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Student Cat Cab

All Birds mixes stand-up comedy and music during a student Cat Cab on Feb. 24. >> page 12

February 25, 2011

INSIDE

Linfield College

VP hopeful drops from ASLC race after one day

McMinnville, Ore.

116th Year

Issue No. 15

Meet the ASLC candidates

Jessica Prokop News editor

Sustainability Students suggest the Observatory house a hub for ‘green’ campus activities. >> page 4

Study abroad Students with multicultural backgrounds share study abroad experiences. >> page 8-9

Mentalist Performer engages and amazes students with a series of mind games and tricks Feb. 19. >> page 11

Presidential and vice presidential candidates for the 2011-12 Associated Students of Linfield College were announced Feb. 21, but one candidate has already withdrawn from the race. Vice presidential candidate junior Sean Boedeker decided to withdraw from the election because of an extensive academic course load. Boedeker recently decided to change to an independent major, which requires much ardor to organize. “I underestimated my class load, and I didn’t want to take on more than I could handle,” Boedeker said. “I know Bradley [Keliinoi] will do a good job.” The three remaining candidates are vice presidential candidate junior Bradley Keliinoi and presidential candidates juniors Rachel Coffey and Katie Patterson. Each candidate has established platform goals for his or her position. • Candidate Coffey wants to increase communication between administration, students and faculty to aid in situations similar to the diploma debate. She also wants to improve ASLC public-

Katie Patterson

Rachel Coffey

Bradley Keliinoi

Running for: President Age: 20 Year: Junior Major: Communication arts Hometown: Sherwood, Ore.

Running for: President Age: 20 Year: Junior Major: Psychology Hometown: Salt Lake City, Utah

Running for: Vice President Age: 20 Year: Junior Major: Political science Hometown: Kaneohe, Hawaii

Extracurriculars: ASLC Vice President; during her freshman year, she was a member of the women’s tennis team, and during her sophomore year she served as a resident advisor.

Extracurriculars: Special Events Chair for the Linfield Activities Board, member of Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority, 2010 Philanthropy Chair for Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority, Activities Council Member and an active participant in community service.

Extracurriculars: ASLC Senate; Service, Patriotism, Understanding, Responsibility, Sacrifice (SPURS) and Alpha Lambda Delta honor societies. He has served on the Curriculum and Academic Integrity committees, has been a Linfield mentor, cochair for the 2010 Lu’au and a student orientation leader.

Interests: Jogging, listening to the Top 40 countdown on the radio and watching reality television. Favorites: Class: Public Speaking; TV show: “Glee”; musician: John Mayer.

>> Please see Elections page 5

Interests: Baking and cooking, watching romantic comedies and being around children. “I am a five-year old at heart,” she said. Favorites: Movie: “Zoolander;” Classes: Human Sexuality, Moral Problems and Biopsychology. “I am also a closet comic book geek; I grew up with two older brothers,” Coffey said. “My favorites are Spiderman, Batman and X-Men.”

Interests: Politics, reading the news, and checking up on CNN, the Whitehouse website and local news stations in his hometown. Favorites: Classes: Comparative Politics and Energy and the Environment. In his spare time, Keliinoi likes to shop, try new local restaurants and have deep conversations with friends.

President aims to revamp Senate, Cabinet Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief

Basketball

The Wildcat basketball teams ended their season Feb. 19 with a win and a loss against Pacific Lutheran University.

>> page 15

INSIDE

Editorial ...................... 2 News ........................... 4 Features........................ 7 Culture....................... 10 Sports ........................ 16

Associated Students of Linfield College President senior Colin Jones proposed major ASLC bylaw changes at the Feb. 21 Senate meeting. The changes would significantly reorganize the Senate and Cabinet. If approved by the Senate, the bylaw changes will be voted on by the student body on the March 8 ASLC election ballot. Jones said he has noticed flaws in ASLC structure, in the Senate in particular, but it’s taken four years of involvement in ASLC to identify what he thinks are feasible solutions. “This [proposal] is based on my personal experience and the positions I’ve held with ASLC and my discussion with Cabinet members,” he said. “What I’ve proposed isn’t

necessarily even the best option, and I hope that senators will think about it and provide feedback on how to improve it.” Here’s a look at the main changes presented in Jones’ proposal: Senate reorganization: The most significant reorganization suggested under Jones’ plan regarding Senate is a cut in the group’s size. Jones said Senate comprises up to 90 senators (although not exactly 90 because of unfilled seats). His proposal would reduce the maximum to about 26 senators. “It makes each senator role a little bit more significant,” Jones said. The reduction would also enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of Senate because fewer members leads to increased discussion, he said. Jones likened the change to a class of 100 students versus a class of 25 students; the latter group would have more mean-

ingful conversations. ASLC bylaws currently require every ASLC-charted club to have a senator; clubs without senators are subject to the dechartering process. Jones’ proposal would change this, too. Instead, clubs would be grouped together, and each cluster would be responsible for choosing a senator to represent the group. Jones suggested clubs be grouped by type. For instance, one group might be activist and political clubs, such as Greenfield, Fusion and Model United Nations; another might be arts and culture, such as Hawaiian Club and Linfield Literary Arts Club (LiLAC); and another might be club sports, such as tennis and rugby. Senators raised concerns at the Feb. 21 meeting about the size difference between these groups. One senator may represent a group of

50 students while another only represents 20. Jones said this was just a proposal, and clubs could be grouped by size, too. He said senators should consider pitfalls such as this and fix them before voting to pass the proposal. The proposal also affects Residence Life representation in Senate. Right now, residence halls are allocated to senators by size, a system similar to the U.S. House of Representatives, and suburb residents and off-campus students can fill at-large senator positions. But large residence halls, which can have two or three senators, are sending only one. Jones proposed that each residence hall and each suburb have one senator. “The reality is if you’re an upper classman, you’re less likely to have >> Please see Bylaws page 6


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LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Kelley Hungerford Managing editor Braden Smith Copy chief Septembre Russell Copy editor Felicia Weller Business manager Sarah Spranger News editor Jessica Prokop Sports editor Corrina Crocker Culture editor Joanna Peterson Features editor Jaffy Xiao Opinion editor Chelsea Bowen Photo editor Katie Pitchford Online editor Megan Myer Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla Illustrator Jenny Worcester Senior reporter Matt Sunderland Senior photographer Katie Paysinger Circulation manager Kyle Guth Columnists Matt Olson “Dear Bailey” Adviser William Lingle professor of mass communication The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists. The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Fridays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday to appear in the Review the following Friday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

Opinions

February 25, 2011

EDITORIAL

Candidates should consider Senate sustainability It seems that the Associated Students of Linfield College presidential and vice presidential candidates have included bolstering Senate effectiveness in their campaign platforms for many years. We at the Review ask this year’s candidates to look at Senate sustainability as well as effectiveness. Student leadership positions have high turnover rates simply because students move on from year to year. This is obviously a roadblock for any long-term (more than one year) Senate projects. And turnover that occurs from semester to semester is even more halting. Such was the case this spring, as senior Katie Kann stepped down from her position as Campus Improvement Committee chair and junior Wesley Allegre stepped down from Campus Liaison Committee chair. Senators, especially those who occupy leadership positions such as the above, who leave before

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Matt Olson’s recent column entitled “Abstract painting in fML does not suit location” expressed a set of judgments concerning a painting of mine displayed in the Fred Meyer Lounge. He went on to demand its immediate removal. Lacking research, the article didn’t identify me by name, much less the title of the work. Matt is of course entitled to his opinion, but as a columnist one would think facts and a more robust appreciation of art might inform and hopefully

their term is over, disrupt the dynamics of Senate as a whole and the organizations they represent. Looking at Senate as a semesterto-semester or year-to-year body diminishes the organization’s effectiveness. For instance, when Duncan Reid, ’10, graduated, systems could have been in place to follow up on the Observatory survey and complete that project. Undertakings such as this often take more than one year to complete. Time must be allotted for research, proposal drafting, proposal submission and project advocacy. When Senate begins long-term projects, it needs to finish them. To simply drop such projects when a new year begins is unfair to students who were expecting and hoping for change. We believe the ASLC presidential and vice presidential candidates need to address how Senate projects can be carried

across the years to completion. Senate has made improvements in the way it functions, such as with the committee restructuring that took effect in the fall, but it cannot achieve true efficiency unless it looks at how to operate without restarting each fall. Senate is not just a club for students who want to enhance their résumés. It’s a representative body that should serve students in the most dedicated way possible. It should comprise students who want to make a mark on Linfield in the long term not just in one year. We would like to see Senators invest more energy in long-term projects even if they can’t be completed in one academic year. For example, we know that planning and advocating for a student center will easily take more than a year, but this does not mean we should simply let the issue die. Senate should be viewed as a strategic body of students who

want to improve Linfield even after they graduate. We at the Review hope this year’s ASLC presidential and vice presidential candidates agree and strive to make it so. -The Review Editorial Board

nuance his writing. Shortly after the Fred Meyer Lounge was inaugurated under President Charles Walker, I was asked to provide a piece for the space over the mantle. I donated the piece in question. Other gifted works of mine on campus include the “Rampant Arch” canvas outside Ice Auditorium and murals in the Spanish classroom. As the legal property of Linfield College, all such work is shown as the administration sees fit.

