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‘West Moon Street’ Linfield College Theatre opens its spring season with an alumnadirected play March 15.

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Linfield College

Students say yes to Senate redesign

116th Year

Issue No. 17

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

ASLC President-elect junior Rachel Coffey smiles as her moment of victory soaks in after being greeted by Dan, Sophie and Colin with news of her win March 8 in Nicholson Library.

Jessica Prokop News editor Whispers, cries of joy and congratulatory hugs were abound after President-elect junior Rachel Coffey and Vice President-elect junior Bradley Keliinoi were greeted with the news of their victories by Dan Fergueson, director of college activities, Secretary senior Sophie Larson and President senior Colin Jones inside Nicholson Library on March 8. Keliinoi said that he was sitting in the library anticipating the committee’s arrival when he spotted the committee looking for Coffey first. “I tried to prepare for both outcomes (winning or losing) the whole time I was waiting,” Coffey said. “I was in the library working on a group project, and we were kind of hidden — then I saw Colin [Jones], Sophie [Larson] and Dan [Fergueson]; all I kept saying was ‘Really? Really? Really?’” Coffey received 62.7 percent

of the vote to junior Katie Patterson’s 35.6 percent and 1.8 percent abstentions. Keliinoi received 71.3 percent of the vote to 28.7 percent abstentions. These percentages are based off of the 617 students who voted. “I just had an overwhelming amount of feelings and emotion and it [the win] made everything with campaigning worth it,” Coffey said. “I went to my apartment right after I found out, and I was jumping around and screaming with my roommates because we were all so excited.” Coffey said that during her campaign, she reached out to students in Dillin Hall and in the residence halls by door-to-door and leaving fliers. “Now that I’ve come to grips, I realize everything that I need to do now — like hiring Cabinet and following through with my goals,” Coffey said. She said she wants to work to bring together a diverse Cabinet that reflects Linfield students as a whole and said that she encour-

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

Coffey celebrates her win with a congratulatory hug from ASLC President senior Colin Jones. ages students to apply or sit on the hiring committee. Applications are due March 15 at 5 p.m., she said.

Culture

INSIDE

Editorial ...................... 2 News ........................... 4 Features........................ 7 Culture....................... 10 Sports ........................ 16

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News

>> Please see Bylaws page 6

McMinnville, Ore.

offey’s campaign efforts capture the win

Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief Students voted March 8 to pass bylaw changes that will restructure the Associated Student of Linfield College Senate. Of the 617 students who voted (38.9 percent of the student body), 59.8 percent voted in favor of the changes; 12.6 percent, against them. Abstentions totaled 27.5 percent. The bylaw changes cut Senate from 60 possible members down to 27: 11 club senators, eight at-large spots (two per class), five for students living in residence halls and suburbs, one for the Interfraternity Council, one for the Panhellenic Council and one for the Communications Board (TLR, KSLC 90.3 FM, CAMAS and Wildcat Productions). “Honestly, you’re just getting rid of dead weight,” ASLC President senior Colin Jones said about reducing the Senate’s size. Activities Council will choose the club and at-large senators at the beginning of Fall Semester, and as vacancies arise, by an application process. The other organizations will choose senators among themselves. “I think, hopefully, with the new Senate structure, the opinion will be from the constituency rather than the senators themselves,” Vice President junior Katie Patterson said. “I would have loved to work with this Senate that [Bradley Keliinoi] is about to have.” Vice President-elect junior Bradley Keliinoi said he’s excited to work with the new Senate in the fall. Senate approved the changes to send to students at its March 7 meeting in a 39-2 vote with one abstention (42 of the 60 possible senators were at the meeting), but senators voted against proposed Cabinet restructuring 20-21 with one abstention. Jones presented changes to Senate and Cabinet at a Feb. 21 Senate meeting; at the next meeting (Feb. 28), senators sent the proposals the Senate Governance Commit-

Lecture on learning

>> page 4

“The best part of all of this is >> Please see Elections page 6

Sports

March 11, 2011

Renaissance songs

>> page 11

Doubleheader dominance >> page 16


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www.linfieldreview.com The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Kelley Hungerford Managing editor Braden Smith Copy chief Septembre Russell Copy editor Felicia Weller Business manager Sarah Spranger News editor Jessica Prokop Sports editor Corrina Crocker Culture editor Joanna Peterson Features editor Jaffy Xiao Opinion editor Chelsea Bowen Photo editor Katie Pitchford

The Supreme Court ruled March 2 that the Westboro Baptist Church’s controversial funeral protests are protected under the First Amendment. Albert Snyder brought the lawsuit against the WBC protestors. He claimed that he suffered emotional distress after a group of protestors from the church showed up at his son’s funeral. The protestors have also shown up at numerous military funerals, where they flaunted signs with messages such as “Thank God for dead soldiers” and “God Hates Fags,” according to washingtonpost.com. Such protests are appalling and disgusting, but we agree that it is

Columnists Matt Olson “Dear Bailey” Adviser William Lingle Professor of Mass Communication The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists.

ultimately the church’s right to protest as long as the protestors stay 1,000 feet away from the location under protest, as the law dictates. Free speech is a core American right, and we think this right would be violated if the church was not allowed to express its opinion, even if its protests cause family and funeral attendees emotional distress. However, just because people have the right to free speech doesn’t mean that it is ethical to say whatever they want, to whomever they want and whenever they want. With free speech there should be tolerance, and with tolerance there needs to be compas-

sion for others. We believe WBC is being intolerant. It’s protests are ethically questionable even if they are legally sound. When confronted with such intolerance, it’s important to remember to remain above it rather than try to stifle freedom of expression. While at Linfield, try to consider how your words and actions affect the people around you. Everyone is entitled to his or her opinions and beliefs, but take note of the way you express those opinions and beliefs to others. Negative voices often lead to destruction and hurt that is difficult to repair. -The Review Editorial Board

March 11, 2011

Review office hours Editor-in-chief Tuesdays 9:00-10:00 a.m. Thursdays 3:20-4:20 p.m. or by appointment Managing editor Tuesdays 10:00-11:00 a.m. Fridays 12:30-1:30 p.m. or by appointment Follow us on Twitter @linfieldreview and on Facebook

March 4 issue: The Senate Discretionary fund is $750.

COLUMN

Women’s month deserves campus recognition

Matt Olson Columnist I hope everyone’s been having an OK month. March is one of my favorite times of school because everyone really begins to get deep into his or her schoolwork. Then just when work starts to get overwhelming, Spring Break comes and carries us happily into April. But March isn’t just a month of homework and Irish drinking parties; it’s also Women’s History Month. I hope you knew that. Women’s History Month is an annually declared month that is dedicated to

the appreciation of women throughout history, and it recognizes the many social achievements and contributions women have made to improve our world. It also highlights the various struggles and issues still faced by women in many corners of the world and raises awareness on what can be done to achieve equality. The month peaks on International Women’s Day on March 8 and is marked by numerous events around the world. Once again, I hope you knew that. This is a very important time to recognize women who throughout history haven’t exactly had the easiest road to making up 60 percent of our student body. Which is why I’m bothered by the lack of events in remembrance that occurred on campus this week. February was Black History Month: a time that rightfully should be recognized and was commemorated on campus with a number of

events. There were a few speakers, a couple of presentations and a general sense that most of the campus knew about it. So why don’t we have something similar for Women’s History Month? March 8 passed by without any form of remembrance whatsoever. No speakers; no campus wide e-mails; no awareness events. Nobody even invited me to an international Facebook event. I don’t think that anyone views women’s history as less important than other times of remembrance — at least, I sincerely hope this isn’t the case. A lot of the problem is the way women’s history doesn’t grab our attention like African-American history or the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) events. Those remind us of times when we were directly building walls around our fellow human beings and closing these people off from any sense of mainstream society.

