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Sports Wildcats lose their final battle of the season >> page 16

December 3, 2010

Linfield College

McMinnville, Ore.

116th Year

Gift drive to benefit community, children

Issue No. 12

INSIDE

Theta Chi Fraternity members are collecting gifts 24 hours a day in a joint effort with YCAP

News

Joshua Ensler News editor With only a sound system blasting Christmas music, a tent and a mobile home trailer to protect them from the elements, the members of Theta Chi Fraternity are collecting gifts for charity in the parking lot next to Walker Hall. For 12 days, from Nov. 29 to Dec. 10, Theta Chi Fraternity members are manning the booth 24 hours a day. Theta Chi Fraternity has partnered for the second year with the Yamhill Community Action Partnership. The fraternity members collect toys and other gifts, and even take requests from children through YCAP. Sophomores Kyle Pfeifer and Robert Nix and junior Eric Anderson sat in the booth at 8 p.m. Dec. 1. “It was kind of slow in the beginning because people were

Panels discuss the lives of America’s homeless during Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. >> page 4

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor

Theta Chi Fraternity members are stationed at a collection booth in the parking lot next to Walker Hall for the 12 Days of Christmas charity gift-collection drive. The gifts are passed along to the Yamhill Community Action Partnership. taking things from the tree,” Anderson said. “It’s always slow in the beginning, but the turnout is always good.” The tree Anderson referenced is a small, fake tree sitting on the

donation table with wish lists from underprivileged children. Anderson said the tree was nearly filled to capacity with requests, but the tree was almost empty by Dec. 3.

“A lot of people have been taking slips from the tree,” Pfeifer said. People who take the slips,

Features Peak at postcard secrets sent in by Linfield students. >> page 8-9

>> Please see Theta page 6

Students sleep outside to raise awareness Hillary Krippaehne Copy editor Fifteen students experienced homelessness on Nov. 15. There were activities on the Intramural Field from 8 p.m. until 12:30 a.m. during which the group watched several movies and played card games. Six students slept outside with blankets, while the rest slept in tents. Several members of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity wanted to raise awareness about homelessness. Junior Anson Whiting and sophomore Daniel Hellinger planned the event with help from VISTA Student Engagement Coordinator Lizzie Martinez. “We started planning the event in October,” Hellinger said. “Kappa Sigma wanted to sponsor this event because we want to show that homelessness has increased and there needs to be a solution to stop it.” Martinez said the point of the event was to think about the issues surrounding homelessness. “We tried to simulate homelessness as much as possible,” Martinez said. “The point is to get

I realized that I take my home and my bed for granted when there are thousands of people in Oregon who don’t have either. -Daniel Hellinger,

people to sleep outside to think about what it is like to be homeless.” Whiting described the experience. “The weather was cold and raining. The wind was the worst part. It was hard to be focused on sleeping without getting woken up,” he said. “It helped having people around me to do [the event] with. It gave me motivation.” Hellinger agreed with Whiting. “Sleeping outside is a very hard process. It took a lot of preparing, but it was a great experience to go through,” Hellinger said. “I realized that I take my home and my bed for granted when there are thousands of people in Oregon who don’t have either.”

sophomore

Community service is one of the most important parts of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity, Whiting said. “We chose this specific event because we like doing things that will make people more grateful for what they have,” he said. During most community service events for the fraternity, people build items, participate in fundraisers or help people directly, Whiting said. “My favorite part was how different it was from any other community service event. This was a simulated event,” Whiting said. “A canopy flew into the projector [for showing the movie]. The quirkiness of [it] made it better. The few problems that arose made

it less stressful because it made things interesting,” he said. Martinez said that she enjoyed working with Hellinger and Whiting and that it was great to work with students on campus. She said that she likes helping students set goals and run successful events. “It made Dan [Hellinger] and I really thankful to come to a warm building and warm clothes. It made me so appreciative to have a home and not sleep on wet grass,” Whiting said. Martinez described the event as successful and said she wanted to get people thinking about homelessness. “I loved seeing student leaders come together,” Martinez said. “It is inspiring to see students give up their bed for a night to raise awareness.” Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week is a week during which college campuses nationwide spread awareness of the issues. Linfield has participated by hosting events such as this for several years. Hillary Krippaehne can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

Culture Students, faculty and staff celebrate Hanukkah. >> page 11

Sports

’Cats take a dive into their season but surface with only a 0-2 record. >> page 13

INSIDE

Editorial ...................... 2 News ........................... 4 Features........................ 7 Culture....................... 10 Sports ........................ 16


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www.linfieldreview.com The

LINFIELD REVIEW 900 SE Baker St. Unit A518 McMinnville, OR 97128

Phone: (503) 883-5789 E-mail: linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com Web: www.linfieldreview.com Editor-in-chief Kelley Hungerford Managing editor Braden Smith Copy chief Septembre Russell Copy editor Hillary Krippaehne Business manager Sarah Spranger News editor Joshua Ensler Sports editor Corrina Crocker

It may be hard to believe, but Fall Semester is already coming to a close. Many students are busy preparing for final exams and finishing up last-minute projects and papers. As we all know, it can be quite a chaotic time of year. To get ready for finals and finish homework assignments in general, many students head to the computer labs inside Renshaw Hall. However, the labs are not always the quietest places to get work done. We at the Review have noticed that too many students use the Renshaw computer labs not as a place to study and complete assignments but as a place to catch up and chat with friends. While being social is important at a resi-

Features editor Jaffy Xiao

I’d like to offer a few comments on the November 5 Review editorial about unreliable printing in Renshaw. By far the most common problem is a job sent to a printer that can’t be printed, usually because it is too complex. When this happens, the printer is out of order until someone calls ITS so we can clear the offering print job. ITS rewrote the signs in the labs

Online editor Megan Myer Graphics/ads designer Juli Tejadilla Illustrator Jenny Worcester Senior reporter Matt Sunderland Senior photographer Katie Paysinger

The Review is funded by advertising and subscription revenue and ASLC and is produced in cooperation with the Linfield College Department of Mass Communication. The Linfield Review is published weekly on Fridays throughout the fall and spring semesters. Exceptions include the week before and of Thanksgiving and Spring Break and the week of final exams in both semesters. A single copy of the Review is free from newsstands. Subscriptions are $50 for a year and $35 for a semester. Memberships The Linfield Review is a member of the collegiate division of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association and the Associated Collegiate Press, a national college newspaper group. Awards 2010 ONPA first place Best Website 2009 ONPA second place General Excellence Letters to the editor Letters to the editor must be signed with name, date and address. Students should include major and year. The Review reserves the right to refuse any letter and to edit letters for length. Letters must be received no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday to appear in the Review the following Friday. Letters are limited to 250 words or fewer. Longer pieces may be submitted as guest commentary.

about an issue is far less awkward than confronting a group of noisy peers. But, we also know that this is not the most practical solution. Therefore, students need to be respectful and realize how much their chit-chat hinders the studying of others. We ask that when you are in the Renshaw computer labs (or in the library), be mindful of other students who are working around you. As previously mentioned, it is the time of the year when students are preparing for finals. This makes it especially important for quiet places to be available to students for studying on campus.

with the goal of making it clearer and more obvious that we need a phone call to fix problems. Often though, we don’t get calls. If anyone has a suggestion about how to make our signs clearer or more noticeable, please let me know. It is true that ITS doesn’t have staffing sufficient to keep our help desk open past 5pm so there’s no one to call. The editorial in the Review prompted me to take two

actions to address after hours coverage. First, we put in place logging so that we can monitor the extent of this problem. This logging may show that we need to shift our staffing toward the evening. Second, we are looking into ways to clear printer problems after hours with out changing our staffing away from what we currently feel is the busiest time of the day.

Review office hours Editor-in-chief Thursday 8-9 a.m. Friday 2-3 p.m. or by appointment Managing editor Tuesday & Thursday 10-11 a.m. or by appointment Follow us on Twitter, @linfieldreview, and on Facebook.

