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Chances are revived for men’s baseball to make it to the NCAA Regional Tournament. >> page 16

May 7, 2012

INSIDE

Wine lecture Students learned how the geography in Oregon affects its wine during a lecture April 30 in T.J. Day Hall.

Linfield College

McMinnville, Ore.

117th Year

Seniors receive top awards for speech contest Center in Portland returned with an award. Sedy took third place, senior Ariel Lillico took second place and senior Lucian Battaglia received the award of encouragement. The three students were the only ones in their senior seminar who decided to make the speech contest a part of the class. They spent several weeks writing, practicing and preparing their speeches in class. Even with the practice, the girls each said that they were nervous to

present their six-minute speeches in Japanese. “Public speaking is not one of my strong points, so if it hadn’t been a part of our class, I probably wouldn’t have done it,” Lillico said. “I was very nervous, but in the end, it was a very positive experience.  I don’t think I’ll have another opportunity to do something like this and it was a good way for me to build

Students dance their hearts out

Scholarship winners gain opportunities to travel

Andra Kovacs Senior reporter Senior Leah Sedy stood before the judges and crowd, hoping that no one noticed her knees knocking together, her nerves on high. However, she completed her speech, which was spoken in full Japanese, landing her in third place at The Toyama Cup Speech Contest. The Toyama Cup Speech Contest is an annual Japanese speech contest co-sponsored by the

Toyama Prefectural Government of Japan and the Japan-America Society of Oregon. It is for college students who are studying Japanese in Oregon, with the purpose being to foster a friendship between Oregon and the sister-state, Toyama Prefecture in Japan. For the past three years, Linfield students have won awards in the language speech contest. This year, all three of the senior Japanese majors who attended the contest April 15 at The World Trade

>> page 5

Exercise crazes Learn about the different exercise crazes that are becoming popular around campus.

>> Please see Awards page 5

Samantha Sigler News editor

>> pages 8 and 9

Student Cat Cab Students from the music department performed during a student Cat Cab on May 3. >> page 10

Track

Wildcat athletes broke records during the May 4 track invitational at Maxwell Stadium. >> page 16

INSIDE

Editorial ...................... 2 News ........................... 4 Features........................ 7 Culture....................... 10 Sports ........................ 16

Issue No. 22

Kate Straube/Photo editor Sophomore Amanda Smith and freshman Garrett Soumokil dance together in Linfield’s Dance Ensemble Concert on May 4 in Ice Auditorium. The ensemble included 17 different dances, with a wide variety of different types of dance styles, such as the one >> Please see Dance above named “Welcome to the Ball” based off of “Cinderella.” page 11

With only six applicants for the Fulbright Scholarship and approximately 20 for the Kemper Scholarship, one would think that students would be jumping at the chance to apply and win. However, this is often not the case. The Fulbright Scholarship is a national scholarship that helps send graduating seniors or recent graduates abroad to teach in another country. The Kemper Scholarship offers freshmen scholarship assistance, as well as, provides them with two summer internships with stipends. “It’s highly competitive, so there is a lot of self selection,” Debbie Olsen, Linfield’s competitive scholarships adviser, said. “People realize the level of competition and the tremendous amount of work, so I usually have more people start out then actually apply. It’s not something you do the night before.” Two Linfield students, freshmen Cody Purchase and Terran SobelSmith, were chosen for the Kemper Scholars award, and one Linfield graduate, Chris Norman, class of ‘10, was awarded the Fulbright Grant. For the Fulbright scholarship, there are two different opportunities for seniors or recent graduates. One is a full grant to be used for research or projects, while the other is to help send the winner as an English teaching assistant to somewhere in the world. Having graduated in 2010, Norman went through Linfield to apply for the Fulbright grant. “He stood out because he was the ASLC vice president [his senior year], and made regular presentations to the board of trustees. And he was comfortable speaking in front of a group,” Olsen said. Norman graduated cum laude >> Please see Scholar page 4


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Opinions

www.linfieldreview.com EDITORIAL The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Jessica Prokop Managing editor Joanna Peterson Copy chief Kelsey Sutton Copy editor Nick Hahn Business manager Jessica Pham News editor Samantha Sigler Sports editor Kaylyn Peterson Culture editor Sharon Gollery Features editor Ivanna Tucker Opinion editor Meghan O’Rourke

Linfield opts for one commencement President Hellie has announced that there will be no commencement ceremony next fall. Although this may seem unfair to those graduating in the fall, canceling the fall commencement actually makes sense when looking at the facts. The main reason for the fall commencement being canceled is that the turnout was minimal. Only 12 students at the Linfield campus were honored during the fall commencement last year. If no one attends a ceremony that requires planning, space and food, there isn’t any reason to put forth the effort required for a ceremony. There are not many graduates in the fall to begin with, and many of those who graduate in the fall decide to come to the spring commencement instead. Another issue with the fall commencement is the weather. The weather is often so bad that people can’t make it to the ceremony, held in the gym. In the past, snow and ice have prevented people from coming to the

fall commencement who would have come otherwise. “Three years ago the snowstorms were so bad that we had to cancel commencement altogether,” President Hellie said. “It wasn’t possible to drive in or around McMinnville.” One reason people may be against canceling the fall commencement is the tradition, but even this isn’t a valid reason. Linfield has only held a fall commencement for a few years now. For the majority of Linfield’s history, there has only been a spring commencement. Linfield will be returning to tradition by canceling the fall commencement. Many colleges of Linfield’s size don’t have a fall commencement. “Most small liberal arts colleges only have a spring commencement,” President Hellie said. There simply are not enough people at Linfield to allow for a fall and spring commencement. By returning to the tradition of having only a spring commencement, Linfield can focus on making this one commencement even greater. Those

students who graduate in the fall will still get their diplomas upon graduation, but they are invited to celebrate with the rest of the graduates in the spring. As a small liberal arts college, we should all come together at the end of the year to support our graduates. We are one community, and should prove it by celebrating together at one commencement. President Hellie’s Cabinet and the Student Policies Committee canceled the fall commencement for the benefit of everyone. According to President Hellie, money and resources were not issues. They sincerely believe that holding one commencement is the best option for Linfield’s community. This year’s spring commencement is just around the corner, and we should all join together to send off our graduates. Together, as a community, let’s celebrate the graduation of our seniors, for this year and for many years to come. -The Review Editorial Board

May 7, 2012 Review office hours Editor-in-chief Mondays 3 p.m.-4 p.m. Fridays 12:00-1:00 p.m. or by appointment Managing editor Mondays and Tuesdays 12 p.m. -2 p.m. or by appointment Follow us on Twitter @linfieldreview and on Facebook

Corrections The Linfield Review publishes corrections from the previous week’s issue in this spot every week that a correction is needed. To submit a correction, email linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail. com.

Photo editor Kate Straube Online editor Jaffy Xiao Graphics/ads designer Illustrator Yura Sim Senior reporter Andra Kovacs Senior photographer Alyssa Carano Circulation manager Samantha Sigler Columnists Chris Forrer Ethan Donnelly Ian Storey Dear Bailey Adviser Brad Thompson Associate Professor of Mass Communication The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists. The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Mondays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than noon Friday to appear in the Review the following Monday. Letters are limited to 2,500 characters or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

CAMPUS

Students need more study space options The end of the school year is quickly approaching, but before the end can come, we have to take finals. Everyone needs places to study in preparation of finals. Space is limited as the library closes in the early morning, and spaces in Renshaw start to fill up. Where are students suppose to study? While there’s always the option of studying in a dorm room or apartment, some don’t work as well in those areas, or they’re easily distracted. When living with roommates, you also have to worry about their schedules, as well.