The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Fridays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday to appear in the Review the following Friday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

CORRECTION

Illustrator Jenny Worcester

Circulation manager Kyle Guth

Church’s protest spurs ethical questions

Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla

Senior photographer Katie Paysinger

EDITORIAL

Online editor Megan Myer

Senior reporter Matt Sunderland

Opinions

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Women’s history is so much more complicated and involves a fight within the majority and a critique of one’s role within the system, not the system itself. It’s not so much about inclusion but, rather, respect. Women’s studies don’t seem to generate the same emotion in most of us that other topics do. That’s a big deal to me. By ignoring this time of activism we are essentially forgetting that the battle isn’t over. Women have overcome a ton to get to where they are. But remember: Women still have a long march on the road to equality. It isn’t over yet. If you get a chance, please commemorate Women’s History Month. That’s not so much a request as it is a call to action. A lot more can be done in the future by reminding ourselves of how far we’ve come. Next year, Linfield, I hope you do better. Matt Olson can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.


March 11, 2011

Opinions

OPINION

Bad drivers cause ‘brakes’ in traffic

Megan Myer Online editor Jeepers! You creepers, where’d you get your blinkers? I’ve been driving a lot lately. Between commuting, my weekend jaunts to my fiancé’s in Hillsboro and my frequent trips to Portland for concerts, I have accumulated quite a few miles on my parents’ Chevy Cavalier. Through all of this driving, I have realized one thing: Other drivers tick me off. They tend to fall into different categories of epic fail. There are drivers that

I would like to call creepers. They never come to a complete stop. Ever. You can find them everywhere, too, which makes them mildly annoying. I’ve found them oozing through the crosswalks in front of stores and never coming to a complete stop, so the people who want to cross don’t know if they will let them pass. I see them in the turning lanes at a traffic light, inching so far forward that their turn is far too late and wide. Then there are the folks who drive so slow I am sure their speedometer is off by 10 miles. Is it a 25 mph zone? They go 15 mph. Fifty five? Forty. There isn’t much I can usually do about these folks other than pass them the first chance I get. They also tend to come to a nearly complete stop when making a

turn, causing me to then stop in the middle of the road and hope the folks behind me are paying attention. I am sure this is just because I am an Oregonian, but it drives me nuts when people don’t use their turn signals or when they decide to use their turn signals just as they are turning. I’m sorry, but by that point, you might as well not bother. I am concentrating more on slamming on my brakes, because you are deciding to swerve at the last second into my lane to make your turn, than on looking at the light that only blinks once in the act. You will swerve in and out through traffic and take turns that make the creepers jealous. Seriously, it wouldn’t hurt to give me more than a foot of space when you cut me off or decide to make me

slam on my brakes. Finally, the one kind of driver that angers me like no other drives like this: They go slow when you can’t pass them and then speed up when you can. I know some are unaware of the fact that they do this, but I am convinced that others like looking in their rearview mirror to see my face twisted in anger. Why can’t they pull over or at least keep their speed constant so I can pass? I would rather be stuck behind a tractor. I suppose I just need to accept the fact that there will always be people in the world who will annoy me; however, I would prefer them not to be the people driving in front of me. Megan Myer can be reached at linfieldreviewonline@gmail.com.

OPINION

Limited overnight parking causes frustration

Chelsea Bowen Opinion editor I think that most students on campus can agree that parking around here is like a battlefield each and every day of the school week. It’s pretty common to see students circle around the school multiple times hunting for a decent parking space. It’s also just as common to see students duke it out for the same prime park-

ing spot once they return from their evening activities such as sports. The number of students who have cars on campus doesn’t exactly correlate to the number of parking spaces that are available for overnight, on-campus parking. I live in the Hewlett Packard apartments, and it seems as though anytime I leave in the evening to go run an errand, I can pretty much guarantee that any spot in the HP parking lot and any street parking next to the football or baseball fields will not be available once I return a short time later. This means that I will have to find a place to park in front

of Dillin Hall or by the Field House. It’s definitely not fun to make the trek back the HPs when this happens. It can also be a little scary when you have to walk so far back to where you live when it’s midnight, dark and there’s no one in sight. I’m not suggesting that the school build a new parking structure or anything of that sort, but it would be nice if there were a few more places where students could park their vehicles overnight. For example, it would be helpful to students if there were more overnight parking spaces in the lot adjacent to the baseball field and clos-

est to the HPs. There are only a small number of spaces that allow overnight parking, and I think it would be greatly appreciated if a few more rows of parking could open up for this purpose. That parking lot is typically fairly empty, and there are still two other parking lots that are located next to the library if students want to drive there to study. Overall, I think that more overnight parking on campus would eliminate stress on students, and it may even keep them from parking overnight in parking spaces that are off limits. Chelsea Bowen can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

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OPINION

Words of wisdom: Take advantage of the college lifestyle

Corrina Crocker Sports editor Can you believe it? Spring Break is right around the corner. It has arrived faster than the blink of an eye. I remember it like it was yesterday, when I moved into my freshman dorm and had to say the dreaded goodbye to my parents. It was the first “big girl” moment in my life. Well, it’s almost time for another “big girl” moment. Graduation is nearly here. And although there is a lot of stress associated with the thought of finding a job, moving home and graduating alone, the thought of how fast college has gone by keeps haunting me. They always say enjoy these four years; they go faster than you think. I agree that they have flown by. I think that it is something we take for granted. We only get one shot, and we need to make the most of it. We need to take full advantage of the situation we are in. This is not a rant about how awful the weight room is or how annoying Trayless Tuesday is in Dillin. This is just my opinion that we

should take full advantage of our situation. We are in college for just four, maybe five, years. We should take hold of every opportunity. Take a random trip to the beach with your friends because in a few months, hopefully, graduating seniors will be working 40 hours a week and won’t have time to escape whenever they want. There won’t always be another opportunity. Take advantage of the on-campus opportunities. Go to Cat Cabs and see your friends. Go to sporting events. Before you know it, we will be at our own childrens’ games. Study abroad and experience the world. Linfield is a small community in a small town — go out and explore the surrounding world. Join a club or a Greek organization. Make some new friends who share your interests and values. Do something out of character. Speak up. Don’t hold back. Again, take advantage of where we all are right now. We are currently living the best four years of our lives. And as for us seniors, we have a little more than two months left before taking off to graduate or stepping into our first “real” job. Live it up. If you don’t, I guarantee you will regret it in the future. Corrina Crocker can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Kelley Hungerford/Editor-in-chief


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News

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March 11, 2011

Professor offers teaching perspectives Brittany Baker Staff reporter Gudrun Hommel, associate professor of German, shared her experiences teaching an Inquiry Seminar class for the past three years, March 9. The lecture “Globetrotters, Heirlooms and Heimat: Reflections on Teaching College,” reflected what she has learned from teaching the INQS. Hommel spoke openly about the challenges and rewards of teaching her class, called “Globetrotters, Heirlooms and Heimat,” that focuses on the way people encounter and interact with other cultures. “I wanted to reflect on my inquiry about how to teach inquiry,” she said. Hommel began by holding up a red tapestry. She asked the audience members where they thought the tapestry came from to introduce one of the central themes of the lecture: the exploration of culture and background as a means of exploring oneself. Students in Hommel’s INQS class must each write a paper about a family heirloom. But instead of writing about the object itself,

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

Gudrun Hommel, associate professor of German, shared her learning experiences from teaching her Inquiry Seminar class, “Globetrotters, Heirlooms and Heimat,” during a March 9 lecture in Riley Hall. students must write about the historical and cultural implications the object may have had in the past.   “It’s fascinating to read these papers because I learn so much,” Hommel said. She alluded to how

teaching the class can be just as challenging as being a student in the class in regard to cultural exploration. “I wasn’t sure what I would encounter in the classroom. I was the foreign-

er,” she said. “I’m learning. I’m growing as a professor and as a teacher and, hopefully, as a person.” Sophomore Keevin Craig attended the lecture and said one of Hommel’s most interesting points was the con-

templation that she put into creating the subject matter for her course. “I liked how much thought she put into the class and each individual student,” he said. “It was interesting to hear about her

battles with cultural communication and how that shaped the subject matter for the class.” At the end of her lecture, Hommel described the heirlooms she have possibly picked, mentioning several different items from her own cultural background. However, she ended up picking her foreign language teaching background as her heirloom and will write a paper about it — just like the students in her class. Sophomore Renae Marble said she appreciated Hommel’s genuine passion for teaching, which she said Hommel communicated throughout the lecture. “It was cool hearing her talk about how she helps guide her students by letting them discover on their own rather than by telling it to them, which is generally less effective,” Marble said. Hommel’s lecture is a part of the Linfield faculty series, during which one Linfield faculty member will present on one of their areas of interest each month. See the calendar below for lectures and readings between now and The Linfield Review’s next issue. Brittany Baker can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