-The Review Editorial Board

A couple of facts: During the month of October 2010, 750 students successfully printed a total of over 23,000 pages in the Renshaw labs. In that same time period the ITS support desk received one (1) call about printer problems in Renshaw Hall. -Irv Wiswall ITS

The week before finals isn’t our final week

Columnists Matt Olson “Dear Bailey”

The Linfield Review is an independent, student-run newspaper. The contents of this publication are the opinions and responsibility of the Review staff and do not reflect the views or policy of the Associated Students of Linfield College or of Linfield College. Signed commentaries and comics are the opinions of the individual writers or artists.

dential college, the Renshaw computers labs are not always the best place for socializing. A number of students go to these computer labs because they have tasks they need to complete, and it is extremely distracting when you hear a group of students next to you loudly talking about who’s dating whom or how exciting the football game on TV was. It’s simply annoying and disrespectful to others. Maybe a designated person could be present in the Renshaw computer labs to monitor what takes place there. In the library, there are several staff members who you can approach if other students around you are too loud. Approaching an authority figure

OPINION

Circulation manager Kyle Guth

Adviser William Lingle Professor of Mass Communication

December 3, 2010

Students deserve quiet study spaces

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Photo editor Sarah Hansen

EDITORIAL

Culture editor Jessica Prokop

Opinion editor Chelsea Bowen

Opinions

Kelley Hungerford Editor-in-chief Ah, the post-Thanksgiving rush! We return to campus with our bellies stuffed like Thursday’s turkeys and our minds building Christmas wish lists. But with just one week until final exams, it’s crunch time. I will have, essentially, a threeweek Christmas Break before January Term. With just one essay due during

finals week, I seem to have it made. Or do I? Having so little to do during finals week means that all of my tests, essays and other end-of-the-semester projects are due next week. Now, I know many students see this as the supreme finals schedule, but I would much rather have the extra week to complete my final assignments than have them all due by next Thursday. Linfield faculty members have been working to hammer out a solution to Spring Semester grading, and one idea they proposed involved getting rid of Reading Day. This was not their top solution, but perhaps it should have been ranked higher. My current “finals” schedule

seems to render Reading Day useless. What am I supposed to study on Reading Day if all of my finals take place before then? I know there are other students with this same problem, and I wonder what drives faculty to schedule finals before finals week. If the issue lies in needing more time to grade student work, then perhaps a version of the faculty’s proposition about spring grading could be applied to Fall Semester. But if the concern is that students and professors are unable or unwilling to meet for an hour and a half during finals week, then scheduling finals before finals week is not justified. Finals week exists for a reason. As

a separate week, it allows students to complete cumulative exams, essays and presentations after classes end, and it allows professors to finish teaching material without worrying about scheduling a final during class time. Scheduling finals earlier means professors skimp on teaching important material. Early finals schedules rob students of essential time required to complete intense final essays and projects or study for final exams. So, in the immortal words of Patrick Henry the acne-ridden student, Give me finals week, or give me less (homework). Kelley Hungerford can be reached at linfieldrevieweditor@gmail.com.


December 3, 2010

Opinions

ADVICE COLUMN

Properly used condoms and awareness can defend against venereal diseases

Sexually transmitted diseases are also known as venereal diseases. The technical term of the definition is morbus venereus. VDs or STDs are caused by genital contact, blood in the genital area, semen or vaginal fluids in the genital area and sexual intercourse. Sex also includes oral and anal sex; diseases can be spread through all of these methods. Ve n e re a l diseases include “AIDS, chlamydia, genital warts, gonorrhea, syphilis, yeast infections and some forms of hepatitis,” according to emedicinehealth.com. Herpes is another VD. Herpes can be spread through genital contact or genital-to-mouth contact. There are two strands of herpes: herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus type 2. HSV-1 is found in the form of fever blisters and can also be spread to the eye, while HSV-2 is usually only spread through sexual intercourse.

Herpes is a fairly common STD that many people know about. About 45 million adults in the U.S. have a form of herpes. One in four women are infected, while one in eight men are infected. To prevent contracting these diseases, condoms are the best defense during sexual intercourse. They work to their full potential when used properly. Think about your sexual decisions. Is this person a good sexual partner? Have you communicated with them about sex and methods of protection? Do you know their sexual health and history? These diseases are impactful and have longlasting consequences. Few are incurable. There will be other people; a future partner or child who will have to deal with the results of your choices. Think before you act, and be aware of the consequences. Bailey can be reached at linfieldreviewbailey@gmail.com.

www.linfieldreview.com

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OPINION

Malibu reveals celebrity culture shock

Dear Bailey, How do I avoid getting venereal diseases?

Megan Myer Photo editor For the past two years, I’ve spent my Thanksgiving Break in Malibu visiting my future mother-in-law. The Los Angeles area was a bit of a culture shock at first to this rainyfarm-town girl. I was awestruck by the amazing houses and the warm beaches. The fact that I was so close to Hollywood also excited me. I have spent my Thanksgiving dinner in L.A. with some family friends at

Michael Moore’s house. No, not the fat and obnoxious Moore, but the one that was nominated for an Emmy in sound mixing for LOST in 2004. It seems like every time I go to Southern California, I see more of the life “behind the cameras.” I hear stories from my future mother-inlaw about the celebrity parents and their kids all the time. This is because she is a fourth-grade teacher down in Malibu and often has celebrity children in her class. She’s told me stories about the celebrity parents, and I always find them entertaining. When my fiancé took karate lessons, my future mother-in-law would be sitting next to other par-

ents, who were often actors. When the school is in need of a crossing guard, Pamela Anderson has been known to help. On a field trip, my future mother-in-law recalled a bunch of the kids gathering in awe around a parent. It turns out he was Tobin Bell (Jigsaw from the Saw series). I find it funny that while Bell hasn’t let his own kids watch the movies (for good reason), so many other kids know him as Jigsaw. While she often sees celebrities just as parents of thier kids, she has been star struck once before. This happened during an open house at the school. When Brent Spiner walked through the door it took everything she had not

to exclaim “It’s Data!” (from Star Trek: Next Generation). Even to this day, when she has meetings with him about school, she is star struck mainly because he talks in a manner similar to his Star Trek character. I have yet to see a celebrity when i’m in Malibu. However, I do find that when in grocery stores I see a lot of familiar faces. This could easily be me thinking too much or seeing a person who has had a small role in a television series or movie. I have a feeling that by the time this happens, I will be so used to the area it won’t be a surprise for me. Megan Myer can be reached at linfieldreviewonline@gmail.com.

OPINION

’Cats have forgotten political tolerance

Matt Sunderland Senior reporter Remember the days when Republicans and Democrats could sit down together openly and discuss ideas respectfully? When they didn’t judge the other side for simply being the other side? OK, maybe those days never actually existed. But they should have. I’ve been a little upset since the midterm elections of Nov. 2. First of all, I’m Republican. I was thrilled with the outcome of the elections. I’ve decided that, in fact, Obama was the right choice for the country back in 2008, even if I didn’t vote for him

at the time. Now, however, after two years of a failed Congress and a nose-dive in approval ratings, I think it’s time to give the Republicans a chance. The reason I’m writing this is because on election night, I stood up for my beliefs, along with a few other brave Republicans that I know, and we were each torn down by various Democrats on campus simply for believing different ideologies. America is a country based on opposing ideas, based on the principle that the two parties in power must share authority and concede to the other at times. Linfield students, I think, have forgotten this. Facebook was a realm of hate against Republicans on election night. I even had somebody I know call all Republicans a blanket f-word. I had at least half

a dozen people post to my wall, decrying my support for my party. Why is this? Why do I have to feel attacked simply for thinking differently than others? Why is Linfield so opposed to the minority party so as to not even accept people who belong to it? I mean, don’t get me wrong, Republicans aren’t innocent, either. From the moment the 60 new GOP members were elected, they were already assaulting Obama and the Democrats and exclaiming their newfound resolve to repeal the health care bill and other Democratic legislation. These devisive politics are precisely why this country is so polarized, and I don’t stand for that, either. Still, I lose respect for Linfield students when I can’t open my mouth without having supposedly open-minded friends derail me. As a whole,

we need to become more accepting of the fact that this country has two parties for a reason. A country with one party doesn’t exist on this Earth, unless a dictator rules that country. Do you really want all Republicans wiped off the map and a Democratic dictator to be the only voice of power? I sincerely hope not. I am Republican. I am proud to be so. I’m proud of my party’s efforts during the last few months, and I look forward to the 112th Congress. If you judge me and see me as less because of this, fine. I probably don’t care enough about your opinion to be fazed, anyway. Just look in the mirror, and ask yourself this for me: Am I part of the reason America is so divided right now? The answer may surprise you. Matt Sunderland can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail. com.

Megan Myer/Online editor


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News

www.linfieldreview.com

December 3, 2010

Events raise awareness of hunger, homelessness

Photos by Katie Paysinger/Senior photographer

(Right) Sophomore Brogan Pierce draws an income level card from AmeriCorps VISTA Student Engagement Coordinator Lizzie Martinez at the Hunger Banquet on Nov. 17 in Jonasson Hall. The banquet was part of National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. Students chose cards distinguishing them as low-income, middle-income or high-income and took on those roles throughout the dinner. (Top left) Junior Jordan Mixsell and senior Chris Slezak take notes at the Hunger and Homelessness in Yamhill County panel Nov. 15. (Above) Sophomore Linh Tang serves food to freshman Dyland Ruef in the buffet line at the Hunger Banquet on Nov. 17. Ruef drew a middle-income card upon entering the banquet, entitling him to rice, beans and bread sticks for dinner. Thirtyfive percent of the planet’s population fall into the middle-income category.