Kaylyn Peterson Sports editor Some dorm buildings have study rooms, but that only really gives one or two people an additional place to prepare for their finals. Although studying in a dorm building’s lounge is always an option, there is always the possibility of distraction. During the two weeks

leading up to finals and during finals week, the library should have extended hours. With all of the resources available in the library, it is one of the ideal places to study and get work done. If the library extended the hours of operation during those two weeks before finals two or three more hours on Friday and Saturday, as well as adding an additional hour or two on other days, students would benefit. The only issue would be the cost of keeping the library open longer. Staff would need to be paid, and the cost of keeping the library running

through the night would rise a bit. The library’s mission statement talks about how the staff works to serve Linfield students and faculty while being cost efficient. With the library being cost efficient all year, the cost of keeping the library open longer should not make a huge dent in the college’s pocket. There are many other places Linfield could keep open as locations to study, such as the Riley Center. As one of the main locations on campus for students to be, the Riley Center offers another lounge-type setting that

can hold a larger number of students. With all the sitting space in Riley, students would be able to meet with groups, or study alone. The only issue with keeping other buildings open would be the lack of supervision of the area. However, with College Public Safety making its normal rounds throughout the night, there really shouldn’t be a problem with a few extra bodies in the building. Finals are a stressful time, and finding a place to study should be the least of students’ worries. Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


May 7, 2012 ENVIRONMENT

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‘Fresh’ shows that we can change the way we grow food

During Earth Week, I went to the viewing of the documentary “Fresh,” which was sponsored by Greenfield. Although I was already educated about many of the problems with our food system in America, the documentary opened my eyes even more. “Fresh” took a different approach than most documentaries about the food industry. Many documentaries ignore the farmers, instead talking to nutritionists, CEOs and people who don’t support traditional farming methods. What many of these documentaries fail to recognize

Meghan O’Rourke Opinion editor is the farmers; the people who actually grow the food and raise the animals. “Fresh” opened my eyes to the plight of the farmers. What I didn’t know is that the farmers suffer from the current methods of farming as well. Being forced to grow crops quickly and fatten up

as many animals as possible takes its toll on the Earth, the animals and the farmers. Farmers feel pressured to use methods dictated by corporations, and as a result, they barely make ends meet. Animals are confined in tiny spaces and fattened up by feed, which includes corn, soybeans and hormones. Corn and soybeans are also the most popular crops for farmers to grow, as they are included in many processed foods. This makes animals unhappy and unhealthy. Farmers attempt to take care of more animals than they can possibly oversee.

Because of the overpopulation of farm animals, disease spreads easily and waste piles up and contaminates our water. Growing too much corn and soybeans isn’t good for the Earth either. Growing the same crop over and over on the same plot of land doesn’t allow the soil a chance to recover, which effectively ruins the land. Growing the same crops year after year also makes them more susceptible to pests, pressuring farmers to spray their crops with pesticides due to the overwhelming amount of land they have to oversee. Although “Fresh” shows

the ugly side of the food industry, the majority of the documentary is positive, focusing on farmers who have turned to organic methods of farming. These farmers lead happier lives, grow healthier, more nutritious food and raise thriving animals. These farmers allow their animals to roam outdoors and feed on grass, which is healthier for the animals and for us, because grass is what cows and pigs naturally eat. These farmers also rotate the crops they grow on the same plot of land, allowing the soil to recover and provide more nutrients to plants.

The organic farmers seemed so much happier than the farmers who follow the industry-standard methods. Their animals were allowed to live happy lives until their slaughter, meaning a more ethical way of raising animals for food. If consumers decide to buy food from farmers who practice organic and sustainable practices, more farmers will understand that organic farming can make money. If more farmers decide to change their methods, we can eat healthier, save the Earth and feel better about what we are eating. Meghan O’Rourke can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

POLITICS

Media should use unedited photos of people Maybe the way women are presented in the media is an overdone topic. People have complained about negative media stereotypes for a long time, and the variations on depression and eating disorders resulting from not looking like a supermodel are prevalent in this country. However, this isn’t just a case of women being whiny because they aren’t magazine cover material. The fact is that nothing is being done about this problem, or at least, nothing that will actually provide a solution. As I said, this isn’t just a case of women wanting to look pretty. Of course women want to look pretty; the urge to present an aesthetically attractive exterior is natural. Everyone has it. The problem stems from the definition of “pretty” as having smooth, lustrous hair, sultry eyes, a slim, elegant form and literally flawless skin. This perfect ideal is only seen in photographs, advertisements or magazines, and that’s because it can only be obtained with a good dose of photo manipulation. You can imagine the impossibility of trying to look like someone who doesn’t actually exist. This is the real reason why eating disorders develop and why depression and low self-esteem so often include insecurities about body image. This is why thin girls call themselves fat no matter how many times you tell them they’re not. What we need is not just to educate women in the deceptive ways of advertising. I’ve found that knowing an image is Photoshopped is not enough to stop some part of my brain from whispering, “I wish I looked like that.” If people could cure their depression and eating dis-

Sharon Gollery Culture editor orders simply by being told these kinds of images are ‘shopped and edited, these disorders would be practically eradicated. No, what women and girls really need is to stop being fed these falsified images. What we need is for the media to stop using Photoshopped, airbrushed and edited pictures of women. Magazines and advertising companies need to start using real, unedited pictures of women. There are plenty of women out there who are beautiful without the added computer magic. Just look at runway models, for example. They may not be the healthiest image for girls either— requirements for being a runway model are exclusive and hard to meet—but at least they look like that in real life. And don’t think this doesn’t affect guys as well. I don’t just mean having to reassure their girlfriends that they’re not fat; when boys are raised to desire this impossible conception of a beautiful woman, they’re going to be in for an unpleasant surprise when they start looking for romance. Sending a message that true beauty can’t exist without photo manipulation is not only deceptive, it’s damaging to girls and women who feel like they can’t live up to this standard. It’s time to recognize this ideal of beauty for what it is: impossible. Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

CULTURE

Our differences make us beautiful It’s that time of year again: sunny days, barbecues and bathing suits. These simple things bring fear to some who dread stepping foot on the beach with more showing than they feel comfortable with. The looming feeling of having to have a perfect body soon becomes a topic on everyone’s minds. Most conversations begin to circle around who’s working out when and what they’ve been eating lately to better their bodies. People start comparing themselves to one another, as well as celebrities,

Samantha Sigler News editor which I find quite ridiculous. I have even caught myself looking in the mirror every now and then; wishing I could tweak a few things here and there— but is this right? People begin spending more time in the gym and

worrying about what they are eating than they do about anything else in their daily lives. Everyone is different, and as I’m sure we’ve all heard before, we all come in different shapes and sizes. It is not realistic or healthy to compare ourselves to others—especially celebrities who spend thousands of dollars on personal trainers, organic food and plastic surgery. Now, I’m not saying working out or eating healthy is a bad thing. I believe that it is in everyone’s best interest to try to take care of themselves as best as they can.

The problem is when people begin to compare themselves to one another and start to feel upset by what they are not or have not achieved yet. So next time you find yourself upset about not fitting into those jeans or dreading putting on that bathing suit, just remember that no one is perfect. Everyone has insecurities, but it is the differences between us that make each one of us unique and beautiful in different ways. So stop worrying about what you ate last night and enjoy the sunshine.

Samantha Sigler can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


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News

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May 7, 2012

Scholar: Linfield helps students earn grants << Continued from page 1

as a political science major, and is interested in political systems around the world. Although he does not want to be a teacher, Norman is interested in education policy and will use this grant to explore different countries’ policies. “This will give him firsthand experience in the classroom,” Olsen said.

