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CAREERS ///// INTERVIEWING ///// EMPLOYERS ///// RESUMES

Magazine Learn to Negotiate

LIKE A PRO

Is your

INTERNSHIP LEGAL?

12

Inside stories from former interns

Intern

PROBLEM SOLVING

TURN THAT INTERNSHIP INTO A

TOP 100 MOST POPULAR INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS

Fulltime Job

Off The Beaten Path Create a unique internship that you’ll love

Also: SUMMER INTERNSHIPS // SKYPE INTERVIEWS // VIRTUAL INTERNSHIPS


IF YOU COULD HAVE THE CHANCE TO WORK FOR ANY EMPLOYER IN THE WORLD, WHO WOULD IT BE? We want to hear from you. What companies would you be excited about

working for? How much money do you expect to make? What types of benefits make a company an ideal place to work? Don’t miss your chance to share your opinions and expectations about your future career. Be on the lookout for the 2013 CAREER BENCHMARK in December.

Turn to pages 14–15 to see the results of last year’s survey and see which companies students voted for the Top 100 internship rankings.

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LETTER from the EDITOR WETFEET MAGAZINE IS A MEDIA PROPERTY OF UNIVERSUM Universum's media portfolio also includes WetFeet.com, Universum Top 100 and UniversumTop100.com. Read more about Universum on universumusa.com Entire contents copyright 2012, Universum All rights reserved. UNIVERSUM 129 West 29th Street 5th floor New York, NY 10001 www.universumusa.com Phone: 917.793.0337 Fax: 215.546.4991 CEO Petter Nylander President, Americas Melissa Murray Bailey Global Director of Media Sanna Burman Production Manager Liza Andersin Editor Katharine Lynn Cover photo Christan Gustavsson Model Rabia Baloglu CONTRIBUTORS Pat Olsen Liz Seasholtz Lindsay J. Westley Copy Editor: Mike Liechty (www.toallagoodwrite.com) UNIVERSITY RELATIONS Christopher Campellone MARKETING, EVENTS, AND PR Jonas Barck Kristina Matthews SALES Karl-Johan Hasselstrom Camille Kelly Kortney Kutsop Vicki Lynn For information about advertising in Universum publications, please contact Jonas Barck, jonas.barck@universumusa.com Universum’s goal is to improve communication and understanding between employers and young professionals. Our annual Undergraduate, MBA, Diversity, and Young Professional surveys are answered by more than 400,000 people in 32 countries.

IT ’S AL L ABOUT INTE R NSH IPS As a recent college graduate, I can speak to the importance of internships and the vital role they play in the job search. I have had my share of internships over the years— some wonderful, others not so positive. What set the great experiences apart from the rest? I was given the opportunity to learn, figure out what I liked and what I didn’t like about an industry, and feel like I was contributing something valuable to my employer. As many of you have learned—or will learn—unpaid internships often seem like the only option in many industries. Unpaid internships are a hotly contested issue—on one hand, they provide students with the opportunity to learn, network, and pad their resumes; on the other hand, unpaid internships seem to take advantage of skilled, if inexperienced, students. Instead of debating the pros and cons of unpaid internships, we have decided to offer some tools and advice to help make the decision easier— read Negotiate Like a Pro on pages 8-9. We also wanted to introduce some new ideas to the concept of internships. If you’re not excited by the thought of spending your summer in an office, turn to Do It Yourself on pages 6-7 to learn how you can craft your own unique internship experience based on your hobbies and interests. Or, turn to page 12 to hear the pros and cons of going totally digital in Virtual Internships. Although summer feels like a long way away, it’s never too early to start planning ahead! Read Summer Internships on page 7 to learn what important steps you should be taking throughout the winter to ensure that you make the most of your summer. And turn to Internship as Interview on pages 10-11 to learn what you can do to increase your chances of returning to a company as a fulltime employee. Universum’s Top 100 Internship Rankings (pages 14-15) for a sneak peak at what your fellow students have to say about their ideal internship employers. We’ve also talked to 12 employees at these top companies for their insights about what it’s really like to work at these companies and how their experiences as interns got them to where they are today. Internships should be a give and take – interns should not be considered free labor and should be compensated in some way, but they should also be given the chance to do work that is beneficial to the company. We hope that with these tips and tricks we’ve provided, you’ll find an internship that works for you. Katharine Lynn

Editor

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The 2013 Student Application is now live! The deadline is 5 pm EST on December 15, 2012 Learn more about MAIP and nd the application at

