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Caleb and Sol Eugene-based twins rock Ice Auditorium with faith-filled concert Feb. 25. >> page 11

March 4, 2011

INSIDE

Cat Cab diva Junior Sabryna Coleman sings for a student Cat Cab March 4. >> page 12

Workout facilities Get the most buff for your buck by finding a gym in McMinnville that’s suits your needs. >> page 8-9

Baseball Wildcats win 7-2 on Feb. 26 but lose the second half of their doubleheader by one. >> page 14

Linfield College

McMinnville, Ore.

116th Year

Issue No. 16

Debates display campaign goals Jessica Prokop News editor The three Associated Students of Linfield College presidential and vice presidential candidates relayed their campaign goals during an elections debate on Feb. 28 in the Fred Meyer Lounge. The hour-long debate was open to all, but only a few students outside of Senate attended the event. A panel of judges comprising ASLC President senior Colin Jones, Secretary senior Sophie Larson and Dan Fergueson, director of college activities, asked questions pertaining to the candidates’ goals and presented hypothetical situations for the candidates to analyze. The judges also read written questions from the audience. The candidates had one minute to formulate their answers. After a brief introduction by each candidate, presidential candidate junior Katie Patterson began the debate by stating her goals for the year if elected to office. She said that she wants to work toward getting a student center, add more intramural sports and possibly establish a Cabinet radio show on Linfield’s student radio station, KSLC 90.3 FM, so that officers are more widely known and recognized. Vice presidential candidate Bradley Keliinoi said that he wants to increase Senate representation and communication. One way he said he would do this is by sending out a single constituency report to the entire campus. “Even though I am running unopposed, I want students to

ASLC presidential candidates junior Katie Patterson (top left) and Rachel Coffey (top right) and vice presidential candidate junior Bradley Keliinoi (left) fielded questions at 9 p.m. Feb. 28 after the evening’s Senate meeting. The questions required the candidates to consider how their platforms are better than their opponents’ and how they would run ASLC differently than the current president and vice president if elected. The candidates will discuss their goals one at a time after the March 7 Senate meeting in a “Fireside Chat.” Students can vote for the 201112 ASLC president and vice president between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. March 8 in an online ballot that will be e-mailed to students. Photos by Christine Fujiki/For the Review know that they still have a choice,” Keliinoi said. “But I would have loved to run against someone else, and I am just as motivated and dedicated.” Presidential candidate junior Rachel Coffey said that she wants to improve communication between faculty, students and administration. She also said

that a monthly report to students from Senate would help set the Linfield community’s tone. • Coffey said that she felt her goals are the most important because they are broad and encompass many of Patterson’s goals. She said she wants to keep everyone in the loop.

“I think I have shown students that I want to represent them and get things done for them,” Coffey said. “All of the candidates are talented, but I think I can do better [than Patterson] because I am well-rounded and have the capa-

declined alongside the economy, Director of College Activities Dan Fergueson said, and the new estimate is more feasible. “The college is asking us as students to put our money where our mouth is,” Jones said. Senate will vote on what to do with its discretionary fund during its next meeting March 7. If Senate were to dedicate it’s approximately $2,000 fund to the lighting project, the college would pay the rest, Jones said. He met with Glen Ford, vice president for finance and administration/ chief financial officer, on March 3 to confirm this arrangement. Jones said in an e-mail that Ford anticipates a final project cost of $23,000. ASLC Cabinet is also willing to put what’s left of its $2,000 fund toward the lighting, too. In past years, senators proposed such solutions as install-

ing solar lighting or path lights (as opposed to lampposts), and one year a senator recommended buying every student a keychain flashlight to carry on the pitchblack path. “While folks who brought [those solutions] may have been serious, I don’t think any of them were viable, long-term solutions,” Fergueson said. He said the path doesn’t receive enough sunshine to charge solar lights and path lights would inevitably be stolen because they aren’t bolted down. Any lighting installed should be lampposts similar to the ones on the path to Nicholson Library. These also fit in with the style and standards of the college, Fergueson said at the Feb. 28 Senate meeting. Some senators mentioned that students could take the longer, lit route along Highway 99-W to go to the grocery store, but Jones said

the safety of students on campus property should be addressed despite this. “Essentially this is our home for four years, and students should feel safe in their home,” Jones said. One senator propsed at the meeting that a Jacuzzi be installed near the school’s pool. Ideas listed on the meeting’s agenda include using the money to expand the Community Garden, build a rock climbing wall or establish a campus Frisbee golf course. The Senate Discretionary Fund exists for Senate committees to undertake various projects, Fergueson said. Untouched money goes toward a project voted on by the Senate. Past funds have purchased bike racks, ASLC election VOTE T-shirts and disaster relief.

>> Please see Vote page 6

Senate suggests illuminating fund proposal Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief

Voices of Hope Variety of faith traditions come together to spread universal message of hope. >> page 10

INSIDE

Editorial ...................... 2 News ........................... 4 Features........................ 7 Culture....................... 10 Sports ........................ 16

The Associated Students of Linfield College Senate began fielding ideas for the use of its discretionary fund on Feb. 28. Most of the discussion focused on helping the college purchase lighting for the path from the Miller Fine Arts Center to Albertsons — a concern that’s caused student anxiety for a long time. President senior Colin Jones said the path’s safety has been brought up in Senate for at least four years, and Vice President junior Katie Patterson said the issue has been mentioned in reports by the board of trustees for the same amount of time. The estimated cost of the project, however, was too expensive for the college to pursue above other budget items in the past. But construction prices have

Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


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www.linfieldreview.com The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Kelley Hungerford Managing editor Braden Smith Copy chief Septembre Russell Copy editor Felicia Weller Business manager Sarah Spranger News editor Jessica Prokop Sports editor Corrina Crocker Culture editor Joanna Peterson Features editor Jaffy Xiao Opinion editor Chelsea Bowen Photo editor Katie Pitchford Online editor Megan Myer Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla Illustrator Jenny Worcester Senior reporter Matt Sunderland Senior photographer Katie Paysinger Circulation manager Kyle Guth Columnists Matt Olson “Dear Bailey” Adviser William Lingle Professor of Mass Communication The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists.

Opinions

March 4, 2011

EDITORIAL

TLR endorses Coffey, Keliinoi for ASLC The Associated Students of Linfield College elections will take place March 8, and we would like to take this opportunity to endorse juniors Rachel Coffey for ASLC president and Bradley Keliinoi for vice presidnet. One aspect of Coffey’s campaign that stood out to us is her initiative to re-vamp the Fred Meyer Lounge. This is a long-term project, and we think that one of the responsibilities of the president should be to embark on projects that will improve student life on campus in the long run. A second admirable aspect of Coffey’s campaign is that she wants to bring about more communication when it comes to students, faculty and administration. Also, she has a set plan for getting the word out about ASLC and Senate, including sending out a report about what is taking place in Cabinet once a month.

Although junior Katie Patterson has experience from being the ASLC Vice President of the 2010-11 academic year, she does not seem to be as motivated as Coffey when it comes to taking on the role of president. “I considered not running, but this is such an interest of mine and it feels like my responsibility to help try to better the student interest, which I enjoy doing,” Patterson told us last week (“VP hopeful drops from ASLC race after one day,” TLR, Feb. 25). It seems that Patterson views the presidency as simply the next step in her career on ASLC and as an obligation. Coffey, however, appears to view the position as a genuine opportunity to make changes in students’ time at Linfield. Patterson also says she wants to take charge of the way fees from the student body are spent, but she has not outlined ways in which she plans

to make this happen. While Patterson’s goals are certainly reasonable and should be kept in mind by whomever is elected, we think that Coffey has the drive to achieve her goals. Patterson campaigned on improving Senate last year and little, if anything, has gotten better during her time in office — although the semester has not yet come to an end. Coffey seems earnestly dedicated to making changes, and we anticipate that. We also endorse Keliinoi and remind you to vote for him even though he is unopposed. If anyone has the experience and dedication to fix Senate, it’s Keliinoi. We hope you take our points into consideration, and we will continue to update you on election happeings. Be sure to catch the next debate or “Fireside Chats” on March 7 and

rounded student with many different perspectives. I have worked in the ASLC office as a LAB programmer for the past two years. I have been a member of ASLC Activities Council for three years. I have also been a student representative on two faculty committees for the past two years. My experiences have given me skills and understanding as a leader to be able to take on the challenge of being ASLC President.