Norman will use the grant to teach English in Germany, which is also where the last four other winners of the grant went. “This speaks very well of our German language program here at Linfield,” Olsen said. The Kemper Scholars Award also spoke well of Linfield’s programs, as they are usually only allowed to give one student the Kemper Scholars Award. However,

last year and this year they were allowed to choose two students. “It is really exciting that we have two again,” Olsen said. Last year, the winners of the Kemper Scholarship were sophomores Blake Densly and Joe Gladow. “They were instrumental in recruiting students for the Kemper Scholarship this year,” Olsen said. Densly and Gladow assisted the commit-

tee in choosing the finalists of the scholarship. One of the two winners, Sobel-Smith, is a biology major in the environmental studies and policy track at Linfield and wants to work in environmental consulting one day. At Linfield, he is involved with Circle K, Greenfield and speech and debate. “The scholarship gives me a good chance for me to get both sides of what it takes

to be in a leadership position,” Purchase said. “I get both the education at Linfield and experience with people who are leaders.” Purchase is a Japanese and International Relations double major, and plans on using the scholarship to intern in Chicago next summer at a not-for-profit organization that has to do with human rights or at a cultural center. The following summer, he hopes to intern at a

for-profit youth exchange program in Japan if available. “However I can make the best impact, whether that’s working directly with kids or something higher up where I work with the overall logistics of it,” Purchase said. Other scholarships that are available to students through Linfield can be found at www.linfield.edu/ scholarships. Samantha Sigler can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Colleges trying new ways to keep students from dropping out Jon Marcus The Hechinger Report Things were going well for Job Asiimwe as he approached his final semester at Bunker Hill Community College here last winter. Then a toothache almost derailed his college career. Asiimwe, an immigrant from Uganda who’s been on his own since age 19, was close to graduating. He had been accepted to a bachelor’s degree program at a college in Vermont and his plan to become a lawyer seemed within reach—until something in his mouth began to throb. He needed a crown on a tooth that had begun to decay. But the procedure cost $2,000, more than he earned in a month, and it wasn’t covered by insurance. As close as he was to graduation, he considered abandoning his studies so he could earn the money. Asiimwe was on the verge of becoming one of the surprisingly large number of American college and university students who fail to earn two-year associate degrees within even three years, or four-year bachelor’s degrees within six. “I don’t think many people know how sometimes just one medical event could affect your life,” said Asiimwe, now 22. Asiimwe was fortunate. Bunker Hill stepped in and paid for the crown with funds from a pool of foundation money. He finished the

semester, graduated in June, and has now begun work on his bachelor’s degree. “I’ve seen other students drop out, not because they can’t afford tuition, but they can’t afford the other costs of coming to college—rent, health insurance, transportation,” Asiimwe said. “I was lucky.” More and more American colleges and universities are recognizing that unexpected crises unrelated to academics are pushing people to drop out, especially as the economy stagnates. Under intense pressure from parents, taxpayers and politicians to improve abysmal graduation rates, the colleges are not only assuming a new role in helping their students over the bumps— they’re also keeping a close eye on students and even monitoring social media to detect early signs of trouble. “Our students are not sheltered from the economic problems of the country,” said Linda Byrd-Johnson, director of the U.S. Department of Education’s TRIO programs, which help low-income, firstgeneration and disabled college students. The “Dreamkeepers” program that helped Asiimwe— underwritten by the Kresge Foundation, the Lumina Foundation for Education and the Walmart Foundation— assists low-income students facing personal emergencies that could derail their graduation plans. Payouts average $500 but can be as small as $11 for a bus pass. (The

Jay Reiter/MCT Job Asiimwe, shown September 23, 2011 at Bunker Hill Community College in Boston,Mass., was on the verge of becoming one of the surprisingly large number of American college and university students who fail to earn two-year associate degrees within even three years, or four-year bachelor’s degrees within six. Lumina Foundation is among the funders of The Hechinger Report, which produced this story.) Many such interventions have not been around long enough to concretely measure their success, but some have. A case-management system at Cedar Valley College near Dallas has decreased the dropout rate for students considered at risk from 53 percent to 40 percent, the university says. At Michigan Technological University in the state’s Upper Peninsula, a program started last fall to monitor and support faltering students reduced the number who were on the brink of leaving by 2 percent, according to the

university. Scholarship America, a charity organization that runs Dreamkeepers and other scholarship programs, reports that the proportion of students who stay in school from one semester to the next after getting help from Dreamkeepers is 72 percent, compared with 50 percent for students who don’t receive such help. “Finances are the number one reason students drop out. It’s not just school finances— it’s life finances,” said Lauren Segal, president and CEO of Scholarship America. “It’s the day-to-day life experiences that are the hurdles students have to get over. And those don’t have to be big things.

They can be small things— say, their day care goes up $100 a month, and that’s the make-or-break number.” Only 29 percent of community college students earn two-year degrees within three years, according to U.S. Department of Education statistics. At four-year universities, 57 percent of students complete bachelor’s degrees within six years. The Obama administration has called for raising graduation rates substantially by 2020. But about a third of students entering college today are the first in their families to go to college, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, and a quarter are

both first-generation and lowincome. “A lot of the issues that (they) have are life issues, not academic issues,” said Ingrid Washington, vice president of student affairs at Gateway Community and Technical College near Cincinnati. Gateway loans laptops to students who can’t afford them and accepts donated clothes for them to wear to job interviews or to work. “They’re so close to the edge, and that’s how they live every day,” Washington said. “Educators used to say, leave your issues at the door. You can’t do that anymore.”

How do you feel about fall commencement being cancelled?

“I’m torn on this topic because, from hearing discussions at Senate, the situation is not a large group of students. It is a lose-lose for everyone.” - Sophomore Sarah Patty

“It’s really unfortunate for those who don’t have the money to come back in the spring but still want to celebrate with us.” - Freshman Rachel Axtman

“It’s unfair to the students because they don’t get the opportunity to walk without having to pay extra money to come back in the spring, which every student should.” - Sophomore Miles Phillips


May 7, 2012

News

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Awards: Students win awards at speech contest

Terroir affects Oregon’s vineyards

<< Continued from page 1

a solid definition of the term terroir, it is not the same for everyone. At the first North American Terroir Conference at the University of California-Davis, 300 people debated about the meaning of terroir. “We drank huge amounts of wine, and we came up to no conclusion,” Burns said. “Everyone’s definition is different, but I really like the definition of the taste of the place.” According to Burns, “terroirists” believe that wine is made up of 80 percent of the vineyard and 20 percent of the wine makers. “It is my goal to turn you all into ‘terroirists,” Burns said.

confidence in my speaking skills.” Battaglia agreed that the nerves were hard to beat, but the experience was well worth it in the end. “It was a little nerve wracking, trying to memorize a six-minute speech in Japanese when my other classes and track were draining my review time allotment,” she said. “I did, in fact, enjoy the experience greatly. After I got the jitters out of me I was able to speak with poise and confidence. Many people liked my speech, and I was happy about the responses I received from the listeners.” It was Sedy’s second year participating in the contest, and she was glad she got the opportunity to experience it again. “[It is] a good way to challenge myself linguistically in crafting and memorizing a speech in Japanese, and it’s always fun meeting other students in the area with shared interest in the Japanese language,” she said. Sedy said she was grateful to have the experience to represent Linfield at The Toyama Cup Speech Contest. “Linfield students have always done well in this contest,” she said. “And it was a nice feeling to stand with my classmates Ariel and Lucian in representing the excellent Japanese program at Linfield.”

Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Andra Kovacs can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Kaylyn Peterson Sports editor What distinguishes Oregon’s wine from wine anywhere else? According to a Portland State University professor, it is something the French call terroir. Dr. Scott Burns is no stranger to Yamhill County as he returned to speak to winemakers, vineyard owners and wine enthusiasts about his research titled, “The Mystery of Terroir in Oregon: The Relationship of Geology, Soil and Climate to Wine.” Burns treated Linfield College to his 113th lecture focusing on the topic of terroir, which he roughly defines as “the taste of the place,” April 30 in T.J. Day Hall. Speaking on his own history with wine and the Northwest, Burns revealed his family roots in Yamhill County that stretch back 150 years. “I’ve been involved in wines for forever,” Burns said. Burns attended Stanford University, which put him in the new developing wine area of the Napa Valley. Burns started teaching in Switzerland as an assistant professor, located in the heart of wine country in Switzerland and was able to teach geology, chemistry and biology by making wine with his students. When Burns returned to Oregon, he started teaching

Kate Straube/Photo editor Dr. Scott Burns talks to students about the relationship between Oregon’s geology and the wine that is produced there during his lecture April 30 in T.J. Day Hall. at Portland State University in 1990. Although Burns was a geologist, he specialized in soil. “I was very interested in the soils used in the vineyards,” Burns said. Burns encountered many different tasting wines through his experiences traveling around the world. “In visiting all the major wine making places in the world, I think [Oregon] is the best place in the world to taste terroir,” Burns said. “There are a lot of differences in the soil, which makes for different tastes in the wine in a short period of time.” According to Burns, every bottle of wine is going to be different, based

on seven factors. The first factor is grape type. The grape type determines the type of wine that can be made. The second factor is the geology. Burns talked about just how much the geology of the vineyards matter. Burns described the age and color of soil as playing a major role in the geology of wine making. “The redder the soil, the better the soil,” Burns said. “The age of the soil determines the color of the soil.” Third, the climate affects the terroir of each wine. Soil hydrology also plays a major role in the taste of the wine. Physiography affects the directions in which wine makers plant the grapes. In Oregon, the

best physiography is south facing hills. “These five factors are traditionally what the French call terroir,” Burns said, “But, there are also two other important factors.” Burns also looks at the wine makers as a factor. “Wine makers determine how the wine will be made, what will go into the wine and how long the wine will ferment,” Burns said. The last factor he talked about is vineyard management. This determines what ways the rows of grapes will be planted and how the grapes will be grown. “These are all important factors in the development of the wines,” Burns said. Though the French have

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May 7, 2012

40th Annual Hawaiian Club Lu’au

Sophomore Ashley Kimi dances alongside fellow Hawaiian club members during the Ho’i Ke Aloha I Ra’iatea dance at Linfield’s 40th Annual Hawaiian Club Lu’au.