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News

March 11, 2011

NewsBrief

Citation phone scam Director/chief Robert Cepeda of Linfield College Community Public Safety and Security issued a campus-wide e-mail exposing a telephone scam March 10. The e-mail stated that the college’s technical staff determined that calls have been made to McMinnville citizens by a male using a number not assigned to any city or county but that appears on caller identification systems as 503-434-7402 — the phone number of the McMinnville Municipal Court. The person behind the calls tells receivers that there are past-due citations in their name and that they owe money to the city. But, the McMinnville Municipal court does not place calls regarding past-due accounts, Cepeda said in the e-mail. The e-mail cautioned against offering the suspicious caller any money, financial or identification information. It suggested to “ask for the name of the caller and insist on seeing documentation of the alleged citation,” pay attention to background noises, vocal cues and report the call to the McMinnville Police Department at 503-434-7307 during business hours and 503-434-6500 after hours and on weekends. Any collections questions can be directed to the Municipal Court at 230 NE Second St. or to 503-4347402. Copies of citations or related documentation are provided by the Court. ~Compiled by Septembre Russell/Copy chief

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Fund helps light the way to safety Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief The Associated Students of Linfield College Senate voted March 7 to use its discretionary fund to help the college pay for lighting the pathway between campus and Albertsons. The ASLC Cabinet will also put its money into the project, bringing the total to $3,000 from ASLC. The project will cost about $25,000, Glenn Ford, vice president for finance and administration, CFO, said. Senate will put up the remaining $692 of its $750 discretionary fund, and Cabinet will supply the remaining balance. The other $22,000 will come from Linfield’s capital reserve fund, Ford said. “It’s nice to be able to work together to solve problems and to be able to enhance the lighting and the safety and the convenience for students,” he said.

The idea appeared on the Feb. 28 Senate meeting agenda for senator consideration, and senators agreed that the issue has been along-standing one among students. They said the unlit path is a safety concern. ASLC President Colin Jones said that the college was willing to spend money to fix the lighting problem if the students would “put their money where their mouth is.” On March 7, freshman Tylor Edison, club support and finance co-chair, suggested two other ideas for the fund’s use: purchasing new speakers for Ice Auditorium and revamping campus sidewalks, which flood with every rain, he said. Edison said in an e-mail that he thought the latter was a more prominent issue than the lighting because there are other paths to get to Alberstons than the unlit one.

“The main argument for getting the lights on Monday was that since we already have a deal with facilities to pay for the lights, that we should buy them,” Edison said in an e-mail. “That should not be the reason why we buy things.” Despite this, the Senate passed the proposal to fund the lighting with only two or three “nay” votes. Jones said he brought the lighting issue to Ford in the fall, when it arose as a “Hot Topic” in Senate. Since then, Ford said he has been working with Dean of Students Susan Hopp and Sinn to solve the issue. He said a partnership with students on this solution is a win-win situation. Ford said that had Senate not voted to use it’s fund on this project, then the project would have been setback, and the college would had to identify other funding channels.

Five lampposts, similar to the ones on the sidewalk to Nicholson Library, will be installed 50 feet apart on the Albertsons path, Brad Sinn, director of facilities and auxiliary services, said. He said the project’s timeline depends on when the school gets the lampposts. “When the construction industry took a big slowdown like it did a few years ago — people don’t keep things on hand like they used to,” he said, explaining that suppliers may not have lampposts readily available. But Sinn said installation will only take about two weeks once the lampposts arrive. Ford said he’s hopeful that the project will be completed by the end of Spring Semester,but that it may get pushed forward into the summer.

Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity celebrates founding Septembre Russell Copy chief Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity members and friends of the organization took the opportunity to catch up and see the newly remodeled chapter house March 5. Fraternity members, ranging from alumni active in the 1950s to active members, came together at the Delta Rho Chapter Founder’s Day and House Grand Re-Opening — an event aimed at celebrating the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity’s 1868 founding. A total of 75 people were welcomed and served appetizers and refreshments before the program began, Joe Welsh, President Delta

Rho of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity building association said. “At the main house during the afternoon was mostly a review of our Founder’s Day,” he said. “We didn’t want to get into too much detail on next steps at the event because we had a lot of friends of the fraternity there as opposed to alumni and active members.” Although the subsequent plans were not revealed in detail during the event, attendees were not completely out of the loop as posters and displays were available to peruse. “We had some architectural plans for a new building that we’re planning on building. [O]ur landscape archi-

tect had done a rendering of our landscape design plan that we’re going to implement over the next couple of years and a plan posted that showed what our furniture plan was going to be over the next year,” Welsh said. The objective is to invest in furniture with industrial and residential qualities, Welsh added. The event was split into two parts. After the festivities at the chapter house ended, attendees ate dinner at Golden Valley Brewery. “We went into more detail about those next steps and their costs,” Welsh said. “There was a laundry list of about 30 different things we want to take care of over the next couple of years.”

Despite the to-do list, Welsh said the focus is on the “big picture items,” the new building, the landscaping and purchasing furniture for the house’s common area. Developing an alumni advisory board was among the discussion topics at dinner that evening, Welsh said. “The board would allow some of our alumni with experience in management, finances and organizational development, step in and help mentor the officers here in the chapter so that as they’re growing they can begin to develop stronger chapter operations,” he said. “We had a really good reception to that conversation.” Septembre Russell can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.


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News

March 11, 2011

Elections: Candidates’ campaigns pay off in race << Continued from page 1 the support that I got from everyone and my roommates,” Coffey said. “It just shows that I surround myself with good people; they helped me get through these past two weeks.” Keliinoi said that throughout the election, a lot of people assumed he was going to win, but he did not have that mentality during the process. “I didn’t run under the assumption that I was vice president yet. Instead, I ran my campaign like I was running against someone,” Keliinoi said. “I’m proud of myself, and I tried to reach out to everyone with campus e-mails, links and fliers.” Keliinoi said that he is excited for next year and looks forward to working with Coffey and hiring a Cabinet. “I’m ready to hit the ground running,” Keliinoi said. “I’m looking to hire a wide range of qualified people that have passion and

drive behind their ideas.” Keliinoi said he also looks forward to working with Patterson and getting her advice during the transition, and he said he hopes that she continues working with ASLC in other leadership positions. The presidential and vice presidential turnovers take place May 1. Patterson declined to interview with TLR via e-mail shortly before the results of the winners were announced. ASLC President senior Colin Jones said that a low percentage of voters typically turn out at the polls when students recognize that there is only one race with competing candidates. No primary election was held March 1 because no more than two candidates were running for a single position. This meant less publicity for the March 8 general elections. “It comes down to the candidates and how much they campaign,” Jones said. “This year, ASLC did a lot more publicity than last year, but the key is to get candidates to

run, not vote.” Jones said that ASLC mandated that candidates create a banner in the past, but it cannot force a candidate to campaign. The day before the General Elections, the candidates sat down in the Fred Meyer Lounge for “Fireside Chats” after the Senate meeting March 7. Each candidate had 10 minutes to answer questions and elaborate on his or her platform goals. Dan Fergueson, director of college activities, moderated the chats. Keliinoi went first and reiterated his goal of having ASLC become more visible to students and his plan of following through with discussions of the Cabinet restructuring. Patterson reinforced her goals of working toward getting a student center, using resources such as the Communications Board to increase communication between students, faculty and administration. Coffey reminded stu-

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

Vice President-elect junior Bradley Keliinoi (right) moves to shake ASLC President senior Colin Jones’ hand after receiving the news of his win March 8 in Nicholson Library. dents of her experience with Cabinet and Senate, and she acknowledged that she was ready to take on the challenge of the presidential role.

