-yard scamper with about two minutes left in the half, the Wildcats led 28-14. “Offensively I’d give us a ‘B’ in the first half,” junior center Hayden Mace said. “We marched the ball down their throats the entire first half, and realistically the game should’ve been 42-7 at halftime.” Mace was one of three offensive linemen who got a career start last Saturday. Others included seniors Ikaika Kaninau and Travis Tocher. The offensive line protected

Boehme in the first half, but as CLU began to fight back in the second half, things began to unravel. “We were beaten man-toman on offense,” Smith said. “I was not pleased with how our offensive line played, and that’s something that will get better.” Following punts by both teams, the Kingsmen surge began with a 29-yard field goal by CLU junior kicker Jackson Damron. On Linfield’s next drive, a Boehme pass from scrimmage at the Wildcat 40-yard line was tipped, intercepted and ran back 45 yards for a touchdown. The score stood at 28-23, Wildcats. “CLU’s rushing attack really took off in the second half,” Avritt said. “And their defense brought the pressure to Boehme, too.” The Kingsmen struck again less than a minute after the fourth quarter and took the lead for the first time at 31-28. The Wildcats answered on a 71-yard explosion by junior running back Aaron Williams to set up a 1-yard touchdown run on an ensuing play. The ’Cats would not find the end zone again until the game’s closing minutes, and Boehme was sacked twice in the final period. “I felt very sick at the end of the game when I looked at Boehme’s jersey and saw how dirty it was,” Mace said. “Our goal up front is to keep him off the ground, and we didn’t do a very good job of that in the second half on Saturday.” CLU added a 42-yard field goal and two touchdown runs by Moser of 45 and 49 yards to buff their lead to 47-35. The ’Cats’ last real chance to change the game, with 3 minutes, 35 seconds left on the clock. It ended with a Boehme sack and fumble, which was recovered by Kingsmen junior defender Sean Post. Boehme would score again, with 28 seconds left, on a 28-yard pass to

September 17, 2010

Photo courtesy of Kelly Bird Junior Deidre Wiersma jumps to battle for the catch against California Lutheran University on Sept. 11. Linfield lost, 42-47, in the second half. freshman receiver Conner Varnell. Despite the loss, there were many positive notes to take from the contest. Smith said racking up more than 500 yards of total offense and over 40 points is always a good thing. But, he added there were many problems with fundamentals that he intends to fix in the coming two weeks before the Wildcats go on the road again Sept. 25 to University of La Verne in California. “I questioned our readiness a bit,” Smith said. “Midweek, I was concerned we weren’t up to full intensity. We had some over-exertion issues, and once the game turned into a dogfight many of these things came to the surface.” With a painful loss under their belts, the Wildcats will use the game and the feelings it produced as motivation as

Danyelle Myers/Freelancer Wildcats’ run offensive drills to prepare for games against University of La Verne on Sept. 25 and Willamette University on Oct. 2 at home. the season goes on. “I won’t forget that feel-

ing as we prepare for the rest of the season,” Mace said.

Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Wildcat sports schedule Sport

Date

Opponent or event

Location

Time

Cross country

Sept. 17

Willamette Grass Course

Salem, Ore.

Noon

Volleyball

Sept. 17

Willamette

Salem, Ore.

7 p.m.

Women’s golf

Sept. 18-19

Pacific Invitational

Quail Valley, Ore.

Noon

Men’s golf

Sept. 18-19

Pacific Inviational

Quail Valley, Ore.

Noon

Men’s soccer

Sept. 18

Puget Sound

Tacoma, Wash.

2:30 p.m.

Men’s soccer

Sept. 19

Pacific Lutheran

Tacoma, Wash.

2:30 p.m.

Women’s soccer

Sept 19

Pacific Lutheran

Tacoma, Wash.

Noon


Sports

September 17, 2010

www.linfieldreview.com

15

High hopes for new coach amid lawsuit Chris Forrer Freelancer After a string of sub-par seasons, the Linfield women’s basketball team looks to its new head coach Robin Potera-Haskins to turn the program around and continue the school’s tradition of academic and athletic excellence. This summer, a hiring committee comprising athletic director Scott Carnahan; men’s basketball coach Larry Doty; Chairman of the Health, Human, Performance and Athletics Department Garry Killgore; senior woman administrator Dawn Graff-Haight; and several members of the women’s basketball team screened many candidates before deciding on its choice for the new head coach. Among the finalists was former interim coach Casey Kushiyama who helmed the team for the past two seasons. “Coach Kusiyama did a fine job as interim coach,” Carnahan said. “He was certainly among our top three choices.” Haskins brings a veritable treasure trove of experience to the court with more than 20 years of work as a coach. She got her first