Junior Tori Ogawa and senior Brent Shimabukuro danced in the couples Aia La O Pele Hawai’i dance, which told the story of Hi’iakaikapoliopele, the younger sister of the fire goddess, Pele.

(From left) Junior Amy Bumatai, sophomore Christine Fujiki, senior Kailee Seto, sophomore Ashley Kimi and sophomore Keana Cramer perform in the Pate Pate dance.

(From left) Senior Cameron Howser, sophomore Tyler Tamayo, junior Kaston Gleason and senior Kalae Parish prepare for the Haka dance which expresses the traditional ancestral war cry along with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet and shouting.

Senior Cameron Howser hosted the event, alongside senior Jeremy Moll, describing facts about Hawaii, as well as, describing dances before they were performed.

All photos by Kate Straube/Photo editor Sophomore Christine Fujiki performed in the Te Tama Ma’ohi dance, a slow Tahitian dance for women. The song tells the story of how the lands bring reminiscence of love for the Polynesian child, Te Tama Ma’ohi.


May 7, 2012

Features

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Ways to simplify the packing process Ivanna Tucker/Features editor The year is quickly coming to an end, and the stress of packing can become an issue. Students are worrying about how they are going to take all their belongings back home or store them during the summer. Packing is one of the most stressful parts of the end year. Organizing how you are going to have time to put everything away takes time. Here are some tips to help you efficiently pack away all your belongings: The first things to be taken down are the items on your walls. Take a study break to start taking posters and photos down. They are simple to rip off, but avoid ripping paint off the walls along with your posters. The next step is to go through your desk and throw away the unnecessary papers. Figure out what you want to keep or get rid of. The stuff that you want to keep should be placed in boxes or in a backpack that is not being used. If you have shelves, start to clear them each day so you are not overwhelmed on the last day. During the next few weeks, start cleaning your room. Throw away all food that you know is going to go bad and that you are not going to eat. When you go shopping for groceries, think about purchasing items you know that you are going to eat. Deep clean your fridge and take time to scrub it down so that will be one less thing to take care of later. Make sure to wash dishes as soon as you finish using them so you won’t be surprised with mold when you are packing them. For most people, clothes prove to be the most difficult to pack. Start gradually stow-

ing your winter clothes, and take them home in small trips if possible. It is important to realize that you may have more clothes than what you started with at the beginning of the year. You can start packing all those unworn clothes now. If you know you won’t wear some items again, consider donating them to a charity or a used clothing store. Start to sell some of those books that you know you won’t need next year. Publicize the ones that you have and try to make some money off of them, instead of letting them take up space. Amazon has a buyback option available so you can earn cash to purchase books or other related merchandise. Some people are not able to send all their things home every summer. There are storage options available on campus and in McMinnville. The storage units on campus are free, but they are not fully protected. The school recommends using local storage places. These places can be a bit pricey, but if you find some friends to share it with, it can be more affordable. Ivanna Tucker can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.


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Featu

Students get fit with pop

Meghan O’Rour

As America’s obesity ra seems the number of exerc creases, as well. Crazes such as P90X, I CrossFit have all recently be and some of Linfield’s own the bandwagon. Junior Michon Hunsake CrossFit in a group fitness c nville three days a week. Hunsaker describes Cr but very intense workouts i strength, conditioning and o skills for athleticism.” Before Hunsaker bega she was taking spin classes nville CrossFit gym, assumin would be too intense for he “I randomly tried it an hooked,” Hunsaker said. “I CrossFit for a year now.” Now that she does Cro says that she has never bee her life. In addition to CrossFit at least two days a week an other type of cardio workou she has time. Hunsaker says that Cro her to become a better long ner, allowing her to be faste sore. “I would recommend C one in a second,” Hunsaker


ures

May 7, 2012

pular workout programs

rke/Opinion editor

ate rises, it cise crazes in-

outs are designed to be achievable for anyone at any fitness level, so there’s no reason to be intimidated by the intensity.” Insanity and Junior Ashley Burgess completed the ecome popular, 60-day Insanity workout during January and have jumped on February. Insanity comes in a series of DVDs er loves doing that each pertain to a particular day. The class in McMinprogram emphasizes max interval training, using cardio, plyometrics and power resisrossFit as “short tance. ncorporating Burgess decided to try Insanity while other essential staying home during January when her twin brother started using it. an doing CrossFit, “He had taken some time off from uss at the McMining his DVDs, so while I was home over ng that CrossFit January, I figured I had nothing better to er. do,” Burgess said. “I was interested in losing nd was instantly some weight, and my workout regimen at have been doing the time just wasn’t cutting it.” After completing Insanity, Burgess said ossFit, Hunsaker she felt that she had more energy and powen as strong in er. To change up her workout routine, she is combining both weight training and sprints. t, Hunsaker runs “Lower body and shoulders are Monnd does some day, Thursday and Saturday while upper ut every day, if body and abs are Tuesday and Friday,” Burgess said. “Additionally, I have a sprinting ossFit has helped workout three days a week that includes g-distance runeither five or 10-yard sprints, five or 10 15er without getting yard sprints, three 20-yard sprints, and either two or three 300-yard shuttles.” CrossFit to any Although Burgess would recommend said. “The work- Insanity to others, she cautions that it is not

for everyone. “If you are looking to gain muscle, then this is a great workout. But if you are trying to lengthen and tone, then I wouldn’t suggest Insanity as your first choice,” Burgess said. While Clayton Truex doesn’t follow a popular exercise routine, working out is important to him. Truex is a baseball player, but he enjoys working out on his own, as well. When he is not in season, he works out five or six times a week, plus running three times a week. While in season, he still works out on his own three or four times a week. “When I was in high school, I wasn’t very big,” Truex said. “It was hard competing with other people in sports.” Since then, working out has become an essential part of Truex’s life. He enjoys feeling stronger and says exercising also makes him feel happier. Truex’s routine includes weight lifting, plyometric work and two hours of cardio a week. For these students, exercise has become a part of everyday life. There are many different ways to workout, which means that there are many different ways for everyone to enjoy getting into shape.

Meghan O’Rourke can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

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Culture

May 7, 2012

‘Mac Reads’ author dives into frontier life Chrissy Shane Staff writer

Kate Straube/Photo editor Oregon author Molly Gloss gives a speech about her novel, “The Jump-Off Creek,” for the eighth annual “Mac Reads” celebration April 30 in Nicholson Library.