A few of the other topics that the candidates touched on were work study, getting along with each other once elected and ideas about the

Community Outreach and Environmental Education (CORE) Coordinator. Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Bylaws: Cabinet restructure placed on backburner << Continued from page 1 tee to revise. Committee Chair freshman Dana Hellie said the committee, along with various Cabinet members and senators who attended the meetings, met three times to work out the kinks of the original proposals. She said the group made many compromises before reaching a consensus on the versions they presented to Senate on March 7. “I was kind of bummed that people weren’t understanding of that [consensus], but that’s probably because they weren’t at the [committee] discussions, so they didn’t understand why we agreed on those changes,” Hellie said. Jones’ initial proposal cut secretary, combined the positions of Club and Student Center directors and created a Vice President of Community and Sustainability Affairs. The committee’s proposal also dropped the secretary position and added a Service and Sustainability Director, but it kept Club Director and Operations Director (Student Center Director) separate.

Christine Fujiki/For the Review

Senators vote against a Cabinet restructuring proposal March 7. The initial proposal was sent to the Senate Governance Committee to undergo changes before it was presented to Senate again March 7. “In truth, I think it got voted down because folks were concerned about process more than content of the proposal. That was the sense I got in the room,” Fergueson said, referring to some senators’ sentiments that the proposal was rushed.

Hellie said the proposal may have been rushed, but the Senate spent the same amount of time on the Senate proposal. Keliinoi agreed, but said that students felt less hurried with the Senate document because, being senators, they have a more thorough

grasp of changes that need to be made in Senate than on Cabinet. The feeling of haste was one of two main oppositions to the Cabinet proposal. The second opposition concerned the addition of a Service and Sustainability Director. The Football Club

senator said at the March 7 meeting that Senate should make sure sustainability isn’t just a passing trend before adding a sustainability position to Cabinet. “When people say things like that, it makes me concerned that they are not receiving a good educa-

tion at Linfield,” Jones said about the “fad” concern. “I was pretty disappointed by the nature of the discussion because I felt that the arguments being put forth lacked the substance I would have liked to see from senators.” Hellie said having a sustainability position in Cabinet represents student interest and need. “Linfield is kind of sustainability-based,” she said. “If Cabinet wasn’t reflecting what the students wanted, then we’re not doing our job.” Patterson said she was disappointed the proposal didn’t pass, especially the part about moving the board of trustees seat from the vice president’s duties to the president’s. But both Patterson and Keliinoi said the Cabinet restructuring proposal won’t disappear. “It’s a continuing dialogue that we will be having with our ASLC government, and proposals will be made and voted on in the near future, perhaps even to the Senate proposal as well,” Keliinoi said. Kelley Hungergord can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


March 11, 2011

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Features

March 11, 2011

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother

On the Road

By Jack Kerouac As its name suggests, this is a largely autobiographical work based on road trips made by the author and his friend across America in the ’50s. It presents the American “Beat Generation” seeking thrills with real-life events. “If you are not currently on the road, then this book makes you want to round up your friends, hop in your car and start driving,” senior Lauren Funtanilla, co-editor of CAMAS, said.

By Amy Chua Yale Law School Professor Chua shares her parenting theories as a traditional, strict Chinese “tiger mother.” She lists a number of rules that she enforces with her two daughters and narrates vivid examples. “This is a story about a mother, two daughters and two dogs,” Chau wrote in the book. “This was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. But instead, it’s about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how I was humbled by a thirteen-year-old.” An article called “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior,” published in the Wall Street Journal on Jan. 8, garnered numerous responses, both positive and negative, about the memoir. Visiting scholar from China, Tang Yu, who teaches Chinese at Linfield, said the book successfully reflects some stereotypical Asian children’s educational success, but it doesn’t represent the way Chinese mothers raise their children. Associate professor of English Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt, recommended the book.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

By Ken Kesey Set in an Oregon asylum, this classical novel reveals the secrets behind mental institutions of the 1950s-1960s. Through the perspective of a Native American patient who pretends to be deaf and mute, the book presents a cynical look at America’s society and its rules. In 1975, the book was adapted as a movie, starring Jack Nicholson, and won five Academy Awards. “It’s a sad, intriguing and engaging book that provides insight into the hidden aspects of institutions within society that most of us tend to overlook or take for granted,” junior Bouquet Harger said.

Midnight at

By Judy Fong Bate A 6-year-old g marries an older m in a small town in restaurant called a living. Through scenes at the Drag Dutt-Ballerstad cially for Asian-Am their similar expe

break away from the plunge into a book, ins by Jaffy Xiao/Features editor

I

n this Internet-driven era, we read news online, watch TV shows on Hulu, chat with friends on Facebook and read online textbooks. But do you remember the first time you read a fiction novel? How long has it been since you read a printed book (textbooks don’t count)? Spring Break is a great time to explore or reconnect with the world of books. Here are a few starter ideas form Linfielders that you can enjoy on the beach, at the airport, in your house, in the yard or at a local café.


Features

March 11, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

Ender’s Game

By Orson Scott Card Published in 1977, this book presents kids who are selected and sent to a battle-school space station for military training to try to save the planet, after aliens attacked Earth twice. The story mostly focuses on the battle school and is told from the perspective of a little boy. Senior Lauren Funtanilla said the book is not just for the science fiction lovers because it’s a fast read that offers a compelling narrative with complex characters.

the Dragon Cafe

es girl’s life is changes after her beautiful mother man and they flee from Communist China to live n Canada during the 1950s. The family opens a Dragon Café and they must work rigorously for the young girl’s eyes, the hardships behind the gon Café unfold. dt said the book is good to read at home, espemerican students who can share and learn from eriences.

e web; stead

Graphic by Juli Tejadilla/Graphics/ads designer

Namesake

By Jhumpa Lahiri Indian-American author Jhumpa Lahiri narrates the story of a Bengali couple who immigrate to the United States and struggle in a life they are unaccustomed to. The couple settles in Massachusetts through their arranged wedding. “It’s about the dynamic relationship between a father and son but also signifies the importance of heritage and family,” Funtanilla said. Associate professor of English Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstadt said this a great travel book because it is separated into small stories by chapters and is easy to find in airport bookstores.

Books of Life

For students not interested in fiction, DuttBallerstadt suggested reading books that relate to their lives or what they are hoping to achieve. “A Linfield football athlete can read a book written by a football player or coach. An accounting major student can read books about how to become successful in the field,” she said. “It’s all about a book that inspires you.”

Jaffy Xiao can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.

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Culture

March 11, 2011

Spring theater season opens with witty play Chelsea Bowen Opinions editor Students will perform a play based on an Oscar Wilde story at 7:30 p.m. March 15-18 in the Marshall Theater in Ford Hall. Junior Kanon Havens, who will play the role of Sybil Merton, said that the central conflict of the play, titled, “West Moon Street,” revolves around the character of Lord Arthur fulfilling a task given to him by a palm reader before he is able to get married to the character Sybil. “It’s very witty,” Havens said. “It’s a play that makes fun of the high class.” Havens said that she anticipates having fun with the performance and seeing how the audience reacts. “It’s such a fulfilling feeling to perform and get an honest reaction,” she said. Freshman Gabrielle Leif, who will play the role of Lady Windermere, said that being involved with the play has been a positive experience so far. “I think it is going well. It’s one of those things when you get closer and closer, you get nervous, but everything is coming together,” she said. Leif described the play as a comedy of manners. “The characters play the role they think they are supposed to be playing, and the show pokes fun at that,” she said.