Hill hopes for aquatic healing Septembre Russell Copy chief Water, a seldom-thoughtof source of healing, can help people recover from injuries. Greg Hill, Linfield athletic training clinical assistant professor of health and human performance, gave a presentation about aquatic rehabilitation on Nov. 17. The lecture, titled “Concepts and Exercises Related to Aquatic Conditioning and Rehabilitation for the Lower Extremity,” focused on aquatic therapy for leg injuries occurring below the hips. Roughly 50 people gathered in Room 201 of Riley Campus Center to listen to Hill introduce aquatic therapy and explain the principles of rehabilitation and aquatics. Students in the Linfield Athletic Training Education Program, former Linfield and community coaches and

other staff, faculty and students attended the lecture. When a great portion of the human body is submerged in water, buoyancy works against gravity, and the body begins to weigh less. Hydrostatic pressure, the pressure exerted by a fluid, increases as the depth of the water increases, Hill said. The water’s resistant force, or fluid resistance, also referred to as drag, is affected by the size, shape, speed and current drag on an object. Hill labeled each of these, buoyancy, hydrostatic pressure and fluid resistance as aquatic principles. To look upon the health care community, Hill said, aquatic therapy is “an extremely underutilized rehabilitation tool” and is not widely used because of limited availability of facilities. Aquatic rehabilitation’s

popularity is not a consequence of its practice or method. “Those who have done it — they enjoy it,” Hill said. “I have yet to meet someone, either health care provider or patient, who, after experiencing it firsthand, didn’t enjoy it.” Aquatic rehabilitation has some dangers and the treatment is not ideal for every individual, such as those who have deep vein thrombosis, or DVT; cardiovascular or cardiopulmonary disease, diabetes, and severe kidney disease, among other afflictions, Hill said during his lecture. On the other hand, he said that rehabilitation in water increases ease of joint movement, improves body awareness and balance, promotes muscular relaxation and increases muscular strength and endurance. “There is so much that can be done through the

use of aquatics to improve quality of life and speed rehabilitation,” Hill said. “It’s unfortunate that it isn’t more widely recognized and utilized in that regard.” While Hill aimed to build on the audience’s existing knowledge of the subject and to introduce new aspects, he said the lecture had a separate underpinning. “My major point was that there are two approaches to rehabilitation: the traditional approach, which does not include aquatic rehabilitation, and the aquatic approach, which uses only aquatic rehabilitation,” Hill said. “Both of these approaches could become more effective by becoming more integrated.” Within the next year, Hill said he intends to make the case for an integrated approach. Septembre Russell can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.


News

December 3, 2010

Celebration of Mexican independence

www.linfieldreview.com

AAAAAAADDDDD

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Library begins accepting food in lieu of fines Chelsea Bowen Opinion editor

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor Associate Professor of Anthropology William Bestor speaks Dec. 2 in Jonasson Hall about his experiences in Tepoztlan, Mexico, where he conducted field work on the medical culture of the region. He also brought some of the students from Linfield’s Portland campus to Tepoztlan to study with him. Bestor holds most of his classes on the Portland campus. The event was in honor of 100 years of Mexican independence.

Linfield students are taking their non-perishable food items to Nicholson Library as part of its first Food for Fines program. Library Evening Supervisor Justyne Triest said the idea for the Food for Fines program came about during a library staff meeting in September. “We would like to help raise awareness that there’s a lot of homeless people in Yamhill County,” Triest said. According to a press release from the library, one package of donated food will result in $1 being deducted from an individual’s library fines. Up to $20 of library fines can be removed. Checks are also accepted in place of canned food. The press release said collected pet food will be donated to Homeward Bound Pets. Triest said that Linfield students and town patrons can participate in the program. The needed foods include rice, canned meals, dry beans, tuna, pasta, packaged meals, spaghetti sauce, tomato sauce, canned veg-

etables, canned fruit, peanut butter, soup and condiments, according to the press release. “It’s a good time of the year to be generous,” Triest said. She said that the program will end Dec. 23 and all of the food and checks will be donated to the Yamhill Community Action Partnership on Dec. 24. “We want the outcome to be an alternative for students to choose if they’d like to give food for people who need it rather than pay a fine to the library. There are a lot of hungry people in Yamhill County,” Library Director Susan Barnes Whyte said in an e-mail. Senior Ngan Hoang, who works at the library circulation desk, said that some people who have fines as low as 50 cents still donate multiple cans of food. “If they donate extra, that would be ideal,” Hoang said, referring to people who plan to take part in the program. For more information about the Food for Fines program, contact Justyne Triest at jutriest@linfield.edu. Chelsea Bowen can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

Coin drive raises money for altruism Sean Lemme Staff reporter Students donated to the Alternative Spring Break program on Nov. 14. The “Be the Change” coin drive fundraiser involved pairs of Alternative Spring Break volunteers knocking on doors and collecting spare change. Organized by senior Lauren Ross, the Alternative Spring Break student coordinator, the fundraiser was a tremendous success, bringing in more than $600 in donations after two hours of door-to-door visits. Twelve students participated, which is roughly one third of the students involved with the Alternative Spring Break program this year. The plan was simple: divide up the campus, introduce themselves to students, talk about the

program and ask them to donate spare change. The Linfield community was more than up to the task. Ross is in her fourth year with the program. She described Alternative Spring Break as an excellent opportunity for “focused and concentrated service work.” Alternative Spring Break sends students to help in various communities during the vacation. This year, the program will send students to work with Habitat for Humanity in Tacoma, Wash., and in New Orleans, and students will help with the urban homelessness problem in Portland. The “Be the Change” coin drive is one of several fundraisers Alternative Spring Break is holding this year. Next, it will sponsor a staff night out on Dec.

3 when the New Orleans team will supervise and entertain the children of any faculty or staff member looking for babysitters. Students signed up in September to become involved with Alternative Spring Break. Participants spend the next few months teambuilding and fundraising. Alternative Spring Break will show a presentation about what the volunteers did during their week of service. “It’s a great way to experience something outside of your bubble, something profound, and to make some new friends,” Ross, a sociology major, said. More information is available on the Career and Community Services website: www.linfield.edu/ ccs/community-service. html Sean Lemme can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


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www.linfieldreview.com

News

December 3, 2010

Revamped award sees first winner Gabi Nygaard Staff reporter The revamped Wildcat of the Month program announced its first winner this week. Freshman Linnaea Funk was nominated for being active on campus and contributing to the Linfield Community. She is the first winner since the program was changed from a weekly to a monthly award. “[She was picked because] she is a very genuine person, she’s always there to help, and she tutors and things along those lines where she’s there to support her friends,” ASLC President senior Colin Jones said. “I think that’s a great thing to be recognized for.” Funk said that when the Campus Liaison Committee

told her she had been nominated, she didn’t think she would win. “I feel very honored to have received this award,” she said in an e-mail. “I am astonished that out of anyone who was nominated, I was chosen, since I am a firstsemester freshman.” The Wildcat of the Month replaces the Wildcat of the Week program from previous years. There are six boxes around campus where students can submit nominations. Submissions can also be made by e-mail at wildcatofthemonth@linfield.edu After receiving the nominations, the Campus Liaison Committee selects a winner. “In previous years, it was weekly, so you got a lot of, ‘This person should be Wildcat of the Week because they have really great hair.’ With

that kind of frequency you ended up with a lot of nonsense,” Jones said. “It was really hard to do major recognition every week.” For these reasons, Jones said, this year’s Campus Liaison Committee decided to find a way to make the program better without getting rid of it completely. “They felt like once a month was a solid recognition period. It makes it a little more significant because there’s only going to be about eight a year, and it means that we can afford to give [a small prize],” Jones said. “It makes it a slightly bigger deal: fewer people, a little bit more prestige.” Jones noted that based on the nominations they received this month, the intended changes seemed to have taken effect. “From the sorts of answers

another on various projects they worked on during the last year. Each of the Linfield students who presented set up a poster displaying his or her research. The three students from Linfield were Wolf, junior Joel Reyes and senior Andrew Carpenter. The students were required to answer questions on their research and stand by their posters. Wolf conducted research all summer for a paid research job under Associate Professor of Chemistry Brian Gilbert. She did research on how enzymes bind to substrates, and she used lasers

to determine how that takes place. She was also selected to present her research in Anaheim, Calif., this spring at the Chemical Society National Meeting Expo along with the other chemistry students who presented their research during the conference. The expo will take place March 27-31. “The conference was a wonderful opportunity to be able to present my research before going to Anaheim; I got to see what kinds of questions I would be asked,” Wolf said.

tree and he encouraged others to do the same. “We’ll take new clothing, old clothing, books, anything,” he said. The event was organized by Theta Chi Fraternity’s philanthropy chair, junior Justin Williams. In an e-mail, Williams said he was working with Alexis Powell of YCAP, which allowed them to make donations of gifts instead of being restricted to monetary donations. Theta Chi Fraternity is still taking money and donates it to YCAP to be distributed to the community. Before partnering with YCAP, the donations went to the McMinnville Food Bank,

the McMinnville School District, Habitat for Humanity, the Salvation Army, the Oregon Health and Science University and the Kids on the Block program, an after school enrichment program for children sponsored by the city of McMinnville, Williams said in an e-mail. Theta Chi Fraternity began doing the 12 Days of Christmas charity event because it helps the community outside of McMinnville, and signified the Christmas spirit, Williams said. “It’s how we want Theta Chi Fraternity to be portrayed,” Williams said in an e-mail.

Three students succeed in science conference Matt Sunderland Senior reporter An annual, regional conference is held to showcase the work of undergraduate science students and to present their work to fellow peers. This year Linfield held the conference in Murdock Hall on Nov. 19-21. Sophomore Amanda Wolf, a member of the conference, said more than a dozen schools were represented at the conference in all major areas of science. The expo was not a competition, Wolf said, but a time for Northwest undergraduates to come together and share research with one

Matt Sunderland can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.