Linfield and McMinnville community members gathered in the Nicholson Library on April 30 to listen to award-winning author and fourth-generation Oregonian, Molly Gloss, speak about her novel “The JumpOff Creek” for the eighth annual “Mac Reads” celebration. The theme and discussion of the event were, what Gloss called, “the literature of the west and where women were left out of it.” Gloss began the event with an excerpt from “The Jump-Off Creek,” the story of the widowed homesteader Lydia Bennet Sanderson and her survival in the backcountry of Oregon in 1895. Called “a classic of its time” by the Los Angeles Times, it was the winner of the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award and the Oregon Book Award, as well as, the finalist for the PEN/ Faulkner Award for American Fiction. Gloss was also the recipient of a Whiting

Writers Award in 1996. Gloss sought to write a novel that provided a different perspective of history, one that was different than the typical stories of male conquest and cowboys at the forefront of the western backcountry. “That’s not the real history of the west,” Gloss said. “The real history of the west was a community and women were at the center of it.” Gloss’s interest in the true depiction of the lives of women made for the strong woman lead in “The JumpOff Creek,” who embodies the same endurance and grit as the male characters. Gloss grew up in rural Oregon in the ’50s and developed an appreciation for western novels early on, reading her father’s collection of “cowboy” novels. “I’d been a Western reader since I was 12—it was my dad’s favorite genre,” said Gloss on her website. However, she noticed that women were consistently “reluctant pioneers.” “I wrote ‘The Jump-Off Creek’ because it was the book I couldn’t find in the

libraries,” Gloss said. The Portland State University alumna wrote the novel in just two years, while she was both a mother and clerk. “Still, and yet, my life as a writer began with motherhood,” Gloss said on her website. Although writing was never an initial career path for Gloss, who went into the workforce as a teacher and later a clerk, she became a full time writer in 1980 and has since published four full-length adult fictions as well as a collection of short stories. Gloss resides in Portland. For more information about Gloss and her works, visit www.mollygloss.com. “Mac Reads” is a partnership of Friends of the McMinnville Public Library, the Linfield Nicholson Library, the Linfield English Department and Third Street Books, which make it possible for the community to have authors, such as Gloss, come to the annual readings. Chrissy Shane can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Music department collaborates for Cat Cab

Alyssa Carano/Senior photographer Above: Freshman Tabitha Gholi plays violin during a Cat Cab on May 3 in the Fred Meyer Lounge. Top right: (From left) Seniors Amanda Summers and Katie McCann perform an interactive version of “Under the Sea.” Bottom right: (From left) Sophomores Alex Zhang, Jaimie McDonald and Gülfem Torunlar perform “Blackbird” by The Beatles.


May 7, 2012

Culture

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Dance ensemble puts on narrative show

Kate Straube/Photo editor

Kate Straube/Photo editor Freshman Garrett Soumokil performs a Michael Jackson tribute, including songs, such as “Billy Jean,” “Smooth Criminal,” “Scream” and “Thriller.”

Top: The Linfield Dance Ensemble presented “Dance Dance Revelation” on May 4 and 5 in Ice Auditorium. (From left) Sophomore Samantha Javier, sophomore Gavin Broussard, freshman Garrett Soumokil, sophomore Colton Wright, freshmen Caitlin Evans, sophomore Amanda Smith, sophomore Amber Olson and sophomore Alex Dickey perform a dance sequence “Welcome to the Ball.” Above: Sophomore Kaleigh Ansdell and juniors Celeste Blakeman, Staci Cowgill and Helena Frueh perform to “Skinny Love” by Birdy.

Orchestra, choir play requiem Sharon Gollery Culture editor The Linfield Chamber Orchestra opened its final concert of the season with the rich sounds of a Felix Mendelssohn piece. But it was the second half of the concert that really stunned the audience. The concert was titled “Reformation and Consolation” and took place May 4 at McMinnville’s First Baptist Church. The church was packed to the point where it was hard to find seats, and the ushers ran out of programs. The concert’s first half featured Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 5, “Reformation.” The strong chords and majestic sound got an enthusiastic applause out of the audience. After an intermission, the Linfield Choir joined the orchestra onstage for the second half and the main feature of the concert, which was the Mozart Requiem. “Singing with an orchestra was quite cool,” sophomore Gülfem Torunlar said. “At first, I was afraid they’d be so loud we would have to sing even louder to be heard. I thought they sounded great, and they told us we sounded great, so we had a good

dynamic between us.” Sophomore Lauren Pak said in an email that the orchestra typically performs one concert a year with the Linfield Choir. “It is a good experience because, individually and as a whole, we have to be extremely aware of the voices and instruments and make sure that everything is balanced properly so that everyone can be heard at the appropriate time,” Pak said. “For some movements, I felt prepared, but others were exceedingly difficult for me to play because of the rapid tempo. This orchestra has always had a high level of repertoire and the music for this concert maintained that standard.” Before they began the requiem, the conductor of the Linfield Chamber Orchestra, Michael Gesme, introduced two of the student musicians, seniors Don DeFrang and Amanda Summers. He also gave recognition to Anna Song, assistant professor of music and director of choirs, for her work with the choir. “The most influential person is the one you don’t see; it’s the person who prepared the choir,” Gesme

announced to the audience. “And this is, bar none, the best-prepared choir I’ve ever worked with.” As the requiem began, it was obvious that the audience felt the same way. The choir had an energy and movement that kept everyone’s attention on them, and there was a tension in the air after every movement, as if the audience was just longing to applaud. Torunlar said although the choir felt reasonably sure of themselves the evening of the performance, they had to do a lot of things last-minute because of the choir tour schedule. “It was quite stressful,” Torunlar said. “We learned three of the movements before the choir tour, and the rest after the tour. We were like ‘wow, we have a whole book to learn in a month.’ I’m glad we pulled it off.” The Mozart Requiem featured five soloists. Sophomore Jaimie McDonald and senior Kayla Wilkens sang soprano, senior Jen Boston sang contralto, senior Logan Freitas sang the tenor solos and senior Jeremy Moll sang bass. Torunlar said the choir had to put in a great deal of

time and work into practicing. “Usually, we have halfhour sectional practices, but then we started doing 45-minute sectionals and then hour sectionals,” Torunlar said. “I feel like we practiced so much, if we would have practiced it any more, we would have gotten bored. As it was, there was some nostalgia after we finished it.” The requiem’s final chord was so strong that the audience sat for a moment in awed silence, broken only by a hushed “Wow!” from one audience member, before bursting into a thunderous standing ovation. “It was a really cool experience, and I’m glad I got to sing it,” Torunlar said. “[Song] kept telling us groups don’t usually do this requiem because it’s so challenging. That felt epic. We felt so tough, doing this thing that not many choirs do.” Pak said she thought the concert went extremely well overall. “It is the best the LCO has ever sounded, and I am so grateful to have been a part of such a great performance,” Pak said. Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


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Entertainment

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May 7, 2012

Movies you should see: ‘Yellow Submarine’ Ian Storey For the Review Don’t worry, “The Avenger’s” movie review is on the way! “The Avengers” is a big deal, not just because it scored an 11 on a one to 10 scale of awesomeness, but because a movie with continuity akin to the comic books it’s based on has never been done before. And based on its success, it could change movies forever. If you want to know why or disagree, email me, but for now, I will say that

for that reason alone, “The Avengers” is a movie worth watching, so, go watch it! But, if like me, you don’t have the money to continuously go out to the cinemas, then why not stay home and rent a movie? With Red Box, Nicholson Library and Movie Time cheap and close by, there are a number of classic movies worth spending a night with. Today, I want to look at a popular film that you have probably heard of but have probably never seen. A film starring, who some call,

the greatest band that ever lived. A musical as colorful as it is brilliant. That’s right, 1968’s “Yellow Submarine.” “Yellow Submarine” was by far the most successful film of The Beatles’ cinematic escapades. Unlike the three movies before it, “HELP!,” “A Hard Day’s Night,” “Magical Mystery Tour,” and the documentary after it, “Let it Be,” “Yellow Submarine” is animated, and in terms of “far-out-ness,” this movie manages to be the wildest younger sibling in a family of Johnny Knoxvilles.