Katie Pitchford/Photo editor Freshman Kay Bartlett (far left), feshman Cole Curtwright (sitting in back), senior Rachel Westrick (left side of table), junior Kanon Havens (right side of table), freshman Gabrielle Leif (sitting in back), and junior McKenna Peterson (far right) practice for “West Moon Street” as director Elizabeth Rothan (standing) oversees the rehearsal. Leif added that an interesting aspect of the show is its three-ring circus theme. There are two rings painted in the stage, and each side of the stage is a few feet from the audience. The audience

will be on all four sides of the stage, she said. Adjunct professor of Theatre and Communication Arts Elizabeth Rothan, class of ’85, is directing the play. “I’m hoping that the audi-

ence will see a little bit of themselves and understand the sensibilities of a time different from our own,” Rothan said. The play was written by New York City play-

Photo courtesy of Laurel Adams

had come true, I would have done something like the boys in the book did,” Adams said. He added that he spent a lot of time researching background information on World War II training regimens and combat techniques to include historical accuracy. He said he consulted volunteers at the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum who were knowledgeable about the World War II era. “I’ve always been a dreamer and fantasized,” Adams said. “This story wasn’t something that I’d dreamt up my entire life, but I’d always wanted to write a novel. I just composed it as I wrote.” The second author, Peter Laufer, will present his non-fiction book “The Dangerous World of Butterflies: The Startling Subculture of Criminals, Collectors, and Conservationists” at 7:30 p.m. March 17 in the Austin Reading Room. The book explores butterflies and the network of traders, breeders and collectors who deal with them Laufer began investigating the subject after being

invited to a butterfly preserve in Nicaragua. The book traces the organized crime and ecological damage behind the butterfly field in Nicaragua. Laufer is the James Wallace Chair in Journalism at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication He has also been an NBC News correspondent, produced a number of documentaries and books and created the nationallysyndicated radio program “National Geographic World Talk.” Nicholson Library Public Relations Intern junior Lindsay Gehres said she encourages students and community members to attend the events. “An author reading is like a literary job shadow,” Gehres said. “It allows students to ask about an author’s process and any other questions about the field and genre.” For more information on the readings, contact Library Director Susan Barnes Whyte at swhyte@linfield.edu.

Alumnus, journalist share stories Joanna Peterson Culture editor

Two authors will read from their latest books — a novel about two friends growing up in Oregon and a non-fiction book about butterflies — during readings in the Nicholson Library this month. Linfield alumnus Laurel Adams, class of ’59, will read from “Two Boys” at 4 p.m. March 12 in the Austen Reading Room. The book chronicles the lives of two friends in a late 1930s-era, small-town, American setting. The story tells of the boys’ coming-of-age in the Willamette Valley in Drayville, Ore. The friends work their way through adolescence playing sports, hunting and daydreaming about girls before enlisting in the U.S. Army Air Corps. Adams said the setting is modeled after McMinnville, Ore., where he grew up, went to college and had a career in education and administration. He said the characters in the story are similar to people he met while growing up in McMinnville. “One of the main charac-

“Two Boys” chronicles the lives of friends in the ’40s ters is a Jewish boy whose family owns a furniture store,” Adams said. “I was inspired by a Jewish family who used to own a similar store in McMinnville.” He said that while many of the characters and the setting were inspired by his life experiences, the story wasn’t an autobiographical account. “In the back of my mind, the characters were probably people I knew, but I think if my dreams

Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com

wright Rob Urbinati, who conducted a play reading and feedback session with students at Linfield on Feb. 26. Tickets cost $7 for Linfield faculty, staff and senior citizens; $5 for Linfield students;

and $9 at full price. For more information about the production, contact Elizabeth Rothan at erothan@linfield.edu Chelsea Bowen can be reached at linfieldreviewopinions@gmail.com


March 11, 2011

Culture

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Trio concert to showcase classical works Sharon Gollery For the Review The Music Department will host a trio concert during which cello instructor Sherill Roberts will perform with guests violinist Amy Natzke and pianist Anna Danese. They will perform pieces by composers Mozart, Vivaldi, Brahms, Mendelssohn and Bach. The performance will be at 7:30 p.m. March 11 in the Delkin Recital Hall in the Vivian Bull Music Center. “We gave a performance

of this program [March 6] in Sherwood, [Ore.,] and thought it would be nice to repeat it at Linfield,” Roberts said. Natzke and Danese have been playing together for four years. “We began just to enjoy playing chamber music together and decided a yearly recital was a way to keep us working hard and also so that we could share the music we love with others. This year we asked Sherill to join us so that we could expand to some trio

literature.  She invited us to play a second performance in McMinnville at Linfield, and we are thrilled to be able to do that,” Danese said in an e-mail. “This is our first time performing with Sherill, and we are so happy and grateful to be doing so.” Danese received her bachelor’s degree in piano performance from Westmont College in Santa Barbara, Calif. She teaches humanities and art history at Veritas Classical Christian School in Newberg,

Ore., where she also teaches private lessons. She is finishing a master’s in Classical Christian Studies at New St. Andrew’s College in Moscow, Idaho. “We are doing this purely because we love to play chamber music,” Roberts said. Roberts has a master’s in music from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She has performed extensively in the United States and in Europe, and is the principal cellist in the Linfield Chamber Orchestra and the Port-

land Opera Orchestra She teaches body mapping and provides workshops for musicians as well as teaching cello at Linfield. “[Roberts] is truly a kindred spirit and a wonderful player. We look forward to this recital very much,” Natzke said. Natzke, a graduate of the Oberlin Conservatory and the University of Michigan, has performed in orchestras and music festivals across the United States She is associate concertmaster of the Portland Columbia

Symphony and has performed with the Portland Chamber Orchestra and the Oregon Chamber Players. She also teaches private lessons. “Performing chamber music for others who truly value it, who truly find inspiration in it, is an exquisite blessing,” Natze said. “There is a spiritual intimacy that occurs … even if there is just one listener — one open, expectant listener.” Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Vocal ensemble brings Renaissance era music alive Chelsea Ploof For the Review The professional women’s vocal ensemble In Mulieribus performed March 6 in Ice Auditorium. Their performance set included famous compositions by Palestrina, Landini, Machaut, Dufay and Josquin. Their music showcased the primary forms of polyphony: florid organum, the conductus and the motet. Florid organum illustrates the subordinate role of preexisting chant while the conductus is completely original and independent. The motet highlights text that is sung simultaneously by upper voices. “I thought the group’s sound was quite spectacular. They had good sense of pitch” freshman Joe Komarek said. “It was a good selection of music, starting with Gregorian chant and ending with contemporary

choral music — with Renaissance polyphony music in between. So I personally enjoyed the concert very much.” Anna Song, director of choirs and assistant professor of music, co-founded the ensemble in 2004. Song served as the artistic director and conductor of the group. “I thought it was good. I was pleased. There were challenges, but overall it went well,” Song said of the performance. In Mulieribus is dedicated to bringing the community together through music written before the 1750s and bringing the Renaissance back to life. “I recently had moved to Portland, and I loved early music, especially from the Renaissance,” Song said. “I was looking for an artistic outlet, and I wanted to perform music at a professional level.” Both Song and Tuesday

Rupp co-founded the ensemble. When Rupp was unable to continue her leadership position, Song took over. What started out as an informal hobby quickly turned into a popular group. “We gave a concert, and we had almost 250 people come to our first Christmas performance,” Song said. “The reception was well received. We got a board together and became a nonprofit organization.” In Mulieribus is also involved in community service. Until recently, all of its proceeds went to non-profit organizations, especially those geared toward helping women and children. The ensemble not only represents polyphonic music but uses its voice to give back to the community at large. To find out more information about In Mulieribus, visit www.inmulierbus.org.

Chelsea Ploof can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Megan Myer/Online editor Members of the women’s vocal ensemble In Mulieribus sing Renaissance classics March 6 in Ice Auditorium.

Na Hemo ‘breaks loose,’ to play for fundraiser Yoko Gardiner For the Review Linfield students will have a chance to soak up some island vibes March 11 in the Fred Meyer Lounge during a Hawaiian Club fundraiser. Resident music group Na Hemo will perform at “Ruba-Dub” to raise money for the 39th annual Hawaiian Club Luau, which will take place on April 30. Senior club president Ihilani Haru said in an e-mail that the luau will feature a country store, food, music and dances from Hawaii. “Linfield students should learn that there is a rich culture associated with the islands. Hawaii is the melting pot of the U.S. and stu-

dents from Hawaii grow up experiencing many different traditions,” Haru said in the e-mail. Na Hemo comprises six Linfield Students who play reggae, bringing alive the “aloha spirit” of their native Hawaii. In the band are juniors Kala’e Parish on vocals and guitar, Logan Freitas on vocals and keyboard, Sparky Gonzalez on vocal and percussion, Chris Kamaka on guitar, Jeremy Moll on drums, senior Cheyne Kaninau on bass guitar. Moll will also perform a solo at the beginning of the night, Haru said. Na Hemo has not performed at Linfield in more than a year.