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TABLE of CONTENTS

DO IT YOURSELF: THE HOW-TO GUIDE TO CREATING YOUR OWN INTERNSHIP PAGE 6-7 PAGE 7 SUMMER INTERNSHIPS: WHAT YOU CAN DO NOW

NEGOTIATE LIKE A PRO PAGE 8-9

OVERCOMING TOP INTERN CHALLENGES PAGE 9 PAGE 10-11 INTERNSHIP AS INTERVIEW

IS YOUR UNPAID INTERNSHIP LEGAL? PAGE 11

VIRTUAL INTERNSHIPS: THE PROS AND CONS PAGE 12

SECRETS TO SUCCESS: INTERN TO FULLTIME IN NO TIME

THE DOS AND DON’TS OF SKYPE INTERVIEWS PAGE 12 PAGE 14-15 TOP 100 INTERNSHIP RANKINGS

12 INSIDE STORIES FROM FORMER INTERNS PAGE 16-29

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DO IT YOURSELF

THE HOW-TO GUIDE TO CREATING YOUR OWN INTERNSHIP By Lindsay J. Westley

F

etching coffee and photocopying documents during the summer? No thanks, say the students who elect instead to hobnob with shrunken heads and six-legged cows as interns at Ripley’s Believe it Or Not! in New York City. Others prefer the crumbling walls and eerie echoes at Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia, whose prison gates open wide to admit interns — as long as you don’t mind sharing your cubicle with the ghosts of inmates past. But if shrunken heads and haunted prisons aren’t your thing and you’re less than excited about shuffling papers all day, there’s another alternative: Create your own internship. “It’s not an entirely new concept,” says Yair Riemer, vice president of global marketing at TweetMyJobs and Internships.com, “but it’s one that requires the confidence to 6

MAGAZINE | FALL 2012

target specific companies where internships don’t currently exist. You have to have a high level of curiosity, good research skills, and the confidence to pitch your ideas.” Mark Babbitt, CEO and founder of YouTern, a resource for connecting young talent to mentors and internships, agrees. “It all starts with confidence and the willingness to hustle,” he says. “Employers might not want to bother with posting a job description and going through the motions of hiring — but that doesn’t mean companies aren’t looking for interns. If you can present a convincing argument for why a company needs your specific skill set, you’re likely to be successful.” Creating your own internship isn’t as easy as calling up the CEO of your favorite company, though — and in many ways, crafting your own summer job is a lot harder than fitting into an existing position. You have to be

self-motivated, organized, and have a realistic view of the skills you can offer to a company before presenting yourself as the best intern they never knew they needed. It all starts with a plan, say Babbitt and Riemer, who offered a few helpful guidelines for crafting your own rocking internship for this summer. (Hint: Start thinking about it now!)

RESEARCH…YOURSELF Now is a great time to honestly evaluate your strengths and weaknesses to see where you’d be a good fit. “Most of us are very good at what we truly like, so maybe start there,” advises Babbitt. “You want to really know what you can offer a company before you approach them.” Standardized personality tests can help you with the basics, but nothing beats a good healthy interest for a particular industry or brand. WETFEET.COM


“Be prepared to answer those types of questions, and even if you can’t solve every problem, think about what skills you could offer to help out the higher-ups so they can address even bigger problems”

SUMMER INTERNSHIPS:

WHAT YOU CAN DO NOW By: Liz Seasholtz

LET’S FACE IT: This time of year, your sum-

mer vocation is not top of mind—there are holiday cookies to be eaten and sales to be shopped. But there are some steps you can take now to be prepared in advance of those looming spring application deadlines. TALK UP YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS ON PAST INTERNSHIPS. While you’re enjoying their

RESEARCH THE COMPANY Dig in deep to really get a handle on what your dream company actually does and believes. “If you only read the ‘about us’ section, you’re only seeing what the company wants you to know about them,” Babbitt says. “Track social media if you want to get a handle on their branding and to see how they really treat people. Pay attention to the company’s mission, and try to figure out its strengths and weaknesses. If you can figure out how you can help solve a problem they’re having, you’ll have a great advantage.”

REACH OUT If you managed to score a meeting with the HR director with one phone call, great. If not, “reach out to a specific department and ask if you can meet with the head of the department,” advises Riemer. “Also, call after hours. The people who make the decisions are still there after 5:30, but the barriers are down since the staff on hand to answer the phones have usually gone home.” If you’re not sure what kind of reception you’ll get if you pitch a job description right off the bat, try asking for an informational interview. Once you’re in the door, ask your interviewer questions — don’t assume you’re there because he or she wants to hear all about your life. “A CEO doesn’t need to learn from your experience — they’ve been there, done that,” says Riemer. “Most people love to talk about what they do, particularly if they’re really pasWETFEET.COM

sionate about their job. Ask them for advice and how they landed in their current position, and most people will be happy to oblige.”

GO IN WITH A PLAN Now that you’re sitting across from the CEO, how are you going to help solve the company’s biggest problem through your internship? “Be prepared to answer those types of questions, and even if you can’t solve every problem, think about what skills you could offer to help out the higher-ups so they can address even bigger problems,” Babbitt says. Maybe that means spending 15 hours per week manning the social media channels so that the VP has more time to work on strategy. “Think about it in terms of providing an answer to the CEO’s silent question, which is ‘what’s in it for me?’”

