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FASHION • TRENDS • STYLE MAGAZINE OF ATLANTIC CANADA

Vol. 1 | Issue 4 | Fall 2013


FALL 2013

table of contents 20

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8 FEATURES

COLUMNS

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29

Klozet

Fashion Tweets

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ET CETERA

LDM OMG

8 She Sells Jewels by the Seaport

12 From Coat to Coat

14 Fashion Editorial

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Letter from the Publisher Letter from the Photo Editor Where to Buy

ON THE COVER Models: Kevin Hull & Kristin Langille Dahl Clothing: Veronica MacIsaac Apparel Photographer: Brent McCombs, Alterego Photography Photography Assistant: Michelle Olsen Hair and Makeup: Elle Munster

Veronica MacIsaac

26 Reviving Downtown

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Letter from the Publisher

AMANDA KINCAID Publisher & Owner

It’s been a huge couple of months since the last issue. Atlantic Fashion Week celebrated its 7th year at the elegant Gallery One location. PHASE fashion design students from the Centre for Arts and Technology, showcased an amazing display of talent during their graduation show. Splurge Handbags closed its shop on Dresden opting to go online. Local fashion line Orphanage is switching gears from deconstruct to creating a new unique line. A new high end store, Klozet Clothing Boutique, opened in Moncton and about a dozen other things I forgot.

These are all signs that fashion is alive and well and growing on the East Coast. As for Line we turned one this month!!! We would like to thank all the readers and supporters that have seen us through the last year. With the New Year will also come a few changes. We will be concentration more on our online presence starting with scheduled blog posts and more engagement on our social media platforms. Events will also become a bigger part of the magazine to help show case local designers in person as well as in print. We are also creating partnerships with local businesses to bring you more fashion and style. Happy Holidays from everyone at Line!!

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Letter from the Photo Editor

BRENT MCCOMBS Photo Editor & Photographer Photo-editor Brent McCombs was on assignment during the week of production, so included here is a sampling of his work from the past couple of months.

Clockwise from top: Sunset shot on Westminster Bridge, models unidentified; Makeup by Elle Munster, as part of her Monster Series; Model Ann Ramsay; Cait Anthony and Kristin Langille Dahl of the aerial troupe Aviatrix.

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oncton fashion has always been a little slower to progress in comparison to larger cities. Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of stylish women here, it’s just harder for them to find unique pieces in Moncton. We are the team captain of chain stores, and let’s face it, it’s way harder to find different, trendy pieces in chain stores. Luckily, for me and other fashionistas in Moncton, twenty four year old Janique Brun has just opened a fabulous new store called Klozet (located at 1435 Mountain Road). She’s carrying all the latest brand names from Rebecca Minkoff and House of Harlow to Line and Dot and so much more. Yes, you heard me right, she is just 24 years old, but seems so mature for such a young age. “I love when people ask me how old I am, because it’s a huge accomplishment for someone my age,” stated Brun. From the cozy feel of a downtown Toronto boutique with fabulous brands to the sweet and welcoming storeowner, it is truly what dreams are made of. “I lived in Toronto and Montreal for a year each and wanted to bring a piece of that to Moncton.” Klozet caters to anyone between the ages of 20

SARAH DUQUETTE Boho and Braids www.bohoandbraids.wordpress.com to 50 years old. Even more exciting is that they carry both men’s and women’s clothing making it a unique attraction for Moncton fashion lovers. They not only carry trendy pieces, but have the best classic pieces as well, which is exactly what every real closet hopes to obtain. “Many stores in Moncton carry a ton of basics, so I tried to balance out my store.” Janique shared that she has chills when she talks about her store. It still doesn’t feel like reality to her. When I asked why she opened her store she said that she’s always loved fashion and now she gets to shop for all of Moncton. What girl wouldn’t love to do that? It sounds like every girl’s dream! Although it is a dream come true, it’s still not easy. “It’s difficult to figure out what all ages want to wear; you can’t just order things that you want.” She loves going to work every day and although it’s a lot of hard work, she is truly dedicated to making it a huge success. Janique is one of those people you meet and their passion is contagious! You can just feel how invested she is in this business, and you find yourself rooting for her to succeed. Klozet has a cute name, great clothes and desirable finds. What more could a girl ask for? This new store definitely has satisfied my fashion hunger. It’s one “Klozet” you’ll never want to leave!