head coaching job at Wilmer-Hutchins High School, where she coached for seven years. Despite being the youngest head coach in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area at the time, Haskins won three district championships and led her squad to a consistent top-10 ranking in the state. “What is unique about her [Haskins] is her ability to turn around sagging programs,” Carnahan said. “In every program she’s entered, they’ve seen a drastic change in win-loss percentage and recruiting.” From there, Haskins coached at Austin College for five years, winning three conference championships and competing in three national title games; Texas-Westlyan University; Division I Montana State University; Louisiana College; and, most recently, Palm Beach Atlantic University. At Montana State, she won two conference championships and upset Baylor University one season prior to its national championship. In addition to her achievements on the court, Haskins kept her players first and foremost focused on its academic lives “At Austin College and Texas-Westylan, we were

Sports Briefs Cross-country starts slow Men’s and women’s cross-country started the season with two meets each. The teams no longer have the talents of Marci Klimek, Shawn Fisher or Chris McIssacs, all class of ’10, although McIssacs is back as an assistant coach for the 2010-11 season. The teams finished third out of four schools at the Lewis & Clark Invitational on Sept. 11. They also lost at the Lewis & Clark/Linfield Dual on Sept. 1. The men and women have the opportunity to prove their hard work at the Willamette Grass Course on Sept. 17 in Salem, Ore. ~Complied by Corrina Crocker

Golf gains new coach Linfield has a new women’s golf coach to help lead the team to victory this year. Brian Trowbridge, who graduated from Linfield in 2002, was given the opportunity to return to Linfield as the head women’s golf coach. This past school year, Trowbridge was the assistant golf coach for the men’s and women’s golf teams at Willamette. This will be his second full year of coaching women’s golf. “I look for our team to be within the top three of our league and compete for a conference championship this season,” Trowbridge said in an e-mail about his outlook on the season. Trowbridge said his goals this season are to help each player become better on at the game as a whole and to work on helping his players become confident in their abilities ~Complied by Chelsea Bowen

among the top 25 schools in the nation for student athletes, as our players had a 3.3 cumulative GPA.” Haskins said. That devotion to academics and athletics is what made Linfield so attractive to Haskins, as well as its location in the Pacific Northwest. The Northwest is close to her husband’s heart, she said, and Haskins agreed to apply for any jobs that opened in the area. “I’ve been on a personal journey to find my niche as a coach,” Haskins said. It’s also changed and been affected as women’s sports has changed. It’s not just a job; it’s who and what you believe in — morals, ethics. I’m thrilled to be here.” While at Austin College, Haskins had the opportunity to listen to a presentation by former Southwest Conference commissioner Fred Jacoby that profoundly affected her opinions on coaching and life she said. In his presentation, Jacoby stressed the importance of never backing down from what’s right and always getting up again. Haskins has adopted those principles, and they form the cornerstones of her ethical and coaching philosophies, she said. “If I can teach my play-

ers anything,” Haskins said. “It’s to never stop getting up. You can always get back up.” While Haskins and Linfield are excited for her to take the helm as head coach, the hire was marred only a day after it’s finalization when the NCAA announced that a lawsuit filed by the new coach against Montana State University was settled primarily in favor of the school. The suit surrounded several ethical and political violations Haskins believed the school had made, including a large discrepancy between the funding and treatment of the men’s and women’s basketball programs. During the trials, MSU accused her of, among other things, being verbally abusive to players and fabricating scholarships. However, no charges were brought, and the NCAA has no plans to pursue an investigation. The accusations are baseless, Carnahan said. “She was hired at two schools immediately after leaving Montana State before coming here,” Carnahan said. “We addressed it in the hiring process, but clearly we aren’t the only school to believe she’s a good fit despite the contro-

versy.” Haskins plans to pursue an appeal, a lengthy and expensive process, Carnahan said. Only a person sure he or she was right would undergo the process, he said. In the new coach’s opinion, it’s in the past and should be left there. But, according to Haskins, in her heart of hearts, she is sure she is in the right. “In my career, I’ve always held myself to the highest standards of integrity,” Haskins said. “To the best of my ability, I’ve always tried to do the right thing. Sometimes when you do that, not everyone appreciates that. It takes courage sometimes to stand up for that, and it doesn’t always give good results for you personally. But if you stand up for it, the effects will be felt in the future.” Despite mostly ruling in favor of MSU, the NCAA did acknowledge that there is a wide discrepancy between the treatment and funding of the men’s and women’s basketball teams. Thus far at Linfield, Haskins’ interactions with the players have been wholly positive, she said. She has had the opportunity to talk with players about their goals, academic