PUT IT DOWN ON PAPER For the sake of everyone involved, don’t anchor your summer internship on a handshake and a smile. “Write it all down,” advises Babbitt. “Write down what you’ll be doing, for how long, during what hours, and most of all, your expectations and what you both hope to get out of the internship. Do this before you talk about hours or pay so that you can set expectations for your employer and for you. It doesn’t have to be a formal contract, but if you have an outline written down, you’ll have a template to keep everyone happy.”

company this December, see if there’s any career advice to be reaped. If your high school friend landed an awesome internship at an ad agency last summer, ask for advice of how you can follow suit. UPDATE (OR WRITE) YOUR RESUME. Take the

time to make sure your resume is up to date and ready for career center reviewing this spring. RESEARCH, RESEARCH, RESEARCH. A lot of

companies have internships but don’t post them on mass job boards. Research companies in your area and go to their individual job websites to learn about their summer internship opportunities. Create a bookmark list of companies so you’re ready to apply in the spring. MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR CAREER FAIRS. Your

school’s career center posts this information well in advance of the actual date. Make a note in your Google calendar. RETHINK SOCIAL MEDIA. We know, you’ve

heard it before: clean up your online presence. But in addition to taking down the beer pong photos, start following potential employers and their HR departments on Twitter and Facebook. You’ll gain valuable company-specific talking points for future interviews—not to mention, they may share interview tips and remind you of application deadlines. FALL 2012 | MAGAZINE

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NEGOTIATE LIKE A PRO

Unpaid internships are often seen as valuable work experience and resume fodder, but they aren’t the only option. Here are some valuable tips and tricks for talking your way into a paid internship.

cates fierce negotiation. Here are some of her top tips for negotiating when you’re staring down the barrel of an unpaid internship:

By Lindsay J. Westley

1. ASK DIAGNOSTIC QUESTIONS:

THIS IS IT: You’re wearing your best suit, your

palms have finally stopped sweating, and you’ve answered all of your interviewer’s questions to the best of your ability. “Congratulations!” your interviewer says. “We’d love to hire you as our intern this summer. By the way, you know the internship is unpaid, right?” Now what? Do you grab your resume and bolt? Swallow your expectations and look forward to an austere summer filled with brown-bag lunches and (hopefully) meaningful work? Or do you take a deep breath and prepare to negotiate? Victoria Pynchon, cofounder and principal of She Negotiates Consulting and Training, has one word for you: Negotiate. A lawyer, mediator, speaker and writer, Pynchon coauthors a popular Forbes.com blog titled “She Negotiates,” and is a fierce advocate for informed debate via her blog and a Twitter feed called simply @PayGenY. “You should never have to work for free,” Pynchon says. “You’re already carrying the 8

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greatest educational burden of anyone in history, so we should not expect you to pay for your on-the-job training.” THERE ARE EXCEPTIONS to the rule though, says

Lauren Stiller Rikleen, executive-in-residence at Boston College Center for Work & Family, and founder of the Rikleen Institute for Strategic Leadership. “If you’re after a position in a highly competitive job market with few jobs, internships are a chance to develop relationships and stand out from your peers,” she notes. “Sometimes it’s worth it if you can clearly see that the educational benefits are significant, or if you just wouldn’t get that kind of experience elsewhere.” Pynchon agrees, and advises that certain organizations, like not-for-profits or very small companies, may not have the resources to pay interns. For companies solidly in the black though—some of which have been known to bill interns’ hours to clients while paying the intern nothing—Pynchon advo-

When you go in for your interview, ask openended questions about how you can be put to the best possible use at that company. If you know they’re looking for specific skills, like Photoshop or SEO savvy, then you’re better equipped to sell your own skills — and the reasons why you deserve to be paid. 2. BELIEVE IN YOUR UNIQUENESS:

Pynchon says that you may have the same degree as thousands of other candidates, but that those candidates don’t have your qualities or your unique talents. “Everyone who is granted an interview will be qualified,” she says. “They wouldn’t be there for an interview if they weren’t. So figure out what your unique talents are, and play them up.” 3. BE LIKEABLE:

It might seem impossible to be friends with a person you’ve just met, but Pynchon says it’s easier than you think: Just turn the tables. You think an interview is all about you? You’re wrong, she says. “Be interested in your interviewer. Ask him or her a million WETFEET.COM


EG GE E

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

TOP INTERN CHALLENGES 

What happens when your internship doesn’t quite live up to your expectations? Don’t feel like your only option is to spend your summer miserable— here are three common internship hurdles and ways to overcome them. NOT ENOUGH WORK

Part of the reason you took the internship in the first place was to gain valuable work experience, so it can be extremely frustrating when you aren’t getting that – especially if you aren’t being paid! Interns are often faced with the problem of not having enough work, or being given “busy work” that doesn’t really add value to the company.

questions. Everyone needs something—that’s why they’re advertising for this position—so ask about the company’s biggest challenges, and then figure out how you can make that person’s life easier by alleviating that stress.” 4. DO YOUR RESEARCH:

Most negotiators advise you to never name the first number. Pynchon disagrees. “When you know what you’re worth, you can anchor high and start the conversation,” she says. “Look at glassdoor.com. Look at salary.com. Tell your interviewer, ‘It’s my understanding that the market value for this job is $X.’ Then aim high.” She recommends starting three moves ahead of where you want to end up—so if you want to make $20/hour, give $25/hour as your opening number. Your interviewer will likely counteroffer $15 and you can meet in the middle at $20, both feeling like you’ve come out on top. Few people feel comfortable practicing the art of negotiation, but faced with the alternative—months of unpaid work that may or may not pay off with intangible benefits—it’s worth a shot. The worst thing that can happen is to have your interviewer say no, and if that happens, you can either weigh up the intangibles, or walk away from the bargaining table with self-respect intact, ready for the next round. WETFEET.COM

BE PROACTIVE. If you find that you’re finishing projects before lunchtime, don’t spend the rest of your day on Facebook – speak up! There are most likely projects that you could be doing, and your employer might be grateful for the help. Better yet, if there is a specific department you’re interested in, grab lunch with a colleague from that department and ask about what projects she’s working on. Schedule a meeting with your boss and share your interest in helping with some of those projects—your supervisor may appreciate the initiative and you’ll be able to do work you enjoy. Just be careful about what you consider “busy work” – there’s a difference between work that is clearly meant to keep you busy, and necessary (albeit boring) tasks that are both beneficial to the company and that are part of your job description.