You probably are wondering what can I do for you? My main goal is to improve communication between students, faculty and the administration. This includes leading the ASLC Cabinet in reaching out and informing students of important issues. I want students to be aware of what Cabinet and Senate are doing for students. If a student has a problem, I want them to know the student leader he or she can contact

to try to find a solution. One way I’ll do this is to add a message from Cabinet once a month in the Wildcat Weekly about Cabinets activities. Feel free to post questions for me on my Facebook group, “Rachel Coffey for ASLC President 2011-2012,” or come to the “Fire Side Chats” with all candidates on Monday at 8 p.m. in the FML.

experience and goals lead you to choose the former. I’ve been a senator since my freshman year and have served on the senate executive committee, as well as Senate president pro-tempore, for the last two years. I was involved in discussions to consolidate the number of Senate committees into the current four, which has been the biggest improvement to Senate in recent years. I look forward to overseeing additional changes to Senate that will produce a more responsive and effective legislative body.

The Review Editorial Board asked a valid question in last week’s editorial, “Candidates should consider Senate sustainability.” They recognized that many student concerns go unaddressed once the academic year has ended. “To simply drop such projects when a new year begins is unfair to students who were expecting and hoping for change.” I agree. I’ve proposed a solution to this problem—let’s make ASLC more transparent. I want to create a webpage on the ASLC website that lists each student concern or long-term

project and the specific actions we as a student government have taken to address them. This will keep ASLC accountable and show students that we are doing what we have promised to do. To read more on my experience and platform goals, please visit my official Facebook group “Bradley Keliinoi for ASLC Vice President.”

Review office hours Editor-in-chief Tuesdays 9:00-10:00 a.m. Thursdays 3:20-4:20 p.m. or by appointment Managing editor Tuesdays 10:00-11:00 a.m. Fridays 12:30-1:30 p.m. or by appointment Follow us on Twitter @linfieldreview and on Facebook don’t forget to cast your vote March 8 in the online ballot, which will be sent via e-mail. -The Review Editorial Board

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Dear Linfield Students, In case you have not met me, my name is Rachel Coffey, and I am running for ASLC President. Over the past three years at Linfield, I have been enthusiastically involved in various activities on campus, ranging from different student government positions to being an active member of Greek Life. My involvement has made me into a well-

Junior Rachel Coffey

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Associated Students of Linfield College, I’m Bradley Keliinoi, and I’m a junior political science major from Kaneohe, Hawaii. In just a few days, you will have an opportunity to cast your vote for the individuals who you believe will best represent student interests and concerns. I am running for ASLC vice president, and I kindly ask for your support. Although I am unopposed in this race, students still have a choice to make: to support or to not support my candidacy. I hope my

The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Fridays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday to appear in the Review the following Friday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

Graphic by Megan Myer/Online editor

Sincerely, Junior Bradley Keliinoi Candidate for ASLC Vice President


March 4, 2011

Opinions

www.linfieldreview.com

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OPINION

‘Portlandia’ clip sparks meaty media dialogue Felicia Weller Copy editor

After recently watching the video “Is it Local?” on YouTube from the Independent Film Channel series “Portlandia,” the increasing popularity of meat in the media and our growing curiousity as a society to know exactly where it’s coming from was brought to my attention. For those who haven’t

OPINION

seen the clip, it features a couple from Portland who, while dining out, want to know more about the chicken they are about to consume. The segment is obviously poking fun at the growing concern surrounding the availability of local, organic and free-range meat options. The couple come to find the chicken’s name was Colin, he had four acres of land to roam free, and he was fed a diet of sheep’s milk, soy and hazelnuts. Although it sounds extreme, this depiction doesn’t seem too far from the reality of our nation’s increasing desire to learn more about the meat indus-

try which has been heavily discussed in the media since the beginning of the 21st century. According to a 2003 CNN. com article, the “first apparent U.S. case of mad cow disease discovered” was recognized after the USDA decided to run tests on a cow that was unable to walk by the time it reached the slaughterhouse. Although the USDA had inspected the meat, it raised concerns of how an ill and crippled animal could even be considered a candidate for the next American meal. Since then, the media have been bombarded with investigations regarding fac-

tory farming and the significance behind supermarket labels, such as USDA organic and free-range claims. Through my own investigation, I have made the decision to become a vegetarian in response to the overwhelming presence of factory farming in the United States. The production of these animals, as I discovered initially in Michael Pollan’s best-selling book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma,” is not only inhumane for the animals, leaving them unnatural for us to consume, but is environmentally unsustainable to boot. However, the purpose of this story is not to tell

everyone to become a vegetarian like me. Watching “Is it Local?” allowed me to recognize the varying opinions from people such as my roommates, in response to the video’s portrayal of picky meat eaters. One roommate from Montana said she grew up knowing where her meat came from. It’s traditional for her family to hunt elk, deer and even antelope for consumption, and this is a healthier option in her mind. Another roommate from Seattle believes that although the majority of meat isn’t produced ethically, it remains an essential aspect of the human diet. Her solution? She’s con-

scious about eating only local and free-range meat whenever possible. This goes the same for my Californian roommate, who, like the actors in the YouTube clip, recently asked at a Portland restaurant if the hamburger was local. My conclusion? I think it’s great that people are thinking about the topic and making educated decisions about why or why not they choose to consume meat. It’s a personal choice to be respected and important to be discussed as more information is presented in the media.

Felicia Weller can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

Lock it up and other advice for preventing bicycle theft

Jaffy Xiao Feature editor While I thought my bike getting stolen last year was a coincidence with “good luck,” I heard three pieces of bad news from my friends

this year as well. If I have 50 friends at Linfield, and 20 of them have bikes, and three bikes are stolen, is this a series of coincidences? Instead of having a strong opinion for the issue, I have some advice to help people avoid having their bike stolen. First, you really need to register your bike. I bought my used bike last March, and it was stolen one month later.

Thanks to my mass communication class, I took a picture of my bike with a digital SLR camera. I reported it to the Linfield College Community Public Public Safety & Security with a high-resolution picture of my bike so that it could identify all of the features. Another coincidence was when I found the exact same bike on campus two weeks later. I called security imme-

COLUMN

diately. However, I didn’t register the bike yet, and the picture couldn’t prove anything. Second, for students who leave their bikes on campus during the breaks or weekends, it’s better to park your bikes inside your apartment or the basement of your dorm if possible. Not only does it reduce the possibility of bad luck but also the damage of rust from the rainy weather. For students who have

bikes checked out from the Linfield Bike Co-Op, you’d better ride the bike on weekdays and return it on Friday. I was told that my friends’ bikes were all stolen during the break. The people who steal tend to choose a break time on campus. They have less attention from others walking on the street and more parked bikes to choose from, as nearly no one takes bikes back home.

Now my third point. I am not sure how many street-view cameras are on campus. As we have more bike shelters available, I hope some of them are under the watch of cameras. If not, I highly encourage security or facilities to consider adding more street-view cameras, as bike shelters also need the function of keeping bikes safe. Jaffy Xiao can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.

OPINION

Student body disinterested Groundskeepers deserve by Senate representation thanks for landscaping labors

Matt Olson Columnist I don’t usually write follow-up pieces to other articles, especially when they’re as succinct as the Review editorial board’s piece was in last week’s issue (“Candidates should consider senate sustainability,” TLR, Feb. 25). But in this case, I feel it prudent to pound home just how utterly inept Senate is as a representation of the student body. The reason that article didn’t make the blood boil in your veins is simple: Nobody cares about Senate anymore. I guess I shouldn’t say that. There are about 25 people who care a great deal about Senate, about 40 more who think Senate is important and about 30 people who regularly use Senate as a cure for their own insomnia. The rest of campus is in another group — tentatively titled “everybody else.” Maybe once as a freshman we got roped into going to Senate because nobody else wanted

to (should’ve tipped us off) and haven’t gone since. Or perhaps we came into college and realized that when none of our RAs could explain what Senate did, it might not be that important. Or perhaps we simply got tired of all the Senate reports and loudly exclaimed what fiery place Senate should go to and have been ignoring it ever since. It doesn’t really matter when it happened. Senate could dissolve, and the collective student body would make less noise than the football team did during Trayless Tuesdays last year. And that’s a problem. A big one. One you might think Senate would like to try and fix. Maybe get the word out about what Senate actually does and what it has done (elections, mostly) so students might be a little bit more informed. I guess that might mean the 25 future leaders of America who are the core of Senate every year could actually have to take responsibility as representatives of the campus. As it turns out, having complete turnover in positions every year is kind of a problem. I know; it surprised me too. It basically assures

that every large project that students want to put on their résum … whoops, I mean that students want to enact to improve the campus never gets finished because the turnover rate is so high every year. I’m sure that’s the main reason nobody cares about Senate. When I see an organization with no foresight mired in rules and bylaws and not making any attempt to connect to the greater Linfield community, I feel like tuning it out. I don’t know how it’s important, I don’t know what it does, and I certainly don’t feel like it benefits me. Why should I (or anyone else) care? If you’re from Senate or any other ASLC affiliate, I hope you’re reading this and asking yourself what you’re doing for Linfield. And if you have some things in mind, think about them carefully and ask who they’re being done for. Most of the school has stopped paying attention to anything that’s going on in Senate, and it’s because you care too much about you and not enough about us. Eh, you’ll probably brush this off. You’ll be graduating soon anyway. Matt Olson can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