Freshman Kelsey Ludin and junior Tara Hill led the Wildcats with seven kills a piece, and junior Samantha Lau contributed with 17 digs. The remainder of the Wildcats preseason schedule comprised two tournaments, one in Colorado Springs, Colo., and one in Forest Grove, Ore. Within these tournaments, the Wildcats played three nationally ranked teams. Their combined record in these two tournaments ended up being 2-5, putting there overall record at 2-6. However, while the record may not show it, allconference player Lau said she believes that these are the types of games that the team must play in preparation for their North West Conference Schedule. “They definitely showed us where are weaknesses were. If we keep playing easy teams we’ll never figure that out. They definitely run quicker offenses, they

hit balls a lot harder,” she said. “When we played Nebraska it was a very close game. So we know we can hang in there, so now we just have to get to the point where we can beat them at that level.” This attitude was echoed by coach Kimura, but he said he understands that losing close games is not enough. “The negative part is obviously you don’t like to lose matches,” he said. The Wildcats opened up conference play with a win Sept. 15 at home against the Boxers of Pacific University. After losing the first game 18-24, Linfield came back and played a solid second game, winning 25-17. The third game was up in the air with both teams looking in control at various times. In the end, the Boxers pulled out with a 25-21 victory. With their backs against the wall however, Linfield responded and dominated the next two games, win-

Haskins lives and aspirations for after Linfield. Haskins said she is excited to have the opportunity to mentor the players and also noted that her favorite moments in coaching have come off of the court. “At Austin College, I got to see a group I recruited as freshmen grow up and succeed outside college,” Haskins said. “One woman is now a doctor. One works for a stock broking firm, one is a vet. To see them succeed was the most gratifying thing I’ve ever experienced as a coach. That’s what it’s all about.” To find out more about Haskins and her career and more about the lawsuit visit the linfield athletics webiste at Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

’Cats make comeback for season Jerry Young Staff reporter The Linfield women’s volleyball team dove into the 2010 season with tough competition and nationally ranked opponents, such as Nebraska-Wesleyan University, Colorado College and Eastern University, on the schedule. But coach Shane Kimura said he believes that playing such opponents is an important step in the preparation for conference play. “I think we played some good competition. So, we know what we need to work on,” he said. “I think it kind of shows us what our weaknesses are and what we need to work on for our conference season.” The Wildcats opened this year against the Beacons of Northwest Christian University on Sept. 1. After the ’Cats won the first set 25-22, the Beacons took command and won the next three 25-21, 25-14 and 25- 15.

ning by scores of 25-14 and 15-12. With this victory, the Wildcats start off on the right foot in conference. With one conference game in the books, Linfield will look for more momentum as the Northwest Conference season gets under way. Six of their first seven matches will be played at home and Kimura said he understands how important it is to get take advantage of this and get a quick start. “We’re going to have tough matches every night, so I think it is important we have a good start,” he said. With a favorable schedule, the Wildcats hope to make some noise this year in the Northwest Conference. The next two home games for the Wildcats will be Sept. 24 and 25 against Puget Sound University and Lewis & Clark College, respectively. Jerry Young can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


16

Catline ’Cats

September 17, 2010

Chris Forrer Freelancer

Football (preseason) Pacific Lutheran

1-0

1.000

Puget Sound

1-1

1.000

Whitworth

1-1

.000

Willamette

1-1

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-1

.000

Linfield

0-1

.000

Pacific

0-1

.000

Linfield

1-0

1.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-0

.000

Puget Sound

0-0

.000

Volleyball

George Fox

0-0

.000

Willamette

0-0

.000

Whitworth

0-0

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-0

.000

Whitman

0-0

.000

Pacfic

0-1

.000

Women’s soccer George Fox

1-0

Linfield

1-0

1.000

Whitworth

1-0

1.000

Puget Sound

0-0

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-0

.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-0

.000

Whitman

0-1

.000

Willamette

0-1

.000

Pacific

0-1

.000

1.000

Men’s soccer (preseason) Whitworth

fumble in Calif.