The 1988 piece that apparently makes Matt cringe is entitled “Phaedrus,” inspired by a key Platonic dialog. In this particular work, I explored existential issues concerning the occasional sense of feeling alien vis-a-vis equally unknown, sometimes dark landscapes that are, nevertheless, the ground of our being. It is not a light theme, I agree, but the central abstract form is luminous and is, I contend, relevant and hopeful to students working their way into life and

the larger world — provided they look and contemplate, rather than expect to be entertained lightly — very lightly — if the writer has his way. I invite columnist Matt Olson to have coffee with me to discuss his reading of my work. Given his apparent sensitivity to art, I might also suggest that he take a course or two in Visual Culture, aesthetics and, oh yes, journalism. Professor Ron Mills Art and Visual Culture

Review office hours Editor-in-chief Tuesdays 9:00-10:00 a.m. Thursdays 3:20-4:20 p.m. or by appointment Managing editor Tuesdays 10:00-11:00 a.m. Fridays 12:30-1:30 p.m. or by appointment Follow us on Twitter @linfieldreview and on Facebook


February 25, 2011

Opinions

OPINION

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ADVICE COLUMN

Americans can learn from Argentine lifestyle Take Planned Parenthood

Juli Tejadilla Graphics/ad designer I recently came back from Argentina on a January Term class about ecotourism with seven other students. I had done some traveling before but always with family and in tour groups — never on my own or with a class. So with this trip, I received an actual view of the culture as opposed to studying it behind glass. Argentine culture is very relaxed people take their time to enjoy life. Coffee, a late lunch or even dinner at the local café may take hours because it takes time to have a conversation and enjoy the

local cuisine. On one of my last days in Buenos Aires at Havanna (Argentina’s equivalent to Starbucks), I noticed a group of co-workers on their lunch break chatting over coffee. Although I couldn’t understand them completely (my Spanish isn’t too great), they seemed to be enjoying themselves and stayed at the café for at least an hour and a half. This would be near impossible in American culture. A two-hour lunch break without an agenda just doesn’t fit into an efficiency-driven society. I’ve always considered myself to be a fairly laidback person, but even I had trouble adjusting to Argentine lifestyle. Eating out in Argentina proved to be a long process. Our guide said it is considered rude if the waiters come to your table

too often or if they bring the check without the customer asking for one. Thus, most meals took us at least two hours to finish — if not more. It only proved inconvenient on days when we were short on time, and it was a little odd to find little to no fast food restaurants. Even at McDonald’s (which I only ate at at the end of my trip), it took at least 20 minutes to receive my food. Things certainly flow at a much slower pace. Another part of Argentine lifestyle we were exposed to was the sharing of maté. Maté is a tea made from yerba maté and is usually consumed from a small, hollowed-out gourd, through a straw that also acts as a tea strainer. The tea itself is rather bitter, so some people add orange rinds or sugar to change the flavor. Drinking maté is a social

custom wherein a group of friends will drink from one gourd, passing it around and enjoying conversation. Maté has actually been banned in some workplaces because the custom takes too much time out of the workday. This is a shame, especially if the Argentines are trying to create working environments more typically matched to an American business firm. While the idea of efficiency is crucial for the business world, personal relationships are deteriorating as everyone is preoccupied with timeliness and new technology. If the custom of taking a bit of time out of each day just for conversation could be adapted in the U.S. it would create better work environments and improve personal relations. Juli Tejadilla can be reached at linfieldreviewgraphics@gmail.com.

OPINION

‘Lettuce’ get to know our veggies

Joanna Peterson Culture editor As a student at Linfield, I’ve been reminded to “buy local” almost as often as I’ve been told to turn in papers on time or to be mindful of quiet hours. Buying local is a theme that appears on T-shirts, fliers and pins and at environmental sustainability seminars. I’ve always supported the idea of purchasing food, clothing and other products from the closest possible source, but it’s never been much of a reality in my everyday life. I love buying tomatoes

and lettuce from summertime farmers markets. My yogurt always comes from a dairy in Springfield, Ore., and I own some handmade bags from local artists. But the extent of my local buying habits are limited. When I need to fill a shopping cart with vegetables and other food staples, I normally just head to the produce isles inside WinCo Foods. It’s close, convenient and cheap. However, during Winter Break, I spent the holidays in Italy visiting family in Rome. We spent a lot of time at the neighborhood farmers market, where I got to know my aunt and uncle’s produce vendor. Whenever family members would approach him, my uncle would greet them enthusiastically before selecting a bag of his favorite veg-

gies for them and instructing them on how to prepare it all. After I got home to Oregon, I started looking for a year-round farmers market experience similar to the one I discovered in Rome. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is my new favorite way to buy local on a regular basis. CSA connects local farmers and community members, providing you with the opportunity to meet and form a relationship with the people who are growing your vegetables. Through CSA, it’s possible to search for and select a farmer who will deliver fresh boxes of seasonal produce to you throughout most of the year while providing updates about the crops and information about growing techniques. Subscribing to a farm’s

weekly vegetable box delivery not only supports local producers, but it provides you with in-depth information about how your food is being raised, which empowers you as a consumer. While buying produce through CSA is slightly more expensive than buying from supermarkets, it’s also using your dollars to bid for a practical, sustainable cause and for a relationship with the people who provide you with food. To search for a CSAsupported farm in McMinnville, visit http://www. e c o v i a n . c o m / s / mcminnville-or/csa-fooddelivery. You can browse through various farm profiles for one that supports your growing philosophies and delivers to an area near you.

Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

OPINION

Linfield is too private for Presidents Day

Jessica Prokop News editor In light of the fact that Presidents Day just took place on Feb. 21, and Linfield did not cancel classes in acknowledgment of the holiday, my question is: Why do only certain schools recognize Presidents Day? After all, Presidents Day is a federal holiday. Elementary, middle and high schools acknowledge it by not holding classes. Even select colleges and universi-

ties throughout the country do the same. So why doesn’t Linfield? Considering that the point of the holiday is to celebrate two of our historically greatest presidents: George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. It seems like a simple way for the college and its students to pay some respect. And it would be nice to have a threeday weekend every once in a while. I understand that colleges and universities have a strict academic schedule and are often crunched for time, especially when it comes closer to finals time. Linfield’s new finals schedule is one reflection of this. And Linfield is even more pressed for time

considering that the only classes offered in January are optional. However, Linfield recognizes Martin Luther King Jr. Day during January term by encouraging students to participate in Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service. So it doesn’t quite make sense that it only recognizes certain major holidays. The same goes for Black History Month during February. Linfield recognizes the month with a series of events through the course of a couple weeks. Guest speakers visit; professors give special lectures; and special events, such as theatrical performances, are just some of the events that Linfield hosts.

Maybe it’s just a private school thing because only public elementary, middle and high schools and public universities are closed on Presidents Day. However, I think that the school system, specifically the higher education school system, should be a little more in-sync when it comes to recognizing national holidays. Or Linfield should at least do something, whether it is canceling classes or a special event, to recognize Presidents Day. It is the least that the school can do to honor a long-standing American holiday. Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

off of the chopping block to save sex education Dear Bailey, Planned Parenthood (PP) provides more than abortions, right?

Sexual education is something that I care about, and it should be important to us all. I write a column about sex and sexual education. Sex is something we all have or will have in common. Someone asked me during the break what I did for work. When I told him that I write for The Linfield Review about sex, he was so excited. He told me that he had a customer come in with her mother, and the mother wanted him to tell her daughter that sex was bad. After repeated comments from Mom, he finally looked at the daughter and said, “I’m not going to tell you that sex is bad. It’s a great and wonderful thing, but it is extremely dangerous.” The danger sex presents is what makes preventative care and screening so important. Last week, a bill passed in the U.S. House of Representatives to cut funding for these health needs. If this bill is put into effect, organizations such as Planned Parenthood will not have the funding to provide easy and affordable access to these health care needs. The funding to PP began in 1970. Why would the government want to pull it now and risk all the recent progress our society has made? President of Planned Parenthood Cecile Richards and U.S. Rep. Gwen Moore of Wisconsin were interviewed on CNN. Abortion through PP is a big concern for many people, but Richards said that the funding is for the “95 percent of Planned Parenthood services, which are preventive care: cancer screening for cervical and breast, birth control, STD testing and treatment.” Abortions are not paid for with federal funds, and isn’t the first step to preventing abortions going to the source and providing preventive care? U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch of Massachusetts is pro-life

and says he does not have many friends in the PP community, but he knows that PP has done more to prevent unintended pregnancies than any other organization and that this is the wrong way to fix the issue. Richards added that 60 percent of patients only have PP to go to for the basic care that they need: “If this bill becomes law, millions of women are going to lose their health care services,” she said. Moore suggested that it is a double standard to cut PP and attempt to pull Woman, Infants, and Children without providing access to family planning. Reading through the comments under the video of the news story on the CNN website displays how misinformed people can be about the situation and sex. One person said that when he was young, his parents taught him morality and that tax payers’ money should not be used for younger people to continue with their immoral behavior. Unfortunately, many people subscribe to this line of thinking, and the reality is that places like PP are about so much more than birth control and abortions. They have saved lives. In my own experience, PP has made a difference in my life and in the lives of many other people I know. More than half a million women have signed a petition to continue funding and thousands have sent in their stories of how PP has affected their lives. People have until March 1 to show their support. If you are interested in showing your support, please visit the PP website or visit it on Facebook. I would like to encourage people to write in with general questions or comments about sex throughout the rest of the term. My e-mail is linfieldreviewbailey@gmail.com. Bailey can be reached at linfieldreviewbailey@gmail.com.