Septembre Russell Copy chief Seeing the big picture distracts us from realizing that it is a result of smaller, less obvious efforts. Sometimes the effects of a lack of those efforts manifest themselves in hindsight. You don’t miss what you’ve got until it’s gone is where I’m going with that. In a line from the song titled “Big Brother,” rap artist Kanye West made it obvious that he understands that people don’t take the time to appreciate each other until time runs out: “People never get the flowers while they can still smell ’em,” he warns in the song. West’s line holds a lot of truth; you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone. And that, my friends, is why I enjoy the opportunity to send out a wave of appreciation to the groundskeepers of Linfield College — but I don’t expect death

to come upon any of them as the rapper’s metaphor hints at. After some research, I discovered that it isn’t truly the United States Postal Service’s motto: The “Neither rain, nor snow, nor hail … ” aspect still applies to the people who work in the aforementioned weather conditions to keep our campus looking photo- shoot ready each semester. They work in the heat, too. And guess what: for safety reasons, they must work outdoors in the heat with jeans and gloves on. Despite inclement weather, when even the campus schedule was delayed because fresh powder covered the ground, it was the groundskeepers that worked outdoors to clear paths while some of us went back to sleep or headed out to play. That morning I traipsed downstairs, caught a glimpse of the snowy wonderland, and started back upstairs with a cup of coffee. On my way upstairs someone was already outside shoveling the snow. On one of the colder days this week, the “keepers” could be seen on the front

side of Melrose Hall clearing the snow off of the areas that were out of the sun’s reach. It was freezing that day. I felt like I was back home in Alaska only much colder. I thought I might bake some cookies and take them over there with a card all Martha Stewart style. Cookies are dandy and all, but recognition lasts much longer. I mean, this will be in the archives. I am more than glad to be the one to highlight such dedication to a job they all do so well. I suppose I had a behindthe-scenes experience with the groundskeepers my freshman year. First, my sisters had work study positions with them. Second, my first feature story (“Cultivating campus,” TLR, May 23, 2008) was about the work they do, as is this piece. But, hey, that means I’m about due to dole out some recognition because they’re still at it. So, once more, I thank you, oh mighty shovel-rakeand trow-wielding warriors of the campus. We applaud you, although you don’t always hear it. Septembre Russell can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.


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News

Mills vies for service award Felicia Weller Copy editor “My program is just as good as theirs,” senior Rachel Mills said about her chances of winning the Students in Services Award (SISA) for implementing the Linfield College Mentoring Program (LCMP) in October 2010. Mills was selected Feb. 15 as one of 50 national semifinalists by Washington Campus Contact and Ispireum (creator of SISA) for her effort to address social and environmental challenges facing her community, according to the award’s website. Mills, among other Linfield students, was nominated for the award by Community Service Coordinator Jessica Wade. Only Mills was chosen to compete for the chance to receive an academic scholarship and grants for the program sponsored by Linfield Career and Community Services. The LCMP was designed by Mills to partner college mentors with at-risk elementary and middle school youth

Mills in the McMinnville School District. The project stemmed from a previous mentoring program under the Yamhill County Prevention Program in jeopardy of disappearing as a result of budget cuts. Mills saved the program by moving it to the Linfield campus and inviting previous members to continue. “Without Rachel, the mentoring program would be dead,” Linfield AmeriCorps Vista Volunteer Lizzie Martinez, ’09, said. Martinez, a former mentor under the YCPP, assisted Mills in developing a new policies handbook, applications and training manuals for practicing members with help from Wade. Mills said she had to start from scratch creating a program that legally

complies with Linfield and McMinnville School District policies as well as maintain the basic ideals of YCPP. Mills said 90 percent of Linfield students who apply to the program get in, and she is looking for students who can be a consistent presence in their mentees’ lives. “The program is designed to provide positive role models for at-risk students,” Mills said. “We’re not taking seniors because we need people to commit for at least a year.” The LCMP aims to match McMinnville students with college mentors based on similar interests. Mills said one mentee with an interest in music was paired with a student who volunteered after the music department was contacted for potential members. Mills said this is one effective way to recruit mentors but that there are applications are available online. “I love watching the program grow,” Mills said. She said the program has been successful so far, but

they are always looking for new volunteers. She said she also believes LCMP would benefit if selected for the award. “I’d really like to try and provide more support to the mentors and opportunities to do more outside activities from the school,” Mills said, “[With the grant money,] mentors and mentees could go to the movie theaters or a Blazer’s game.” The SISA winner, runnerup and fan favorite will be chosen by a national selection committee of civic leaders along with a fan vote, and announced on March 15. The winner will be awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship award; the runner-up and fan favorite, $2,500 each. The top three winners will also be given a $2,500 grant for both the college-service learning center and non-profit partners involved in the program selected. Mills is currently waiting to move to the top 12 finalists to be announced March 4.

Felicia Weller can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

Duo wins cook-off for cash Michele Wong For the Review Chef duo junior Jenaveve Linabary and sophomore Julia Cooper cooked up a dish worthy of a $50 cash prize and first place in the Linfield Activities Board Cooking Marathon on Feb. 25. LAB gave participants $15 and 30 minutes to shop at WinCo Foods for ingredients. With only one hour to complete recipes, competitors hurried to create impressive dishes to be judged by Linfield students. Sophomore Linh Tang, LAB student talent coordinator, said she was inspired to organize the cook-off by previous LAB-sponsored cooking classes. “I want to honor student talents in all aspects,” she said. Three teams participated in the cooking marathon. Student spectators were encouraged to sample and vote for the best dish. Linabary said the crowd favorite, baked macaroni and cheese, was not difficult or expensive to make. She said she modified a recipe from a hall dinner for the contest. The winning duo will use their cash prize to treat themselves and Memorial Hall residents to dessert. “We‘ll go on a date to Nick‘s and buy ice cream for my residents,” Linabary said. Despite the budget and time constraints, Linabary was not worried during the shopping or cooking phase because she said she is used to cooking with limited time.

March 4, 2011

NewsBrief Core themes are endorsed Student senators voted unanimously to endorse a document presented by representatives from the College Accreditation Committee on Feb. 21, despite strong opposition from senior Colin Jones, Associated Students of Linfield College president. Accreditation committee co-chairs Library Director Susan Barnes Whyte and Brenda DeVore Marshall, department chair and professor of theatre and communication arts, along with committee member Jeff Mackay, associate dean of students and director of residence life, presented to Senate on Feb. 14 four core themes that their committee developed as a first step to comply with new accreditation policies. The themes are culture of engagement and excellence, integrated teaching and learning, global and multicultural understanding, and experiential learning. The committee representatives said they included faculty, administrative and student input in the discussion of the themes. But Jones, who sat on the committee, said that student voice is absent from the final core themes document that was endorsed by the board of trustees last weekend. “There’s a big difference between having a student sit at the table and actually integrating the student views; they only did the former,” Jones said. “I resigned [from the committee] at the end of Fall Semester out of frustration with the process.” Mackay said that Jones was doing his job as ASLC president by standing up for the student voice and that students had and will continue to have a vote in the new seven-year accreditation process. “The students were at the center of what we were trying to create. Those core themes are all focused on the student experience,” he said. Whyte said student voice, specifically regarding strong pressure for a sustainability core theme, will be incorporated into the objectives. Developing objectives from the core themes is the second process the accreditation committee will address. She said the process is constantly evolving, so sustainability may be added as a core theme in the future, especially since it’s included in the revised Linfield mission statement, from which the themes were derived. “Change shows an evolution of the strategic planning and budgeting process of the college,” Whyte said. “Since we’re just starting, we’re not clear how it’s going to work out.”

~Compiled by Kelley Hungerford/Editor-in-chief

Photo courtesy of Rachel Coffey Junior Jenaveve Linabary (right) and sophomores Julia Cooper (center) and Elizabeth Turner, admire a dish from the LAB Cooking Marathon on Feb. 25. Sophomores Elizabeth Turner and Kelsey Hatley, creators of the third-place dish, tofu stir-fry, also encountered problems within the limitations. However, cooking a large amount for the contest did present a challenge. “The wok was too small to fit all our veggies,” Hatley said. “It was like cooking for an army.”