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KLOZET

Photographer: Denis Duquette Model: Jessica Auffrey (City Models) Hair: MĂŠlanie Rojas Makeup: Bastarache Beauty Stylist: Janique Brun Location: Tide and Boar Gastropub

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LDM

OMG

Already love Turbine by Lisa Drader Murphy? Then you’ll equally love her new line and store. Lisa has opened a second store to house her limited edition LDM line. The new line will incorporate elements of Turbine with a fresh new flair. Each design will be handmade and limited to 5 or 6 pieces making LDM a more private label. Lisa will be busy stocking the new store located at Historic Properties frequently, so make room on your shopping calendar,no piece will last for long. FA S H I O N • T R E N D • S T Y L E

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Angela Grace Jewely (from left to right): Ste-Cecile Talisman, Ancient Wounds Talisman, Geode Knuckles

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Jewels She Sells

by the Seaport Inside the Studios of Tori XO and Angela Grace

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here is a space across from the Seaport Farmers’ Market where artists tinker away at odd hours, amidst curling newspaper clippings, seashells and minerals overflowing from shelves. And, here and there, they emerge from their studios to discuss new designs over cups of tea, before retreating back to their creations.

The space is a set of studios at 1113 Marginal Road at the Halifax Seaport, and two such occupants are jewelers Tori Poynton, of Tori XO, and Angela Grace, of Angela Grace Jewelry. Upon entry, the building seems like an industrial warehouse, doors showcasing names of the artists within like offices, but this is no office space. Studios are rife with materials, tools, and machinery from which some of Halifax’s most beloved jewelry is made. My first stop is to visit Tori Poynton, who welcomes me with a cup of green tea and a tour of the studio she shares with renowned Nova Scotian jeweler, Peter Lawrence. I ask her if it’s odd to share such a small space. “As a jeweler, you only need a small space, so it’s luxurious to have this warehouse space,” she responds, sitting at her workbench, which Peter constructed over thirty years ago. “I do all my business work at home, so it’s nice to have a

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WHITNEY MORAN

space to just be creative,” Poynton says of the space. “It’s a really nice community, being surrounded by jewelers. Everyone is really giving with their knowledge.” I ask about the fragments of jewelry in front of her. “The pieces that didn’t make it…I just leave them out as inspiration,” she says. “I’ll look at it to see how it could be improved. It’s an evolution.” When I admit my ignorance to the jewelry-making process, she offers to show me. “It’s all done by hand,” she begins, taking me through the fascinating process of melting silver, pressing it through what resembles “a giant pasta press,” and then, at the last minute, adding her signature touch: French lace. The lace pattern, featured in her Chantilly collection, was a Parisian flea market find. When Poynton experimented with it, she found the combination of the fabric— “something so fragile and feminine”—and metal to be particularly striking: “It makes this strong piece of art out of something so delicate,” she explains. Whether in Sicily with her mom, or combing through the mines in her home country of Australia, Poynton normally finds her inspiration in travelling. But this is not the case for her new collection, Mermaid’s Amulet, launching at the end of November.