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News

February 25, 2011

Bigger budget Evergreen promotes water park brings bigger band to campus Braden Smith Managing editor

Katie Pitchford/Photo editor Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum representative Brandon Roben spoke about his excitement for student involvement in the Evergreen water park, “Wings and Waves,” to be opened will open June 6 in McMinnville.

The Linfield Activities Board made an announcement on its Facebook page Feb. 15, declaring, “You heard right, Parachute will be performing at this year’s Wildstock Festival, May 13. Excited yet?” The post garnered 13 “likes” and four positive comments. “I’m really excited. I didn’t really think I would ever have the opportunity to see them,” freshman Gabi Leif said upon seeing the announcement. “I definitely had a little freakout.” Junior Nicole Bond, Associated Students of Linfield College vice president of programming, said she offered the band $12,500 during January Term to come to Wildstock this year. The band accepted. Bond oversees the Linfield Activities Board and said she is the primary organizer of Wildstock. Director of College Activities Dan Fergueson said that the budget committee, which comprises the ASLC president, vice president of business & finance and three senators, voted to increase the amount of money spent on the act for Wildstock. The changes were noted when they drafted the 201011 ASLC budget at the end of last year in an attempt to bring in widely known bands that could draw a larger turnout. “The program board was given more money for the entertainment this year than in past years, where the entertainment budget ranged from $4,000 to 7,000, so this was a very intentional increase both by LAB and by ASLC to have a larger-named act at Wildstock,” Fergueson said. “For a number of years now, the vice president of

programming has wanted to bring an act who folks would know, which unfortunately has a price point associated with it,” he continued. “By choosing an act last year with a little more name recognition, they were able to show what that could be, and so the budgeting committee liked that approach and decided to grant some more money to try and get a bigger name.” While other groups, such as clubs, saw cuts in funding from the 2010-11 budget, LAB was among the groups that saw an increase in funding: $31,857 more than the previous academic year for a total of $142,087 (“Penny Wise or Pound Foolish?” TLR, May 21, 2010). Fergueson also mentioned that previous acts involved opening bands, which increased the costs, bringing them somewhat closer to the current budget. Leif said she thought the increase was money well spent because it gives students the opportunity to see a popular name band without traveling far or paying money. Bond also emphasized the draw of a more popular band. “I wanted to get a band that a lot of people on campus would know, and I know they [Parachute] had one really big hit song and a few other pretty popular songs, and I thought they’d be fun for outside,” she said. “I wanted to get upbeat, energetic music.” Wildstock will also take place shortly after Parachute releases its new album, “The Way It Was,” on April 12, making the event even more exciting, Bond said. Braden Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.


News

February 25, 2011

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Elections: Candidates share platform goals << Continued from page 1

ity. One way Coffey plans to do this is by having a Cabinet report sent out once a month, possibly in the Wildcat Weekly e-mail. She also wants to revisit the idea of revamping the Fred Meyer Lounge, an idea that was proposed a few years ago. “I feel like I’m a pretty well-rounded student and that I’m not pegged in a certain area around campus,” Coffey said. “I’m a team player and an approachable person, and students should be able to come to me with any concerns.” • Presidential candidate Patterson, currently vice president of ASLC, plans to advocate for students and non-student groups by being involved on various committees, such as the budget committee. She wants to focus on areas such as spending student body fees more effectively, representing the student

voice and improving publicity tactics. “I considered not running, but this is such an interest of mine, and it feels like my responsibility to help try to better the student interest, which I enjoy doing,” she said. Patterson became involved with ASLC after checking out its website; it sparked her interest to run for vice president in 2010. “Thankfully, it worked out for me,” she said. “I feel like there should be an extra element of stress, but there’s not because I know what to expect.” • Vice presidential candidate Keliinoi said he wants the opportunity to be the person who implements the changes that students suggest. “I have filled various leadership roles on campus, and I feel I have demonstrated my ability to help students,” he said. Keliinoi said he would try to improve Senate representation since some constitu-

ent students are not equally represented. He also wants to improve Senate communication by sending one Senate report to the entire campus. Encouraging senator and constituent interaction and beginning the process of creating a student union are other goals of Keliinoi’s. He also hopes to increase ASLC’s accessibility and visibility by holding some office hours in Dillin Hall where he can interact with students. “I wanted to run because I feel like I have the experience to do the job, and I have been involved in Senate since freshman year,” Keliinoi said. “It’s the next step, and I want to encourage people to become leaders.” • ASLC President senior Colin Jones said that he was happy with all of the candidates, especially since they all have experience with senate and working closely with the ASLC cabinet. He also said that no one is unqualified for the positions that he or she is running for. “The president needs to

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

Vice presidential candidate junior Bradley Keliinoi talks with junior Ebonee Atkins during an ice cream social campaigning event on Feb. 24 in the Fred Meyer Lounge. represent all students equally, which is really hard to do and really important,” Jones said. “The president needs to be calm and diplomatic but stand up for students even to administration.” Jones said that good qualities of a vice president are strong public speaking and

communication skills as well as the ability to encourage people to do the most and best that they can. “I hope students take the time to learn about each candidate and vote intelligently,” Jones said. Election debates will take place after Senate meetings

on Feb. 28 and March 7 at about 7:30 p.m. The general election will take place online March 8. For the full list of campaigning events, visit http:// www.linfield.edu/aslc/elections.html. Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Activism, music to briefly share hub Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief Students on Linfield’s Sustainability Team recommend that the Observatory become a sustainability center in a proposal dated Jan. 10. But the project will need to find a different home because Observatory Rocks, a rehearsal venue and musical outlet for students, was promised the space by President Thomas Hellie’s Administrative Cabinet. Senior David KellnerRode, junior Kit Crane, sophomore Collin Morris and freshman Katy Shewmaker worked on the proposal for a Linfield Center of Sustainability as a side project to their main objective: a green house gas inventory for Advisory Committee on Environment and Sustainability (ACES). The group wanted to house the center in the Observatory because of its heavy foot traffic and proximity to students. Dean of Students Susan Hopp said that the creators of Observatory Rocks are willing to share the Observatory space until the center finds a more suitable venue. She said in an e-mail that the sustainability project is temporarily being referred to as a sustainability hub, as Linfield Center for Sustainability could be confused with Linfield

Center for the Northwest. According to the proposal, sustainability efforts on campus are so numerous

Shift Linfield, Sodexo’s waste reduction program and the community garden. The hub would become

It incorporates faculty, students, staff and community efforts so that there is synergy, and [it] supports sustainability as a campus objective.

-Susan Hopp Dean of Students

and affiliated with so many different organizations that the overall sustainability effort is suffering. “[T]hese actions [for sustainability] have sometimes been disjointed and often the people carrying them out have had trouble communicating effectively between each other, or do not know where to turn on campus for support,” the proposal states. The proposal laid out examples of sustainability initiatives on campus including ACES, Power

a centralized place for sustainability across campus and, the proposal states, is “a collaborative working space and community resource center” that would coordinate and support goals and initiatives of sustainability groups and help disseminate information about them. “It incorporates faculty, students, staff and community efforts so that there is synergy, and [it] supports sustainability as a campus objective,” Hopp said in an e-mail.