The greatest reward that we can gain through sharing our music with our students is a smile and a good time.

-Kala’e Parish junior

Na Hemo was formed in 2008 when the members started at a friend’s house. Parish explained that they had the idea to start a band for a Cat Cab.

“It’s a part of our culture to sit around and ‘jam’ or play all types of music from the past and present,” Parish said. Kaninau said the name of

the group has a meaning: “The word ‘Na’ in Hawaiian is a pluralizer or an adjective meaning a thing or a person. The definition of ‘Hemo’ is ‘to be loose,’” Kaninau said. Parish mentioned some of the band’s various inspirations. “[Our music is] influenced by our elders (grandfathers, fathers, uncles, etc.) back home in Hawaii who have passed down the music and culture and experience to us. We are also heavily influenced by the one and only Bob Marley, Katchafire and Israel Kamakawiwo’ole,” Parish said in an e-mail. The band hopes students enjoy themselves by dancing, feeling alive and break

ing free from their problems while listening to groovy music. “The greatest reward that we can gain through sharing our music with our students is a smile and a good time,” Parish said in the e-mail. For more information about Na Hemo and future shows, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ nahemomusic. The Hawaiian Club luau costs $3 without a canned food donation and $2 with a can of food, which will be donated to a food bank. Students are encouraged to bring exact change and soft drinks will be served. Yoko Gardiner can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


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Entertainment

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March 11, 2011

Australian band chases the nu-disco funk groove Braden Smith KSLC 90.3 FM Codebreaker, made up of Steven Hawley and Sage Schwarm of Christmas Island, Australia, released its debut album “The Space Chase” Feb. 15. The album is a vibrant model of the emerging nudisco genre that is gaining popularity in the U.S. The duo is pioneering the young genre, which fuses elements of modern dance and house music with those of disco and funk from the ’70s and ’80s. With solid dance beats, funky guitar riffs, futuristic synthesizers and cheesy vocals, “The Space Chase” is a shining example of nudisco’s potential. On the surface, the album is fun and easy to dance to, but it is also sophisticated in the way it is produced and mixed. The

result is a sleek album that will appeal to many modern listeners, even those without an appreciation for the fine art of traditional disco. The first track, “Silver Lining,” introduces spacey synthesizer effects that permeate the album but quickly establish a solid disco beat accompanied by tambourine and clapping. Short, lyrical phrases, effects and synthesizer solos are interspersed so that even after six minutes, the song never becomes dull. Similar techniques are used throughout the album to keep the body dancing while simultaneously taking the mind on a trippy, synthy sojourn through space. All of this is laden with cheesy lyrics about love that supposedly died out after the ’70s and early ’80s. The singing is rarely so pronounced that it becomes too

cheesy but is still quite fun and provides a humorous glimpse into how love was once expressed in the music of a past era. However, the romance really heats up in an entertaining way when they break out the French in the sixth track “Sous l’ Choc,” featuring Marc Gauvin. Other enjoyable tracks include “Follow Me” and “First True Love Affair.” While each track isn’t amazing, they are all exceedingly entertaining and will put you in the mood to get you groove on to wherever you are. The synthesizer has seen quite the rebirth in the 21st century, and Codebreaker masterfully employs it and other modern techniques to give disco and funk a fresh, sleek coat of paint, reviving a genre that many thought to be dead.

Photo courtesy of www.codebreakermusic.com Nu-disco duo Codebreaker released a debut album, “The Space Chase,” on Feb. 15 on Disco Demolition Records. RIYD: Tune in to KSLC 90.3 Chromeo, Miami Horror, Daft Punk FM to hear tracks from Recommended Tracks: Codebreaker’s “The Space “Silver Lining” (1) Chase.” “Follow Me”(3) Braden Smith can be reached at “First True Love Affair” (4) kslcmusic@gmail.com.

Pro Cat Cab to marry melody and story lines Joanna Peterson Culture editor Nelly’s Echo, a band that prides itself on telling stories with melodies, will perform a professional Cat Cab on March 17 in the Fred Meyer Lounge. Frontman singer-songwriter Nelson Emokpae uses a blend of soulful styles to bind stories together melodically. Emokpae said that music is a valuable medium for storytelling because of the emotional power it holds for listeners. “The beautiful thing about melody is that it makes it easier to put the stress of

life into words,” Emokpae said. “The message has a deeper connection because of the melody behind it.” Emokpae said the name for his band was inspired by audience reactions to the musical stories he performed. “Music is a two-way street,” he said. “Nelly’s Echo stands for Nelly, who is a performer, and his audience, who make an echo as a response to the performance.” Emokpae said that his sound, a mix of blues, reggae, jazz, and soul, has evolved over time, but that the base of his identity as a musician has remained the

same since his early years in Nigeria. “In Nigeria, as a kid, I was always walking around humming tunes and playing beats on the table,” Emokpae said. “I still hear the same melodies and beats in my head today.” Emokpae said that he grew up singing in choirs and church events but that he was a physical therapist until his musical career turned into a full-time pursuit last spring, when he toured 60 colleges in six months. Emokpae said that he enjoys performing for college students because of their impressionability.

“The cool thing about college students is that they haven’t made up their minds about life yet,” he said. “They’re still open to new ideas, so if I can spread the positive messages of hope, love and peace, then I’ve done my job.” Emokpae released his first E.P. in 2007, “Live, Love and Laugh,” which Emokpae said was a learning experience. “It allowed me to learn where I stood in the music world, but I made a lot of mistakes that I rectified in the second album,” he said. Emokpae said that his second album, “Secrets of a Happy Life,” stemmed

mostly from his journal entries. “I’ve always written in journals because I can refer back to them and follow the train of thought I had about an emotion or experience I was having,” he said. Emokpae explained that strong feelings drive his music. “After a powerful reaction to something, I think of a melody, and then try to tie words to that melody,” he said. Emokpae said he plans to release a new album titled “Victoria’s Secret.” It will be centered on the struggles women face in today’s culture.

“Victoria’s Secret tells a woman that she has to dress a certain way, act a certain way and interact with people a certain way,” Emokpae said. “This album deals with these pressures from a woman’s perspective.” He said that his former relationships and female friends contributed to the ideas and experiences that shaped the songs. “Life is too short for the rubbish we dish out and take,” Emokpae said. “One way to help soften the blow is to make good music as a soundtrack to life. That’s what I hope to do.” Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

A cappella Cat Cab

Juniors Chelsea Janzen (left) and Kayla Wilkens sing a duet during a Cat Cab on March 10 in the Fred Meyer Lounge.