The $15 budget caused one team to change its competition recipe. Sophomore Chau Le said that she and her roommate, sophomore Nora Burnfield, originally wanted to make salmon and lemon but it was too expensive. The pair won second place with their dish, “rainbow chowder,” named for its colorful ingredients. Tang anticipates putting

on another cook-off during the Fall semester if she is chosen for the LAB position again. For now, Tang encourages Linfield students to join the LAB Facebook page to keep up with event updates. Tang said she is relying more on this method to inform students about LAB. Michele Wong can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


News

March 4, 2011

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Speech highlights renegade U.S. ‘heroes’ Joanna Peterson Culture editor An endowed lecturer highlighted the importance of prostitutes, slaves and lazy workers in a lecture about the development of American freedom March 2 in Ice Auditorium. Thaddeus Russell, adjunct assistant professor of American studies at Occidental College, delivered the Jonas A. Steine Jonasson Endowed Lecture, which emphasized the cultural clashes that have come to define American culture today. “I want to introduce you to your cultural ancestors,” Russell said. “Your cultural ancestors are drunks, prostitutes and shiftless slaves. These people should also be your heroes because they pioneered the freedoms that you enjoy today.” Russell said that because of the Protestant-inspired idea that work is virtuous, early Americans didn’t par-

Sharon Gollery/For the Review

Thaddeus Russell lectures about feminism, sexual liberation and civil rights March 8 in Ice Auditorium. take in vacations or weekends because idleness was considered evil. Newspapers, textbooks and pamphlets all reprimanded people who embraced leisure and recreational activities, creating a culture that valued work on a religious level, he said. “Thankfully for us, there were many children who didn’t follow these lessons

after they became adults,” Russell said. “They grew up to be heroes in my book. And if you value the weekend, I think that they should be your heroes, too.” Modern Americans should be thankful to lazy workers and “shiftless slaves” for the development of vacations and weekends, Russell said. The Protestant work ethic

wasn’t a universal idea, so slaves and immigrant workers came to America with a smaller capacity to work without breaks or vacations, he said. Slaves pioneered the idea of vacations by running away from the fields for periods of time to take a break from working before coming back to their plantations to continue, Russell explained. He said this tendency to take breaks from manual labor made an impact on plantation owners and philosophers of the time who began to assume that African-American slaves were biologically lazy. Russell also highlighted prostitution as a contributor to the freedoms of women today. Such Freedoms included owning property, wearing make-up and appearing in public without a male chaperone. “Prostitutes were the first women to break free of what feminists rightly called

‘the system of female servitude,’” Russell said. He included that, according to an 1859 survey by William Sanger, more than a quarter of the 19th century prostitutes surveyed said that they chose the job to fulfill sexual desires. Russell said that prostitutes earned higher wages than the average construction worker at the time and that they received healthcare, food and housing through the brothels run by madams. This led to the idea that women can receive high wages and benefits for work. He also said that prostitute styles and values, such as their attire, hairstyles, dancing and willingness to participate in interracial sex, eventually made their way to women of higher classes. “Did prostitutes stand for the things they did because they had a moral or political agenda? No,” Russell said. “But like all good renegades, they weren’t committed to

morality at all.” Junior Matt Brown said he thought the lecture was important because it offered students a more complete view of American history. “We should be able to understand history in a holistic manner,” Brown said. “A lot of factors play into how we view culture, but people tend to look at issues singularly or with a bias.” Junior Ryan Reed said that it is useful to be aware of popular culture’s origins. “It’s important to understand the background of the things that we get pleasure from as a society,” he said. Russell is the author of “A Renegade History of The United States” and has written for publications such as The Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe and New York Magazine. He has also appeared on The Daily Show and the History Channel. Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com

Senate defers voting on proposed bylaw changes Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief Senators elected to postpone a vote on proposed Cabinet and Senate bylaw changes until their March 7 Senate meeting. The decision to defer discussion to a Senate committee was made after the twohour meeting Feb. 28. The Senate Governance Committee will meet March 7 to discuss improvements and make recommendations about the proposal. “There were clearly still a lot of questions and unease about voting one way or the other,” Dan Fergueson, director of college activities, said about the deferral decision. ASLC president senior Colin Jones’ proposed bylaw changes would vastly restructure Senate, mainly by reducing the body from up to 90 members to less than 30 and by giving Greek and Residence Life formal representation. The proposal also suggests eliminating the secretary position, reducing Cabinet from nine members to eight, combining the club and student center directors’ jobs, and creating a vice president of community and sustainability affairs. If senators pass the proposal, or parts of the proposal, students will have one day to decide if they will accept the bylaw changes. The proposal would appear on the online ballot March 8 along-

side the candidates for next year’s ASLC president and vice president. Discussion at the Feb. 28 Senate meeting focused on Jones’ Cabinet proposal. Secretary senior Sophie Larson said at the meeting that she supported the idea of dropping secretary as a Cabinet position. Student Center Director senior Evan Hilberg and Club Director sophomore Keevin Craig agreed with the benefits of combining their positions into one vice president of student interests. But other Cabinet members, especially Vice President of Programming senior Nicole Bond, spoke fervently against the proposed changes because they reduce the number of campus leadership positions. Vice President junior Katie Patterson also commented on some of the proposal’s flaws. “The fact that we didn’t present it to Senate a month ago is a huge error on our part as a Cabinet,” she said. “If it doesn’t pass, we will likely take feedback on why it’s not accepted and probably cater to those needs and try again.” Jones said it’s important to note that everyone whose position change under the proposal is comfortable with the suggested amendments. Senators and Cabinet members were also divided about the creation of a vice president of community and

sustainability affairs. Senators had a shorter discussion Feb. 28 about the proposed Senate changes but overwhelmingly agreed that Senate needs restructuring and that decreasing its size will boost its efficiency. But how to break clubs into groups to be represented by one senator each was an undecided issue. Jones said the details of club groups can be worked out in the Senate Standing Rules if the proposal passes; however, Fergueson said he thinks it’s better to have the kinks worked out before the vote. “When you write somewhat unclear bylaws, it leads to confusion when you try to interpret them later,” Fergueson said. “I think it’s probably better to have all your ducks in a row before putting it to a full vote.” Senate Governance Committee Chair freshman Dana Hellie has been meeting with her committee about how to divide clubs and how to improve the proposal overall. Jones said he believes the proposal, at least in part, will be passed and sent to the student body to vote on. “I’m confident that we’ll be able to come to a consensus and come to a compromise that will move ASLC forward but maybe not in quite such a dramatic fashion,” he said. Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


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News

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Vote: Candidates discuss Greek Life, bylaws << Continued from page 1 bility to give a good reflection of the student body.” Patterson responded by saying that a good president requires good communication skills like herself. And she said that she is already involved in a committee that is working toward a student center. Other goals are to include Cabinet notes in The Linfield Review and work to improve Homecoming. • Next, the candidates were asked about their positions on Greek Life and campus relations. Keliinoi said that he plans to reach groups that are not always represented through Senate, such as Greek Life. Patterson, who had a role in a recent ASLC bylaws proposal, said that if passed, the new proposal will formally include Greek Life in Senate. She said that she wants everyone to have the opportunity to be heard. Coffey said that as a member of Greek Life, she wants to help merge the two bodies so they can work together to help build a feeling of community. •

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity will celebrate the official re-opening of their fraternity house on March 5. President of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, senior Jon Thompson said that members of the group were moved into the house on Feb. 5, but March 5 will mark the completion of construction on the house. A total of 50-70 fraternity alumni will see the finished product just days after the fraternity’s 143rd Anniversity on March 1. “To be honest, the contractors and builders did an excellent job,” Thompson said. Even though the layout of the new house is a bit different from the old one, it still has lot of the same characteristics. The house has the original fireplace, and the front porch is of the same style as the one before it. “The alumns wanted to keep the core pieces of the house similar,” Thompson said. “The general house structure is the same and you would be able to recognize it no matter what year you were a ‘Pike,’” he said. Thompson compared the new style of the house to that of a small dorm. All of

EMS embarks on software updates Lauren Ostrom For the review

Christine Fujiki/For the Review

ASLC presidential candidate junior Katie Patterson (center) responds to a question at the first election debate Feb. 28. Her opponent, junior Rachel Coffey, and vice presidential candidate Bradley Keliinoi listen to her reply. Another question that the candidates answered was about their positions on the new ASLC bylaws proposal. Patterson said that she supports part of the proposal. She said that she agrees with the reorganization of Senate but does not agree with the Cabinet proposal and urged students not to vote for it. Keliinoi said he thought the proposals were too rushed and that more time is necessary to reach a decision. Coffey said that she supports the restructuring

Fraternity celebrates house re-opening Chelsea Bowen Opinion editor

March 4, 2011

the upstairs bedrooms are shared by a single hallway. “If you need help studying there’s someone right across the hall,” he said. “You could be separated from your brothers in the old house because of the layout.” The old Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity house was shut down after the fire marshal came through the house in 2008 and declared it unsafe. During the fall of 2010, Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity received a large loan from nationals. The main construction of house began in the spring of 2010. “I’m mainly excited that we have a place to live together,” said In House Vice President sophomore Brad Dupea. “It’s going to be nice having the new house and getting back into Greek events.” Thompson expressed that he is looking forward to having all of the alumni back to meet the new Pikes at the house. “I feel like Saturday is going to be a great day for all Pikes no matter what year,” he said. For more information about Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity contact Jon Thompson @ jothomps@linfield.edu Chelsea Bowen can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

of Senate and that the Cabinet restructure is a good idea in theory. But it needs to be worked on more, she said. • Other questions asked of the candidates included theoretical situations with faculty and students, including factors that come into play with committee and Senate chairs, what they would have done differently from the current president and vice president and what they view as the best and worst parts of the positions.