The style is sort of reminiscent of something you would see as a transition in a Monty Python movie, only less realistic and about a hundred times more colorful. Though this style remains constant throughout the movie, the film takes numerous visual twists and turns to the tune of classic Beatles songs to stimulate the viewer’s imagination and tell its story. The emphasis on the colorful art style and music is necessary, too, because the story to “Yellow Submarine”

is a lot less straightforward than most movies, and like the characters themselves, the movie saunters through the plot and setting, carefree and with ease. In fact, the optimistic direction the film takes is possibly what makes the film so fun to watch. Animated John, Paul, George and Ringo, are even more lovable and witty than a Beatles fan would hope they would be and the central conflict never seems to get them down. The film exudes all of those positive feelings and

truth will uncover some questions, but dare will also tell how open one will be with sex and what they like. There are pre-made cards with questions, or you can come up with your own questions and dares. There is also a tower version, like Jenga, where you take turns pulling out a block and answering a question or doing the dare. For the creative artists, there is body paint. This is

totally open-ended. It can be used to trace around the body. This is a sensual way to get to know your partner’s body. Getting to know one another’s bodies in an intimate way like this can be a satisfying bonding experience. Of course, everyone knows about strip poker. You can go by the standard rules or adjust them to fit your own needs. This can be done with two people or a group of friends who are comfortable enough with each other. Generally, strip poker is played with a five-card draw and, in place of money, an item of clothing is the bet. Decided by the players,

concepts that most associate with the ‘60s hippie movement, love, peace, acceptance, and that certain laid back attitude and humor. When the movie came to an end, I was left with a heartened feeling in my chest and an encouraging feeling in my head. So I have to recommend “Yellow Submarine” to everyone and deem it required viewing for any Beatles fan. See this and save your money for “The Avengers!” Ian Storey can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Game night switches things up When it’s time to change things up in the bedroom, games and other fun activities are great things to try. And with so many options, everyone is bound to find something they love. A trip to Spencer’s or an online search will yield a variety of games for couples, gag games and group games. Erotic dice have intimate body parts on one and actions to do on the other. A roll of two dice will tell what action to perform on what body part. There’s even a glow-inthe-dark version, which could require you to feel each other to find the body part. Truth or dare is fun and a good way to get to know your partner. Of course,

clothes can be taken back or they can be lost for good. An alternative for couples is betting sexual favors. This can be anything the two agree on and are comfortable with. Some bets could be positions, strip teases, lap dances, a room to have sex in or something new you want to try with your partner. Technology can provide these games and others right at your fingertips. There are apps for the dice game, truth or dare, Kamasutra for positions, sex roulette for how and where to have sex, and many others. Decide what you want to accomplish and have a game night! Bailey can be reached at linfieldreviewbailey@gmail.com.

Rock band makes radical EP James Testa KSLC 90.3 FM

Upcoming culture events Lacroute Arts Series

May 7-9 On campus

Pro Cat Cab: Cousin Affect

9 p.m. May 10 Fred Meyer Lounge

Marshal Theatre Springfest: Student-directed shorts

May 10-12 Marshall Theatre

Jazz Night

8 p.m. May 11 Ice Auditorium

Thai Country and Suessical Musical

5 p.m. May 12 Off campus

Rock finds a new source of grunge-like intensity with Thought Transfer, the brainchild of the group’s front-man, Bob Katsiaficas. The EP, “Another Mistake,” showcases the group’s insane energy and wide variety of skills that should appeal to any rock lover. The EP dives right into fast-paced action with the first track, “Get Up,” which could be best described as something like the Foo Fighters with the amount of energy found on the song and the Dave Grohl-esque lyrical performance of Katsiaficas. The song also features an intense guitar solo that supplements the rest of the track wonderfully without overtaking the sound. The title track, “Another Mistake,” follows and does not let up on the radical nature of the EP. A monster guitar riff kicks off the track with a drum intro that infiltrates listeners’ senses. Accompanied by the unique style of vocals that

Katsiaficas has, it makes for a solid song that seems like it comes from the ‘90s grunge scene in Seattle. The third and final track of the album, “Turn Around,” is an emotionally charged song in which Katsiaficas finds himself pleading with the main character to “turn around” and not go through with some regrettable actions. The song features cryptic guitar riffs and a powerful drum performance that reaches optimal levels of intensity. Through these tracks, Thought Transfer is able to transcend their primary influences, such as Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Nirvana, Tool and Neil Young, while adding its own unique perspective on the world and what it has in store for all of us. Katsiaficas created Thought Transfer after writing and performing under various incarnations more than 15 years and amidst a bunch of other new material. His works include Acrobat, Kat, B Kats and Thousand Days, but he has put a lot

“Another Mistake” album cover of energy into Thought Transfer, and it shows in the group’s new EP. Katsiaficas recruited the talents of Annie Hoffman to play bass and the organ, and his fellow Thousand Days band mate Matt Hayden to play the drums. When Katsiaficas is not shredding with Thought Transfer, he still somehow finds the time to play guitar

and write all the music for Thousand Days. The group recorded “Another Mistake” in its hometown of Brighton, Mass., at Zippah Recording. Look for “Another Mistake” to invade the KSLC airwaves in the coming weeks. James Testa can be reached at kslcmusic@gmail.com.


Sports

May 7, 2012

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Golf considers the season’s ups, downs Meghan O’Rourke Opinion editor Although the women’s golf season is over, the team is already looking to the future, which means working hard during the summer in preparation of the fall season. In the mean time, co-captains senior Lydia Smith and junior Brinn Hovde reflect on the team’s recent spring season, which ended at the NWC Championships. Linfield’s women placed fifth out of nine teams. “One of our goals was to place third or higher in every tournament, so I was proud of my team for finding the positives in our individual games and not dreading on

Smith

Hovde

not meeting our goal in a couple tournaments,” Smith said. According to Smith, this is one of the team’s strengths: focusing on accomplishments rather than defeats.

“Our team has a ton of fun, which has gotten us through all the ups and downs that golf presents,” Hovde said. “I think that is an important strength to have out on the course.”

However, Smith notes that it can be difficult to stay positive in the middle of a game. “We’ve all had our moments when something has gone wrong, and we weren’t able to turn our attitude and game around,” Smith said. “The mental aspect of golf is just one of the many challenges that we face and at times, have difficulty overcoming.” The team has had to face many challenges this year, such as tough competition, bad weather, a coaching change mid-season and having a small team. “It was a great accomplishment for us to overcome roadblocks, such as this, and still achieve so much this

spring season,” Hovde said. George Fox University and Whitman College were the top two teams in the conference, but Smith said Linfield’s toughest competitors were Whitworth University and Willamette University. “We had hoped to beat both Whitworth and Willamette, but unfortunately didn’t do so every time we competed against them,” Smith said. Linfield placed just behind Willamette in the NWC Championships. Willamette ended with a total of 687 while Linfield ended with a total of 699. Although the season presented many challenges, the team also had many accom-

plishments. “One of our greatest accomplishments was the first day of our Spring Classic at Wildhorse Golf Course in Pendleton, Ore.,” Smith said. “Four of the five of us shot in the 80s and Hannah shot 78. It was the lowest team score we had all season.” Although Smith is graduating, the upcoming summer means training for the returning players, including Hovde. “As long as we keep our goals in mind we will be ready to perform and improve off of this past season,” Hovde said. Meghan O’Rourke can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

Students awarded for tennis excellence Caleb Goad Staff writer The Wildcats tennis teams swept the Sportsman of the Year Award this year, with both a men’s and women’s player earning the award. Senior Cody Levien, who earned the Sportsman of the Year Award in men’s tennis, also earned AllNWC Honorable Mention, alongside junior Zachary Lyons. “I’m very honored to have received the award. There are so many players in our conference who exhibit great sportsmanship,” Levien said. The Honorable Mention Award means that each player was recognized as one of the top 15 players in the conference. Head Coach Carl Swanson, said he is proud of both players. “Zach was fantastic this year. He played the right way and he was very competitive at the highest level in singles,” Swanson said. Swanson said that Levien and Lyons earned this distinction primarily

