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PORTFOLIO selected works by Lindsey Leardi

M.ARCH 2016


RESEARCH COMMUNICATE

INNOVATE


TA BL E OF C O NTENTS


resumé 06 OLYMPIC COMMUNICATIONS 08 SUBMERGED 12 CROSSROAD NATION 20 BLUE EARTH FRAMEWORK 26 SPINE FABRICATION 32 DRAWINGS + PHOTOGRAPHS 36 TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE 42


NAME Lindsey Leardi WEBSITE lindseyleardi.com CONTACT lindseykeren@live.com 732 213 2168


EDUCATION

KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY I Manhattan, Kansas I 2011-2016 Master of Architecture, Minor: Mass Communications Related Coursework: Emotion in Architecture, City Planning, Environmental Communications, Fundamentals of Public Relations, Advanced News + Feature Writing Centro Studi CittĂ di Orvieto I Orvieto, Italy I Spring 2015 Related Coursework: Architecture + The Human Body, Italian Art History, Italian

EXPERIENCE

KURT J. LUDWIG, AIA I Milltown, New Jersey I 2013-2015 Architectural Field Assistant K-STATE COLLEGIAN I Manhattan, Kansas I 2014 Staff Writer

ENTERPRISE

GRADUATE STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Spring 2016 ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ADVISORY BOARD 2015-2016, President ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDENT ASSOCIATION 2011-2012, President WOMEN IN DESIGN Fall 2014, Event Coordinator AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS Spring 2012, Public Relations APDESIGN AMBASSADOR 2012-2016

EXPERTISE

AutoCAD; Revit; Rhinoceros 5; Grasshopper; Illustrator; InDesign; Photoshop; Website Design; Communication (written, verbal); Leadership; Management; Organization; Planning; Research


9th/10th SEMESTERS Fall 2015/Spring 2016

OLYMPIC COMMUNICATIONS Professor: Nathan Howe

Our studio evaluated the city of Vancouver for the 2028 Summer Olympics. The site we focused on for the Olympic Park was False Creek Flats, a primarily industrial, poverty stricken neighborhood, and an opportunity to redevelop an “eyesore� of the city. The master plan design was weaved together using parametric logic and goals for leaving a lasting legacy for the city. As project manager, my primary roles were to plan, oversee, and document all aspects of the design process. Other responsibilities in my bailiwick included: creating clear and attainable project objectives and requirements. parametricallydriven.wordpress.com


POETIC FORM IS NOT DEAD, YET FORM MUST BE BALANCED BY LOGIC. NATHAN HOWE


MPC CZ

IBC

PROGRAM

TOPOGRAPHY

THOROUGHFARE

MODULARITY

CONNECTIVITY

BUILDING UP

GREEN ROOF

ASSEMBLY 10

WORKSPACES

BROADCAST STUDIOS

BROADCAST STUDIOS


MAIN MEDIA COMPLEX

For my final semester at K-State I choose to design the Main Media Complex (84,000 m2), which is comprised of the International Broadcasting Centre (78%), the Main Press Center (15%), and a Commercial Zone (7%). Based on in-depth program and site analysis, the MMC design will need to consider the limitations of its context and

program while integrating parametric logic and achieving a healthy, flexible work environment in line with Vancouver’s Greenest City Action Plan. An aesthetic work environment can be achieved through the integration of site parameters and the influence of natural daylighting parameters.

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6th SEMESTER Spring 2014

SUBMERGED Professor: Gary J. Coates

Museums are an opportunity to celebrate especially meaningful circulation. In the spring of our third year, the one-artist museum project afforded my classmates and I the opportunity to delve into the mind of an unfamiliar artist, design an urban infill project, and visit our site in New York City. My project featured the dynamic underwater work of, internationally acclaimed sculptor, Jason DeCaires Taylor. Taylor’s underwater “living” installations are typically sitespecific, permanent works, designed to symbolize a, “striking symbiosis between man and nature.” As the environment takes hold of his works, they become impossible to replicate and assimilate to marine life.


VICCISITUDES 14


15


UP

UP

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


DN

UP

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN

DN

UP


WIND PORTAL

TURBULENT LINE

WAVE OCULUS

MARE UNDURUM


7th SEMESTER Fall 2014

CROSSROAD NATION Professor: Genevieve Baudoin My design for the Kansas City Crossroad’s public library features an elevated courtyard, bounded by a tension cabled green wall. By placing the courtyard on the second floor, observers are, “above the noise,” away from the street but visually connected to the public realm. Community spaces are housed on the ground floor, while quieter, private areas of the library reside above. This project incorporated the design of a concrete parking structure, and detailed technical drawings from schematic, development, to construction documentation, utilizing both digital and freehand drawing and modeling methods.