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“The first piece from the new collection came to me in a dream,” she muses. “I woke up and sketched it.” She shows me the drawing, an ink twin of the necklace she now wears. “It’s a complete departure,” she explains. Much more three-dimensional, dreamlike, “structured yet organic.” After a cup of green tea, Tori guides me across the hall where I find Angela Grace Arsenault, returning from her trunk shows in LA and San Francisco. “I just picked up some sharks’ teeth!” she says excitedly, the way one might exclaim over any vacation souvenir. She admits that these could very well find their way into her jewelry soon. I ask her what she’s working on. “I have a ridiculous amount of ideas,” she says, “that’s never a problem.” Right now she’s working out a few new designs, but is always busy with orders for pieces from her popular collections, including Foxes, which gained international attention at the Pre-Emmys Talent Lounge in 2012, and Ancient Wounds, a violently untraditional yet feminine collection inspired by donning the spoils of war as talismans or armour for protection, and includes moulds of fossilized shark’s teeth and plenty of chain maille. Tori XO rings

Surprisingly, a lot of her inspiration comes from books. “I’m a big reader. I think books have a lot of influence on what I do.” As for how this translates, it’s less literal; more conceptual. “Just aesthetically… I try to work with concepts a lot; unwearable art pieces. I think the conceptualism spills over.” The most poignant example is her 2009 collection, Bibliophile I, an unwearable collection that won that year’s Circle Craft Award, which would theoretically allow one to carry a short story around at all times. Since she has an air of academia, I ask her how she became a jeweler. After studying photography and film at NSCAD, Angela took a workshop with— now studio neighbour—Peter Lawrence, who told her she was a natural. Soon after she found herself leaving Vancouver Community College’s traditional European jewelry program, taught by European jewelers who work for Cartier and Tiffany’s, with the top award.

Tori XO

“It’s a journey,” she says of her path to finding her current vocation. “I feel like it was a good thing that I started when I was older, because it requires a lot of dedication.” Like Tori XO, Angela Grace is currently preparing for Christmas but plans to do a few trunk shows at J & R Grimsmo over the winter. In the meantime, both artists will continue to feed off the creativity that lives in every crevice of this building. “The sense of community is great. There are a number of people working in different mediums. Everyone’s approaching art from a different perspective,” explains Grace. “We do little jobs for each other. We sort of help each other out that way.” Tori XO and Angela Grace will both be showing at the Halifax Crafters’ Fair (Nov 30–Dec 1) and the NSDCC Christmas Show (Nov 15–17). Visit torixo.com & angelagracejewelry.com.

Tori XO

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Tori XO Mermaid’s Amulet Angela Grace

Tori at work in her studio

Tori XO Vionnet Cuff

Tori XO lace collection

Tori XO

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Angela working on Fox Ring

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COAT COAT

From

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Pam Matheson Brings Luxury Home to Atlantic Canada

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multitude of winter coats exist; from oversized to structured to military and anything else in between. The possibilities are endless, but finding the right one on the other hand, that can prove to be difficult. For something you wear every day, and the first thing people notice; it’s worthwhile investing in a good quality coat that will help get you through the blustery winter weather (in style). Not content with what was available in stores Pam Matheson decided to take the initiative and create outerwear she wanted to wear, and as a result created her successful brand Esmé. Matheson

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KAYLA SHORT Jacket” is currently in production. With quality at the forefront of this brand, the collection is made up of 100% wools, wool blends and novelty fabrics from all over the world. Combining her love for clothing and travel, Matheson sources from France, Italy, Germany, Austria, and Japan, countries she feels are known for producing quality fabrics. takes pride in the garments she creates and favors quality over all else. Matheson assures us she “would never sell something she would not purchase herself”. Chic and cozy, the 2014 winter collection of “The Esmé Original

The Esmé line favors a fitted silhouette with subtle stretch to help hug the waist and hipline and falls to about mid-length. Matheson suggests “it’s a perfect length for many different heights” and she’s dubbed it the perfect “car coat” length”. Signature

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to the brand, the high stand-up collar neckline (can also be rolled down or worn open) creates a polished and sophisticated look for any age. Three weights of fabric make up the Esmé Jacket: a lightweight stretch fabric that woman can wear indoors in an office or restaurant setting, a fall weight perfect for warm days and cool evenings, and a heavier winter weight. To help encourage individuality Matheson produces the jackets in small quantities, and sizes range from 4 – 14. Lined with blends of silk, polyester and spandex, the interiors are designed to feel great against the skin. Created to be very comfortable The Esmé Original Jacket is designed to move with the body, not against it. With its stretch fabrics and feminine tailored fit it’s flattering on many body types. Dressed it up or down these jackets are a “go-to” piece for the cooler months ahead, and you can also taken comfort in knowing that your jacket was made right here in Atlantic Canada. “The Esmé Original Jacket” for winter 2014 retails between $300 - $350. FA S H I O N • T R E N D • S T Y L E