NOT ENOUGH DIRECTION What if you get an assignment from your supervisor that is completely unclear – you don’t want to be annoying or get in anyone’s way, but you also have no idea what you’re doing! Do you call up your boss for what feels like the tenth time to clarify the assignment, or try to figure it out on your own?  DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK QUESTIONS. Sometimes it’s easy for supervisors to forget that you’re new to the industry, but it’s really important to reach out for help when you need it. Your employer will understand that

you’re not an expert, especially if you’re starting a brand new project. Just about any employer would rather answer questions during the process than have to clean up the results of a mistake that could have been avoided. The only kinds of questions that will irritate employers are ones that have already been answered – so pay attention and take notes the first time to avoid making your boss repeat herself!

NOT ENOUGH FEEDBACK

It has been a few weeks, you have just the right amount of work, and don’t have any specific questions about any projects you’re working on—but you have had no feedback from your supervisor, good or bad. You really want to know if there is something you can improve upon, but you have no idea how you’re really doing – do you keep quiet and assume that no news is good news?

 FIND A MENTOR AND SET UP WEEKLY MEETINGS. The best way to get feedback is to actively seek it – set up weekly meetings with your supervisor so you can check in and make sure your expectations are aligned. Ask for feedback and ways you can improve your work. Not only will this alleviate some stress and frustration on your part, but your supervisor will also appreciate your conscientiousness. Send a recurring calendar invite so that the meeting is always in both of your calendars— this way, it won’t feel like you’re bothering your boss when you do need to talk. MANY OF THESE scenarios can be avoided by tak-

ing simple steps before you start your internship to ensure that you and your employer are on the same page – communicating what you hope to gain from the internship, as well as what sort of skills you can offer and what kind of projects you’ll be working on, will make a huge difference in your experience. FALL 2012 | MAGAZINE

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INTERNSHIP AS INTERVIEW Turn that internship into a full-time job! Follow these tips to make the most of your summer experience and increase your chances of returning as a full-time employee. By Pat Olsen

C

ongratulations! You’ve nabbed an internship. Your preparation and hard work paid off. But if you think you can rest on your laurels now, think again. You need to be just as savvy during your internship as you were in obtaining it. Lauren Berger, 20-something author of ­ All Work, No Pay: Finding an Internship, Building Your Resume, Making Connections, and Gaining Job Experience, calls herself The Intern Queen. And rightfully so—Berger had 15 of them during college. She says in her book that an internship is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and that you should use it as a springboard to your future. We talked to a variety of career experts about how to make the most of your internship. Here is their insight and advice:

The New Jersey Star-Ledger and founder of employability-expert.com. “Attitude is critical,” according to Miller. Most interns are qualified to actually do the work, because they self-select into areas for which they are qualified and because employers select interns they might want to employ. So, Miller continues, what makes the difference in who gets hired is how you approach the position. Miller recommends that you demonstrate a positive ‘can-do’ attitude by: 1) doing outstanding work, 2) going out of your way to look for work by asking individuals if they need help, 3) coming in early and staying late when people are working under a deadline, 4) showing curiosity by asking questions, without becoming a pest and 5) smiling and always being positive.

What should interns remember above all else? When you started college, you may have heard that “showing up”—attending class— is the number one item crucial to success. When it comes to an internship, it’s attitude, hands down, says Lee E. Miller, career columnist for

What can an intern do to start on the right foot? Author Berger recommends that you make sure everyone in your department knows who you are. (If that’s not realistic, at least try for those people who are relevant to your position.) Further, if someone doesn’t take

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you around the office and introduce you, take yourself around. And start keeping track of people you might consider professional contacts. Connie Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, cofounder of career coaching and consulting firm SixFigureStart®, suggests you get to know your colleagues by asking simple, open-ended questions like: “How did you get your start here?” and “What are the two or three critical skills you need to succeed here?” Also, get to know people in departments that your department depends on or feeds information to. “If no permanent openings are available in your department, perhaps there will be openings in a related group,” she adds. Her final tip? “If you’re shy, put a candy dish on your desk. You’ll make many friends in the office – especially after 3:30 p.m.” If an intern really wants to be proactive, what else can he or she do? Don Asher, author of Cracking the Hidden Job Market and The Overnight Resume, recommends that you find out how many prior interns were offered a permanent job at the organization. “If the answer is zero, then you are being exploited. You can keep going to work if you want, but more importantly, you should start looking for another internship WETFEET.COM