According to the proposal, “the Student Sustainability Intern and the ASLC Community Outreach and Environmental Education Coordinator (CORE) would manage the office’s everyday activities,” communicate with ACES, ASLC and the Office of Community Engagement and Service. Rob Gardner, associate professor of sociology, would be the center’s adviser and faculty liaison. The Sustainability Team also proposed that the hub have a minimal budget, which could be achieved through a grant from the ASLC Sustainability Council. The proposal does not specifically indicate what a budget would be used for. The sustainability hub is not associated with any sustainability initiatives of the Associated Student of Linfield College, ASLC President senior Colin Jones said. He said he thinks the hub simply moves the college toward a sustainable sustainability movement. “I don’t think we’ve quite hit a point where we’re duplicating the work, but the sustainability movement on campus has moved so fast in the last four years that we’re just trying to get our feet under ourselves,” Jones said. Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


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Students encourage others to give blood Chelsea Bowen Opinion editor The American Red Cross will be on campus for its second annual blood drive with Linfield on Feb. 25. Order of Omega president senior Michael Eldredge was in charge of sending out e-mails and setting up tables inside Dillin Hall to gain publicity for the blood drive. He also had the responsibility of contacting Red Cross members and reserving spots for two buses outside of the Rutschman Field House. “Our goal is 108 signups, but we want at least 84 students actually giving blood,” Eldredge said. The ideal outcome for the American Red Cross would be to draw 84 pints of blood, he said. “It’s a great cause, and there are certain blood types that are more rare than others,” he said. Junior Sarah Wilder has helped with the blood drive

before and will be working in the front of the bus, which is called the canteen. Wilder will help students recover after they have given blood by giving them juice and crackers. “Most people recover in 10 to 15 minutes,” Wilder said. Wilder, who has also given blood in the past, said she suggests that a person should refrain from looking at the needle if he or she is feeling nervous about giving blood. Junior Kathryn Baker has been giving blood since she was 16 and said she would like to see others contribute as well. “To encourage students, I would make sure they understand that their small donation of one pint of blood can save up to three lives and that it is a very important cause,” Baker said. “Many people are afraid of needles and having their blood drawn; I

myself used to by terrified of giving blood, but I would encourage those people to overcome their fear because not only does it help with personal growth, but it also helps save lives.” Baker said in an e-mail that she has no problem giving blood. Territory representative for the American Red Cross Kelly O’Rourke works with partners to set up blood drives. “Linfield is one our bigger McMinnville drives,” she said. On top of having students donate blood, another mission of the American Red Cross is to educate students. “Every two seconds someone in the country needs blood,” she said. For more information about the American Red Cross contact Michael Eldredge at meldred@linfield.edu.

February 25, 2011

NewsBrief Machine warms up for repairs The frozen yogurt machine has returned to Catty Shack and is undergoing repairs. But General Manager of Linfield Dining Services Bill Masullo said he isn’t sure why the fix is suddenly occurring. The machine broke early in the fall, and Masullo said then that the student demand for frozen yogurt wasn’t high enough for the administration to justify replacing or repairing the machine (“Tumult freezes repair process,” TLR, Oct. 17, 2010). He said there doesn’t seem to be a rise in this demand even now as the machine is being fixed. In the fall, Masullo estimated that the fix could cost the college $14,000. But he said doesn’t know how much it’s costing to fix it now. So while there is some mystery surrounding the frozen yogurt machine and its repairs, students can still get excited about seeing their favorite frozen treats soon returned to the Catty Shack.

~Compiled by Kelley Hungerford/Editor-in-chief

Chelsea Bowen can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

Bylaws: Proposal increases non-ASLC representation in Senate << Continued from page 1 Senate representation,” Jones said, explaining his reasoning for including formal representation of suburb residents. Off-campus students can still fill at-large Senate seats, which Jones proposes are reduced from five to four. These seats will be available to individuals who represent non-ASLC organizations. Greek organizations will also receive Senate seats under the proposal. Currently, they are allowed to fill at-large seats, but not all fraternities and sororities have chosen to do so. Jones proposed that the Interfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council should each get one seat. However, ASLC cannot force Greek organizations or Residence Life to have senators, so the seats are offered in an effort to make Senate representative of the whole campus and not just club members, Jones said. And keeping the Senate representative is key to discussions about the proposal. “I think the big question is how do you make it a more manageable, interactive, engaged body and still represent the general population,” Director of College Activities Dan Fergueson said. Jones said a significant drawback of the proposal is that it reduces the number of

Information courtesy of Colin Jones/Graphic by Juli Tejadilla/Graphics/ads designer

ASLC President Colin Jones’ proposal shown above modifies Cabinet officers’ duties in an attempt to increase Cabinet efficiency by decreasing the number of members from nine to eight. leadership roles offered on campus. Fergueson agrees but said that a smaller Senate could mean increased effectiveness if it can remain representative. “I think it really enriches the experience of the individual senators and in some way enforces them to be engaged,” he said. Cabinet proposal: “I was less certain that Cabinet needed to be changed, while with Senate, it was very clear to me that it was dysfunctional in some ways,” Jones said. “But at the same time I thought there were ways [Cabinet] could possibly run better and be more in tune with student needs and interests.”

To increase Cabinet effectiveness, Jones’ proposal reallocates duties and reduces the number of members from nine to eight. In the proposal, Jones eliminated the secretary position, combined club director and student center director, renamed most of the rest and added a position: vice president of community & sustainability affairs. The secretary’s task of taking Senate meeting minutes would fall to an ASLC office helper, Jones said. Clubs, Activities Council, the CIC and the Game Room fall under the command of the vice president of student interests. The Bike Co-Op and Sustainability Council move

to the community affairs position’s responsibility. “That position is an effort to respond to rapidly growing student interest in community service, civic engagement, environmental sustainability,” Jones said. The vice president of community & sustainability affairs would also be in charge of planning community service outings for the ASLC Cabinet. Other proposed changes to Cabinet roles include moving elections management from the responsibility of the secretary to the vice president, and making the vice president’s representation on the board of trustees a duty of the president.

Again, the reduction in leadership roles on campus is a drawback, but Fergueson said he’s also concerned about having eight Cabinet members. “I personally don’t like groups in an even number,” he said. His unease comes from the fact that even-numbered groups can vote in a tie; an odd number allows for more efficient decision making. Concerns and hopes: Jones and Fergueson both expressed hope that senators will seriously consider this proposal and talk about it with their constituents. “The fear is that there won’t be any serious dialogue about it in the Senate, and it

will get rubber stamped and people will just vote yes when it’s in front of them,” Fergueson said about the proposal. Senators will discuss the proposal in depth at their Feb. 28 meeting, during which they can propose changes to the original draft before voting to pass the proposal. Jones said he encourages senators to modify his original proposal. “I feel that we will have a thorough discussion on Monday about these proposals before any decisions are made,” junior Katie Patterson, ASLC vice president and 2011 ASLC presidential candidate, said in an e-mail. “It is important for students to understand exactly what each proposal means and how it will affect the way that ASLC is run.” If senators approve the proposal, then it will appear on the March 8 ASLC elections ballot for approval of the student body. If they don’t approve it, then the proposal will die. But if discussion runs too long, senators can also choose to defer the vote until the March 7 meeting, but that will leave only a single day for the student body to review the proposal before it goes to ballot the next day. Students can read Jones’ proposal at http://www. linfield.edu/aslc/elections. html. Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


February 25, 2011

Features

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Stay off the grass: Save yourself from seasonal allergies by Felicia Weller/Copy editor

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he cold weather may bring false signals of an ongoing winter season, but spring is just around the corner and begins on March 20. One would think with the blooming flowers and trees pollinating during this time of year, the worst of seasonal allergies is yet to come. However, many Linfield students have experienced year-round symptoms that may be a result of allergens specific to the Willamette Valley and increasing effects of global warming. Senior Sarah Spranger, TLR business manager of Mercer Island, Wash., has suffered year-round allergies that become notably worse when she returns to campus. “When I go home for the weekend, my symptoms seem to disappear,” Spranger said. “I really think that my allergies get worse when I’m in McMinnville.” Nurse manager Tina Foss of the Asthma Allergy Centre in McMinnville said that allergies aren’t more common in the Willamette Valley but simply unique to the area. Students coming from other states are exposed to these new allergens and then react. Naturopathic physician Bruce Dickson of the Key to Health Clinic in McMinnville elaborate on the emerging spring allergens. “Right now the birches and hazelnuts are blooming,” Dickson said. “The big thing for people around here is the grass; we have several kinds — Johnson, Sudan, Timothy and blue grasses — on golf courses.” The website www.Oregonallergyassociates.com specifically lists pollen seasons specific to the Willamette Valley and the allergens produced. It also explains why certain allergens are more common than others. “The Willamette Valley has a high grass pollen due to nearly 500,000 acres of land used for commercial production of grass seed,” the website states. Other sources reveal that global warming is responsible for the increasing length of pollen seasons. According to a Feb. 22 Huffington Post blog post “Allergy Season Longer from Global Warming in North America,” pollen doesn’t become an irritant until it crosses a certain threshold for many allergy sufferers. “The longer season and more powerful plants may be the threshold needed to trigger allergies,” the post states.