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Draped

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Most people know designer names like Michael Kors and Dolce Vita. Haligonians are even familiar with local jewelry from House of Moda, but the best kept secrets are coming from other local designers Zafira, Wear Blair and Diana Watts. Accessories from Clutch Culture and Angela Grace and Overman round out the who’s who of East Coast fashion seen here. Pairing established lines with local looks proves that local is just as fashionable as luxury! FA S H I O N • T R E N D • S T Y L E

Photography: Brent McCombs, AlterEgo Photography Models: Teaghan Gosley, Tamara Chemij, Brooke MacDonald and Hanna Ramsay Hair: Laura Lewis Make-up Artist: Tansy Rudnicki Stylists: Conni Zafiris and Ashley Garland Location: Shadow House Studios

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LEFT: Model: Hannah Clothes & accessories: Dress by Wear Blair; Bracelet by House of Moda; Purse by Clutch Culture; and Shoes by Dolce Vita @ Mills RIGHT: Model: Teaghan Clothes & accessories: Hood scarf by Diana Watts; Top by Diana Watts; Leggings by Wear Blair; Eyeball ring Overman; Thorn Rings by Angela Grace “Laden in Brown�; Necklace by Overman; and Boots by Michael by Michael Kors

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LEFT: Model: Brooke Clothes & Accessories: Top by Wear Blair; Leggings by Wear Blair; 2 finger bracelet by Overman; Body chain by Overman; Purse by Clutch Culture; and Shoes by: Dolce Vita @ Mills. RIGHT: Model: Tamara Clothes & Accessories: Pink slouchy cardi by Zafira; Crop top by Diana Watts; Leggings by Wear Blair; Bracelet by House of Moda; Earrings by House of Moda; and Shoes by Michael by Michael Kors @ Mills

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BEHIND THE

SCENES

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Model: Brooke Clothes & Accessories: Relax Blazer by Zafira; Romper by Zafira; Shark Tooth Necklace by House of Moda; and Shoes by Michael by Michael Kors @ Mills

Model: Teaghan Clothes & Accessories: Romper by Zafira; Mounted Fox Head Bangle by Angela Grace Jewelry; Mounted Fox Head by Necklace Angela Grace Jewelry; Bag by Marc by Marc Jacobs @ Mills; and Shoes by French Connection @ Mills

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Cover Story

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COURTNEY SMITH

n today’s fashion industry where big companies like Forever 21 and H&M are shooting out products faster than you can say mass-production, it’s important to find designers who want to emphasize a sense of quality and heritage in fashion. Veronica MacIsaac, designer of Veronica MacIsaac Apparel, strives for those qualities. A completely bespoke clothing and accessory line of tartan pieces, MacIsaac provides a modern take on the Celtic tradition, without the grandmother or Britney Spears school-girl effect. Learning how to sew at the age of four and having childhood bedroom walls adorned with Vogue ads, she always held a love

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can’t just make a pretty dress. There’s way too many people doing it cheaper and better than you, so there has to be some kind of niche. This is my niche.”

Fashion designer, Veronica MacIsaac.

for fashion. But, it wasn’t until a few life crises and unsatisfying jobs that MacIsaac realized she needed to do something that made her happy. “Fashion is the only thing I know that I’m really good at,” explains MacIsaac. “You have to do something you know. In today’s day and age, you

Before you picture the punk plaid trend sweeping fashion blogs, envision instead a historically valuable pattern of lines and colours that represent a family heritage. Contrary to plaid, tartans are hundreds of years old, and the varying sets of lines and colours are symmetrically designed to represent different clans. A traditional kilt alone takes 22 hours to create, hand-stitched with a needle and thread by MacIsaac. However an entire collection of modern designs takes months of creating, cutting and sewing.