Katie Pitchford/Photo editor


Sports

March 11, 2011

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Column: Athlete kicked off team for sex << Continued from page 16 to comply with the Honor Code.” OK. I have nothing against the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints as an institution or against Mormons themselves; some of my best friends in high school were practicing Mormons. I also can respect BYU on one level in the sense that the university stuck to its guns and dismissed him from the team for the violation as per school policy. But that’s where my agreement with the decision begins and ends. I have so many issues with

this situation that it makes my head spin. For starters, who reported Davies to BYU in the first place? He didn’t come forward on his own; the school approached him and essentially forced him to fess up. Was it someone from ASU, his girlfriend’s school, who saw BYU basketball on the rise and took an opportunity to sabotage the team’s NCAA tourney chances? Or was it another student at BYU trying to make himself or herself look good by ratting out an unworthy brother? I’m betting that’s the case; after all, the Honor Code tells students to “encourage others in their

commitment to comply with the Honor Code,” even if it means turning them in to the administration. Is that the kind of environment that should be promoted — one of constant suspicion and fear in which students are looking for any transgression to report to the powers that be? What a wonderful way to make stressed-out students even more nervous and subsequently knife many of your own tenants as Mormons by breeding distrust and secrecy among what your church wants to be: a big, happy family. Furthermore, the Honor Code itself is a joke. You’re a college, BYU, not a train-

ing program for your next generation of church-goers. Yes, as a private institution you have the right to set your own rules, but even as a devout Christian I can’t respect a religious university that expects perfect adherence to an utterly unrealistic set of rules. First of all, your religion believes in the teachings of Christ. That means that you acknowledge that as humans you will sin and you will sin frequently. How can you possibly reconcile this fact with a notolerance policy toward what your church considers sins, especially since many of the tenants in the Code aren’t even biblical. I don’t

remember Christ espousing that “Thou shalt not consume caffeine.” Also, I’ve never met anyone in my life (Mormon or non-Mormon) that doesn’t break at least one of those tenants every day. Does such a Mormon even exist? I’m talking swearing, drinking caffeine or even wearing baggy clothes, all of which are in the Code. It’s a wonder you have any students left at all, especially since college students don’t exactly have the same level of restraint that a mature adult does. This whole situation stinks. Someone just suddenly decides to report one

of BYU’s best players, and then the university immediately dismisses him from the team. I have to wonder if an average person at BYU would have been booted from school if he was reported — can you say example case? As this situation continues to develop, we will see the true character of the university. If Davies is allowed to return to the team next year when he’s “learned his lesson,” thus continuing the media circus fixated on BYU as of late while still showing that the university sticks to its guns,

Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Tennis: Men’s side drops to 2-4 in conference << Continued from page 16

Dewitt. Magdaong won 6-2, 6-4, Dewitt won 6-4, 6-1, and Kingzett won 7-5, 6-2. Dewitt was the only player to win a singles and a doubles match. The men suffered another loss, 3-6, to Willamette on March 5 in Salem. But when the Wildcats weren’t successful in tallying any singles victories, they swept the doubles matches. Magdaong and Kingzett won 8-5, and junior Cody Levien and sophomore Zachery Lyons also won 8-5.

The men’s team has now dropped to a 2-4 conference standing. “I think to improve we need to figure out a team unity. We need to not focus on the past matches and really just take one match at a time and work to improve that way,” Dewitt said. This week, the women’s team will travel to Spokane, Wash., for a doubleheader against Whitworth University on March 11 and against a Division I nonconference team, Gonzaga University, on March 12. The men will host Whitworth at 4:00 p.m. March 12. Kelsey Sutton can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Megan Myer/Online editor Sophomore Lexi Thomas anticipates the ball during a match March 5 at home against Willamette University.


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Sports

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Wildcats walk away with wins Rae Smith Staff reporter The Wildcat softball team remains undefeated after another weekend of command performances. Junior outfielder Jordan Mixsell said the team maintained a high level of play throughout the weekend. “We did a good job of not letting up and getting the most out of every play — pitch or at bat,” she said. In the weekend’s first doubleheader on March 5, the ’Cats took on the George Fox University Bruins. Senior pitcher Claire Velaski led the ’Cats to victory in the first game, recording her first no-hitter. Juniors catcher Emilee Lepp and first baseman Staci Doucette each hit three-run home runs to lead the offense in the 12-0 thrashing. The ’Cats held the Bruins scoreless again in the second game of the day, which ended 11-0. Junior pitcher Lauren Harvey picked up the win and was aided by the relief of senior pitcher Elise Karscig. Several players had multiple hits and RBIs to boost the offense. Lepp, senior shortstop Emily Keagbine and sophomore third baseman Karleigh Prestianni each hit home runs. Junior outfielder Jaydee Baxter complimented every contribution to the wins. “It was a good overall team effort. Even though

everyone’s hitting wasn’t at 100 percent, we managed to score quite a few runs,” she said. “We are a really wellrounded team. We work hard, and we also have a lot of natural talent.” The weekend’s second doubleheader on March 6 saw the ’Cats blow out Lewis & Clark College 12-4 and 20-1. The games featured impressive offensive performances from the ’Cats’ experienced line-up. In both games combined, Keagbine racked up nine RBIs on 8-for-8 hitting, three

pitchers saw action in either the first or second game. Velaski and freshman pitcher Hannah Muller held the Pioneers scoreless, each pitching two innings. Karscig finished up the last inning of the game, allowing four runs. Freshman pitcher Karina Paavola picked up her first collegiate win in the second game, giving up only one run in two innings pitched. Harvey and freshmen pitchers Kim Chase and Shelby VandeBergh each added one inning of shutout pitching. Paavola said she was excited to get the win and was impressed by Keagbine’s and Hubrich’s offensive performances. She also credited the team’s chemistry. “[It] makes it easy Date: March 12 to work together, relax and just play,” Paavola Time: Noon said. Inclement weather Location: Tacoma, Wash. postponed the ’Cats’ doubleheader, which was slated for March 9, against Concordia University. Baxter said the team of which were home runs, uses rough weather to gain and senior outfielder Kayla strength. Hubrich went 7-for-8 on the “It makes us mentally day, scoring six times.      tough, and we learn how Three players, including to deal with adversity,”she Prestianni, senior second said. baseman Alex Hartmann The ’Cats are scheduled and freshman third base- to travel to Tacoma, Wash., man Ashley Garcia, added this weekend to take on three runs each to Keagbine Pacific Lutheran University and Hubrich’s combined 10 on March 12 and the Uniin the second game. versity of Puget Sound on Baxter also had a solid March 13. Both doubleheadday, contributing seven RBIs ers are scheduled to start at from five hits over the two noon. games. Rae Smith can be reached at All seven of the ’Cats’ linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Linfield @ Pacific Lutheran

Golf is out of the rain Lauren Ostrom For the Review The women’s golf team is eager to start the season, but foul weather has delayed its tournaments. The men’s team, however, is anticipating the rest of the season, after already competing in one tournament. The women team’s first tournament Feb. 28 against Willamette University was canceled. The women have been practicing and hitting the gym in order to stay fit. Sophomore Brinn Hovde says that the team has been waiting for their first tournament. “I’m excited just because during the time off, we have

worked on our games,” she said. “I can’t wait to see how we all apply that.” The men’s golf team has already participated in its first tournament. The team played in the Puget Sound Invitational, which was held March 3 and 4. Linfield came in second place behind Oklahoma Christian University’s 577 with a total two-day score of 606. The University of Puget Sound followed close behind, at 615 as did as Pacific Lutheran University with 631 and North Idaho College with 647. Three golfers on Linfield’s men’s team were among the top-10 finishers at the invitational. Junior Alex Fitch tied

for sixth with a six-over-par 148. Freshman A.J. Taylor scored a 150, as did Senior Yutaro Sakamoto. Taylor and Sakamoto placed eighth and ninth, respectively. Fitch said he hopes the team will step up its game this season to qualify for Nationals. “I’m looking forward to seeing some improvements from some of the younger guys on our team,” Fitch said. Both the men’s and women’s teams are conditioning and improving on individual games to rank high in the next tournament March 13 and 14 at Pacific Lutheran. Lauren Ostrom can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

March 11, 2011

Wildcat sports schedule Friday, March 11 Women’s tennis

@ Whitworth

3:30 p.m.

Men’s tennis

vs. Whitworth

4 p.m.

Track and field

@ Columbus, Ohio

All day

Women’s tennis

@ Gonzaga

9:30 a.m.

Track and field

@ Pacific

10 a.m.

Baseball

@ Willamette (2)

11 a.m.

Softball

@ Pacific Lutheran (2) Noon

Women’s lacrosse

@ Portland

12:30 p.m.

Track and field

@ Columbus, Ohio

All day

Softball

@ Puget Sound (2)

Noon

Baseball

@ Willamette

1 p.m.

Women’s golf

@ Tacoma, Wash

All day

Men’s golf

@ Tacoma, Wash.

All day

Women’s golf

@ Tacoma, Wash.