IS YOUR UNPAID INTERNSHIP LEGAL? Ask Yourself These 5 Questions By: Liz Seasholtz

UNPAID INTERNSHIPS seem like a win-win:

The employers get free labor and the interns get work experience and a glossy title to add to their resumes. But unfortunately, many unpaid internships end up being legally questionable: Interns walk away without a paycheck and without any new skills. Before you start your unpaid internship, ask yourself these 5 questions to test whether or not your internship is up to Uncle Sam’s (and the Department of Labor’s) standards. 1. DOES YOUR INTERNSHIP HAVE AN EDUCATIONAL COMPONENT? You won’t be sitting in a

lecture hall and learning Workplace Lessons 101, but you should receive training and learn transferrable skills that you can use in future jobs. At the start of the internship your employer should outline goals and projects for your summer.

or a job. If you get something better, walk out the door the minute you find it. You don’t owe that organization anything,” he says. Don’t stop at simply finding out how many former interns were hired, he continues. If some interns were hired and others weren’t, sit down with your boss and pose the following: “I want to be one of the interns who is offered a permanent position with you. What do I need to do to make you comfortable advocating that I am one who is hired permanently?” Then, whatever your boss specifies, do it. “There is nothing wrong with making your ambition known,” he says, “especially when your ambition is to turn an internship into a job.” What’s a big mistake some interns make? Expecting the employer to spoon-feed them. If you want to get hired, you need to show initiative, advises Miller. “Most employers don’t have time to spend with interns unless they are adding value to the organization, which is why some students are disappointed with their internships. So you need to seek out opportunities to demonstrate your potential value to the organization through the work you do.” Are there steps an intern should take as the internship ends? SixFigureStart® executive ThanasoulisCerrachio suggests that you gather contact information to use when following up. “During your last week, ensure you have WETFEET.COM

everyone’s email address by forwarding the addresses to your personal email and putting them in a folder identifying the company,” she explains. She has found that many interns fail to do this and have no way to follow up. Send an email thanking your main contacts for their help and let them know you’d like to stay in touch. Thirty days after you leave, send an email updating the group on your progress at school, she adds. Follow up during the year by sending articles of interest, holiday greetings, and the like. But as Miller says, don’t overdo it. Author Asher cites three takeaways you should shoot for. “You want a job offer, a letter of recommendation for your files, and evidence of a signature accomplishment—a project or work product you can point to and say, ‘I did that’,” he offers. What if you don’t have a job offer when you leave? Candidates should always remain optimistic, insists Thanasoulis-Cerrachio. People will remember if you turn sour or are disgruntled. “Things may work out a year later, or five years later, when you’re already employed and making a good income. Networking is about establishing long term, mutually beneficial relationships of give and take, with the emphasis on the give. So look at every contact with a very long time horizon versus a short one that is dependent upon you getting what you want.”

2. A RE YOU REPLACING A POSITION NORMALLY FILLED BY A FULLTIME EMPLOYEE? If so, this

is a big red flag that the internship is illegal. For example, if an employer uses interns as substitutes for fulltime workers during a busy season, the interns need to be paid. 3. W ILL YOU WORK CLOSELY WITH A SUPERVISOR AND LEARN FROM OTHER EMPLOYEES? You

should have a defined supervisor and receive more direction than fulltime employees. If you’re going to spend your days isolated in a cubicle, that’s a problem. 4. IS THE INTERNSHIP MORE BENEFICIAL TO YOU OR THE COMPANY? The answer should

be you! Of course you’ll be helping around the office, completing projects, and participating in meetings, but at the end of the day the employer is getting free labor—and you should be getting industry exposure, learning new skills, and completing projects to add to your resume. 5. A RE YOU GUARANTEED A JOB AT THE END OF THE INTERNSHIP? Surprisingly, you

should not be. The focus should be on learning, not on grooming you to be a full-time employee. Also make sure your unpaid internship has a fixed duration—you don’t want to still be the unpaid intern come next Thanksgiving. FALL 2012 | MAGAZINE

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I am still waiting on the final color for the folder but could you we liked the messaging with 3 lines, could the font size be the same as black folder one, (so smaller). THE DOS AND DON’TS OF SKYPE INTERVIEWS

What to Know When You’re Interviewing Online WHETHER OR NOT you’re applying for a remote

position, more and more companies are interviewing candidates online. Not quite phone interviews, but not in-person interviews either, digital interviews require a few unique tricks in order to ensure success:

VIRTUAL INTERNSHIPS THE PROS AND CONS Interning-from-home is on the rise, but it’s not the best option for every student. Here’s what to consider before you apply. By Liz Seasholtz

AS THE WORKPLACE continues to become more flexible and advances in technology allow for telecommuting ease, the demand for virtual interns is growing. According to SmarterTechnology.com, intern search engines are reporting huge increases in the number of virtual internship postings. Urban Interns, for instance, says 40 percent of their listings are remote positions. We checked in with Heather Huhman, career advice blogger, contributor and columnist, plus author of Lies, Damned Lies and Internships: The Truth About Getting From Classroom to Cubicle, about whether the workfrom-home internship is all it’s cracked up to be. Here’s the breakdown: PRO: No geographical limitations. Most remote

internships can be performed anywhere with an internet connection. So if most positions in your industry are in New York but you can’t afford New York rent, virtual interning can solve your problem.