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This established designer not only delivers a beautiful product, but actually makes a difference in extending a family’s history. MacIsaac recalls one experience where a woman’s husband suddenly passed away and didn’t want to dispose of the kilt he had treasured for years. Discovering that MacIsaac’s parents had made the kilt 12 years before, the designer became a part of this family’s history. Using the material, buckles, and lining, MacIsaac transformed the memento into a 40s short-sleeved jacket and a flared skirt giving the kilt a new life. Not only has MacIsaac shown collections in every Atlantic Fashion Week to date, but this Halifax-born designer is invited to every fashion week in North America, London Fashion Week, and has appeared in Vogue Italia and British Vogue. She has revealed collections in New York at Dress to Kilt and From Scotland With Love, prestigious events in the Scottish world showcasing other visionaries such as Vivienne Westwood and Alexander McQueen. Recently, she travelled to Oceanstone in Peggy’s Cove on a fashion retreat hosted by the influential Jeanne Beker, where she presented her work alongside other Halifax-established fashion labels. But, despite her worldwide success, this elite designer has not and will not let fame take priority. “It’s not a glamorous lifestyle; look at me,” points MacIsaac to her simple denim and zip up sweatshirt, hair in a messy bun. “The shows are all people want to hear about, but you have to come home and put on your sweatpants and make your own clothes. You have to be okay with this part; you can’t just do it two times a year to go out and wave at a crowd.”

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Evidently, MacIsaac proves that big egos don’t lead to success. It’s still under wraps, but MacIsaac exclusively told Line that she has big plans in the making, which will be officially revealed in the New Year. MacIsaac is currently working on a menswear and womenswear line, and will be teaming up with a prominent Nova Scotian businesswoman to create a new collection to be released in London in early February. Curious? You’ll have to stay tuned, because that’s all MacIsaac is spilling for now. So, if you want a staple in your wardrobe that is not just fashionable, but represents a piece of you and where you came from, I suggest you check out Veronica MacIsaac Apparel. She’s passionate, determined, and creative in redefining fashion with meaning. And, despite working in one of the most stressful industries in the world, she insists that she wouldn’t trade it for anything. “No matter how bleek things are, you have to keep working,” confirms the confident fashionista. “This is my life. I’ve never been happier, and I’ve never been so fulfilled.”

Models: Kevin Hull & Kristin Langille Dahl Clothing: Veronica MacIsaac Apparel Photographer: Brent McCombs, Alterego Photography Photography Assistant: Michelle Olsen Hair and Makeup: Elle Munster

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Photography: Brent McCombs Model: Highland dancer Tasha Reilkoff Hair: Cara MacInnis Styling Assistant: Sarah McKenna Location: Basel, Switzerland at Basler Münster Cathedral

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Reviving

DOWNTOWN Taking Halifax’s fashion boutiques to the next level

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SARAH SAWLER

his fall, Splurge Handbags, one of Halifax’s go-to boutiques for fashionable accessories, locked the door of their brick-and-mortar store for the last time, in favour of a new online store that’s set to launch this month. A fashion staple in the Spring Garden Road area for years, Splurge started with a location in Spring Garden Place, moved to Park Lane, and finally relocated to a storefront location on Brenton Street. According to owner Sarah deWolf, all of these moves were in response to a need for more square footage. But in 2008, the worsening economy began to take its toll and, after a few years, it simply wasn’t feasible to maintain the downtown store any longer. “It’s just too hard to run a store in downtown Halifax right now,” explained deWolf. “I’m sure it’s just in transition and will come back, but it’s too difficult to hang on until it does.”