Theta: YCAP partnership allows for gift donations

<< Continued from page 1 Anderson said, either returned the slips with the requested gifts or take care of things themselves. If hunting down a gift takes too long, Anderson said that there would be more collections at the Rutschman Field House on Dec. 18. The gift must be accompanied by the request slip so workers can send the package to the right person. YCAP is supplying the requests in their gift-tag form, he said. Anderson said that the Theta Chi Fraternity members often take slips from the

Joshua Ensler can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor Freshman Linnaea Funk is the first recipient of the revamped version Wildcat of the Week Award. The award is granted to Linfield students who contribute to the Linfield community. that we got, it really seemed ASLC Vice President like people were going, ‘Wow, senior Katie Patterson said this is really cool. There are that the program lacked pubgreat members of the Linfield licity, structured criteria and community,’ rather than, ‘Eh, incentives, in the past, but it you know, I like their teeth’ has been changed with posiand silly things like that,” tive results. Jones said. “I am impressed not only

with the dedication of the Campus Liaison Committee but also in Linfield students who are taking the time to recognize their peers by nominating them for Wildcat of the Month,” Patterson said in an e-mail. Campus Liaison Committee Chair senior Wesley Allegre said his goal was to get more faculty involved and to make more people aware of Wildcat of the Month. “The people we choose are going to be people who are doing good things around campus, and that’s what we want to highlight,” Allegre said. Allegre said he is currently working on getting a board set up in Riley Campus Center to display the Wildcats of the Month.

Gabi Nygaard can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.


December 3, 2010

Features

www.linfieldreview.com

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Planning for a ‘green’ scene by Jaffy Xiao/Features editor

As defined by the GHG (greenhouse gas) Protocol, a standard for emissions reporting, emissions sources are divided into three scopes. Each scope

Graphic by Jaffy Xiao/ Features editor Information courtesy of the Strategic Climate Action Plan Linfield’s 2007 greenhouse gas emissions inventory is divided into three scopes that count the amount of carbon dioxide equivalent. More information can be found from GHG report for Linfield College on acupcc.aashe.org/ghg/978/

Difficulty and possibility

$2,200,000 528,009 KWh

Since it’s mostly responsible for the Strategic Climate Action Plan, ACES faces challenges with its implementation. One of the biggest problems is the school’s reluctance toward devoting more resources to making this plan a reality, senior David Kellner-Rode, sustainability intern and a member of ACES, said in an e-mail. “There are various ways for the college to actually achieve carbon neutrality, but it’s going to be a collaborated effort,” McKeegan said. “I identify alternative strategies [in the plan]. The community as a whole makes some fundamental decisions about which we want to pursue.” Hall said besides requirements the college got to do including gas emission inventories and climate action plan, Linfield is still struggling as a community to identify what sustainability means to ACES, what it means to Linfield, not just the 5 percent of students that advocate for it. McKeegan said he doesn’t want the impression to prevail that Linfield is doing nothing. He also said one thing ACES didn’t do a good job of is letting people know that the college has urged for sustainable actions.

Notable numbers from the Strategic Climate Action Plan:

Belief in the future

Kellner-Rode leads three other students on a sustainability work study team that works on Linfield’s 2011 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and will release a new report next May. “Hopefully, [the new greenhouse gas inventory] will give [people] a clear picture of where we are and whether initial projection that we are going to see is correct. Then we will decide potential strategies,” McKeegan said. Hall praised Kellner-Rode and other students who are involved in increasing sustainability on campus. He said their passion helps push the process of the plan. Hall said that strategic plan is the first step, and that the college needs to look at additional details to develop a specific action plan with one or two more steps. “A good next step is to engage the Linfield community, and tell them the plan exists,” Kellner-Rode said. Jaffy Xiao can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com.

(Below) The eco-roof between Elkinton and Terrell halls was built in Novemeber as part of the Sarah Hansen/ Photo editor Strategic Climate Action Plan.

4,800 MT

The plan

takes behavioral and infrastructural sources into account (see figure below). As part of its commitment to ACUPCC, Linfield aims to reduce the school’s emissions to below the baseline identified in Linfield’s 2007 greenhouse gas emissions inventory by Clean Air Cool Planet Campus Carbon calculator and initially contributed from the environmental studies senior capstone class. Eventually, Linfield anticipates that it will be zero. “Those [strategies in the plan] are detailed in curriculum or facilities. House sustainability is a significant part of what we’ve been doing. We have saved both emissions and financial resources as we are progressing to the future, for example, renovating Northup Hall to LEED silver,” John McKeegan, Advisor to the President and Co-chair of Advisory Committee on the Environment and Sustainability, said. The college calculated the efficiency for several potential projects. According to the official documents, one of the projects will remove outdated control systems and replace them with campus standard system which will potentially result in $19,369 annual savings. Hall said that some of the renovations to T.J. Day Hall (formally Northup Hall) include environmentally friendly technology, such as an energy-saving roof with solar panels to capture sunlight and convert it into electrical energy for the building.

26%

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n September, students picked produce from the Linfield Community Garden. In October, compost bins for students to put in their kitchen and assorted wastes were made available. In November, vegetation sprouted on the eco-roof of the bike shelter between Elkinton and Terrell halls. What will happen next? These projects were supported by Linfield’s Strategic Climate Action Plan. Finalized in early September as part of The American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), the plan was implemented to “balance leadership in sustainability and climate change action with the academic and financial integrity of the institution,” according to the official copy of the plan. This strategic 28-page plan reviews Linfield’s sustainability achievements during the past 12 years, introduces current factors and ongoing projects to reduce the college’s greenhouse gas emissions and identifies potential opportunities to reduce carbon emissions. “The plan is a framework for what we actually do,” John Hall, sustainability coordinator and director of capital planning & development, said.

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n an effort to reduce energy consumption for heating, cooling, hot water production and lighting, Linfield has developed a Comprehensive Energy Conservation Plan, which has yielded extraordinary results. During the last 10 years, Linfield College has implemented many energy efficiency conservation projects saving $2.2 million in operating costs.

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uring the spring and summer of 2009, the college implemented lighting retrofits in many of its buildings. These retrofits included reducing the number of lamps in a fixture by half and installing high-quality reflectors. The combination of new, high-efficiency T8 lamps, new generation ballast and reflectors created significant savings along with the installation of double pane windows in the college apartments. Total electrical savings came to 528,009 Kilowatt hours per year.

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lthough Linfield has no Scope 2 emissions from purchased electricity as calculated by the Clean Air Cool Planet calculator, the college recognizes the benefit of reducing electricity usage. Regional and national sources of carbon neutral electricity are limited, and by reducing Linfield’s electricity usage, capacity is made available to others. Linfield has calculated that the use of hydroelectric and wind power instead of regional average electricity sources allows Linfield to avoid emissions of 4,800 MT carbon dioxide equivalent annually, or an increase of 60 percent of the emissions calculated. This knowledge will allow Linfield to demonstrate the impact of future reductions in electrical usage.

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infield students have participated in so many cultural travel programs that 26 percent of Linfield’s GHG inventory comes from study abroad air travel. This is a higher emission impact compared with the average eight percent of emissions from air travel calculated by other colleges that have signed the ACUPCC.


www.linfieldreview.com

secrets...

Secrets,

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...are more fun when they’re shared with everyone! Last year, students flooded the Review’s unit box with index cards decorated with secrets. This year, you answered our call once more and did not disappoint. Wildcats can whisper their secrets again next semester in a second Post Secret feature. Send in your postcards to unit box #A518.

Features

December 3, 2010


Features

December 3, 2010

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Culture

December 3, 2010

Poet draws crowds with Whitman-inspired poetry Braden Smith Managing editor

Oregon’s sixth poet laureate read from her new book of poems to a high turnout of students, faculty, staff and others Nov. 30 in the Jane Austin Reading Room of Nicholson Library. The event is part of Linfield’s ongoing series “Readings at the Nick.” More than 60 people listened to Oregon Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen read from her new collection of poems, “The Voluptuary.” “The turnout was gratifying — one of the largest we’ve had for any of the ‘Readings at the Nick,’” Professor of English Lex Runciman, who arranged Petersen’s visit, said in an e-mail. “It suggests to me that even in a time of 4G phones and instant access to information, the title ‘Oregon Poet Laureate’ carries a particular cachet.” Petersen said the book was dedicated to Walt Whitman (with whom she shares her surname) and to her parents. One section of the book consists of poems addressed directly to Whitman. She said she was inspired by Whitman and wrote

many poems while reading through two of his collections: “Leaves of Grass” and “Speciman Days.” “I was overcome by the immensity of his embrace of the world. [He] just draws the whole world into his poems, and his generosity of spirit,” Petersen said. “It was very, very moving.” She read two of her poems addressed to Whitman, and she also read a poem by Runciman, titled “All Is A Procession,” which praised Whitman. “I didn’t know she would be reading it,” Runciman said via e-mail. “For her to do so was a gracious gesture.” Junior Josh Rivas said he enjoyed Petersen’s reading. “I liked it overall; her words were almost always of praise, with a bit of nostalgia laced in between,” he said in an e-mail. “Her style has a very personal voice — something I can respect in a poet.” Rivas said he particularly liked her poem “During a Solar Eclipse.” In the poem, Petersen described how ancient cultures yelled and made noise during solar eclipses in order to drive off whatever they thought was

trying to kill the sun, but she also wondered if perhaps the sun and the moon were making love instead and that perhaps it was best to keep quiet and look away. Petersen also answered questions from the audience about her work as a poet. “It’s so wonderful to be an ambassador for poetry,” she said in response to a question about her role as poet laureate. “It’s a delight and honor. It’s pure pleasure.” When asked why she thought it was important to write, she said, “we write to create ourselves.” She also called writing “a wonderful process of discovery.” Rivas said he thought writing was important for individuals. “I believe she meant that writing is a way of exploring and relating to the human condition,” he said via e-mail. “We find a bit of ourselves in writing because it is a reflection of the will of our hearts.” According to oregonpoetlaureate.org, Petersen began writing poetry after moving to Klamath Falls, Ore., and being inspired by its landscape. Her first published poem was in a Sun-