Northwest Conference standings

Pacific

sports

www.linfieldreview.com

4-0-1

.900

3-1

.750

Puget Sound

3-1-2

.670

Willamette

2-2-1

.500

Linfield

1-2 -1

.375

Pacific Lutheran

1-3-1

.300

Whitman

1-3-1

.300

George Fox

0-2-1

.167

Women’s soccer aims high Freshman Emily Fellows scores her third hat trick for a Wildcats victory over Willamette University. See page 13 >> Volleyball brings one home The Wildcats win their first conference game after a devastating trip to Colorado. See page 15 >> New addition for hoops After a search for a new women’s coach, women’s basketball has high hopes for the coming winter season. See page 15 >> Weekend events Men’s and women’s soccer both travel to Washington to take on teams in Tacoma, while football has its first bye of the conference season. Check the sports schedule to see weekend sporting events. See page 14 >> Follow The Linfield Review on Twitter for Wildcat sports updates: @Linfield_Review

The Wildcats appeared to be picking up right where they left off at California Lutheran University to begin the 2010 season, following a 12-1 finish a year prior. But after going up 28-14 in the first half, the ’Cats were outscored 33-14 the rest of the way, en route to losing their first regular season game, 42-47, in more than two years. Kingsmen tailback junior Daniel Mosier led CLU down the stretch with 202 yards rushing and three touchdowns, and the normally water-tight Wildcat offense choked up the ball five times down the stretch. “It’s an emotional loss for us,” head football coach Joseph Smith said. “We couldn’t put the game away, and it gave them life in the second half. We turned the ball over, and they got their running game going.” Normally rock-steady senior quarterback Aaron Boehme was intercepted on Linfield’s opening drive following a 64-yard march down the field to the CLU 4-yard line. The pick was returned 97 yards to the Linfield 1-yard line, >> Please see Football page 14

Photo courtesy of Kelly Bird Senior Scotty Ray tackles a California Lutheran University offender in a game Sept. 11. Senior Eric Hedin (bottom left) assisted the take down against the Kingsmen in Thousand Oaks, Calif.

Wins, loss carry soccer into conference Matt Bayley Staff reporter The men’s soccer team starts conference play this week after finishing preseason play with games against Corban College and Concordia University, Sept. 10 and 11. The ’Cats beat Corban and lost to Concordia in the hard-fought games at home. In their third preseason game, the men won 2-1 over Corban in a thrilling victory, despite being down 0-1 at halftime. Head coach Ian Lefebvre used the halftime to motivate the team. “He knew that we could play better than what we showed in the first half,” senior Kevin Donato said. “He told us to pick it up, that it was on us to give the game away or take it from them.” Linfield rallied in the second half, scoring off of a penalty kick by senior Carter Elhabbassi and a goal from Donato in the second overtime. The Wildcats played tenacious defense in the last minutes of the game, not allowing a single Corban goal. Senior Michel Camacho said the team’s attention is on the defensive end. “The main focus this year has been defense. It’s been more than lacking the past few years,” Camacho said. “It’s been the source of our problems. We’ve noticed that we’ve been growing defensively as

a team. A lot of it is effort, and a lot of it is learning to play together. It’s easy to see that we’re improving.” Concordia came to McMinnville the next night to play Linfield in its final preseason game. The game was a match of defensive execution, as neither team had scored by halftime. However, in the second half, Concordia found enough offense to overcome a strong defensive effort from Linfield, winning the game 2-1. The men’s team finished the preseason with a record of 1-2-1. Last season, it finished preseason 1-3-1. But despite the similar record, Camacho and Donato noted areas of improvement. “The work ethic is there, more than it has been in previous years,” Camacho said. “As a program and a team, we’ve figured out the effort that has been needed to be successful in the league.” Donato also felt that player relationships were improving. “Chemistry is getting better with players,” Donato added. “It’s something we are trying to improve on.” Linfield opens its conference schedule this weekend, with a couple of games in Tacoma, Wash. After matching up with Puget Sound University and Pacific Lutheran University on Sept. 18 and 19, respectively, the men come back to McMinnville to face off against Pacific University for their first home game on Sept. 25.

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Junior Zach Farrington lunges to trap the ball with his foot before opponent, Corban University on Friday, Sept. 10. The players know the conference is tough but have high expectations for this season, and they hope to improve on last year’s 5-13-1 record. “We’re always looking to improve,” Donato said. “I felt last

year was pretty disappointing.” The team will get to take the first hopeful step toward a successful season on Sept. 18, when it plays Puget Sound. Matt Bayley can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


TLR Issue 3 9-13-2010  

TLR Issue 3 9-13-2010

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