Layla Boutique, HIM Boutique and Renaissance Clothing Company. Gordon Stevens, founder of I Love Local Halifax, paints an accurate picture: “When you step onto Spring Garden Road now, you look at your options and say ‘I don’t know where to shop.’ But a few years ago, it was ‘I don’t know which store to choose.’ It used to be that there was a lot of choice, but there really isn’t anymore.”

And Splurge isn’t unique. A number of downtown fashion boutiques have closed over the past year, including Pretty Things Boutique,

Trish Tacoma is the owner of Smoking Lily, which she founded in Victoria shortly after she began sewing silkscreened scarves in her spare

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When you ask retailers about running a store downtown, the complaints are almost universal. One of the most commonly cited challenges is competition with the big box meccas, Bayers Lake and Dartmouth Crossing. “I tried bring in things that were different from what you get from the big box stores,” says deWolf. “Some things were similar, but mine were better quality and the big box stores carried them six months to a year later than I would have.”

bedroom. After a summer of peddling her wares at an outdoor market, she found a small retail space in a prime area of the city and moved her shop indoors. That was eighteen years ago. She now has a second Smoking Lily in Vancouver, and another Victoria shop called Milkman’s Daughter. She feels lucky because, like Halifax, Victoria doesn’t have any big box fashion stores downtown. And, according to Tacoma, Victoria is thriving. Right now, Victoria’s downtown association is running a campaign that features signs on lampposts and parking metres that address common complaints about downtown. One example will sound familiar to Haligonians “Some of the signs address the complaints that there is no parking,” says Tacoma. “They point out exactly how many parking spots we do have.” And not only does Victoria have plenty of parking, the city has also taken the edge off the costs by offering an hour of free parking in city parkades with a stamp from a downtown retailer. Plus, all city-owned parking is free on

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Sunday—including the parkades. Unlike Tacoma, deWolf doesn’t seem to feel lucky to have avoided downtown big box competition. She believes that big box competition and parking issues have teamed up to draw shoppers out of the downtown core entirely. “Big box stores are setting up in business parks, where there’s ample free parking,” she says. “And now the office workers have moved out as well, because their companies are also taking larger, newer spaces in these business parks.” It’s not just the lure of endless parking lots and shiny new buildings taking offices out of downtown. When it comes to rent, offices are feeling the same crunch as the boutiques. Stevens thinks that downtown landlords need to take a closer look at what they’re trying to charge their tenants. “There are a lot of landlords with vacant spaces and an unrealistic expectation of rent,” he says. “They don’t seem to get that the businesses are struggling. It’s almost like they’re saying ‘The businesses are failing, but it’s not our fault. We’ll just get another tenant.’ But as you can see on Spring Garden road, the businesses aren’t coming.” He points to the The Trillium on South Park to support his argument: “It’s full because it’s cheaper. If our main shopping street is going to be desolate, the landlords need to take some responsibility for the viability of stores on that street.” But the rent problem isn’t unique to Halifax. Tacoma also cites rent as her biggest expense, next to labour. “I just spent a few months looking for a new studio space,” she says, “and I was really surprised by how many empty spaces there were, and how unwilling the landlords are to lower the rent. I don’t understand it.”

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Reviving Downtown (continued)

Bleak as this picture might seem, there are solutions. Right now, there’s a lot of talk about street level animation, with a focus on pedestrianizing specific streets. According to Stevens, New York has made huge sections of Broadway pedestrian-only, and despite an initial uproar from local businesses, their sales are now up 250%. The streets are packed with people, occupying the tables and chairs set up in the middle of the street. “Those people sit there, and they look at the stores across from them. Then they get up and go in,” says Stevens. “We need to make downtown fun and exciting, to draw people in.” There might also be a disconnect at the education level. Stevens feels that, when future fashion designers and artisans work through their chosen education program, it’s extremely