All day

Men’s golf

@ Tacoma, Wash.

All day

Saturday, March 12

Sunday, March 13

Monday, March 14


Sports

March 11, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

15

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Senior pitcher and designated hitter Robert Vaughn swings at bat against the Pacific University Boxers. The Wildcats lost 4-11 at home but won both games March 5, with scores of 10-4 in the first game and 2-0 in the second.

Baseball: Team triumphs during doubleheader << Continued from page 16

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer The ’Cats huddle around head coach Scott Brosius for a pep talk during the game on March 6 against the Boxers.

underclassmen. “Due to injuries and graduations from last year’s team, there are a number of younger players who look to have promising college careers. [Sophomore] Zach Manley, [sophomore] Chris Mueller and [freshman] Zach Brandon are all underclassmen pitchers who play key roles on the mound. Truex, Urness and [freshman outfielder] Nate McClellan are all young position players who saw a lot of action last week,”

Brosius said. Larson said he is also expecting a lot from the team. “I  enjoy being out there with the team everyday and hanging with the guys. We’re a pretty close-knit group, and everyone gets along,” he said. “I expect us to go out each weekend and give it our all. If we play like we should, we will have a great year.” The Wildcats will host Whitman College at noon March 19. Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


16

sports

www.linfieldreview.com

March 11, 2011 Sports Commentary

Catline

Honor Code draws attention

Northwest Conference standings Men’s Tennis Whitman

7-0

1.000

Willamette

3-1

.750

Pacific

4-2

.667

George Fox

3-2

.600

Whitworth

2-2

.500

Linfield

2-4

.333

Puget Sound

1-3

.250

Pacific Lutheran

0-4

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-5

.000

Chris Forrer For the Review

We’re focusing on our strength, which is strong doubles. It won’t be easy, but we can do it,” Click said of the upcoming matches against the also undefeated Whitworth Pirates. “We have a lot of fight and that will take us a long way in the next matches.” The men failed to claim a victory on March 4 with a 4-5 loss to Pacific. Linfield lost the first two doubles matches; however, the No. 3 team, seniors Tal Dewitt and Tim Wagar, defeated Pacific in the final doubles match of the day with a narrow 9-7 victory. Picking up wins in the singles matches were seniors Mark Magdaong, Brent Kingzett and

Hey ’Cats. This week I decided to steer my gaze over the nation at large in search of a juicy story. It didn’t take long for me to pinpoint the perfect issue to wax philosophical on. In the opening days of March, Brigham Young University basketball was on top of the world. It was riding high with only a pair of losses, was top-10 ranked and was arguably the best college player in the country in guard Jimmer Fredette. Then, without any warning, BYU’s administrators announced that forward sophomore Brandon Davies, the team’s leading rebounder, had violated the school’s Honor Code and was immediately dismissed from the team. Davies’ violation, which remained unspecified for a time, was later revealed to have been consensual sex with his girlfriend, an 18-year-old student at Arizona State University. The Honor Code, for those unfamiliar with it, states that students must “be honest; live a chaste and virtuous life; obey the law and all campus policies; use clean language; respect others; abstain from alcoholic beverages, tobacco, tea, coffee, and substance abuse; participate regularly in church services; observe the Dress and Grooming Standards; encourage others in their commitment

>> Please see Tennis page 13

>> Please see Column page 13

Women’s Tennis Linfield

6-0

1.000

Whitworth

4-0

1.000

Whitman

3-2

.600

Willamette

4-3

.571

Pacific

2-2

.500

Puget Sound

2-4

.333

Lewis & Clark

2-4

.333

George Fox

1-4

.200

Pacific Lutheran

0-5

.000

Megan Myer/Online editor Junior Abby Olbrich prepares to hit the ball during a match against the Willamette University Bearcats on March 5 at home. The women’s tennis team won 7-2.

Softball Linfield

8-0

Pacific

6-2

1.000 .750

Pacific Lutheran

3-1

.750

Whitworth

4-4

.500

Willamette

3-5

.375

George Fox

0-4

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-4

.000

Puget Sound

0-4

.000

Willamette

3-0

1.000

Puget Sound

3-0

1 .000

Pacific

4-2

.667

George Fox

2-1

.667

Linfield

2-1

.667

Pacific Lutheran

1-2

.333

Baseball

Whitworth

0-0

.000

Whitman

0-3

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-6

.000

Weather delays golf play The women’s golf team wait anxiously for the season to get started because of constant weather delays, but the men’s team is off to a good start by placing second in its last two tournaments. See page 14>> Softball dominates NWC The Wildcats are well into the conference season and maintain an undefeated record with wins against George Fox University and Lewis & Clark College. Because of weather, the ’Cats had to postpone a game against Concordia University. See page 14>> Sports schedule Missed out on the sporting events last weekend? Check out the sports schedule to see when your favorite teams play this weekend. See page 14>>

’Cats match Bearcats Kelsey Sutton For the Review The tennis teams continued its season with matches against Pacific and Willamette Universities on March 4 and 5, respectively. The men’s and women’s teams ended the weekend with opposing results. The women’s team secured an 8-1 victory at home over Pacific on March 4 and again with a 7-2 win over Willamette on March 5. With the wins, Linfield is undefeated with a 6-0 record in the Northwest Conference. The women opened with two tight singles matches, with a 7-6(6-4), 3-6, 6-3 win by junior Abby Olbrich and a Pacific win of 7-5, 6-7(6-3), 6-2 over freshman

Lexi Thomas. This was Pacific’s only victory of the day. Linfield won against Pacific in the remaining four singles. Linfield took three wins in the women’s doubles. The No. 1 doubles team, senior Sarah Click and junior Abby Olbrich, won 8-4. The No. 2 team, senior Sophie Larson and freshman Caroline Brigham, won 8-3. The No. 3 team, sophomore Lexi Thomas and senior Sarah Watanabe, won 8-3. Linfield won five out of six singles matches against the Willamette Bearcats. Two out of the three doubles matches were won by the ‘Cats as well. The women remain a dominant force in conference play. “We know that Whitworth [University] is top competition.

Power from the mound brings wins Kaylyn Peterson For the Review The Linfield baseball team dominated over Pacific University in a doubleheader March 5 but lost to the Boxers the next day. The bats were swinging in the first game: ’Cats won 10-2, and the  they scored their first three runs in the second inning. Seniors catcher Cole Bixenman and pitcher Robert Vaughn and junior infielder Kevin Allen scored the runs. Sophomore outfielder Danny Urness earned another run after senior third baseman Dustin Smith hit a RBI to left field. Other players who scored during the

game were freshman infielder Kenny Johnson and sophomore first baseman Clayton Truex.  “In the first game, we hit the ball well and scored runs throughout the whole game,” junior pitcher Ryan Larson said. During the second game on March 5, the team’s power came from the mound, leading to a Wildcat win of 2-0. “In the second game, Vaughn was nearly unhittable on the mound,” Larson said.  Linfield scored the only runs of the game during the second inning, when Allen scored after Coleman’s RBI to left field, and then again when Smith hit an RBI to left field and McClellan scored

a run. Vaughn pitched for seven innings and only had three hits off him. He had eight strikeouts during the game. Linfield lost its March 6 game 4-11. Part of the team’s struggle involved injuries. “So far, a few key guys have been injured. Injuries are never a good thing, especially this early in the season,” Larson said. “However, with injuries come opportunities for other guys to step up.” Head coach Scott Brosius said he will lose some of his senior powerhouses, the athletes who have been important to the program. “I’ll start with our two senior captains, Smith and Eric Evenson.

Both are infielders, who have been four-year varsity players for us,” Brosius said. “On top of having outstanding careers, their leadership has been tantamount. Bixenman has been a three-year starter for us and has been a staple in the middle of the hitting order.  [Senior outfielder] Gunnar Cederberg and [senior first baseman] Kevin Coleman provide depth for us in the field. [Senior pitchers] Evan Hilberg and Vaughn have been key members of our pitching staff as well.” Brosius also spoke positively about this season’s >> Please see Baseball page 15


TLR Issue 17 3-11-2011