The blog post also noted that 50 million Americans have allergies, which can worsen into asthma. Spranger said her asthma has been effected by allergies. “Sometimes the allergies make my asthma bad enough that I can’t go to class, and it makes homework miserable,” she said. Foss said everyone is affected differently depending on their allergy. “The most common effects are runny nose, itchy eyes, nasal congestion and drainage, which make everyday tasks difficult to complete,” Foss said. Foss said blood and skin tests are used to detect allergen sensitivities in patients and determine the appropriate treatment for seasonal and year-round allergies. Common solutions include antihistamines and immunotherapy or allergy shots used to increase tolerance against the detected allergens. Foss also suggested to wash sheets in hot water as this may help reduce the effects of pollen from trees, grass and mold. For allergy sufferers seeking a more natural remedy, Dickson suggested advanced allergy therapeutics, which is provided at his practice. The approach combines 21st century technology with 3,000-year-old acupuncture principles to help reset the immune system. “Allergies are an abnormal response by the body to something that is actually normal in the environment,” Dickson said. “They are usually developed in times of stress or after infections, and the body reacts. With naturopathic medicine, we’re not trying to suppress symptoms but rather strengthen the immune system and eliminate the cause of the reaction.” For more information about advanced allergy therapeutics, Dickson suggested visiting allergytx.com, especially for those seeking treatment without the use of shots, needles or supplements. To reduce the discomfort of her allergies, Spranger uses an antihistamine and nasal spray and rinses her sinuses frequently. “I also had to have sinus surgery because I was having so many sinus infections [from allergies],” Spranger said, “I can sympathize with people who are suffering from them.” Felicia Weller can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

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any students misconstrue seasonal allergies for the common cold. Here are tips for distinguishing between the two:

Pollen seasons in the Willamette Valley: December January Cedar Pine

February

Hazelnut Alder Juniper Birch Cypress Elm Spruse

March/April Oak Sycamore Cottonwood Maple Ash Walnut

Allergies vs. colds: • Allergies — genetic hypersensitivity causes a reaction when exposed • Symptoms — last for weeks or months, sometimes year-round • Nasal discharge — thin, watery • Allergies do NOT cause fevers. • Cold — viral infection • Symptoms — last for two weeks • Nasal discharge — mucous color starts clear, then becomes cloudy and discolored • Cold may cause fever, head and muscle aches (Information from oregonallergyassociates.com)

EpiPen For some, allergies are a serious matter. People may need to keep certain treatments, such as antihistamine, an inhaler or even epinephrine, on hand. Epinephrine often comes in the form of an EpiPen (Epinephrine Auto-Injector), which is used to combat anaphylactic shock , which can occur during anaphylaxis. According to National Center for Biotechnology Information, anaphylaxis is a severe, whole-body allergic reaction to a chemical that has become an allergen. Instructions for using a traditional EpiPen: 1. Pull off the safety release. 2. Swing and firmly push the orange tip against outer thigh so it clicks on and hold thigh approximately 10 seconds to deliver drug. 3. Seek emergency medical attention.

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Features

February 25, 2011

Layers of culture, l by Jaffy Xiao/Features editor

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hile we began Spring Semester discussing new professors and new classmates, 63 students are experiencing a transition from a foreign culture back to America’s culture. They studied abroad in Fall Semester, and it opened their eyes to new perspectives. For some of them, studying abroad is even more than that. “When I was in France, I represented both America and Vietnam,” junior Mai Doan, a four-year international student from Vietnam, said. To complete a French minor, she studied at the American University Center of Provence in Aix, France, last fall. Junior Cassie Kwon, a Korean-American born in Seattle, Wash., who studied abroad at Kanto Gakuin University in Yokohama, Japan, is another student who had a unique multicultural background before studying abroad. “People in Japan greeted other girls that I was abroad with in English but greeted me in Japanese,” Kwon said. “I might integrate that culture more, but I definitely felt the wall between us.” Junior Michele Wong studied abroad last fall at the Hong Kong Baptist University. She said she didn’t feel like she was living in a foreign country but rather a big U.S. city, such as San Francisco. She visited Hong Kong for two weeks when she was in high school, and her father is originally from Hong Kong.

her third language besides speaking Korean at home and English at school. “It’s such a privilege to learn a language and know other languages; it’s so important to keep on top of that,” Kwon added. “A lot of people assume that because I speak Korean, Japanese comes naturally for me. But I only found these similarities as I was learning Japanese not [because] I already knew the similarities.”

Culture barriers

While learning the language is the first step to communicating well with locals, culture shock as another challenge that presents itself as students come down from their excitement of being tourists. Wong said she was excited about everything during her first visit to Hong Kong in her senior year of high school, but studying abroad last fall let her tourist mood shift to that of a resident. Kwon agreed. She said she took pictures of everything including each meal she had and shopping goods during the first month in Japan. “I thought [going abroad in France] would be simple and easy as I already had study abroad experience at LinPhoto courtsey of Mai Doan field. But it’s not true,” Doan said. She Junior Mai Doan with her language partner Marine Sedy has been to the U.S. since senior year by the fountain while she studied abroad at the Ameriof high school. can University Center of Provence in Aix, France. On the other hand, study abroad experiences let these girls understand Learning their languages the cultures they already hold onto. Not all the study abroad programs at Linfield have language Kwon said she realized her attachment to Korea didn’t mean course requirements, but learning the language of the country that she is Korean. you’re visiting seems to be the best way to learn everything else. “Even though I was in Korea, I was an overseas Korean,” she Doan said she was already interested in the French language added. when she entered Linfield and that France has always For Doan, a third culture helps her open her mind, she said. been a place she has wanted to visit. “[Before I studied abroad in France], I always kept my VietnamKwon said she didn’t expect to learn and speak ese value and doubted U.S. value. I didn’t accept being an AmeriJapanese fluently, but Japanese has become can but preferred Vietnamese food and boys,” she said. “French

McMinnville, Ore.

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Features

February 25, 2011

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layers of learning people helped me to push myself into French culture.”

Learning from cultural differences Definitions of culture shock differ for everyone, but these three girls said they learned from the cultural differences they noticed. Kwon said she was impressed by how locals taught her rules patiently. And she was able to learn more about the Japanese culture through her mistakes by getting in “trouble” and breaking the table manner rules. Influenced by Korean custom, she said she thought she was an expert at using chopsticks. But when she and other Linfield students had a barbecue in Japan, she and another girl grabbed a piece of chicken with chopsticks at the same time and everyone froze. Later, a native Japanese explained that it’s unacceptable for

two pairs of chopsticks to hold one piece of food. Kwon also provided two other tips she learned in Japan: Don’t stick chopsticks in the rice bowl, and don’t ask to change orders in the restaurant because it means you are destroying the chef’s creation. When she lived with a host family in France, Doan said she felt like she was a princess the first day she woke up. Her host mother cooked breakfast and took care of the laundry for her. “These are things that even my mother won’t do for me. Being independent in America is what I learned [as an international student at Linfield], and I learned being interdependent from French culture,” Doan said. Although Wong said she did know what she should have expected before going abroad, she was moved by how local students are tied to family, as she has many family members on her father’s side in Hong Kong.

Distinct changes

Photo courtsey of Cassie Kwon Junior Cassie Kwon cleans her hands, mouth and the stick itself with water before she entered a temple, a Japanese tradition. She studied abroad at the Kanto Gakuin University in Yokohama last fall.

rance

Besides the culture shock, Kwon said she noticed distinct changes in herself after she came back. She said before going abroad, she knew she should practice her Korean and Japanese with some Korean and Japanese exchange students at Linfield, but she didn’t care at the time. She thought they came here to learn English, so she only spoke English with them. “After going abroad, and I came back, I spoke Korean to Korean exchange students this year, and they spoke English to me — practice for both of us,” Kwon said. Doan said she changed when her host family helped her embrace the French culture, which helped her loosen her grip on her American and Vietnamese identities. Opening her mind to fully understand French culture, Doan plans to go to France for a master’s degree after she graduates from Linfield. Wong also said she plans to go back to Hong Kong in the future because of the friends she made and family members. Jaffy Xiao can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@ gmail.com.

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H.K.

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Vietnam

by Juli Tejadilla/Graphics/ads designer

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Culture

February 25, 2011

Artist creates twist on community Kelsey Sutton Staff reporter Artist Damien Gilley spoke in an artist talk on Feb. 19., answering questions from the audience and describing his artwork, which is on exhibit in the Linfield Gallery. His piece, titled “Masterplexed,” is a maze-like design that challenges perceived and actual space. It features temporary walls set up at 45-degree angles that confuse the eye’s perception of the installation. The continuity of the walls and lines are interrupted by the artist’s manipulation. “The main point was to create space visually instead of physically,” Gilly said. Gilley uses the installation of makeshift walls using gray panels to develop and elaborate on the room’s already existing walls. The lines on

the panels are contrasted with additional orange lines. Everything in the exhibit is set to a grid with simple angles. He said he wanted to reinforce the grid and then break it at the same time. “The orange lines have no grid relationship; they are less measured and less predictable,” Gilley said. Cris Moss, gallery director and intructional associate of art and visual culture, shared his perceptions of the exhibit. Gilley’s work “questions how we view our personal space and perception. His art is busy yet clean. It uses simple lines and colors that allow the viewer to extend viewing past the walls,” Moss said. The simplicity of the display is one of Gilley’s artistic traits. At first glance, the piece looks complex and

busy but is simple at it’s core. “The goal is to create a perplexing space with a minimal amount of visual stimuli, allowing the viewer to explore and experience subtle perceptual phenomena. The space is optically playing with color, spacial depth and flatness,” Gilley said. The exhibit translates as something different to everyone who sees it. “The exhibit is sort of a maze,” freshman Harry Bayley said.“It reminded me of a fun house. I like that it suggests depth without using shading. It looks like you could almost walk into the wall.” Gilley reflected on his work. “I like making visually challenging spaces, specifically referencing contemporary architectural developments,” he said. ‘Masterplexed’ is a pun on

‘master-planned communities’ and developments with a confusing twist.” Gilley’s artwork has been showcased in many venues including the Las Vegas Museum of Art, the Arthouse in Austin, Texas, and even the East West Project in Berlin. He has received many grants from the Regional Arts & Culture Council and was awarded an artist fellowship by the Oregon Arts Commission in 2010. He is an adjunct professor at the Pacific Northwest College of Art and the Art Institute in Portland. The exhibit will run through March 12. Gilley’s flat artwork is also featured inside of the James F. Miller Fine Arts Gallery. For more information, contact Moss at cmoss@linfield.edu. Kelsey Sutton can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com

Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer “Masterplexed,” an exhibit by Damien Gilley, features a maze-like exploration of master-planned communities.