“I think it [the debate] went really well — smoother than I expected,” Patterson said. “No one froze up, and everyone had solid answers and was obviously prepared.” The next ASLC election debate, or “Fireside Chats,” will take place March 7 after the Senate meeting. The general election will take place online March 8. For the full list of campaigning events, visit www. linfield.edu/aslc/elections. html. Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

New technology will soon crop up in Nicholson Library. As many students have noticed, furniture has moved around in the Electronic Media Services and more computers are being placed in the area. These computers will be upgraded with an array of new software from the Adobe Creative Suite 4 (CS4) package. The only type of software on current campus-owned computers is CS3. The newer edition is equipped with many upgraded CS4 programs, such as InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Flash Professional, Dreamweaver, Fireworks and Acrobat Pro. Many students are familiar with these programs, but the CS4 version has more features. Multimedia Support Specialist Andy Lockhart said that although the software update may take about a year to complete, the library is starting to update every computer. “The funding will come from an endowment that we have received for the

library,” he said. “We have a set number that we can spend, and we will draw that number each year for the software.” Students will be able to work more efficiently with print, Web, mobile, interactive, film, audio and video production. Junior Spencer Crepeaux, an electronic arts major, said that the new CS4 software is not only for those of his major but could also be helpful for other majors such as mass communication, theater and art. “CS4 is completely better than CS3. It’s a lot more user-friendly — especially with Web design,” Crepeaux said. “You can also do a lot more with your photos.” Lockhart also mentioned that there will be new furniture being put in the multimedia section, such as tables between the music scores and the DVD section. “We are hoping to make it more student friendly. Ideas are appreciated, and there is a box for comments by the front desk,” Lockhart said. Lauren Ostrom can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewnewsr@gmail.com.


March 4, 2011

Features

www.linfieldreview.com

Felicia Weller/Copy editor

Photo courtesy of Kayla Wilkens Juniors Blair Schur and Kayla Wilkens leapt on the opportunity to build a snowman on the football field Feb. 24.

Photo courtesy of Cody Levien

Snow-day snapshots: Caught on ’Cat cameras Students helped us capture some of the winter wonder of Feb. 24 — a sight that most Wildcats haven’t seen since snow shut down most of the campus during finals week at the end of 2008. Enjoy these wintry pictures and keep your gloved fingers crossed for more snow next year! Graphic by Juli Tejadilla/Graphics/ads designer

Photo courtesy of Cody Levien Top: Nearly four inches of snow blanketed McMinnville on Feb. 24, delaying Linfield’s start until 10 a.m. Middle: Senior Adriana Daoust braces for a snowball to the face from junior Spencer Crepeaux. Bottom: Daoust laughs as she shakes the snow from her hair.

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Features

March 4, 2011

‘Mac’-ximize y T

he summer season is approaching and that means the winter pounds packed on from the ma

need to be shed before the swimsuits are brought back out. A quick-fix crazy tea diet or magic

cast members could do the trick but are not recommended for health reasons. A safer option is

Linfield’s weight room can get overcrouwded, a membership at a McMinnville gym may be just what the t workout facilities in the local area for those who are looking to improve their “situation.”

e l l i v n n i M c M t i f s s Cro

ccording to Crossfit’s website, “Crossfit is a fitness program focused on maximizing a person’s potential in strength, cardiovascular endurance, respiratory endurance, power, speed, stamina, flexibility, coordination, agility, balance and accuracy. In other words, general all-around athleticism.” Crossfit is more for the athlete willing to sweat. It is not the average gym with stair stepper machines, but it uses classes to get the members in shape. There are classes throughout the day, at specific times, to sign up for depending on which works best with your schedule.

Pricing:

A

Tanning:

$111

•Intro. Academy (6 classes for 2 weeks): $55 •Misc. Membership 10-visit punch card:

•3x week prices, no contract:

1 month: $90 3 months: $80/month 6 months: $70/month 1 year: $60/month •Unlimited, no contract: 1 month: $120 3 months: $110/month 6 months: $105/month 1 year: $90/month

location:

•None

845 NE 8th Street

Phone:

•503-435-9013

Cindy’s Gym indy’s Gym is not for everyone — literally. It is a women-only health club. The gyms boasts many machines for a cardio workout. The gym also offers classes, including Zumba and yoga, throughout the day that are free with membership.

C

Tanning:

•Non-members: 10 tans: $42 Per month: $60 Single tan: $7 •Monthly members: 10-tan monthly package: $30 Monthly, unlimited: $42

Pricing:

•Student/1 month: $40 •Student/1-year contract: $35/month

Curv

f you are a cardio only, and t

location:

I

Phone:

Pricin

1015 NW Adams •503-472-2541

•One-ye

Tannin •None

locati 490 NE

Phone

•503-4


Features

March 4, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

your Exercise Exc Fit ell nes s

assive amounts of holiday foods

c pills endorsed by Jersey Shore

s a simple trip to the gym. Since

trainer ordered. Here is a list of by Corrina Crocker/Sports editor

E xcell Fitness is a medium-sized gym

near Pizza Hut. It provides many cardio machines with televisions to watch your favorite shows while working out. The drive is a little bit further than most gyms but it is a cheaper option. Excell also offers a nutrition system online and classes such as Zumba and Turbo Kick.

Pricing:

Tanning:

location:

•Now owned by Tan Republic •One month unlimited in silver level bed: $19

(offer ends April 1)

•Half-off enrollment for any membership

(includes free bottle of Hemp lotion) •Offers UV-free Mystic tan: $15 with membership

Anytime Fitness lthough a little bit farther from campus, there is a benefit to the drive to An time Fitness. Hence the name, Anytime Fitness, the gym is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

A

Pricing:

•Student special: $31.99/month for a 1-year contract plus enrollment fee

Tanning:

•Once month, unlimited: $43.99 (membership not required)

location:

856 NE Hwy 99W Suite C

Phone:

•503-472-7200

ves

e short on time, head over to Curves. The workouts are aimed at accomplishing o and strength-training session in 30 minutes. The gym is offered to women they can visit any Curves location with the membership.

ng:

ear contract: $34/month, plus enrollment fee

ng:

ion:

Highway 99 W

e:

472-3280

•Student

special, 1-year contract: $34/ month with $60 enrollment fee or $49 without a contract 1461 NE Highway 99W

Phone:

•503-472-3022

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Culture

March 4, 2011

Playwright opens script to student critique Brittany Baker Staff reporter

Students had the opportunity to witness a renowned playwright at work and get involved in his creative process Feb. 26. They were invited to a dramatic reading of Rob Urbinati’s most recent work, “Death by Design,” where they were encouraged to provide feedback after the show. The play is a murder mystery set in London in 1930. It took a humorous spin on developing the suspects and gave the audience plenty of opportunities to speculate about who the murderer was in the end. “The plot is full of twists and good fun. It’s an opportunity for the audience to actively be involved in the show,” freshman Jenny Layton said. Freshman Dorthy Sterling also had a positive reaction to the play. “The actors used accents because the play was set in England, so it was really realistic,” Sterling said. “Some of the actors even looked like what their characters would have looked like.” The staged reading was designed to give the audience a feel for the

Victor Zhu /For the Review Two Portland-based actors perform a staged reading of Rob Urbinati’s play, “Death by Design” on Feb. 26 in Ford Hall. Urbinati was available to answer student questions and recieve suggestions for the play. story without seeing a full performance. Actors had to portray a character through their voice and facial expression rather

than using props and a stage. They also remain seated throughout the performance. “‘Death by Design’ has a

lot of action, so it was weird listening to someone read the actions out loud rather than doing them,” Sterling said.

After the reading, audience members were invited to ask questions about the plot, characters or why Urbinati wrote what he did.