UP


THE LIBRARY IS A SPHERE WHOSE EXACT CENTRE IS ANY ONE OF ITS HEXAGONS AND WHOSE CIRCUMFERENCE IS INACCESSIBLE. JORGE LUIS BORGES, THE LIBRARY OF BABEL

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DRAINAGE PARAPET FLASHING TERRACOTTA TILES CONCRETE INSULATION

GLASS CURTAIN WALL BASIC GREEN WALL SYSTEM BASIC WALL PLANTS BASIC WALL DRIP LINE GROWTH MEDIUM FILTER FABRIC INSULATION HEATING WIRE DRAINAGE PIPE

GLASS CURTAIN WALL

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CONCRETE CONCRETE BOLT ALUMINUM BRACKET INSULATION BOLT ALUMINUM CARRIER TRACK TERRACOTTA TILE

CONCRETE CONCRETE BOLT ALUMINUM BRACKET INSULATION BOLT ALUMINUM CARRIER TRACK

TERRACOTTA TILE

PARAPET FLASHING CONCRETE BOLT INSULATION ALUMINUM BRACKET BOLT TERRACOTTA TILE 25


6th SEMESTER Spring 2014

B LUE E ART H FRAM EWO RK Professor: Gary J. Coates

The commission for this project was to design a pavilion that could potentially house the local farmers’ market and community events adjacent to Blue Earth Park in Manhattan, Kansas. A farmers market is sustainable. It is a step towards preserving everything, from the local economy to the health and prosperity of consumers, and, ultimately, the environment. My partner for the project, Gongyan Liu, and I wanted our design to reflect the persona of a farmers market through its materiality and selfsustainability.


FARMERS’ MARKET

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EVERYDAY LIFE


SPECIAL OCCASIONS

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9th/10th SEMESTERS Fall 2015/Spring 2016

SPINE FABRICATION Professor: Nathan Howe Our studio designed and fabricated SPINE, a parametric seating structure created out of a need for seating at Kansas State University’s College of Architecture Planning and Design’s temporary swing space, APD West. At the inception of the fall 2015 semester, KSU CAPD was relocated to APD West while their longestablished home, Seaton Hall, underwent reconstruction. Nathan Howe’s studio decided to tackle the lack of seating head on. Our success depended on teamwork, cooperation and our ability to problem solve.


CONCEPT

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LAYERS


FABRICATION

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DRAWINGS + PHOTOGRAPHY

DUOMO DI MILANO


DUOMO DI MILANO


FLORENCE, ITALY

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BRION CEMETARY


CASTELVECCHIO

BARCELONA

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WHEN WE TRAVEL, We experience a most facinating act of self-discovery. INSPIRED BY D.H. LAWRENCE

PONTE VECCHIO 40


CATTEDRALE DI SANTE MARIA DEL FIORE 41


ORDER [LITERATURE REVIEW]

TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE

Have you ever considered the order of things? People consider order on a daily basis. Whether it be the order of clothes, meals, what to do during the day, errands to run, emails to answer or workout routines. Order is ubiquitous. Not only is order unavoidable, but it has the ability to affect how people feel. Historically, order has obtained many meanings over the decades. The word order comes from ordin- (stem of ordō) which is Latin for row, rank or regular arrangement. Row originally referred to a row of threads in a loom versus the Italic root ord- which meant arrangement.1 When the Latin prefix dis- is added to order, the opposite meaning is conveyed. Dis- is a negative prefix meaning apart or away. Therefore, if order means arrangement, then disorder means, most literally, apart or away from arrangement.1 Over the course of time the meaning of architectural order has changed. Previously ordered architecture entailed the use of symmetry and universal proportions derived from nature and the human body. Today, architectural order isn’t always mathematical, sometimes it is simply perceived or sensed. However, the part of order that has not changed is that each individual piece must relate to one another and the entirety of the design. Order is the creative force that drives the form and, to achieve it, all architectural elements of the design must intentionally relate to one another and the whole. If order isn’t fully achieved or if the relations of ordered parts are implied but not provided, then disorder occurs. Disorder is not merely the nonexistence of order but rather, “discord between partial orders,” (Arnheim, 171). Within disorder there must be some sort of order. The frustration occurs when the ordered parts don’t relate to one another. The principle issue with disorder in architecture is not only the aesthetic aspect but


the clarity of the design that is lost. Arnheim’s solution for previously erected disorder is simply, “radical surgery or total destruction,” (Arnheim, 175).2 I lay claim that order and disorder have the ability to provoke a visceral response.

NEUROSCIENCE [SCIENTIFIC REVIEW]

“Architecture is a science arising out of many other sciences.” Vitruvius, 15 BC.3 An architect’s task, since at least the Greeks, imports the science of its day to create aesthetic experience4, where architecture becomes more than mere building, extending “into the mental and existential sphere of life.”5 Buildings mediate between the world and us, housing our delicate bodies and dreams, all while ordering life’s myriad situations and memories. The science of our day, neuroscience, teaches that atmosphere is the architect’s artistic medium. Expressed by Peter Zumthor as a “singular density and mood,” ambiance is attended to cognitively to be aesthetic by nature.6 For instance, in the ambiance of the Kimbell Art Museum. Here science and art agree, aesthetics is “sense perception,”7 a full body contact sport combining thinking and feeling. Architects and scientists can come to the conclusion that atmosphere is aesthetic by understanding: (1) Observers perceive atmosphere through mirror mechanisms;8 (2) Embodied simulation affords us an aesthetic experience; and (3) There is a neural link between aesthetic preference and emotion. Before embodiment stimulates our perception of atmosphere, visual processing occurs; peripheral vision clarifies context and central vision arouses meaning.9 The Mirror Neuron System (MNS) translates our observations into mental and physiological responses.8 Our imitation of the forms, action potentials and materials with our own bodies (brains) incites movement in atmosphere, suggested by imaging results.10