Joel Ray/For the Review

Oregon Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen reads Whitman-inspired poetry from her new collection, “The Voluptuary,” to a crowded audience Nov. 30 in Nicholson Library. day edition of the Oregonian in 1976, according to the website. In April of 2010, she was named Oregon’s sixth poet laureate. “It still seems amazing to me,” she said. “Practically every day I just have to stop and think, ‘Oh my gosh, is this really true?’” Runciman said he thinks it’s important for students to attend events such as read-

ings, concerts and art exhibits. “For our students, we want to put them in the company of practitioners and practitioners that aren’t their teachers,” he said. Rivas also said that he believes readings such as Petersen’s are valuable to students interested in writing. “It gives us a perspective of the successful writer and

the things that they have to do in order to become so successful,” he said via e-mail. “It also exposes us to new styles and techniques in writing that we have yet to touch upon.” For more information about Petersen, and to read selections from “The Voluptuary,” visit www.paulann. net. Braden Smith can be reached at linfieldreviewmanaging@gmail.com.

Dance show tumbles from lack of participation Gabi Nygaard Staff reporter This year’s Fall Dance Showcase, originally scheduled for Dec. 4, was canceled because of a lack of participants. Sophomore Kira Weaver said that a shortage of new student interest contributed

to its cancellation. “A lot of freshmen don’t know about it, so it makes it hard for them to get involved because dance is still really small on this campus,” she said. This cancellation is expected to be a one-time occurrence, Adjunct Professor of Dance Emily Crocker

said. The Spring Dance Showcase, which is studentproduced through the Linfield Dance Ensemble, is still scheduled for next semester. “The people who normally choreograph are abroad this year or busy,” Weaver said. Weaver performed in the showcase last year and

planned to perform this year until its cancellation. She said junior Mai Doan, who also performed last year, would have been likely to participate again but is studying abroad in France. Last fall’s showcase drew a considerable crowd to Ice Auditorium, with special guests performing from

McMinnville’s Mountain Warrior Kung Fu Academy’s Demo Team. But this year, there weren’t enough performers to fill the program. The showcase began two years ago and is sponsored by Crocker. The fall performance was coordinated with the intent to make it

annual to complement the Dance Ensemble’s formal Spring Dance Showcase. Students with their own choreography and campus groups, such as the Bellydance Club, typically perform. Gabi Nygaard can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

‘Autumn Leaves’ concert is a hit despite bell theft Chelsea Ploof For the Review The Linfield Concert Band and Wind Symphony performed a concert titled “Autumn Leaves” at the McMinnville First Baptist Church on Nov. 16. The showcase included a variety of pieces led by guest conductor Jay Chen, who has experience in education and performance. “It was a good chance to play music in the area,” sophomore Wes Yurovachak said. The concert was sponsored by the Department of Music and was free and open to the public.

There were three segments in the program including two performances by the Concert Band and one by the Wind Symphony. The Concert Band opened with “Lux Aurumque” by Eric Whitacre. Then it performed “Russian Christmas” by Alfred Reed. The Wind Symphony performed “Petite Symphonie in Db Major” by Charles Gounod. The Concert Band closed the recital with “The Sweet of Old American Dances” by Robert Russel Bennet and “Autumn Leaves” by Johnny Merser. Several music students attended the concert. “My favorite song was

Joel Ray/For the Review

The Linfield Concert Band and Wind Symphony perform their fall concert “Autumn Leaves” Nov. 16 at the McMinnville First Baptist Church. Despite the theft of a student’s percussion instrument, the concert was a success. ‘Russian Christmas,’” freshman Joe Komarek said. “Out of all the pieces, that one sounded the most polished.” Behind the scenes, however, freshman percussionist Will Chou ran into trouble. “I was supposed to play percussion for the band,

but I didn’t get to play because someone stole my instrument. This is the second time,” Chou said. “We had to file a police report, and we will be questioned.” The stolen instrument was a bell that belonged to the college. Other performers had positive outlooks on the

success of the concert. “The concert went fine. I play the trombone for the Concert Band. I felt that the Whitacre piece went really well,” senior Cameron Carr said. “Jay is a good conductor, and we are lucky to have him. He came up here every Tuesday from Oregon State

University. Joan Poddack will be back next term,” Carr said. For more information about the Concert Band and the Wind Symphony, visit www.linfield.edu/music.

Chelsea Ploof can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.


December 3, 2010

Culture

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Film festival debut flirts with copyright infringement Jessica Prokop Culture editor The Linfield Activities Board held its first video talent showcase titled Film It - Show It video and talent showcase, Nov. 18 inside Ice Auditorium. Up until the showcase, LAB had the videos uploaded to its Facebook page so students could view them and vote for their favorite. But, because of copyright issues with music in some of the videos, LAB was advised by Michael Huntsberger, assistant professor of mass communication, to remove them. The videos were still allowed for public viewing during the event, Associated Students of

Linfield College Vice President of Programming junior Nicole Bond said. In spite of this setback, the videos received a lot of views and votes before they were removed from Facebook, Bond said. LAB received seven submissions for Film It – Show It. However, one of the submissions dropped out before the showcase on Thursday. The first place prize of $50 went to junior Ashleigh Rousselle for her movie “Sim Bat Time.” It featured Rousselle’s family, who she had invited to campus during the January Term 2010 to help her create the video as her final project for Huntsberger’s Visual Commu-

nication: Electronic course. The video starred her sister as a ballerina dancing in the Multi Purpose Room. Suddenly, she received a phone call, which set off her Batman theme-song ringtone. She then transformed into “Batman” and snuck around the building looking for the bad guy. She found a man in a suit, who was Rousselle’s father, and they had a standoff until he revealed that he was Superman. Then “Batman” jumped on his back and they “flew” away together. The second place prize of $30 went to junior Alex Van Slyke for his rap video titled “I’ll Take Ya to the Catty Shack.” The video,

produced by Slyke, was created for a course he took in January. “It was a lot of fun, and it got [a] good response, so I decided to submit it,” Slyke said. The third place prize of $20 went to senior Carolyn Blood. Her video titled “Ecuador Jan 2010” featured herself and other Linfield students on a 2010 January Term trip to Ecuador. Blood was unable to attend the showing to elaborate about her video. Other movies submissions included a music video to the song “Headlock” by Imogen Heap, submitted by junior Elizabeth Bond; a human rights video titled

“HRF Torture” submitted by freshman Amber Hay, which was created to raise awareness about human torture around the world; and another music video to the song “Uchaore Irekte” by OKI submitted by sophomore Braden Smith. LAB also played a late submission from sophomore Nic Miles, even though his video did not count in the contest. Miles’ movie was a music video to the Blink 182 song “I Miss You.” Approximately 20 students came to view the showcase, and the audience’s votes were combined with the online votes. “Given that this was the

first time [the event] had been done, doing a new event is a success itself,” Bond said. “It’s cool to give students an opportunity to show their talents.” LAB Student Talent Coordinator sophomore Linh Tang said that if it holds this event again, LAB will prohibit the use of copyright protected material in the videos or perhaps have the videos on display inside the library, such as the wine exhibit videos are this year. “I was really pleased with the turnout of seven submissions, and I saw a lot of smiling faces,” Tang said. Jessica Prokop can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

Student gives insight into African culture Robin Fahy For the Review For junior Gerald Rusere, returning to his native Zimbabwe was like being immersed in a completely different land, he said during a Nov. 17 presentation in Jonasson Hall. He explained how he revisited his homeland, experiencing new tastes and sounds and being overwhelmed by culture shock. He said his favorite ethnic food, a type of polenta, was no longer delicious. It had been a long time since he had heard the spoken language of Shona and Ndebele, too, and in many ways, felt like he lost touch with his people, Rusere said. “It was quite an experience to use the public transportation in Zimbabwe,”

he said, articulating to the audience his struggle with trying to figure out the currency to take a cab. Nonetheless, Rusere said he enjoyed his experience at the World Cup and shared his trip down memory lane. Rusere said the strange trip back to Africa opened his eyes. He said he believed that the people were unified because of their common interest in soccer, particularly in big soccer games, such as those at the World Cup. People from all over the world came to Zimbabwe to see the big game, filling the stadium with more than 56,000 avid fans. In the urban areas of Zimbabwe, people took a halfday off to see the match on television or listen to it on the radio. “I can only describe the atmosphere of the sheer

Art Exhibit

euphoria,” Rusere said regarding the first World Cup match ever played in Africa. The nation of excited fans, who had waited 76 years to see this event, was absolutely crazy over the match up, he said. “It was interesting to see people from all nations” Rusere said, showing the audience a video of cameras panning over the crowds. “Soccer is the most beautiful game.” The stadium, which is the ninth of its kind in Africa, features state-of-the-art seating and passage. The crowds it brings are also driving much of the tourism in Zimbabwe, which, in turn, benefits the developing country’s economy. “I was taken by the iconic architecture of the stadium,” he said.