They could also critique the work, which Urbinati encouraged to improve his story. “The point is to ask the playwright questions so that he can go back and re-write another draft of the show and be sure that it makes sense to an audience,” Layton said. “It was very helpful for Rob [Urbinati] to double- check his facts and even his grammar so the story is clear.” Urbinati’s writing received varying critiques, including one audience member who believed the word “deeply” was overused in the second act. Another audience member suggested revising the ending of the play to make the final resolution more straight forward. “Death by Design” is set for a world premiere in September. However, the Linfield community can see an Urbinati play sooner when his original play, “West Moon Street,” opens March 15 in the Marshall Theater. “West Moon Street” is based on Oscar Wilde’s short story “Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime” and will feature Linfield theater students. Brittany Baker can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Interfaith dialogue lights path to understanding Sharon Gollery For the Review A mingling of expectant conversation and instrumental hymns met audience members as they filed into Jonasson Hall for the interfaith gathering Voices of Hope on Feb. 27. After a warm welcome and invocation by Linfield Chaplain David Massey, the gathering proceeded with messages of friendship, songs and peace prayers from people of different faiths. Massey said that true interfaith dialogue, without the combative attitude so prevalent in today’s religious debates, is the only way to understand others. “When we truly get to know the other; it’s then that we start to see ourselves reflected in them,” he said. “True dialogue brings out our common humanity.” Special guest Jan Michael Looking Wolf spoke about a similar belief: the One Heart tradition of Native American tribes. Human beings, he said, were not made so that their minds agree all the

time; the One Heart tradition promotes the awareness that hearts and spirits can agree despite this. The gathering’s theme, hope, was chosen because all people have it in common. “All major religions have hope,” Massey said. “It’s a quality we each long for and strive for, and it reflects what the world needs today.” Many of the speeches placed a heavy emphasis on the importance of learning about and understanding others. Muslim speaker Gulzar Ahmed maintained that it is only through cooperation with one another that humans can ever hope to live in peace. “Blessed be the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God,” he reminded listeners. Area Director Delane Hein spoke about the need to know one’s neighbor. She had everyone in the audience stand and greet the people around them. “By getting to know one another, it promotes understanding, respect and trust,”

Sarah Hansen /For the Review Father and daughter Julio (left) and Camila Matamala-Ost sing “Oh God, My Adored One” on Feb. 27. she said. “Understanding is not abstract as it comes about through knowledge and connecting with the hearts of others.” Senior Dayna Tapp led a ceremony in which the audience was invited to come forward and light candles representing hope.

“Hope is fostered by interfaith celebration,” Tapp said. “At a conflicting time in history when religion divides many nations and relationships, I believe that the process of learning and celebrating various faith traditions is an excellent example of hope.”

Although Linfield offers a variety of religious programs, such as spiritual discovery trips and discussion panels, Voices of Hope is the first interfaith meeting of its kind at Linfield. Faiths represented included Christianity, Islam, Zen Buddhism, Quakers, Native American

traditions and Bahá’í. “I hope our community will continue its work in creating an environment that feels safe to share, question and celebrate our spiritual experiences,” Hein said. Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


March 4, 2011

Culture

www.linfieldreview.com

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Musical twins deliver values through performance Yoko Gardiner For the Review Not even the dismal weather could dampen the spirited music resonating from Ice Auditorium on Feb. 25. Twin brothers Caleb and Solomon (Sol) Rexius took the stage with energy. The audience included the Linfield and McMinnville communities that listened attentively as the brothers made jokes and conversed with good humor. Senior Sierra Stopper organized the event when she heard the twins’ band, Caleb and Sol. She said she first heard about Caleb and Sol from her sister when the group performed a live concert at her high school. “The idea took off after [I returned from studying abroad in Spain] and it became beyond what I originally thought. It was in September; I was thinking of events for Salt-n-Light and thinking of a way to bring both the concert and community at once.” To fund the event, Stopper spoke to Campus Ministry, Director of College Activities Dan Fergueson, Associated Students of Linfield College and junior Nic Miles, the Linfield Activities Board Musical

Megan Myer/Online editor Twin brothers Caleb and Solomon Rexius perform in their Eugene-based Christian band, Caleb and Sol on Feb. 27 in Ice Auditorium. Entertainment Chair. Miles said he and Stopper decided to go through with it because there was an opportunity to work with another group and work with people outside of Cat Cab and to invite a different crowd. The Rexius’ music is primarily Christian but also includes recitation, pop and rap genres. Although their music is based on their Christian faith, Caleb said he believes their music connects to all beliefs, as their songs pertain to love, faith

and hardship. Both singers are inspired by their faith as well as other musicians and “personal experiences or experiences from people we know,” Sol said in an e-mail. Included in their group are violinist and vocalist Marisa Frantz, lead guitarist, Scott Frantz and drummer Hunter Gray, all of whom provide an additional layer to Caleb and Sol’s harmonic voices. To expand to the genre of the music, the Rexius broth-

Student develops photography skills

ers took the stage by rapping, which received enthusiastic responses. At one point they engaged the audience by having it ask questions. One student asked whether he could marry the brother, and Sol replied, “I can’t tell you, and I won’t tell you.” The concert received enthusiastic feedback from audience members who deemed the concert “pretty good.” Senior Karina Grant esteemed the band as a

“very talented group of musicians.” “I enjoyed the be-bopping and the rapping,” Grant said. Junior Keith Mader also commented on the performance. “I thought they were really good. I checked out the music before, and they are really cool guys,” he said. In their song “Burn,” Caleb took the lead playing the acoustic guitar. His voice carried a melodic, essencefilled tone. In another, Sol recited a small speech, accompanied by a mournful violin played by Frantz and the crystalline tone of the keyboard played by Caleb. Sol said the speech was about “how Jesus is better than anything, better than achievements. He should be our ultimate pursuit.” Toward the end of the concert, the band showed “Barabbas” a film illustrating the Christian Gospel. Sol said the clip tells a story about a prisoner who was set free. Although the prisoner was guilty, Jesus took his place and was crucified instead. To add to their repertoire of songs, they also sang their best-selling single “Afloat.” The inspirational and expressive composition is based on the biblical story

of Peter who walks on water with Jesus. The twins’ songs were lyrical and artistically sung with zest and passion. Originally dedicated to sports in high school and at the University of Oregon, the Rexius twins said in an e-mail that they decided to concentrate on music and ministry instead. The balancing act between their career and daily life proves to be one of the biggest obstacles for both twins. One of the questions from the audience was ‘‘when did the band get their inspiration?’’ Caleb answered: “We share song writing. We write songs on our own then share ideas.” Caleb and Sol’s surprising success as musicians led them to perform publicly and release their 1999 debut album “Afloat.” “Good songs just happen. They come naturally as I’m playing piano or guitar and letting my mind wander,” Sol said in an e-mail. “I can’t think of any other way our music has evolved.” For more information about Caleb and Sol’s music, visit the band’s web site at www.calebandsol. com. Yoko Gardiner can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Kelsey Sutton Staff reporter “Ever since I was a kid, I was always drawing, painting, doodling on my parents’ walls,” junior Alison Pate said. Pate has always been an artist. She discovered her love for photography in eighth grade and it has grown ever since — finding even more momentum in her college years. Coming to Linfield, Pate said she didn’t think she would be so serious about her art. She initially planned to double major in Spanish and studio art but said it became obvious that she wanted to devote her time toward an art-based career. “Being an art major is probably one of the hardest things I can think of doing. The art professors really push you, but I’ve really matured as an artist,” Pate said. Once Pate completed all the introduction art courses, she took more photography classes and a bookbinding course. Pate said her art is largely inspired by people. “I’m really inspired by

Photo courtesy of Alison Pate A self-portrait of junior Alison Pate. human interactions and human relationships. The idiosyncrasies that make up everyday life are really interesting to me,” Pate said. “I love photographing people more than anything else.” Pate has tried out other forms of art such as drawing and painting but said she always finds that she goes back to photography. “I like the freedom that photography gives me,” she said. “The lens brings a sort of closeness and a connection to my subject that is absent in some

other mediums I’ve experimented with. There is an intimacy that a camera lens brings.” Pate said one of her favorite projects was one she did her freshman year, when she convinced some of her guy friends to wear fake eyelashes and let her photograph them. “I was playing with masculinity and femininity. It was sort of crazy, but it was fun. I’ve mellowed out since then,” she laughed. Aside from photography, Pate said she has discovered a ninterest in book

Photo courtesy of Alison Pate A portrait titled, “Dad,” from Pate’s most recent art series. binding. “I work a lot in book making,” she said. “I’ve just started getting into that, which is really fun.” When she’s not busy in the art studio, Pate enjoys baking and movies. She is also the go-to photographer for the band Jack Ruby Presents. She met the band her freshman year, and after

attending a few shows she asked if she could photograph them and they gladly accepted. “Alison is an amazing artist. She photographs what is really happening, visually and emotionally,” Jesse Hughey, class of ’10 and lead singer of Jack Ruby Presents, said. “She is able to really capture the energy

of the moment beyond a simple photograph.” As for future goals, Pate said she is unsure, but she mentioned pursuing a possible internship with a photographer this summer. “I want to take a few years off after college and just live,”Pate said. Kelsey Sutton can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