world. By telecommuting, you’ll miss out on learning cultural norms at the office—like water cooler talk, eating in the lunchroom, and what to do when you run into the CEO in the hall. PRO: Flexibility. Most virtual internships are

not 9-to-5 gigs, so you can fit them into your schedule. “Many young professionals are also taking on large course loads, working parttime jobs, and involved in numerous clubs and student organizations,” says Huhman. “It makes commuting to an internship difficult, if not impossible.” CON: Increased accountability. Just like

students think online courses are “easier” than traditional classes, remote internships may seem like an easy option. But you need to have a strong work ethic and sense of accountability—just because you’re working from home doesn’t mean you can slack off. PRO: Comfort. You can work in your slippers.

CON: Increased competition. Huhman says

Enough said.

because there are no geographical boundaries, there’s going to be a nationwide pool of applicants for the job.

CON: No collegiality. Not being in an office

PRO: No commute. Commuting can be a

hassle—not to mention a big expense. CON: No chance to learn office etiquette. Part

of what makes internships so great is they are often a student’s first foray in the working 12

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means you can miss out on the opportunity to build your network, not to mention Friday happy hours. “In the office, you’re often forced to interact with different people because you see them on a regular basis,” says Huhman. Working online you’ll have to make a special effort to stay connected and form relationships.

DON’T SHOW UP IN SWEATPANTS It may be tempting to assume that you can dress extra casually because your interviewer can only see above the shoulders, but it’s important to make sure your clothes are interview-appropriate. Not only will you get into the right mindset, but you’ll also be prepared if you need to get up and walk across the room during the call. CREATE A PROFESSIONAL ATMOSPHERE… Your interviewer does not want to see your unmade bed or messy bookshelf in the background. Even if you don’t have an office at home, it’s important to create an atmosphere that is quiet, professional, and won’t distract from your interview. Test several spots using the camera on your computer until you find a blank wall or neutral background. …AND DON’T FORGET TO ADJUST THE LIGHTING Make sure that your light source is in front of you, not behind you—otherwise, your interviewer will only be able to see your silhouette. DO A TEST RUN Don’t make the mistake of learning that your computer’s microphone is broken two minutes before your interview – always test your camera, microphone, and Internet connection well before your scheduled call. Add your interviewer to your contact list before the interview, so you’re not scrambling at the last minute. LOOK INTO THE CAMERA On Skype, it’s very common to look at the person you’re talking to on the computer screen, rather than directly into the camera— in fact, it feels very unnatural to look into the camera when someone on screen is speaking to you. Do your best to avoid to temptation to watch the screen. Although you know you are listening to and looking at your interviewer, it may seem to him as though you are gazing distractedly at something else. ELIMINATE ONLINE DISTRACTIONS It can sometimes be very tempting to multitask online, but your interview should not be one of those times. Close any window that isn’t related to your interview so you aren’t distracted. It may also be a good idea to set your Skype account to invisible once the interview starts, so you don’t receive other messages. WETFEET.COM


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1h

I just helped a student realize he can be what he thought he couldn’t. Best status update ever. #makebetterhappen WETFEET.COM

FALL 2012 | MAGAZINE

13


1 GOOGLE

TOP 100

INTERNSHIPS

2

WALT DISNEY COMPANY

3

GOLDMAN SACHS

4

ERNST & YOUNG

5 DELOITTE 6 APPLE 7 PWC 8 NASA 9 BOEING 10

J.P. MORGAN

11 FBI Internships have become an integral component of the job search. Not only do they offer glimpses into various industries and companies, but they also provide invaluable opportunities to build skills and network with industry experts. Students are focusing more and more on finding the perfect internship, perhaps with the hope that it will lead to the perfect job.

12 MICROSOFT 13

PROCTER & GAMBLE

14

KPMG LLP

15

GENERAL ELECTRIC

16

MAYO CLINIC

17 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE

L

ast year, Universum surveyed nearly 60,000 undergraduate students from more than 320 universities across the country. These students shared their opinions about their career goals, salary expectations, and ideal employers and internship programs. It probably comes as no surprise that Google once again tops the list of the Top 100 Internships. The company is widely known for putting a strong focus on innovation and work/life balance, both of which align seamlessly with today’s students’ career interests. Walt Disney Company took the second-place spot, followed by Goldman Sachs. Ernst & Young and Deloitte rounded out the top five best internships. These companies represent a variety of industries, so what is it about them that make their internship programs so attractive to today’s students? Is it the op14

MAGAZINE | FALL 2012

portunity to do real, meaningful work and contribute value to an organization? Or is it the flexibility to balance the need for work experience with the demands of a busy student schedule? Perhaps it’s about the networking opportunities that are offered, or the hope that an internship might lead to a fulltime position. We have interviewed employees to answer these questions: What makes these companies attractive, and why? What is it really like to intern and work at some of these top companies? Most of these employees were students not too long ago, and they have valuable insights and advice to share. As you flip through the following pages, you’ll hear from people who could be your future colleagues—listen to their stories, hear about what they liked and what they didn’t, and learn what you can do to help further your own careers.