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor

The 2010 Juried Student Exhibition opened Dec. 1 in the Linfield Fine Art Gallery in the James F. Miller Fine Arts Center. See next week’s Review for a full story on the exhibit.

Robin Fahy can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.

International student junior Gerald Rusere describes his African culture experiences in Zimbabwe during a Nov. 17 presentation in Jonasson Hall.

Victor Zhu/For the Review

Celebrating Hanukkah

Sophomore Alex Grant, a player on Linfield’s varsity soccer team, said he thought it was interesting that soccer was so popular in Zimbabwe. “Its cool that soccer is being represented here [Zimbabwe]. In America, many people don’t play or observe the sport as serious,” Grant said. During his trip, Rusere also visited the ghettos and said he was emotionally taken by the differences in living standards in Zimbabwe and America. But he assured everybody that Zimbabwe is a safe place to live. He also showed photos he took of the Victorian Falls, capturing the wonder he said he felt upon staring into the mystical waters.

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor

Senior Chaia Schupack lights a menorah candle in celebration of the second night of Hanukkah during a presentation by Rabbi Gary Ellison titled “Everything you always wanted to know about Hanukkah” on Dec. 2 in Renshaw Hall.


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Entertainment

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December 3, 2010

R&B songstress is where she ‘Belongs’ Philip Yovetich KSLC 90.3 FM We live in a musical era in which drummers get kicked out of bands by drum machines because it makes them sound more like LMFAO, in which artists would rather you buy 13 singles than one album because the record companies steal all their money, in which Justin Bieber gets nominated for Grammys and in which the two most famous musicians are not famous because of their music, but because they‘re either giant douche bags or they wear meat bikinis. Yes, folks, these are trying times indeed. All we wish for is a simpler time, away from the My Chemical Romances, the Maynard

James Keenans, the idiots at the Academy, the Kanye Wests and the Lady Gagas (all from which my previous accusations come from). In this 3OH!3 and Ke$haridden world, where can we turn for some musical peace and quiet? I would suggest turning to coming artist Andreya Triana, a sultry R&B singer from Great Britain who has recently released her first solo album, “Lost Where I Belong,” on independent label Ninja Tune. Triana is a stark contrast to the corporate hustling and bustling of today’s popular music since she is a completely self-made woman. She taught herself to sing at a young age and made her first recordings with cheap cassette record-

ers in her bedroom. Her musical repertoire expanded as she began studying musical technology while fronting multiple experimental Latin, fun, soul and jazz outfits. As she honed her musical skills and styles, she began to attract critical acclaim and was eventually asked to contribute vocals to popular experimental acts as Flying Lotus (in their song “Tea Leaf Dancers”) and Bonobo, with the latter featuring Triana on three of the tracks off his most recent album, “Black Sands.” He was pleased with her work on the songs, Bonobo eventually approached Triana in hopes of being able to produce her first solo album. She agreed, and the

result is a wonderful debut we have now. The album itself is as DIY and eclectic as this star duo will have it, resulting in a smooth, mellow, yet perpetually fun and entertaining album. The two wrote the songs together, combining live instrumentations and found sounds in unique and subtle ways. The album is undeniably jazzy and full of deep, funkladen bass lines, spunky shuffle-rhythms, soft horns and lush vocals, melting us in the same way that chocolate melts into crushed velvet by candlelight. Bonobo’s production gives the songs intricate layers, and all the while keeps the tracks spacious, giving us and Triana ample space to breathe. Highlights include the

Photo courtesy of www.ninjatune.net Andreya Triana’s album, “Lost Where I Belong,” was released June 9 on the UK-based record label Ninja Tune. peppy “A Town Called Obsolete,” the bossa nova-y “Something in the Silence,” and the funky, flute-powered soul jam “Up in the Fire.” Tune into KSLC 90.3

FM to catch a tune off of Andreya Triana’s debut album, “Lost Where I Belong.” Philip Yovetich can be reached at kslcmusic@gmail.com.

Rockin’ and Rollin’ Cat Cabs

Joel Ray/For the Review

Associated Students of Linfield College Vice President of Programming junior Nicole Bond (left) and Director of College Activities Dan Fergueson join in the Rock Band festivities during a Rock Band Cat Cab on Dec. 2 in the Fred Meyer Lounge.

Joel Ray/For the Review

Junior Barrett Zetterberg shows off his enthusiasm for Rock Band during the Rock Band Cat Cab on Dec. 2 in the Fred Meyer Lounge.

Sarah Hansen/Photo editor

Juniors Jeremy Moll and Jessie Goergen and sophomore Evan O’Kelly perform during a student Cat Cab Nov. 18 in the Fred Meyer Lounge.


Sports

December 3, 2010

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Swimmers barely stay afloat Jerry Young For the Review The Linfield swim team has an 0-2 Northwest Conference record. The Wildcats have competed in six events so far, and head coach Gary Gutierrez said he has been pleased with how the men’s and women’s teams have performed. “We’re doing good. We are down this year and we lost a lot of talent,” he said. “They are working hard and have their noses to the grindstone racing hard.” The Wildcats opened the season at home in the NWC relays on Oct. 30, and they placed sixth in both the men and women’s

events. After that, Linfield competed in its first two conference meets against Pacific Lutheran University and the University of Puget Sound on the Nov. 12 and 13, respectively. The men lost to Pacific Lutheran 64-139, while the women lost 62-143. While the scores may not show it, sophomore Rachel Codd thinks the team is making strides in the right direction. “I think the team has swam well so far considering that we have been working hard,” she said. “I think we have a lot of people getting faster, although it might not show in their performances at this point in time.”

After a week of practice and recovery, Linfield headed to the Northwest Invitational in Tacoma, Wash. Both the men’s and women’s teams finished in fifth place out of the six teams at the meet. Sophomore Katie Main said she was happy with the teams’ efforts. “We were really supportive and many of the swimmers really stepped up during a long meet to have some good swims for this time in the season.” As the season rolls along, the Wildcats aim to improve and win some meets. While winning individual events is great, Gutierrez pointed out that they don’t

have to win every event to be successful. “My first year here, we won the men’s conference championship and only won two individual events,” Gutierrez said. “The team knows that you can not win any individual event but still win the meet.” Lee Rivers is a promising freshman on the men’s side, and Main and Codd have shown potential on the women’s team. Codd also said that Gutierrez does a great job making sure the team has a good time but also swims well. “Coach Gary [Gutierrez] is really enthusiastic about what he does, which is

really motivating. He loves to joke around, so he brings a great sense of humor to the team,” Codd said. “He knows how to push us to the limits of what we are capable of doing, even if we don’t think we can do something.”

The Wildcats have several road trips coming up on their schedule. Their next home meet takes place at 1 p.m. on Jan. 29 against the Pacific University Boxers.

Owens will be in a great position to score and win some games.” Linfield traveled down to California on Nov. 21 to take on La Verne. The ’Cats had an early nine-point advantage and took control of the rest of the game. Four players, Owens, juniors Chrissy Baumgartner and Micha Pringle and fresh-

man Kaely Maltman, scored in the double-figures: Owens was the top scorer with 20 points, Pringle scored 19, Maltman, and Baumgartner scored 16 and 11, respectively. A final score of 87-63 marked their season’s first win. “La Verne was a tough game,” freshman guard Breanna Ribeiro said. “It was the first time I saw the team come together and use all of our strengths.” Linfield competed against the Cal-Tech Beavers on Nov. 22. Strong defense and accurate shooting brought the Wildcats another win. The ’Cats had a 60 percent shooting average and forced 29 Beaver turnovers.

Baumgartner was the ’Cats leading scorer with 16, and Pringle had a whopping eight steals throughout her game play. The team’s performance led to their win of 92-56. The Wildcats battled against Pomona-Pitzer during the last night of their trip. Linfield began with solid play and an unbeatable defense, which quickly shut down the Sagehens. The ’Cats were ahead by 20 points at halftime and continued to hold their lead through the rest of the game. Eleven three-pointers contributed to a third-straight win, 77-51. First-year head coach Robin Potera-Haskins has

connected with the team, Gummersall said. “The team and I have fully embraced coach [Potera] Haskins,” she said. “She is supportive of everyone on the team and has really pushed us to improve our game as a team as well as individuals.” With a preseason record of 3-2, the Wildcats anticipate the first league game against Whitman College at home on Dec. 3. “If we can protect our house, that will be a really good start for us,” Ribeiro said. “I’m looking forward to the team meshing and creating some good upsets.”

Victor Zhu/For the Review Sophomore Seth Ruwitch swims the 400m individual medley on Nov. 13 against University of Puget Sound.