Levien

Lyon

NIp

based on the strength of their record at the No. 1 doubles position. They ended the season 11-6 in doubles play. The pair beat the doubles team, ranked fifth in the region, while in Texas, competing against UTTyler. Levien, as well as, senior Kiana Nip, earned the Sportsman of the Year Award. In the 12 years that Linfield has had a men’s tennis team, this is the fifth year that a Wildcat has earned the Sportsman of the Year Award. The Sportsman of the Year is awarded to

players who demonstrate good sportsmanship both on and off the court. “Cody was an excellent ambassador for Linfield College, and he embodied and embraced our foundational principles,” Swanson said. Nip said that she was surprised to have earned the award. She has received honorable mention before, but this is the first time she has received Sportsman of the Year. “There are so many great players, and to be chosen out of everyone felt good, and I was so thankful.” Nip commented. With only two of these awards being given in the

entire conference, earning both of is a great honor for Linfield. “It speaks to the principles of success that are the foundation of our program. We play hard, play smart, play fair and have fun,” coach Swanson said. For Nip, winning this award is an excellent way to end a season full of good memories. “All I wanted to do my senior year was try to have the best season possible and to make as many memories I could. This award added to my season of unforgettable memories,” she said. Caleb Goad can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Fitch: Student reflects on past, future of golf << Continued from page 16

best places to play by Golf Digest in 2008-09 and has also been a site of a U.S. Amateur qualifier from 2006-11. Fitch recalls Juniper Golf Course as his favorite course, while growing up as a child. Now, his preferred course is either Wine Valley Golf Club in Walla Walla, Wash., or Bandon Dunes. Fitch said he enjoys a variety of things about golf. “Most enjoyable is getting

to see a lot of different great courses across the country and get challenged both physically and mentally on them,” Fitch said. Early in high school, Fitch decided that he was going to play for the golf team. From his freshman to senior years, Fitch was a four-year letter winner. His team won back to back conference titles and took second place in state his senior year, Fitch said. Fitch has won two conference championships in his

Linfield career. Although he has not scored an ace on a hole in his lifetime, he has scored a double eagle at the Wildcats home course, Michaelbook. He said he is excited to go to nationals, where the Linfield team will compete. Having won seven tournaments this season, he looks to claim his eighth as he heads down to Orlando, Fla., to compete in the NCAA Division-III National Championship. Carson Crepeaux can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


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Sports

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Wildcat Sports Schedule Monday, May 7 Softball

NCAA Selections show

7 a.m.

Thursday, May 10 Softball

NCAA III Regionals

TBA

Softball

NCAA III Regionals

TBA

Women’s Tennis

NCAA III Regionals

All day

Softball

NCAA III Regionals

TBA

Women’s Tennis

NCAA III Regionals

All day

Softball

NCAA III Regionals

TBA

Women’s Tennis

NCAA III Regionals

All day

Friday, May 11

Saturday, May 12

Sunday, May 13

Injuries mar playoffs: Who’s to blame? This 2012 NBA postseason has already been an ugly one. On day one of the playoffs, reigning MVP Derrick Rose blew out his knee and will sit out the rest of the season with a torn ACL. On the same night, New York Knicks guard Iman Shumpert was lost with the same injury. Chicago center Joakim Noah joined Rose on the injured list with a sprained ankle. Last Sunday, New York guard Baron Davis was seriously injured. As the injuries mount, questions and accusations fly. Detractors of the lockout-shortened season are quick to say that the injuries are because of the compressed 66-game schedule and the toll it takes on an athlete’s body. NBA commish David Stern has shrugged off such criticism and said the schedule isn’t the problem, of course. Any admission that cramming too many games into this short season was a bad idea would only open up the league to lawsuits. People have used this “too many games in too

Sports Commentary

Chris Forrer Sports columnist short of a season” notion to attack other leagues that are considering extending their seasons, like the NFL and NCAA Division-I football. They point to athletes’ bodies breaking down this season at an alarming rate as evidence that adding games can only end in disaster. I’m not contesting that there have been an uncanny amount of injuries this season; that’s a fairly self-apparent fact. But these critics miss the point by blaming injuries on extra games. Major injuries may occur on the court, but they are born much, much earlier. A person’s knee doesn’t just explode at random. Smaller, micro injuries to

the joints pile up over time until an area like the knee is raw and ready to break down. These smaller injuries are a completely routine part of an athlete’s career and are usually taken care of by each organization’s training staff during training and practice days. But guess what teams didn’t have time for this due to the reduced time frame? It’s not the amount of games. It’s the lack of practice and training time due to the shortened time frame. If we want to cut down on injuries at any level, we’ve got to make sure athletes and organizations have time to work together to properly condition and treat micro injuries before somebody tears an ACL (or two). As the NFL and NCAA weigh seasonextending proposals, I hope this is the number one priority on their minds. Otherwise, we’re headed for more injury-riddled playoff games like these. Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

May 7, 2012

Track: Final meet highlights team talent << Continued from page 16 ond in the 10,000 with a time of 32:05.42. The next day at the Oregon Twilight, after the Linfield Twilight, junior Melany Crocker and a handful of other Linfield athletes traveled down to Eugene. Crocker broke her personal mark in the 200-meter once again with a time of 25.69 seconds. This time is the fourth-best in Linfield history. “I was really excited when I saw my times, and then to PR again in the 200 on Saturday was a great feeling,” Crocker said. “It’s always a rewarding feeling to PR because that’s what we work so hard for.” In the women’s 100-meter dash, Crocker and freshman Halsie Peek placed sixth (12.40) and ninth (12.52), respectively. Senior Misty Corwin was another record-breaking Linfield athlete. She also broke a personal record by clearing the bar in the pole vault at a height of 12 feet, 6.75 inches. “We’ll really be focusing on the 4x100. We have a good chance of making it to nationals, but we need to get our hand-offs perfected to cut some time off,” Crocker

Kate Straube/Staff photographer Senior Shanna Peaden places second in the 5000-meter run during Linfield Twilight on May 4 at Maxwell Stadium. said. The day before, Corwin was 19th in the nation, and now with this personal record, she vaulted all the way to sixth place in the country. Senior Eric Weinbender dismantled his personal best

in the 1,500 with a time of 4:00.14. In two weeks, the track team will test its skill at the George Fox Last Chance on May 18. Tyler Bradley can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


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Baseball: Wins could lead to NCAA Regionals << Continued from page 16

Kate Straube/Staff photographer Junior Kyle Chamberlain slides into second base during a game against George Fox University on May 6 at Roy Helser Stadium.

by Lindell off a double hit by Boskovich. Earning the second run was Boskovich, who scored off a single hit by Allan. The Wildcats leave the Lutes no room to score as the game ends, 3-0. “[This weekend] went as well as it could have,” sophomore Zach Brandon said. “Hopefully we put ourselves in a good enough position so that [the NCAA] will talk about us.” With the last home game coming to an close,

Baseball

R H E

George Fox

- 0 6 1

Linfield

- 8 14 0

R H E

Pacific Lutheran

- 0 4 0

Linfield

- 3 9 1

R H E

Lewis-Clark State

- 3 7 0

Linfield

- 4 7 1

the Wildcats’ eight seniors made an impact on the rest of their team. “Its been a pleasure playing with [the seniors]

the last couple years, a lot of selfless guys who put in a lot of hard work and have been great leaders to the rest of us,” Brandon said. With the three wins, the weekend’s series will work as part of the deciding factor in whether Linfield will receive an at-large bid for the NCAA Regional Tournament. The final decision on whether or not the team will be going will be announced May 7. Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Seniors hit it off during college baseball careers Ivanna Tucker Feature editor Wildcat baseball has a strong reputation attached to its name. Even with the rough season, the senior class has been a support for the rest of the team. Each year, the team comes in with a new group and the seniors serve as role models. The seniors on the team include Ryan Larson, Kevin Allan, Jesse Boustead, Spencer Crepeaux, Robert Vaughn, Casey Cameron, Jacob Nolte and Zach Boskovich. Five of them serve as pitchers for the team. Larson has lettered three times and serves as captain of the team. During his time at Linfield, he has been selected as an all-star and was named Pitcher of the Year as a sophomore. This season, he led the team with 63 strikeouts. As a solid infielder for the wildcats, Allan sets high standards in defense for his teammates to follow. In the 2011 season, he was named First-Team All Conference. “[Allan] is a great cap-

tain and leader for the team, Coach Scott Brosius said. Boskovich serves as one of the team’s strongest players, even with his injury that caused him to miss the majority of last season. When he is up at bat, he sets high expectations for himself with his power-striking hits. As a sophomore, he was acknowledged as third team ABCA All-American honors. Vaughn set high expectations during his freshman year, as he earned First-Team All-Northwest Conference. His fastballs fly past most of his opponents as he struck out 44 players this season. Nolte is one of the returning letter winners and stands as a role model for his teammates with his admirable work ethic. He has made seven appearances this season and serves mainly as a relief pitcher. Audience members can catch Boustead leaping into the air, catching highflying balls in the outfield. He serves as one of the best defensive players and is a leader for his teammates.