18 CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 19 TEACH FOR AMERICA 20

UNITED NATIONS

21 NIKE 22

PEACE CORPS

23 JOHNSON & JOHNSON 24 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 25 TARGET

WETFEET.COM


26 LOCKHEED MARTIN CORPORATION

49 NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY (NSA)

27 EXXON MOBIL CORPORATION

50 GENENTECH

28 THE COCA-COLA CO. 29 FACEBOOK 30 INTEL 31 CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL 32 BANK OF AMERICA MERRILL LYNCH 33 IBM 34 NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL 35 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) 36 MCKINSEY & COMPANY 37

MORGAN STANLEY

38 MARRIOTT 39

DOW CHEMICAL

40 D.O.D. 41 CONOCOPHILLIPS 42 THE BOSTON CONSULTING GROUP

51 FORD MOTOR COMPANY 52 PFIZER 53 AMAZON 54

GENERAL MOTORS

55 SOUTHWEST AIRLINES 56

MERCK & CO.

57

CATERPILLAR INC.

58 ACCENTURE 59 LILLY 60

DELTA AIRLINES

75

KRAFT FOODS

76 ABBOTT 77 WELLS FARGO & COMPANY 78 RAYTHEON COMPANY 79

BLOOMBERG L.P.

80 DUPONT 81 TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 82 AT&T 83 STARBUCKS 84 UNDER ARMOUR, INC. 85 GRANT THORNTON LLP 86 CERNER CORPORATION 61 SONY

87 THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP

62 PEPSICO

88

NESTLÉ USA

63 CITI

89

U.S. NAVY

64

U.S. ARMY

90 KOHL’S

65

JOHN DEERE

91 MONSANTO

66 CARGILL

92 WALMART

67

93 GLAXOSMITHKLINE

MACY’S INC.

68 TURNER CONSTRUCTION

94 HYATT HOTELS & RESORTS

43 BMW

69 SIEMENS

95 COACH

44 AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

70 NORTHROP GRUMMAN

96

45 SHELL OIL COMPANY

71

97 UBS

46 BP

72 ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAR

98

47 CHEVRON CORPORATION

73 3M

99 VERIZON

48

74

100 L’ORÉAL

WETFEET.COM

BAIN & COMPANY

GENERAL MILLS

U.S. AIR FORCE

CISCO SYSTEMS

LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE

FALL 2012 | MAGAZINE

15


TABEL OF CONTENT

| INTERNSHIP | The following employees have offered a rare inside look at what it’s really like to work at their respective companies. Wetfeet would like to thank them for sharing their stories.

DELOITTE, PAGE 17 JUAN BETANCOURT GENERAL ELECTRIC, PAGE 18-19 RODOLFO “RUDY” CHAVEZ AND JUSTIN BEHYMER LIBERTY MUTUAL INSURANCE, PAGE 20 TARYN SMITH MASTERCARD, PAGE 21 JARRETT NORTHINGTON ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND, PAGE 22 KELLY STEELE TOYS“R”US, INC., PAGE 23 LETICIA “LETY” ALEJANDREZ STATE FARM, PAGE 24-25 NEIL JACKSON UBS, PAGE 26-29 JANELLE ADAMS, DEVON DOBSON, SEUN OLU-AYENI AND CHARLOTTE REVOL

16

MAGAZINE | FALL 2012

WETFEET.COM


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

| INTERNSHIP

Deloitte

photo: Jeff Fitlow

“I learned something new every day as an intern at Deloitte. The program really exceeded all of my expectations.”

Key Facts

A

s the first person in his family to go to college, Juan Betancourt did not spend his college years actively searching for a job – he was more focused on getting good grades and working full time to pay for school. The beginning of Juan’s career at Deloitte was largely a result of outstanding academic performance and a little bit of luck. “It came as an accident,” Juan explains. “But it was the type of accident that changed my life!” He joined Deloitte as an intern and has been with the organization since. Q How did you become involved in the

internship program? A

In the spring of 2008, Deloitte coordinated with HACU (Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities) to recruit five top-performing Hispanic students across the U.S. as part of a diversity initiative. I was one of those students, so I interviewed for the internship and accepted the position. Q What surprised you when you started?

A I was surprised by how much Deloitte cares about its people. There is a familylike atmosphere that makes employees feel welcome from the moment they walk in the door. I was also impressed by the level of responsibility that new hires are given; it really helps our professionals develop skills and build confidence quickly. Q Did the internship program live up to

your expectations?

A I was really blown away by the program. In college, I never thought

Juan Betancourt

• Position: Tax Senior, Deloitte Tax LLP • Education: University of Houston, Business Administration: Accounting, 2009

I’d end up working for one of the top professional services organizations in the United States, but my experience as an intern exceeded any expectations I may have had. I was able to work on a vast array of projects and learned something new every day during the program, which helped immensely when I returned to Deloitte full time. Q What are the opportunities for

advancement at Deloitte?

A Deloitte has a high-performance, high-rewards approach to advancement. People who want to go the extra mile are encouraged to do so. There are programs in place that allow you to challenge yourself, develop new skills, and excel in the organization.