Embodied simulation evokes empathy, giving us an emotional connection with the atmosphere.11 The activation of biologically based embodied mechanisms grants us an aesthetic experience.10 Where a multilevel aesthetic experience activates sensorimotor, emotional and cognitive centers, allowing the beholder to perceive, feel, and sense architecture. An fMRI study by Di Dio et al. concludes a neural link between aesthetics and emotion, meaning the insula and amygdala, mediate aesthetic preference.11 Aesthetic atmosphere is the sensorial presence of a space activating sensorimotor, emotional, and cognitive mechanisms through embodied simulation. Neuroscience, then, brings to mind the interactions we have with our built environment as our ability to empathize. Through the science of today, atmosphere and aesthetic experience are not light weight concepts to be dismissed as art, but substantial sensorial experiences to be studied.


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IMAGES VICCISITUDES_Taylor, Jason DeCaires. “Viccisitudes.” Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor. Jason DeCaires Taylor, n.d. Web. WIND PORTAL; TURBULENT LINE; WAVE OCULUS; MARE UNDURUM_ Kahn, Ned. Ned Kahn Studios. Ned Kahn, n.d. Web.

FOOTNOTES 1. Merriam-Webster. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web.Stokols, Daniel. “Establishing and Maintaining Healthy Environments.” American Psychologist 47.1 (1992): 6-22. American Psychological Association, Inc. Web. 2. Arnheim, Rudolf. The Dynamics of Architectural Form. Berkeley: U of California, 1977. Print. 3. Pollio, Vitruvius, and M. H. Morgan. Vitruvius: The Ten Books on Architecture. New York: Dover Publications, 1960. Print. 4. Cinzia and Gallese define aesthetic experience as, ‘to perceive-feel-sense.’ Aesthetic experience is modulated by factors such as: context, individual interest(s), and prior knowledge or familiarity.14 5. Pallasmaa, Juhani. “Body, Mind, and Imagination: The Mental Essence of Architecture.” Mind in Architecture: Neuroscience, Embodiment, and the Future of Design. By Sarah Robinson and Juhani Pallasmaa. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT, 2015. 51-74. Print. Page 52 6. Zumthor, Peter. Atmospheres. Basel: Birkhäuser, 2006. Print. 7. Mallgrave, Harry Francis. “’Know Thyself’: Or What Designers Can Learn from the Contemporary Biological Sciences.” Mind in Architecture: Neuroscience, Embodiment, and the Future of Design. By Sarah Robinson and Juhani Pallasmaa. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT, 2015. 9-29. Print. 8. Gallese, Vittorio. “Empathy, Embodied Simulation, and the Brain: Commentary on Aragno and Ziff/Hartman,” Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 56, no. 3 (2008): 769. 9. Rooney, Kevin K., Lester C. Loschky, and Robert J. Condia. “Extended and Projected Embodiment.” Cognitive Processing - International Quarterly of Cognitive Science (Unpublished draft): 1-4. Print. 10. Mallgrave, Harry. “Emotion” and “Experiencing Architecture.” Architecture and Embodiment: The Implications of the New Sciences and Humanities for Design. New York, New York: Routledge, 2013. 89-164. Print. 11. Ebisch, Sjoerd J. H., Mauro G. Perrucci, Antonio Ferretti, Cosimo Del Gratta, Gian Luca Romani, and Vittorio Gallese. “The Sense of Touch: Embodied Simulation in a Visuotactile Mirroring Mechanism for Observed Animate or Inanimate Touch.” Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 20.9 (2008): 16111623. Print. 12. Freedberg, David, and Vittorio Gallese. “Motion, Emotion and Empathy in Esthetic Experience.” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11.5 (n.d.): 197-203. Web. 08 Sept. 2015. 13. Kahn, Louis. Kimbell Art Museum (Fort Worth). Digital image courtesy of authors. 14. Di Dio, Cinzia, and Vittorio Gallese. “Neuroaesthetics: a Review.” Current Opinion in Neurobiology 19 (2009): 682-687. Web. 29 Sept. 2015.

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thank you

for exploring selected works by Lindsey Leardi. For more visit: lindseyleardi.com


Graduate Architecture Portfolio//Lindsey Leardi  

An accumulation of design project by Lindsey Leardi from her time working on her Master of Architecture at Kansas State University.

Graduate Architecture Portfolio//Lindsey Leardi  

An accumulation of design project by Lindsey Leardi from her time working on her Master of Architecture at Kansas State University.

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