Jerry Young can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

’Cats achieve three-game winning streak Katey Barger Staff reporter The women’s basketball team traveled to California Nov. 21-23. The ’Cats won all three of their games against University of La Verne, the California Institute of Technology and Pomona-Pitzer College. Before that, Linfield hosted the Chapman University Panthers on Nov. 19. The Wildcats were down by 11 points with less than nine minutes of play remaining but went on an 11-3 spree over Chapman to take the lead. Junior guard Gretchen Owens led the team during the run, scoring six of the

11 come-back points. The Panthers took the lead again with two quick baskets, which put them ahead by four points. Owens, in an attempt to keep the Wildcats in the game, scored two more points in the last eight seconds of the fourth quarter. But Linfield fouled with two seconds remaining. The Panthers sealed the win with two free-throws and a final score of 71-67. “As a team, we are working on improving our defensive intensity as well as our rebounding efforts,” junior post Lindsey Gummersall said. “If we can stop teams on defense and maintain possession of the ball, we

Katey Barger can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Scoring runs plays roll in game outcomes Matt Bayley Staff reporter Men’s basketball split the first two games of the season, defeating Trinity University on Nov. 21, and losing to Corban College on Nov. 23. The team pulled together for a win over The Evergreen State College on Nov. 30. The ’Cats opened their season strong, edging Trinity for a 69-57 win in Spokane, Wash. Led by 23 points from senior center K.C. Wiser, the ’Cats recovered from a slow start. With less than 10 minutes remaining in the half and down by 11 points, the ’Cats pounced. Scores from Wiser, senior guard Ryan Lobdell and sophomore forward Zach Meikle composed a 14-3 run to cut Trinity’s lead to one. The ’Cats struggled to find momentum until the second half. Trailing 45-50, Wiser nailed a three-pointer and closed the gap to two points.

Wiser’s shot ignited a 20-2 run by the ’Cats, giving them a 65-52 lead with 52 seconds remaining. Sophomore forward Zach Anderson credited the team’s defense with the big run. “We started to play more aggressively on defense, which kind of propelled our offense,” he said. “Defense has been a focus for us.” Linfield’s defense held Trinity to just 25 points and 26 percent shooting in the second half. The ’Cats allowed a paltry 33 percent shooting for the game. Anderson said that smart shots and ball control were key on the offensive end. “We turned the ball over a lot at first, but once we stopped doing that, things got rolling,” he said. “We have a lot of guys who are good at shooting and that helps us out. We’ve also had good shot selection in our two wins.” The undefeated Corban Warriors erased a 12-point, first-half deficit to hand the ’Cats their first loss of the

Victor Zhu/For the Review Junior David Lee (left) tries to tip the ball away from senior K.C. Wiser during practice on Nov. 9. season, 81-84. Corban took advantage of a large free throw disparity, sinking 30 free throws to Linfield’s 10. The ’Cats, however, struggled to capitalize on

their free throws. They finished 10-20, good for only 50 percent. Anderson said the team’s defensive and free throw difficulties ultimately cost them the game. “On defense, we kind

of fouled and reached too much,” Anderson said. “We fouled a lot and put them to the line a lot, which hurt us.” A three-pointer from freshman guard Josh Rodrigues gave the ’Cats a 41-29 lead in the first half. The Linfield bench provided a spark, outscoring the Corban reserves 19-4. The ’Cats entered halftime with a nine-point cushion following a three-pointer from junior forward Zach Spencer. Corban jumped on Linfield after the break, putting together a 14-4 run. Junior guard Jonathan Ramirez scored on a layup, which put Corban ahead for good at 51-50. The Warrior lead was extended to 73-65 with six minutes left in the game, but the ’Cats responded with an 8-1 spurt in which Wiser scored six of his game-high 22 points. Senior guard Ryan Lobdell trimmed the deficit to one with 34 seconds remaining. The Warriors made all

four of their ensuing free throws as they held onto the win. The ’Cats earned their second win of the season in a 97-77 rout of Evergreen on Nov. 30. Anderson and senior forward Sergio Rosario contributed 18 points and nine rebounds apiece on a combined 15-20. Wiser led the team with a career-high 37 points on 14-23 shooting. He scored 19 points in the first half, helping the ’Cats build a 14 point lead. “We have a lot of tall, lengthy players,” he said. “Our guards are tall, so we figured crashing the boards would be a good thing for us. Our overall height as a team is pretty good.” The ’Cats hold a 2-1 record heading into their Dec. 3 matchup with Whitman College. The team also plays rival Whitworth University on Dec. 4. Both games are at home at 8 p.m. Matt Bayley can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


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December 3, 2010

Clockwise from top left: Senior Simon Lamson dives for the touchdown that out the ’Cats in the lead against California Lutheran on Nov. 20. (Photo by Megan Myer/ Online editor) Senior Simon Lamson (left) gets a hug from junior Hayden Mace. (Photo by Danyelle Myers/For the Review) Senior Buddy Saxon (right) and junior Deidre Wiersma celebrate after the first touchdown, which tied the game. (Photo by Megan Myer/Online editor) Senior Bubba Kukahiko and junior Axel Cederberg congratulate each other after the game against Cal Lu. (Photo by Megan Myer/Online editor) Senior Aaron Boehme looks to throw the ball against the Lutes. (Photo by Danyelle Myers/For the Review)

Football: Season stops cold in Minnesota << Continued from page 16

for a total of 51 lost yards. “They were definitely the best team we faced defensively, so that is always an adjustment you have to make,” Boehme said. “They are a loaded team defensively with their talent.” St. Thomas struck again at the top of the second quarter on a 32-yard field goal by sophomore kicker Tim Albright to extend the home team’s lead to 10-0. With their backs against the ropes, the defense needed a stand and got it in the form of junior middle linebacker Christian Hanna. Hanna intercepted a Tracy pass and returned it 50 yards all the way to the Tommie 22-yard line. Deep in St. Thomas territory, Boehme and the offense finally found the end zone on a 2-yard toss to senior receiver Chris Slezak. Boehme finished the day with an odd bunch of sta-

tistics: 24-46 for 226 yards, two touchdowns and an interception. The number of attempted passes was uncharacteristically high for Boehme, which he attributes to St. Thomas’ stingy defense. “We really didn’t play well in the first half on offense,” Boehme said. “We were forced to throw the ball a little more in the second half-more than we would have liked.” On the next Tommies series, junior safety Drew Fisher read Tracy like a book and snatched another pass out of the air for the Wildcat defense. After a 14-yard return and a 15-yard facemask penalty against St. Thomas, Linfield found itself deep in Tommies territory once again, but this time couldn’t convert in the red zone. The ’Cats settled for a 27-yard field goal by freshman kicker Jordan Walker to tie the score at 10 points. Fisher made another spectacular interception on the following St. Thomas drive to

end the half. “I think this game displayed the defensive backs as a whole getting more opportunities to make plays on the ball,” Fisher said. “They knew they weren’t going to be able to hold onto the ball against us without taking sacks, which created more errant throws, and then I was able to beat my receiver.” In the second half, with momentum in their favor, Linfield seemed poised to run away with the game and move into the national quarterfinals. However, the Wildcats struggled in the red zone, and they wouldn’t end up scoring again until their need was absolutely desperate. The ’Cats, on 19 plays within the St. Thomas 25-yard line in the second half, only gained a net 15 yards, and Boehme threw eight incompletions. Walker also missed a pair of feasible field goals from 33 and 30 yards. “There were two factors

that caused the struggle in the red zone: poor offensive execution on our part and strong defensive execution on St. Thomas’ part,” Avritt said. “Either our offensive game plan didn’t seem to manipulate their red zone defense as well, or our offensive execution wasn’t able to outplay their defense.” Junior rover Kole Kreiger breathed some life into his team by picking off Tracy for the team’s fourth interception. In the middle of the fourth quarter on a 12-yard run by Tobin, and with only two minutes to go in the game, Boehme mounted one final, desperate drive to save the Wildcats’ season. He delivered accounting for every yard of a 64-yard march and tied the game on a 7-yard strike to senior receiver Buddy Saxon. “It was a gutsy comeback at the end for our team,” Fisher said. In the first overtime, Walker missed another field

2010 All-Northwest Conference Football Team Offensive Player of the Year: Senior quarterback Aaron Boehme Defensive Player of the Year: Senior defensive end Eric Hedin Coach of the Year: Head coach Joseph Smith

goal, this one from a difficult distance of 47 yards. The ’Cats’ defense immediately forced a fumble to snuff out the Tommies’ first attempt and sent the game into a sixth period. That’s when tragedy struck, with Tracy finally finding the end zone on a 10-yard pass into the corner of the end zone. After Avritt’s fumble sealed the game, Linfield’s season came to a crashing end. However, the players took it in stride and recognized the success they achieved that day and throughout the

season. “I have no regrets or hard feelings toward this game,” junior middle linebacker Kala’e Parish said. “Every player gave it their best effort and nothing less. The game of football is fun, and being in situations such as double overtime makes the game an incredible sport to play. We had a rough start in the beginning of this season, but all of our hard work seemed to pay off in the end in a game like this.” Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


Sports

December 3, 2010

www.linfieldreview.com

15

A sad end of an era for the Catdome Chris Forrer For the Review I’m an emotional guy when it comes to the sports programs I love, so last weekend, after watching my beloved Wildcat football team lose in double overtime in frigid Minnesota, I felt emotionally steamrolled. As many of you die-hard ’Cat fans can attest, this one hurt. After the last fumble on the 4-yard line sealed the deal, I was stunned speechless. All I could do for the next 15 minutes was stare at my computer screen as the Tommies whooped and hollered, as the broadcasters discussed their chances against Bethel University and, finally, as the webcast

ended, and the window went black. It wasn’t the fact that the Wildcats lost that deactivated my higher brain functions for a brief period of time but how they arrived at the loss and, on a larger scale, everything that it represented. From what I, and everyone else who laid their eyes on this game saw, Linfield was the superior team. This is a game that we should have won running away. For the better part of three quarters our defense was playing so well that the Tommies didn’t even smell the end zone — let alone enter it. We picked off their quarterback three times in a matter of minutes. Aaron Boehme was carving up their defense on big drives and Taylor Avritt, who was shoved into a major role on a moment’s notice after Simon Lamson was sidelined by an injury early on, was playing the best football of his life, finding holes, breaking tack-

les and opening up big runs when we needed them most. But when we got into or close to the red zone, everything came to a crashing halt. Every play Linfield ran within the St. Thomas 25-yard line in the second half amounted to a whopping 15 total yards, eight incompletions and two missed field goals. The only time the ’Cats scored in the entire second half was on a final, desperate drive that culminated in Boehme’s clutch TD pass to Buddy Saxon that sent the game into overtime. The extra periods weren’t any better, with another missed field goal and a fumble that sealed the loss. True, much of this can be chalked up to the Tommies’ defense, but not all of it. That’s how the Wildcats ended the season: in a manner that was both utterly heartbreaking and uncharacteristic of their usually fiery offense.