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important for them to complete a mandatory business component. “I don’t know how much of the business side is taught in school,” says Stevens, “but I get a sense that there’s not enough of it. There are industry norms that exist, and they exist because there’s a cost of doing business at every level. The people on the creative production side need to understand those norms before they start.” Above all, retailers need to understand the challenges that exist, and make educated, smart business decisions with those issues in mind. There are a few downtown Halifax boutiques who seem to have mastered those challenges, including Biscuit General Store, Wildflower Clothing and Sweet Pea Boutique. All three stores share a common trait: spectacular, personal customer service. “When you go

into Biscuit, you feel Wendy’s touch throughout the whole place,” says Stevens. “And I don’t think Wildflower has many customers who don’t know Jill by name.” Tacoma feels that research is key. She avoids waste by initially producing each new item on a very small scale— just four of each design. Then she sends them to her retail stores and waits for feedback. If the design falls flat, it doesn’t hurt her much, because she hasn’t invested a lot. And if it’s wildly popular, she can react quickly and go into full production. “Ultimately, it’s your business,” says Tacoma. “It has nothing to do with other people. You have to make sure that every cent you spend is smart and that you provide good customer service. And you should always make people feel like they’re at home.”

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WHERE TO BUY

WINNER OF OUR TAG YOUR STYLE HFX CONTEST Lauren Stevens

@lauren_nstevens @linemagazine @aleaxapopeind #stylehalifax Lauren won a #fashion not for the faint of heart shirt and a $25 GC from Alexa Pope www.alexapope.ca

Dress: Veronica MacIsaac Apparel, MacQueen Tartan Location: From Scotland with Love show, New York

shortpresents Pages 4-6 Klozet Clothing Boutique 1435 Mountain Road, Moncton, New Brunswick Page 7 LDM by Lisa Drader Murphy Historic Properties, 1869 Upper Water Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia Pages 8-11 Angela Grace Jewelry online www.angelagracejewelry.com Tori XO Various location nationwide including Lady Luck, Hydrostone 5519 Younge Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia or online http://store.torixo.com Page 12-13 Esme Original Jacket esme@ glinx.com. Check out their Facebook page for updates on their website, coming soon www.facebook.com/EsmeOriginalJacket.PamelaMatheson Pages 1419 Mills 5486 Spring Garden Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia House of Moda 5486 Spring Garden Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia or online houseofmoda.ca Overman 93 Water Street, Charlottetown, PEI, various locations throughout the Maritimes including Reneu Boutiqe 349 King Street, Fredericton, New Brunswick and P'Lovers, The Trillium, 1443 South Park Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Online www. overman.ca Clutch Culture Biscuit General Store, 1661 Argyle Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, www. etsy.com/ca/shop/ClutchCulture Wear Blair by Ashley Reading www.facebook. com/wearblair Diana Watts Clothing by Ashley Garland www.facebook.com/ DianaWattsFashion Cover & Cover Story Page 20-25 Veronica MacIsaac Apparel www.veronicamacisaac.com

Owner/Publisher

AMANDA KINCAID

Photo Editor

BRENT McCOMBS

Editors Creative Director

SARAH LYON LAURA FLETCHER

Advertising

sales@linemagazine.ca

Home sick today sporting some buffalo plaid and winter socks #halifaxstyle @linemagazinehali @alexapopeind #canadianblogger #canadianstyle #ootdhfx #ootd #cozy #sickday #fashionblogger #bestoftheday #halifaxfashion @oldnavy #onstyle #oldnavy #buffaloplaid #winteroutfits #style #blogger #contests

Jennifer Merlin @jennifermerlin 22 November I want to win some @alexapopeind stuff! @linemaghalifax #stylehalifax

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Sarah @SAPL 24 November I think my #stylehalifax is casual with a little pop! @linemaghalifax @alexapope pic.twitter. com/ZNtl6VrGT0

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Profile for Line Magazine

Line- Issue 4 Fall 2013  

Line is an Atlantic Canadian fashion magazine featuring local designers, shops, models and photographers that make up the fabric of the Atla...

Line- Issue 4 Fall 2013  

Line is an Atlantic Canadian fashion magazine featuring local designers, shops, models and photographers that make up the fabric of the Atla...

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