Senior vocalist entertains with operatic performance Ellen Brahae For the Review When audience members filed in to watch senior Melissa Davaz’s student recital on Feb. 20, many found they got much more than they had bargained for. Davaz sang various operatic pieces, such as “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühling” by Mozart, “Waldesgespräch” by Schumann, “Ganymed” by Schubert, and “Fleur desséchée” by Viardot. Deborah Huddleston, adjuct professor of music and the pianist at the recital, spoke highly of her experience working with Davaz. “She’s very organized, she knows what she wants, and she adapts well,” Huddleston said. “It’s wonderful to play with someone who can nuance the songs like she does. It’s like working with a professional.” Davaz has been singing for about eight years. She said she is inspired by artists from the Romantic period,

Ellen Brahae/For the Review

Senior Melissa Davaz performs a vocal recital accompanied by Adjunct Professor of Music Deborah Huddleston and senior Carolyn Blood on Feb. 20 in Delkin Recital Hall. The recital wraps up Davaz’s year at Linfield.

such as Schubert and Brahms, although she admitted she is also partial to more contemporary artists such as the Allman Brothers and Billie Holiday.

In addition to her operatic performances, Davaz also plays the keyboard and sings with the folk-rock band Jack Ruby Presents. Davaz studied vocally

under Professor of Music Gwen Leonard and spent a semester abroad studying music in Vienna, Austria. Davaz graduated in December 2010 with a

Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and a minor in Music. “For me, Linfield has created a diversity of experiences,” she said. “It has helped me

the game — which includes more options than the beta version — became available for download on Feb. 23. The 99-cent version with expanded levels will hit the market on March 2. Martin said “Pirates vs. Ninjas” is a tower defense game, which is a style of game that requires players to defend their own bases while attacking the opposing team’s fortresses. Players choose to play as pirates or ninjas before selecting a difficulty level, Martin said.

The complete version will feature 50 levels in its initial stages, but Martin said that he and Ferrese plan to expand the game to 100 levels. Martin said they began creating “Pirates vs. Ninjas” as  Ferrese’s senior capstone project for his computer science major. Martin said that Ferrese was in charge of writing the code for the application, while Martin was involved in business and marketing aspects of the process, such as finding an artist and testers, managing the design and publicizing the

game. He said that 10 students tested the application before its release. One tester was senior Samuel Shryock. Shryock said he helped adjust various aspects of the application, such as changing the damage level of certain powers and testing for difficulty. Martin said the game has been downloaded 3,000 times since the game’s launch date. “It’s been successful so far,” Martin said. “The amount of money we’ve invested in the project is so small that even

if we only make a thousand sales, we’d still be making a profit.” Ferrese and Martin plan to continue producing applications through the company after graduation this spring, Martin said. Shryock said he will work with Black Sparks Studio next year doing more coding and game production work. “We don’t know how much it’s going to take off, but it has potential to go places and I kind of want to be there when it does,” he said. Shryock said that he

become a more professional performer.”

Ellen Brahae can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com

Students develop game application out of capstone project Joanna Peterson Culture editor Two Linfield seniors created a game application for Google’s Android smart phone. The game is the first in a series that their new company plans to produce.   Robert Ferrese and Clayton Martin designed “Pirates vs. Ninjas,” which came out in a free beta version on Feb. 16 . “Pirates vs. Ninjas” is produced by Martin and Ferrese’s company, Black Sparks Studio.   The free, full version of

doesn’t anticipate it being a full-time job at first but that everyone is interested in seeing how far the company will progress. “It’s been a fun experience,” Martin said. “It’s almost like having the American dream without the same amount of work. You get to be a programmer on par with someone working at Apple except without the years of experience.”

Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com


February 25, 2011

Culture

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Mentalist captivates audience with mind-blowing tricks Brittany Baker Staff reporter Mind-bending stunts captivated a full house when mentalist Craig Karges performed a popular show Feb. 19 in Ice Auditorium. “I was constantly amazed by each illusion and enjoyed it thoroughly,” junior Geoffrey Hamilton said. “The audience was packed and everyone was on edge.” Karges “combines the art of magic with the science of psychology and the power of intuition to create the impression that nothing is impossible,” according to his website, www.craigkarges.com. Karges did his best to prove that assertion by performing a wide variety of stunts, including levitating a table and correctly guessing what audience members were thinking. “My favorite was when he shouted out a name in the audience and all of the students who had that name stood up. He then decided which one’s thoughts he could read, and he accurately knew what they were thinking,” freshman Kelly

Katie Pitchford/Photo editor Mentalist Craig Karges performs for a packed audience in a crowd-engaging show Feb. 19 in Ice Auditorium. Yokoyama said. Karges opened the show with a big trick involving four coasters. One had a large spike coming out of it. He then had a student assistant place a Styrofoam cup over

each coaster and change the order of the cups. Karges proceeded to crush all of the cups but the one with the spike, all while he was blindfolded. “It was amazing as well as suspenseful,” Hamilton said.

European travel inspires alum’s penchant for writing Joanna Peterson Culture editor A Linfield alumnus recently published a novel inspired by a post-graduation trek through Western Europe. Caleb Kearns, class of ‘08, said that he began writing his debut novel, “A Journal Away from Life,” during a fourmonth backpacking trip. Kearns described the novel as a mix between a romance and a murder mystery, with elements of travel mixed throughout. The novel chronicles a father’s journey to Italy to identify his son’s corpse. As he travels, the father reads his son’s journal in an attempt to decode the mystery of his death. The journal tells the father more about how his son lived than about how he died. Kearns said that his European travels led him to encounter most of the people who inspired the characters in his novel. “Readers tend to be more uninterested in these characters because they don’t pertain to the murder mystery element of the story,” Kearns said. “But to me they are the most important part because their interactions illustrate the human experience. It’s not about how we died or when

we died; it’s about who we were when we died.” Kearns’ trip also provided him with inspiration for the setting of the novel, which takes place in Cinque Terre, Italy. The hardest part of Kearns’ writing process, he said, was finding time to devote to composing the novel. He said he began writing in Italy but found it difficult to continue the process once he returned home to North Carolina. “I needed complete isolation,” he said. “There was this nine-month period that I couldn’t find any length of time to write, so I finally took 12 days off work and stayed in a friend’s cabin in Bend, Ore.” Kearns said that it was important for him to find a friend who thought differently than he did to edit his work. “My friend, Matt Hall, was able to edit my work ruthlessly because he wasn’t attached to my style and because it wasn’t material he would ever want to read on his own,” Kearns said. “And if he told me that I nailed a section, I could take it as a genuine compliment.” Kearns said that “A Journal Away from Life” has been the biggest accomplishment

of his life. “When you finish writing — nobody can take that moment away from you,” he said. “I’ve been on state champion teams, in show productions on a wide scale and in films where I’ve seen the finished product. None of those moments compared with the moment I finished this book.” Kearns said he discovered his voice in writing while taking creative writing classes at Linfield’ under Professor of English Lex Runciman. “Lex told me that if you’re the type of person who imagines new people and things on a daily basis, then you have to find a way to create,” Kearns said. “He’s the reason I switched my major from math to creative writing.” Kearns said he advises aspiring writers to actively seek their genre and become excited about it. “If you have a passion for writing, then make time, make it a priority and find the story first,” Kearns said. “You’ll be amazed at how easy it is to write when it electrifies you.” Joanna Peterson can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com

Karges also performed several tricks during which he was blindfolded by a student and would either write down what a specific audience member was thinking without looking, or

already had it written down on a piece of paper long before the show. “The most impressive presentation for me was whenever he would incorporate something that he had

written,” sophomore Keevin Craig said. “Like when he had a piece of paper that he previously wrote that stated what kind of car the different members in the audience would describe to him.” Karges emphasized audience involvement, and throughout the course of the show, he involved one student or more in nearly every trick he performed. “He was great at bringing you into the show. Even when you knew what was coming, you were still on the edge of your seat saying ‘no way,’” senior James Rhodes said. Freshman Sydney Waite agreed. “I liked that he involved students a lot, it made it easier to engage. Everyone seemed to be having a pretty good time,” she said. Karges, who is referred to on his website as an “extraordanist,” started his career performing at college campuses and performed for a similarly packed crowd at Linfield in 2009. Brittany Baker can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com

Playwright highlights minorities in plays

Katie Pitchford /Photo editor The Theatre and Communication Arts Departments hosted New York City-based playwright Rob Urbinati on Feb. 23-26 in Ford Hall. Urbinati delivered a presentation about his Immigrant Voices Project, a program that is meant to educate playwrights about plays on themes pertaining to minorities. Urbinati is the author of the play “West Moon Street,” which Linfield students will perform March 16.