I can’t think of another loss in recent memory that hurt my heart, and the hearts of ’Cats everywhere, as much as this one did. Our boys played with their all against one of the nation’s toughest teams; they battled hard for four quarters and two overtimes; and in the end, the better team was still walking off the field with their helmets in hand and their hearts sinking. That hurts. Among were some of the most talented senior players to ever suit up in purple and red, and my heart breaks for them above all else. Boehme, the prolific dualthreat quarterback who will go down as one of Linfield’s best, is leaving enormous shoes to fill next season after two incredible years at the helm of this offense; Eric Hedin, the “Sack Master,” leaves bearing many of Linfield’s most prestigious defensive records after turning himself

into a one-man quarterback wrecking crew this season; Buddy Saxon and Chris Slezak, both of whom came back for a final year of eligibility to help Linfield win a national championship and had their hopes dashed in the Minnesota snow; Simon Lamson, who, after a careerdefining season, could only watch when it mattered most; Sam Higgins, perhaps the most underrated player on the entire team, who had a better eye for picking off balls than most gave him credit for; Paul Nishizaki, among the college’s alltime best tackles, who wore a smile on the sidelines no matter what the scoreboard read. There are many more seniors who deserve their names listed here, but only one that I want to mention. Taylor Avritt: You might have been tempted to hang your head the lowest of all. But if you gave into those feelings, I know that every

pair of hands on that football team was there to lift you up and carry you all the way to Oregon because after stepping into a major responsibility at a moment’s notice in the biggest game of your life, you deserve nothing less. I applaud you, and you have absolutely nothing to regret. I apologize for my verbosity this week, ’Cats, but the end of this football season marks the end of an era as well. For the past two years, I’ve been a spoiled journalist for covering a team such as this, and I cannot possibly express the full depths of my gratitude for that. Now, to this remarkable class of seniors, I raise my glass and drink to the honor of your farewell. And for those who remain, it’s time to anticipate the future. I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait to see what it holds. Is it September yet?

Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

Megan Myer/Online editor Wildcats crowd together for a postgame talk and celebration after winning against California Lutheran University on Nov. 20. The ’Cats advanced to the second round of playoffs, but lost in Minnesota against the University of St. Thomas on Nov. 27.

Runners miss nationals Wildcat sports schedule Tim Marl Staff reporter

Friday, Dec. 3 Women’s basketball

vs. Whitman

6 p.m.

Men’s basketball

vs. Whitman

8 p.m.

Women’s basketball

vs. Whitworth

6 p.m.

Men’s basketball

vs. Whitworth

8 p.m.

Saturday, Nov. 13

The cross country teams landed in the top 10 at the NCAA Division III West Region Championship hosted by Willamette University at Bush’s Pasture Park in Salem, Ore., on Nov. 13. Freshman Mimi Seeley finished 35th among the racers. With a time of 23 minutes and 43.26 seconds. She received all-region honors. “I thought I had a successful season. I was the top female for Linfield, and I made all-conference as well as all-region honors,” Seeley said. “Next year, I would like to qualify for nationals.” Out of 117 teams, the women’s team finished in 10th place. First-time runner senior Scott Pinske finished 24th at the regional meet with a time of 26:23.27, earning all-west region honors. The hardest part for Pinske was keeping his head in the game between meets, he said. “Since there was a twoweek gap between conference and regionals, it was difficult

to keep focused for such a long time,” Pinske said. “The course was not too difficult, other than the fact that it was muddy, and there were times when it was difficult to have decent traction on the course.” Junior Scott Gage finished in 40th place with a time of 27:04.68. The men’s team finished in ninth place. No one from the Linfield received individual invitations to the NCAA championships. According to the Linfield cross country website, “Linfield is without a NCAA championship-meet qualifier for the first time since 2005.” Overall, both teams were strong competitors. At the Northwest Conference Championships on Oct. 30, the men placed fourth and the women placed fifth. Both teams stayed in the middle of the standings at the Willamette Open on Oct. 2, and the Concordia/Puma Classic on Oct. 16. “We stayed fairly steady throughout the season, and although the numbers may not prove it, we are, and will continue to be, a very compet-

itive team in the Northwest Conference,” Pinske said. The teams proved that they can be successful. The men finished second at the Willamette Grass Course on Sept. 17, and the Linfield Preview on Sept. 25, and the women finished third in those races. “This season was absolutely amazing in every aspect: community, competition, etc. I take pride in being a member of the Linfield cross-country program and can’t wait to continue,” freshman Colton Wright said. Coach Travis Olson said he was slightly disappointed that the teams didn’t finish as expected, but he said he knows they will continue to improve for next year. “I feel good about what we have accomplished this year,” Olson said. “Although we may not have finished exactly where we wanted in the conference, we did establish a great atmosphere that will help this team continue to grow and eventually be a contender.” Tim Marl can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.


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Catline Northwest Conference standings Men’s basketball George Fox

1-0

Lewis & Clark

0-0

1.000 .000

Linfield

0-0

.000

Whitman

0-0

.000

Puget Sound

0-0

.000

Pacific

0-0

.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-0

.000

Willamette

0-1

.000

Women’s basketball George Fox

1-0

1.000

Puget Sound

0-0

.000

Whitman

0-0

.000

Pacific Lutheran

0-0

.000

Lewis & Clark

0-0

.000

Linfield

0-0

.000

Whitworth

0-0

.000

Pacific

0-0

.000

Willamette

0-1

.000

Linfield

6-0

1.000

Pacific Lutheran

5-1

.833

Willamette

4-2

.667

Whitworth

3-3

.500

Lewis & Clark

2-4

.333

Puget Sound

1-5

.167

Pacific

0-6

.000

Football (Final)

’Cats swim in last The Linfield swim team is halfway through the season and have yet to see a win as a team. See page 13 >> Basketball recovers its game The women’s basketball team started preseason with two losses but recovered with three wins prior to conference. See page 13>> Wildcats recover after loss The men’s basketball team started its preseason winning two and losing one. It begins the season at home Dec. 3. See page 13>> Cross country wraps up The running Wildcats finished well at regionals, but did not make it to nationals. See page 15 >>

Sports schedule Missed out on the sporting events last weekend? Check out the sports schedule to see when your favorite teams play this weekend. See page 15>>

Follow The Linfield Review on Twitter for Wildcat sports updates: @Linfield_Review.

Megan Myer/Online editor Senior Buddy Saxon reaches for the ball in front of California Lutheran University sophomore Broc Galbreth for the Wildcats’ first touchdown, tying up the game Nov. 20. The ’Cats won 42-26, but the Wildcats returned home from playoffs after a loss in Minnesota on Nov. 27.

Wildcats drop double overtime Chris Forrer For the Review In double overtime, senior tailback Taylor Avritt fumbled the ball away on the Tommie 3-yard line, and Linfield left Minnesota with a 17-24 loss and its playoff hopes dashed in a nail-biting finish against the St. Thomas University on Nov. 27. Before the kickoff of Linfield football’s second-round playoff game on the road against the St. Thomas Tommies, www.d3football.

com analysts billed the showdown as what could have been one of the postseason’s best. Those expectations were met in dramatic fashion. After four quarters of play failed to deliver a winner of the game, two more overtimes were needed to determine the outcome. Avritt, who stepped into a major role in the game after senior starting tailback Simon Lamson left the game due to an injury, played a solid game up to that point with 68 yards rushing, including a key

28-yard burst in the second half. “The outcome of the game was a pretty terrible event for me personally,” Avritt said. “A lot of people offered words of encouragement, ranging from teammates to fans to parents.” Early on, long before two overtimes were needed, the game was every bit the battle it was predicted to be. St. Thomas had its way with Linfield early, as junior quarterback Dakota Tracy marched his team down the field on the Tommies’ game-opening drive before handing

the ball off to junior running back Colin Tobin for a 1-yard score. The Wildcat offense faltered early, with senior quarterback Aaron Boehme getting dropped for two back-to-back sacks on the next possession. The defense of the two teams would set the tone for the entire contest, and neither team scored for the remainder of the first period. Both teams combined for six sacks >> Please see Football page 14

TLR Issue 12 12-3-2010  

TLR Issue 12 12-3-2010

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