This season he has made 61 appearances at bat. Crepeaux is a relief pitcher and plays a major role for the team. He has made 12 appearances as pitcher this season and closed out his final home game. His wellknown ground balls have tricked his opponents at bat. Cameron is known for his variety of pitches and is one of the key people in the bullpen. During his sophomore year, he had the opportunity to pitch 26 with only a select few against him. As a junior, he set a record in relief stints. As the season comes to a close, the seniors have made a big impression on the underclassmen with high expectations for themselves and the program. Their high achievements have left a mark on the baseball program and sets standards for the years to come. “It is something that we have grown to expect, not to hope for,” Cameron said. This group had the opportunity to attend the World Series in the 2009 season and has proven its potential. With these last few games left to determine their shot in the playoff, the seniors have

Kate Straube/Staff photographer Senior Zach Boskovich continues to play after injury until a medical trainer pulls him out during the sixth inning May 6 at Roy Helser Stadium. stepped up to show their competitive nature and go after what they want. During their last home game against

George Fox on May 6, all the seniors made appearances. “The seniors play an important role for the team,

Brosius said. “They go out there and lead by example.” Ivanna Tucker can be reached at linfieldreviewfeature@gmail.com.

Baseball Seniors 2012

Larson

Boustead

Allan

Cameron

Crepeaux

Vaughn

Boskovich

Nolte


16

www.linfieldreview.com

sports

Senior golfer receives honors

Catline Northwest Conference Standings

Carson Crepeaux Staff writer

Baseball Pacific

17-4

ish by freshman Brooke Niemann in the 3,000-meter steeplechase (11:56.21). As she has been doing all year, sophomore Anna LaBeaume won the shot put (12.93 meters) and the hammer (44.06 meters), while taking third in the discus (41.20 meters). Sophomore Courtney Alley also placed in the top three in the discus, hammer and shot put. On the men’s side, sophomore Joe Gladow took first in the 5,000 with a time of 15:45.71, and he was followed by senior Arian Anderson and freshman Calvin Howell in second and third place. Junior Scott Gage finished sec-

Senior Alex Fitch can navigate a golf course. “I’m keeping my options open,” Fitch said. “I have a great internship as a financial planner at Northwestern Mutual in Portland this summer. I will still be playing in amateur tournaments, and if I keep improving, I will try to go pro.” His golf experience at Linfield has deepened his love Fitch for the game. He can pinpoint his best memory on the golf course to last year. “The proudest moment for me is winning the Conference Championship last year,” he said. “I had to make a 6-foot putt to win by a stroke. It was my first collegiate win, and I dedicated it to my Grandpa who was extremely sick and passed away a few days after,” he said. Fitch grew up playing golf in Redmond, Ore., at Juniper Golf Club, which was voted one of the

>> Please see Track page 14

>> Please see Fitch page 13

.810

Whitworth

16-5

.762

Pacific Lutheran

15-6

.714

Linfield

15-9

.625

George Fox

15-9

.625

Willamette

7-14

.333

Puget Sound

5-16

.238

Whitman

5-16

.238

Sophomore Joe Gladow and senior Arian Anderson place first and second at the Linfield Twilight on May 4.

Lewis & Clark

4-20

.167

Linfield

25-3

.893

Track enters ‘Twilight’ zone

Pacific Lutheran

24-4

.857

Willamette

19-9

.679

George Fox

15-13

.536

Whitworth

12-16

.429

Pacific

11-14

.393

Lewis & Clark

3-25

.107

Puget Sound

3-25

.107

Whitman

12-0

1.000

Pacific

11-1

.917

9-3

.750

Softball

Men’s Tennis

George Fox Whitworth

8-4

.667

Pacific Lutheran

5-7

.417

Willamette

3-9

.250

2-10

.167

Linfield

2-10

.167

Puget Sound

2-10

.167

Lewis & Clark

Women’s Tennis Linfield

12-0

Whitman

10-2

.833

Whitworth

9-3

.750

Pacific

6-6

.500

Puget Sound

6-6

.500

Willamette

5-6

.417

George Fox

3-9

.250

Lewis & Clark

3-9

.250

0-12

.000

Pacific Lutheran

May 7, 2012

1.000

Tennis players earn awards Three tennis players from the men’s and women’s teams receive honors from Northwest Conference. See page 13>> Women’s golf ends season well Ending the season in fifth in the NWC standings, women’s golf finishes the season strong. See page 13>> Sports schedule Check out the sports schedule to see when your favorite teams play this weekend. See page 14>> Baseball seniors inspire others With eight seniors on the team, baseball players reflect on all their hard work. See page 15>>

Kate Straube/Staff photographer

Tyler Bradley For the Review It comes as no surprise that the Linfield track and field team was outstanding in the final home track and field meet of the season May 4 at Maxwell Field. Some Linfield athletes also competed at the Oregon Twilight in Eugene, Ore., on May 5 at Hayward Field. At the Linfield Twilight, junior Melany Crocker led the way for Linfield as she crushed her personal records in the 100-meter (12.33 seconds) and the 200-meter dash (25.79 seconds). She also contributed to the first place finish in the 4x100 relay along with freshman Halsie Peek and seniors Misty

Corwin and Catherine Street. The four women finished the race with a time of 48.77 seconds. Senior Misty Corwin also found time to score a season-best in the pole vault. She cleared the bar at a height of 11 feet, 11.75 inches and she is now in line to qualify for the NCAA Championships. Freshman Audrey Lichten finished first among collegiate runners in the 1,500 with a personal record of 4:48.69. Her teammate, junior Shanna Peaden, took first among collegiate runners in the 5,000. She posted a time of 18 minutes, 5.05 seconds. Other running successes by Linfield included a second place finish by sophomore Katie Skinner in the 800 (2.27:18) and a third place fin-

’Cats catch success in weekend series Kaylyn Peterson Sports editor The Wildcats competed for an at-large bid for the National Collegiate Athletic Association Regionals with their last three home games May 4-6. The Wildcats played hard to have a winning weekend as Linfield went into the final game against George Fox University with two wins from the weekend. The Wildcats took a quick lead scoring the first run in the third inning when senior Ryan Larson scored off an error made by the Bruins. Earning an additional two runs in the fifth inning, the Wildcats continue with the lead. The first to score for the inning was sophomore Kenny Johnson, who scored off a double hit by junior Tim Wilson. The second to score was Wilson, who scored off junior Nate McClellan’s double to center field. Starting off the sixth inning, Boskovich was taken out of the game due to an arm injury sustained while sliding into second base. Stepping in for Boskovich was senior Jesse Boustead, taking over the left field position for the remainder of the game. Hitting the eighth inning hard, the Wildcats raised their score from four to eight. The lead allowed the team to play the

remaining senior pitchers, Jacob Nolte and Spencer Crepeaux. The team celebrated its final home game with a score of 8-0. Starting the weekend off with a game against Lewis-Clark State University, Linfield took an early lead in the second inning. Earning the first two runs of the game were freshman Kramer Lindell and junior Kyle Chamberlain, scoring off a double hit by Boskovich. Despite Lewis-Clark State’s run earned in the fifth inning, Linfield continues with the lead with another run scored during the fifth inning. Senior Kevin Allan scored off a double hit by junior Jordan Harlow. In an attempt to catch the Wildcats, Lewis-Clark State earned two more runs during the eighth and ninth innings, but failed to pull ahead ending the game 4-3. The second game of the weekend was played against Pacific Lutheran University on May 5. Slow to score, the Wildcats earned their first run in the third inning. Sophomore Jake Wylie scored the first run of the game after a single hit by Wilson. Keeping the Lutes at bay, Linfield scored two more runs during the sixth inning. The first run of the inning was scored >> Please see Baseball page 15

Kate Straube/Staff photographer Senior Robert Vaughn pitches eight innings during the game against George Fox University on May 6 at Roy Helser Stadium.


The Linfield Review