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Entertainment

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February 25, 2011

Chamber folk sextet releases intricate album Braden Smith KSLC 90.3 FM The Portland-based sextet Loch Lomond has grown in popularity in the Pacific Northwest after a number of releases and touring with the Decemberists. The band’s second fulllength album, “Little Me Will Start A Storm,” was released Feb. 22 and is proof that the emerging chamber-folk subgenre, which incorportates elements and instruments of classical music with modern indie folk/folk rock is quite viable. Frontman Ritchie Young leads the band with his distinct vocal talent, weaving in and out of falsetto and displaying his wide singing range. Clever orchestration fills in the rest of each song with a variety of instruments, along with singing from other members of the band. These elements are combined in such a way that each song sounds elaborate but never

cluttered. The album in its entirety is elegant, intriguing and a little dark at times but still catchy with simple, amusing melodies. The opening track, “Blue Lead Fences,” is upbeat and rhythmically driven, but the album soon descends into slower tempos, lighter melodies and a more soothing atmosphere. This descent continues throughout the album with a more contemplative mood replacing the lighter, more comforting one. The second track, “Elephants & Little Girls,” opens with an absolutely beautiful melody on the clarinet that reworks itself throughout the song. This track is undoubtedly the prettiest piece on the album and is a clear illustration of the band’s talent in knowing where to insert what instrument. A clarinet pops up here and there, a viola entwines itself around the melody at key points

and aglockenspiel chiming is present occasionally, among incorporated instruments. “Elephants & Little Girls” is followed by thedarker “I Love Me,” the more traditional folk-sounding “Blood Bank,” with its simple sway in triple meter, and the pretty instrumental piece “Water Bells,” which features the always lovely musical saw. However, the dénouement of the album is reached on the seventh track, “Water In Astoria.” The song employs all of the best techniques featured on the album to create a natural and harmonious atmosphere. “Little Me Will Start A Storm” is short, at a total of 34 minutes, but it is exceedingly sweet and never actually feels short. Each song is given just the right amount of time to shine and merge with the others in an intricate tapestry. The album can sound dark at times, but the lyrics maintain a lighthearted feel,

Photo courtesy of www.terrorbird.com Loch Lomond released its second full-length album Feb. 22 on the Portland-based record label Tender Loving Empire. and the music never allows itself to become entrenched in a dark and somber mood like other music can. Anyone with a slight interest in today’s folk music scene will enjoy “Little Me Will Start a Storm” and

it’s subtle, yet effective, variations on the genre. Tune in to KSLC 90.3 FM to hear tracks from “Little Me Will Start A Storm.” The track “Elephants & Little Girls” is available for free download at www.tenderlovingempire.

com. Loch Lomond will play its record release show on Feb. 26 in Portland at the Alberta Rose Theater. Braden Smith can be reached at kslc@gmail.com

‘All Birds’ Cat Cab blends music and comedy

Megan Myer /Online editor Juniors Miles Oliveira and Logan Veith, of the band All Birds, burst into laughter as they perform their rendition of an emo song on Feb. 24 at the student Cat Cab. Junior Tyler Mais is also a band-member and performed with Oliveira and Veith.


Sports

February 25, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

13

Column: Wildcats will find the proper pitch << Continued from page 16 streak lately after winning their first five in a row. One of those wins was against Western Oregon University, by the way, which is a Division II school. For those sports-illiterate out there, that means that WOU has

more funding, better facilities and the ability to recruit more top-tier players than Linfield, and we beat them. Pretty neat, huh? True, the team did proceed to drop their next two games in a row, but these were topnotch teams in, again, higher divisions (NAIA and D-II, respectively), so take it with

a sizable grain of salt. Basically, your Linfield baseball team is living up to its No. 8 ranking and looks like a national title contender for the second year in a row. Mazel tov! As for the women, the softball team was rained out before its highly anticipated

season opener, so anyone interested in watching that game can catch it at 3 p.m. on March 9. Something else seems to be nagging me the back of my mind about these gals. Maybe it’s the five All-Americans still on the roster? The bulk of last year’s team (which set more NCAA and school

records than I can count) returning? The No. 1 national ranking by the National Fastpitch Coaches Association? Never mind; I’m sure it’ll come to me later. In the meantime, I’d highly recommend catching some softball games while the weather is nice. Last year’s team belted a ri-freak-

ing-diculous 78 home runs in 49 games last year. In other words, if this season’s squad is anywhere near that caliber (which the NFCA says it is), you’re guaranteed at least one home run a game. Now that’s getting some bang for your buck! Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Sports Briefs

Megan Myer/Online editor Junior Cody Levien rallies during a match against Pacific Lutheran University at home on Feb. 18.

Men’s and women’s tennis The women’s tennis team collected another win against Lewis & Clark College on Feb. 19. Four out of six singles matches went to the ’Cats. The team took the Pioneers 6-3, is 2-1 overall and has uncontested wins within the conference. George Fox University will host the Wildcats at 10 a.m. on Feb. 26. The Lewis & Clark University Pioneers could not hold their own

against the Linfield men’s team on Feb. 19, as the ’Cats, who are 2-0 in the conference, overpowered their opponents on Feb. 19 during the first home game of the season. The Wildcats won each of three doubles contests that day and the final score was 8-1. Linfield will play at home again at 5 p.m. on Feb. 26. ~Compiled by Septembre Russell/ Copy chief

Christine Fujiki/For the Review Senior Chelsea Machida leaps over the bar during practice.

Track and field

The Linfield track and field team has competed in two meets so far in preparation for conference. The team traveled to Washington State University on Jan. 15, and then to the University of Washington for the Washington Open on Feb. 13. The season looks promising for the ’Cats, as 15 letter winners are returning to the team. Of the 15, three competed at the national level in the NCAA championships.

The team welcomes a handful of newcomers, too, including first-year head coach Travis Olson. The team aims to compete at the George Fox Invitational in Newberg, Ore., on Feb. 26. The following weekend the Wildcats will host the Erik Anderson Memorial Icebreaker on March 4 and 5. ~Compiled by Corrina Crocker/ Sports editor

Photos by Christine Fujiki/For the Review Top: Senior pitcher K.C. Wiser works on his pitch during a practice. Bottom: The baseball team looks on as the men practice.

Sports Brief Baseball

Momentum didn’t pick up for the Wildcats until the seventh inning in a tournament game against Lewis-Clark State on Feb. 20. The loss was the team’s second and brings the No. 8-ranked team’s win-loss record to 5-2. Before competing against Lewis-Clark, the team dropped a game against St. Martin University on Feb. 19.       The ’Cats scored two points against the Warriors during the game. The scorelessness

ended when freshman Tim Wilson crossed home plate on a hit by freshman center field Kramer Lindell. The second point was scored once a single by freshman outfielder Clayton Truex brought in junior infielder Ryan Larson. The next game is slated for noon on Feb. 26, when Linfield will have a homefield advantage over Oregon Institute of Technology. ~Compiled by Septembre Russell/Copy chief


14

Sports

www.linfieldreview.com

Wildcat sports schedule Friday, Feb. 25 @ Gresham, Ore.

Noon

Baseball

vs. Oregon Tech (2)

Noon

Softball

vs. Whitworth (2)

Noon

Swimming

@ Gresham, Ore.

10 a.m.

Men’s tennis

@ Whitman

5 p.m.

Women’s tennis

vs. George Fox

. 10 a.m.

Track and field

@ George Fox

10 a.m.

Women’s lacrosse

@ Forest Grove

6 p.m.

Softball

vs. Whitworth (2)

Noon

Swimming

@ Gresham, Ore.

10 a.m.

Women’s tennis

vs. Whitman

10 a.m.

Swimming Saturday, Feb. 26

Sunday, Feb. 27

Monday, Feb. 28 Women’s golf

vs. Lewis & Clark

1 p.m.

vs. George Fox

3:30 p.m.

@ Tacoma, Wash.