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Entertainment

www.linfieldreview.com

March 4, 2011

Portland-based indie band releases an ‘honest’ album Eric Tompkins KSLC 90.3 FM During a time when all indie music sounds like the same heartfelt, selfabsorbed ramblings, it’s rare to find a band thatproperly expresses what seems to be the true ethos of the genre: honesty. “A New Kind Of House,” an EP by the upand-coming Portland band Typhoon, is set to win over a wealth of listeners faithful to the sound of troubled musicians. The focus behind “A New Kind Of House,” is not immediately clear, even after a fourth or fifth listen. However, the album serves as a cartharsis: It’s powerful, moving and seems inspired by a real human experience. It’s not some pop-influenced expression of pubescent angst; this is the adult version: a mire of emotion that has historically worked extremely

well for the Goth movement and the emotionally charged Indie movement of the early aughts. Unlike most of its contemporaries, Typhoon manages to pull off this emotion without sounding contrived or disingenuous. The band’s just being honest. When it comes to describing the overall sound of this EP there are the standard descriptors that can be broadly applied to all on this collection: lush, captivating, sincere, moving and triumphant. But, as with anything that’s well- made, it’s incredibly difficult to separate one piece from the whole. It’s hard to imagine this EP as a collection of separate songs, and even harder to choose the highlights. That being said, there are a few tracks that stand out above the rest — not necessarily as the greatest but certainly as the most interesting. My favorite is the second

track “Summer Home,” which has a sound that gently guides the listener deeper into the EP’s true meat. The song consists of cheerful percussive elements and the sort of poetic lyricism which lends itself to repeated listenings. “Summer House” is is an excellent showcase of Typhoon’s talents and of its overall range of emotion. Everything about this track seems thoughtfully considered, right down to the title, which is appropriately chosen for the mood the track conveys. The song also provides a gentle segue into the intended magnum opus of “Claws Pt. 1.” Clocking in at nearly 8 minutes, “Claws Pt. 1” is the longest track on the EP and is given billing as one of the EP’s foremost singles. Perhaps it’s because of the pressure put on it that “Claws” is a bit off, somehow coming across as schizophrenic and con-

Photo courtesy of www.tenderlovingempire.com Typhoon’s “A New Kind of House” will be released March 8 on the Portland record label Tender Loving Empire. stipated at the same time. Frantic, uncomfortable and strange, Claws is a lowpoint in an otherwise stellar display of talent. Ultimately, “A New Kind Of House” is nothing if not enjoyable. An EP full of images: washed-out postcard snapshots of steel-toed

workboots following the muddy treads of a snowy road or lonely woodcuts of unashamed blue-collar heartache. Typhoon seems like a band that doesn’t pretend to be anything it isn’t, and that is what good music is all about. So if you’re in the

mood for something a little bit special give “A New Kind of House” a listen. Typhoon’s “A New Kind of House” will be released March 8 and can be heard on KSLC 90.3FM. Eric Tompkins can be reached at kslcmusic@gmail.com

Coleman Cat Cab showcases sultry style

Megan Myer/Online editor Left: Junior Sabryna Coleman belts out a song at the Cat Cab on March 3. Top Right: Coleman performs with junior Erika Helm-Buckman. Bottom Right: Coleman sings with acoustic accompaniment in the Fred Meyer Lounge.


Sports

March 4, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

13

Column: Home-run rate could shatter records << Continued from page 16

the NFL. Cross your fingers and watch for more developments here as they come in. • Smells like a National Championship: If you recall, I mentioned last week that the softball

team was likely to have a lights-out season and belt more homers than you can shake a Louisville Slugger at. Sure enough, as if the fans had cried out “Here we are now; entertain us,” the ’Cats have blasted nine home runs in their first four games. If they keep knocking them out of the park at this rate, and assuming

they play in as many games this season as the last (49), the softball team is going to rack up 108 home runs during a single season. Even adjusting this for what will certainly be lower scores in the postseason, 90-plus is still a fair approximation. That figure would shatter the Linfield and Division III records

for home runs in a single season set by last season’s squad. The team also outscored opponents 49-7 in four-straight wins to open the season. These are some seriously gaudy numbers, and I’m tremendously excited for the group’s prospects at winning a national title in Salem, Va. this year.

•Doucette on the warpath: Reigning All-American junior Staci Doucette was named NWC player of the week after Linfield’s four-game winning streak against Whitworth University. On the weekend, she hit three home runs (including a grand slam), racked up nine RBIs and

batted an unreal .667. She is single-handedly promising fans that attending a Linfield softball game means you’re going to see offensive production every couple of minutes. All aboard the Wildcat Softball Freight Train! Next stop, Salem! Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Sports Briefs Men’s and women’s golf The Wildcats men’s and women’s golf teams were slated to swing into the 2011 season this week. But only one team made it onto the greens.       The women’s Willamette Invitational was scheduled for Feb. 28, but because weather conditions were poor, the tournament has been rescheduled for March 5. The Puget Sound Invitational took place at the Fircrest Golf Club on March 3. The men’s team played through the wind and the foul weather and placed second out of five teams, with 302 strokes—nine strokes behind tournament leader Oklahoma Christian University. A 12th-hole eagle by Thomas Schmitz served as a high point during the competition.  Freshman A.J. Taylor and junior Alex Fitch, who is three strokes behind lead golfer senior Axel Ochoa, achieved two-over-par 73s and three golfers placed among the Invitational’s top ten. Day two of the tournament will take place at Fircrest March 4.

~Compiled by Septembre Russell/ Copy chief

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Junior Abby Oblrich prepares for the ball Feb. 26 at a home match against George Fox University. The Wildcats won 9-0.

’Cats: season is underway << Continued from page 16

overcome.” The men and women both battle Pacific University on March 4. The women’s

match begins at 3:30 p.m. at home; the men at 4:45 p.m. at the indoor Club Green Meadows in Vancouver, Wash., because of anticipated poor weather. Both teams will play against Willamette Uni-

versity on March 5. The women will compete with the Bearcats at home at 10 a.m., and the men will play on Bearcat turf in Salem, Ore., at noon.  Corrina Crocker can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


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Sports

www.linfieldreview.com

March 4, 2011

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Junior Ryan Larson pitches Feb. 26. The ’Cats won their first game 7-2 but lost their second 0-1 against the Oregon Institute of Technology Hustlin’ Owls.

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Senior Cole Bixenman steps up to bat against Oregon Institute of Technology in the first game of the doubleheader Feb. 26. The Wildcats won the game with a score of 7-2. Bixenman was a key player in the first game against Oregon Tech. He totaled four RBIs and one home run. The home run was a double-run for the Wildcats, putting two runs on the board.

Wildcat sports schedule Friday, March 4 Track and field

@ Linfield

9 a.m.

Men’s golf

@ Tacoma, Wash.

Noon

Women’s tennis

vs. Pacific

3:30 p.m.

Men’s tennis

@ Vancouver, Wash. 4:45 p.m.

Saturday, March 5 Track and field

@ Linfield

9 a.m.

Women’s lacrosse

@ Forest Grove

9 a.m.

Women’s tennis

vs. Willamette

10 a.m.

Baseball

vs. Pacific (2)

Softball

vs. George Fox (2)

11 a.m. . Noon

Men’s tennis

@ Willamette

Noon

Baseball

vs. Pacific

11 a.m.

Softball

@ Lewis & Clark (2)

Noon

vs. Concordia (2)

3 p.m.

Sunday, March 6

Wednesday, March 9 Softball

’Cats warm up, shake off chill Kaylyn Peterson For the Review The last two weeks have been dynamic for the Linfield baseball team. The team played against Oregon Institute of Technology on Feb. 26 at home winning the first game 7-2, although falling short, 0-1 in the second game of the doubleheader. It also recently returned from a tournament in Lewiston, Idaho, where it competed with schools such as Western Oregon University, Lewis-Clark State College and St. Martin’s University on Feb. 18 through Feb. 20. During the Idaho trip, the team played its first game against the Western Oregon Wolves,

scoring two runs in the first inning and adding two more during the ninth. The final score was 4-3. While the tournament began well, the team faced some challenges during its final two games including below-freezing temperatures, which they were not accustomed to. “That is no excuse for how we played. We pitched the ball well in Idaho, but our bats were limited,” Bixenman said. “We have a lot of new guys this year, and we are still in the process of getting it together.” Wildcat bats were swinging strong against Oregon Tech with 11 hits and seven runs throughout the game. Oregon Tech scored two

runs during the first game. However, the Wildcats lost the second game 0-1.  “Just like any other year in the baseball program, we expect to win,” Bixenman said. “We have to take it one game at a time and hopefully win conference, make it to regionals and win that and then head back to Wisconsin again for the World Series and take the next step and win a national championship.” The Wildcats will play a doubleheader at home against Pacific University at 11 a.m. March 5 and against the same opponents at 11 a.m. March 6.

Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


Sports

March 4, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

15

’Cats whomp Whitworth in four straight Rae Smith Staff reporter

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Senior shortstop Emily Keagbine bats for the Wildcats on Feb. 26 at home against Whitworth University.

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Junior first baseman Staci Doucette hits against the Pirates on Feb. 26. The Wildcats won both games 12-2, 10-1.

The softball team left no doubt that it is seeking a national championship. Linfield pounded the Whitworth University Pirates in four games Feb. 26 and 27. The doubleheader saw several impressive offensive performances. The ’Cats tallied eight runs in the first inning of the first game.  Junior outfielder Jaydee Baxter went 4-for-4, knocking in three RBIs. Junior first basemen Staci Doucette and Sami Keim went 2-for-3, combining for five RBIs. Senior pitcher Claire Velaski praised the team’s bats. “Our hitters had a phenomenal weekend. They got a ton of hits, and that is a testament to how hard they have been working,” she said. Velaski, last year’s NWC Pitcher of the Year, allowed the Pirates only one run off of two hits in four innings. Freshman Karina Paavola finished off the game’s last inning, giving up one run as well. The ’Cats trounced the Pirates with a score of 10-1 in the second game. Junior Lauren Harvey pitched all six innings and allowed six hits. The teams competed in Pasco, Wash., on Feb. 27, for the second doubleheader. The offense continued to dominate, scoring 11 and 16 runs, respectively, in the first and second games. Velaski allowed four runs in the first game while Harvey, Paavola and freshman pitcher Shelby VandeBergh all had a hand in shutting out the Pirates during the second game. Coach Jackson Vaughan

recognized how well the team played despite the cold conditions. “I thought we handled the weather well — the cold, on Saturday and the 30-mph winds on Sunday in Pasco,” he said. “Usually teams don’t hit well in the cold but we hit really well and our pitchers performed well considering what the cold does to your hands.” The ’Cats hit nine homeruns — three off Doucette’s bat — on their way to gaining 49 runs during the four games. Harvey and Velaski ended the weekend with two wins and combined for more than 19 innings pitched. The team’s strong leads allowed the majority of the roster time in the game. “I think we used more kids last weekend than we ever have at Linfield in one series,” Vaughan said. Velaski recognized some of the players. “I think the freshmen did a good job of stepping up when they were put into the games, especially [freshman] Katy Brosig, who came up with a big home run and a great suicide squeeze,” Velaski said. The ’Cats lead the NWC with a 4-0 record but are staying focused on getting better. “The cool thing about our team is that we can score 49 runs but we aren’t as good as we can be yet, and everyone knows that there is room for improvement,” sophomore third baseman Karleigh Prestianni said. Weather permitting, Linfield will take on George Fox University in a noon doubleheader at home March 5, and the ’Cats face Lewis & Clark College at noon March 6 in Portland. Rae Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


16

sports

www.linfieldreview.com

Catline

March 4, 2011 Sports Commentary

Wildcat week in review

Northwest Conference standings Men’s Tennis Whitman

5-0

George Fox

3-1

1.000 .750

Willamette

2-1

.667

Pacific

2-2

.500

Linfield

2-2

.500

Whitworth

2-2

.500

Puget Sound

1-2

.333

Pacific Lutheran

0-3

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-4

.000

Chris Forrer For the Review

The men faced an upsetting match against the Bruins. Senior Mark Magdaong played the No. 1 singles spot and won 7-4, 6-4 and teamed with Kingzett for the No. 1 doubles spot and won 8-4. Sophomore Cody Levein won the No. 2 singles play 6-0, 6-4 and senior Tim Wagar took the No. 6 singles win 6-1, 6-3. “We’re not pleased with our match against George Fox and are eager to come out and play at a higher level,” senior Brent Kingzett said. “We are looking forward to the opportunity and challenges the weekend present.” The match against the Bruins left the Wildcats in the middle of conference with two wins and two losses.  “We ended up on the losing side of two close doubles matches, which were determined by tiebreakers. Though we fought back valiantly in singles, the early

Hey ’Cats. With winter sports fading into the sunset a few weeks ago and spring sports only a few days old, stories are getting harder and harder to come by these days. But fear not! As much as I love unearthing good narrative stories from the Northwest Conference to share with y’all, this week I’m going to go in a different direction and give you some nice little stats and tidbits. Without any further exposition, the week in review: •Ach! Nishizaki and Boehme to Deutschland: As I’m sure you read in last week’s issue of TLR, quarterback Aaron Boehme and defensive tackle Paul Nishizaki, two of Linfield football’s finest during the last four years, have signed professional contracts with the Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns of the German Football League. Admittedly the mascot isn’t the most masculine I’ve ever heard of, but in a state of Beavers and Ducks who can talk, right? Also, while the GFL is certainly no National Football League, this signing is a big deal in the context of the team’s status. Long-time quarterback Chad Rupp of the Unicorns walked a year ago and left a vacancy at the position that was filled well by replacement Brian Brunner in 2010. Furthermore, Unicorn coach Siegfried “Ziggy” Gehrke has stated that Nishizaki is going to be a big part of shoring up his defense. This means that Boehme and Nishizaki are both in a good place to compete for some serious playing time in a professional league; how many other Division III athletes can say they’re headed for a professional gig after college? Not many. I’ll be keeping up with their exploits occasionally, as well as other Linfield sports alumni, as I can next season, so stay tuned. •Goin’ down to Dixie: On another football note, senior tackle Aaron Heston was invited to the Dixie Gridiron Classic Feb. 3, a game that involved almost entirely Division I athletes. This kind of major exposure to NFL scouts could lead Heston to land a walk-on contract next season. If he does, he could become one of only a tiny handful of Lin-

>> Please see Tennis page 13

>> Please see Column page 13

Women’s Tennis Linfield

4-0

1.000

Whitworth

3-0

1.000

Whitman

2-1

.667

Willamette

3-2

.600

Pacific

1-1

.500

Puget Sound

2-3

.400

George Fox

1-2

.333

Lewis & Clark

1-4

.200

Pacific Lutheran

0-4

.000

Linfield

4-0

1.000

Pacific

2-2

.500

Willamette

2-2

.500

George Fox

0-0

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-0

.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-0

.000

Puget Sound

0-0

.000

Whitworth

0-4

.000

Pacific

3-0

1.000

George Fox

0-0

.000

Linfield

0-0

.000

Willamette

0-0

.000

Whitworth

0-0

.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-0

.000

Softball

Baseball

Puget Sound

0-0

.000

Whitman

0-0

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-3

.000

Softball start winning season The nationally ranked team wins four consecutive games and maintains top spot in conference. See page 15>>

Baseball begins season The Wildcats begin their conference season at home against Pacific University on March 5. See page 14>>

Sports schedule Missed out on the sporting events last weekend? Check out the sports schedule to see when your favorite teams play this weekend. See page 14>>

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer Senior Sarah Click prepares herself for the ball during a match Feb. 26 at home against the George Fox University Bruins. The Wildcats won 9-0, and Click and her partner won the No. 1 doubles match 8-3.

Tennis opens season Corrina Crocker Sports editor Tennis opened its Northwest Conference seasons on Feb. 18 and have been competing in matches since. However, they are not off to an equal start. The women’s team won at home against George Fox University 9-0 on Feb. 26 and on Feb. 27 against Whitman College, 7-2. With both the wins, Linfield remains undefeated in the conference. The first match of the competition was won by Whitman 6-8, which was played by Linfield’s No. 1 doubles team, junior Abby Olbrich and senior Sarah Click.  Although the No. 1 team fell short, the women’s No. 2 and No. 3 teams recovered the wins. The Wildcat’s No. 2 team, senior Sophie Larson and freshman Caroline Brigham, won 8-5. The No. 3 team, senior Sarah Watanabe and sophomore Lexi Thomas, won 9-7.  For women’s singles, the women took the majority of the

wins. The ’Cats won five of six matches against the Missionaries. The women secured the win, as well as the top spot in the Northwest Conference during the first weekend of conference play.  “I expect us to continue to work hard in practice, to be supportive of one another and to play well at our matches. Our goal as a team is to win conference, and I expect us to do that,” senior Sarah Watanabe said about the upcoming season.  The men’s team was off to a great start during its opening weekend Feb. 18 and 19, but it fell short during the last two matches. The ’Cats lost 9-0 to Whitman on Feb. 26 during a trip to Walla Walla, Wash. The Missionaries proved their national ranking and won 71-straight wins in the Northwest Conference.  The men hosted the next match on March 1, although George Fox took the win. The Bruins came out on top with a 4-5 win over the Wildcats. 


TLR Issue 16 3-4-2011