All day

Tuesday, March 1 Men’s tennis Thursday, March 3 Men’s golf

February 25, 2011

’Cats to play abroad Corrina Crocker Sports editor Two Wildcats are packing their bags and leaving the Catdome for the opportunity of a lifetime. Seniors quarterback Aaron Boehme and defensive tackle Paul Nishizaki have set their sights on professional football. The two will leave in March for Germany, where they have signed contracts to play professional football for the Schwäbisch Hall Unicorns of the German Football League. These recently signed professional athletes will return in the middle of October. The season for the Unicorns, their team, begins in early April against the 13 other teams in the German Football League. The season comprises 15 games, which will finish up in mid-September. “They contacted me originally in the month of December, and I was pretty interested early on. It wasn’t until late January that I decided it was what I wanted to do,”

Boehme said. Boehme explained the process of how he found the Unicorns. “They contacted the [Linfield] coaches and then the coaches let me know. Eventually the head coach from the team e-mailed me and then called me,” he said. According to the Linfield Athletics Website, two other former Wildcats have traveled overseas to pursue a professional career in the sport. Quarterback Tyler Matthews, class of ’03, and quarterback Brett Elliott, ’05, both played in Germany after their Linfield football careers. Elliott played for the Rhein Fire of NFL Europa in 2007. Matthews played with the Franken Knights of the GFL 2. Although adapting to a new country may be a bit of a challenge, Boehme has a positive outlook. “I think it will just be playing with the guys that you don’t know very well. I think that as the season

Boehme goes on I will get to know my teammates and their culture better, and it will be like any other team I’ve been on,” Boehme said. Another change for Boehme will be the step up from Division III to professional. “[The competition] will be somewhat comparable [to Linfield]. There will be some pretty good players, and there will be some pretty average players,” he said. When he returns to the U.S., he said he will most likely be substitute teaching and helping coach football. Corrina Crocker can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


Sports

February 25, 2011

www.linfieldreview.com

15

Clockwise from top left: a) Senior K.C. Wiser defends as freshman Michael Moreland makes the freethrow against George Fox University at home Feb. 18. b) Junior Abby Olbrich looks for the pass as junior Bruin Arianna Mohsenian defends Feb. 18. c) Freshman Josh Rodrigues follows through during a freethrow during the George Fox game Feb. 18. d) Junior Micha Pringle drives to the hoop Feb. 18. e) Senior Ryan Lobdell dribbles down the court Feb. 18. f) Lobdell jumps for the shot Feb. 18. All photos by Megan Myer/ Online editor

’Cats’ season ends Septembre Russell Copy chief The culmination of the season was bittersweet for Linfield basketball. Both teams encountered Pacific Lutheran University in a final game on the Lutes home court in Tacoma, Wash., on Feb. 19. The Wildcats balanced a loss with a win at PLU. The final scores were 64-58 and 71-68 for the women’s and men’s teams, respectively. Following two shutout seasons, the women’s team achieved a 13-11 overall win-loss record with a first-year coaching staff. Head coach Robin Potera-Haskins led the ’Cats against George Fox University, Lewis & Clark

College and Whitman College — some of the league’s top competitors. The men’s team was predicted to take second place in the Northwest Conference but tallied nine wins and 16 losses total. The men ended conference in seventh place with five conference wins and 11 losses. At the season’s start Doty predicted a championship contention with Whitworth University. “I am proud of our team,” head coach Larry Doty said. “Although we did not accomplish our season goals, the team worked hard all season long and prepared to win each game.” Team goals may have been easier to achieve had

the team not lost four of last season’s starters. Still, defense and rebounding proved to be key success factors regardless of the number of returners. Potera-Haskins had seven players return and had an enthusiastic bench. She rotated the players in and out of the point position and capitalized on the team’s freshman talent, her own philosophy and a new system. Advancing to the conference tournament was the overall objective, but not reaching that aim does not detract from the signs of improvement and turnaround exhibited this season. Septembre Russell can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.


16

sports

www.linfieldreview.com

Catline

February 25, 2011 Sports Commentary

Spring sports are almost in the air

Northwest Conference standings Men’s basketball Whitworth

15-1

.960

Whitman

11-5

.688

Lewis & Clark

11-5

.688

Pacific Lutheran

10-6

.625

7-9

.438

Puget Sound George Fox

6-10

.375

Linfield

5-11

.312

Willamette

4-12

.250

Pacific

3-13

.188

Chris Forrer For the Review

Women’s basketball George Fox

14-2

.875

Lewis & Clark

14-2

.875

Puget Sound

11-5

.688

Whitman

9-7

.562

Linfield

8-8

.500

Whitworth

7-9

.438

Pacific Lutheran

4-12

.250

Pacific

3-13

.188

Willamette

2-14

.125

Men’s Tennis Whitman

3-0

1.000

Linfield

2-0

1.000

George Fox

1-1

.500

Puget Sound

1-1

.500

Willamette

1-1

.500

Whitworth

1-1

.500

Pacific

1-2

.333

Pacific Lutheran

0-2

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-2

.000

Women’s Tennis Linfield

2-0

1.000

Whitworth

2-0

1.000

Whitman

1-0

1.000

Pacific

1-1

.500

Puget Sound

2-2

.500

Willamette

1-2

.333

Lewis & Clark

1-2

.333

George Fox

0-1

.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-2

.000

Megan Myer/Online editor Senior center Sergio Rosario (22) reaches for a lay up against a George Fox University defender. The Wildcats lost 61-76 to the Bruins at home on Feb. 18.

Wildcats are defeated at home

Both the men’s and women’s basketball teams suffered upsetting losses at home. Read more on page 15 >>

>> Please see Column page 13

Preseason Softball Pacific

4-1

George Fox

5-5

.800 .500

Lewis & Clark

2-4

.333

Whitworth

2-4

.562

Pacific Lutheran

1-3

.250

Linfield

0-0

.000

Willamette

0-2

.000

Puget Sound

0-4

.000

7-0

.800

Baseball George Fox Willamette

3-1

.750

Linfield

5-2

.714

Pacific

4-3

.571

Whitworth

4-4

.500

Pacific Lutheran

4-5

.444

Lewis & Clark

1-4

.200

Whitman

0-8

.000

Sports schedule Missed out on the sporting events last weekend? Check out the sports schedule to see when your favorite teams play this weekend. See page 14>>

Hey ’Cats! Spring has sprung and that means it’s back to the old grind of schoolwork, classes and being so busy you only stop to eat, sleep and go on the occasional 11:59 Catty Shack run. It’s been a long, cold couple of months since I last got to burn up the keyboard for the Review, and I’m currently battling a head cold that has swept through the theater department, so pardon my rust. Before I get going into the bulk of my column today, I want to give a quick shout out to coach Robin Potera-Haskins and the Linfield women’s basketball team on their first winning season in more than five years. Not to say “I told you so” or anything, but I did write two separate articles focusing on how I thought Haskins was going to turn the team around, and what do you know? A winning season is in the books. But enough about basketball! It’s spring: the time when wet, miserable weather and dreams of summer and sports are the focus of everyone’s attention. Well, maybe not everyone is dialed into spring sports ... but they really should be. The baseball team is on a pretty hot

Hubrich: team has ‘depth,’ ‘experience’ Rae Smith Staff reporter The softball team will see its hard work pay off on Feb. 26 after almost two months of practice. “I think I speak for all of the girls in saying that we are antsy to start playing games,” junior outfielder Jordan Mixsell said. The ’Cats were scheduled to open the season Feb. 23 against Concordia University, but the double-header was postponed because the field was too wet. The games are rescheduled for March 9. The team’s first games are now at home against conference opponent Whitworth University at noon on Feb. 26. Only three seniors graduated from last year’s team, leaving a solid core of returning players. Senior outfielder Kayla Hubrich

listed the returners as one of the team’s strengths. “The team has a lot of returners that have experience in big games, and our hitting line-up will be solid,” she said. “The pitching staff has good depth and the returning pitchers have a lot of experience.” Two key components of the pitching staff are senior Claire Velaski and junior Lauren Harvey, who each earned NWC All-Conference honors last year. Mixsell siad the duo is a vital part of the team. “Their pitching styles really complement each other, and they both have pitched in a lot of pressure-filled games,”she said. Junior All-American Staci Doucette also named pitching and offense as reliable aspects of this year’s team, adding defense and work ethic to that list.

“We don’t really have any weaknesses,” she said. The ’Cats’ strengths and returning line-up have not gone unnoticed. Linfield was voted the No. 1 Division III softball team by the National Fastpitch Coaches Association in its pre-season poll. Both Doucette and Mixsell were wary of the ranking’s effect and said that it put a target on the team’s back. “The ranking is a nice honor but it’s not everything,” Mixsell said. The team will focus on using what it learned from last year to stay concentrated on getting back in the championship game, Doucette said. “Last year I think we struggled at the beginning of the season with the expectations from the year before. This year, the main thing is that we want to get better

every day,” Doucette said. Last year’s loss during the National Championship game seems to have left this year’s returners with more motivation to take home the NCAA title. “Like everyone, I want to win a championship, especially after getting so close last year,” Hubrich said. Mixsell listed a championship win at the top of the team’s goals. “I think, in the back of our minds, getting back to the championship is where we want to be, but there are a lot of steps to get there,” she said. “First we have to win the conference championship and then regionals.” Check out the Catline to the left for Northwest Conference preseason standings in softball. Rae Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


TLR Issue 15 2-25-2011