Q Are there any myths about Deloitte?

A I think the biggest misconception about Deloitte, and public accounting in general, is that employees are human calculators who spend all day crunching numbers. In reality, success at Deloitte involves an acute awareness of the human side of business. A large part of the work we do involves managing relationships with clients and colleagues. I've met some of the finest people I know at Deloitte, and they are far from the “bean counter” stereotype. Q What is the office culture like?

Deloitte is one of the leading professional services organizations in the U.S., specializing in audit, tax, consulting, and financial advisory services with clients in more than 20 industries. We provide powerful business solutions to some of the world’s most wellknown and respected companies, including more than 75 percent of the Fortune 100. Employees: More than 51,000

There is a strong sense of camaraderie and teamwork at Deloitte that makes all of the hard work really enjoyable. This collegial environment extends beyond project work – the strong friendships that form between colleagues tend to last forever.

Future Coworkers: We’re looking for leaders across a variety of backgrounds who thrive in a team environment and have strong analytical and communication skills.

Q Any advice for students?

FIND OUT MORE:

A

mycareer.deloitte.com/us

A

As with most things in life, what you get out of something is directly proportional to how much effort you put into it. If you work hard, show that you really want to be at Deloitte, and make yourself known to people here, you should be successful. 

Watch Juan describe his path to success

at Deloitte: mycareer.deloitte.com/us/juan

As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.deloitte.com/ us/about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

INTERNSHIP |

General Electric

photo: Tori Soper

“The work we do makes a real impact, and I take a lot of pride in that.”

R

odolfo "Rudy" Chavez always felt a strong tie to the health care industry, having grown up in a family of medical professionals, but ultimately knew he wanted to work with technology. When the opportunity presented itself to do an internship with GE Healthcare, it seemed like the perfect way to synthesize his familiarity with health care and his interest in computer science. As a software engineer in the two-year GE Edison Engineering Development Program, Rudy is able to program technology and create products that make an impact.

work we do makes a real impact, and I take a lot of pride in that. Q Do you have any favorite products or

technologies that you’ve worked on?

I became involved in the program after working at GE as an intern – GE does a lot of recruiting through its internship programs. The rotational program really gives you a chance to try a little bit of everything, depending on your interests.

and they can tackle a lot of the hard problems like health care and energy.

A One of my favorite technologies that I worked on for a short time was the Centricity Perinatal product, which is used to track a mother and child through labor. It’s a successful product and continues to innovate: Over 35 million babies have been born using that software. I was also able to work on a technology that will improve how we send and receive medical images and make them available to different systems around the world. Since integrating information is one of the biggest challenges in health care today, it was exciting to work on something that would make a real difference.

Q What was your perception of GE

Q What is the best part of your job?

Q What competencies are in demand?

Q How did you become involved with

the GE Edison Engineering program? A

before you started? Was it accurate? A

I don’t think I really had any negative or positive perceptions of GE; I just knew that it was a company that made appliances and lightbulbs. I have come to realize that it’s much more than that. They have history and strength as a global company, but they’re not resting on that – they’re constantly growing and innovating,

Rodolfo "Rudy" Chavez

• Position: Software Engineer, GE Healthcare • Education: Marquette University, Computer Engineering, 2009

A

Since I work on software that’s customer-facing, I receive immediate feedback and I can see right away whether or not the product is going to be right for the customer. I value being able to actually produce – even though GE isn’t traditionally known as a software company, we’re creating the kind of software keeping airplanes in the air and helping heal patients. The

A GE has always been a big engineering company, but in the last year or so, GE has made a big commitment to software across all the different businesses. If you’re in computer science or computer engineering, that’s going to be exactly what we’re looking for. 

Contact: gerecruiting@corporate.ge.com

Key Facts GE traces its beginnings to Thomas A. Edison, who established Edison Electric Light Company in 1878. In 1892, a merger of Edison General Electric Company and ThomsonHouston Electric Company created General Electric Company. GE is the only company listed in the Dow Jones Industrial Index today that was also included in the original index in 1896. Ways In: Leadership programs, internships, co-ops, direct hire


photo: Ronald Glassman

PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

| INTERNSHIP

“It's exciting to spend every day developing new technology and working with people around the world.”

J

ustin Behymer joined GE as an intern in 2010, after he was introduced to the company through a brother in his fraternity. Thanks to his participation in internships and cooperatives, he gained nearly two years of real work experience before he even graduated. He returned to GE after college to complete the Information Technology Leadership Program (ge.com/itlp), a twoyear program that includes technical assignments, global rotations, and leadership training classes. Justin has been able to grow within GE and work on real projects that make a difference.

7, working a lot with upper management to ensure that it was a really cool and innovative product. Another project involved developing the applications that enable our employees to access work email and internal information on their cell phones. In both of these cases, I personally helped build the applications and launch the products that we currently use every day.

Q What do you like most about your

full-time employee in the ITLP?

daily work? A

I’m a project manager for various assignments, so I have a broad perspective of industry trends and different technologies. I think my favorite part of my job is having the opportunity to build really cool applications and design sets that I’ve never seen anywhere else. It’s a true thrill to spend every day developing new technologies. Q What surprised you most when you

first joined GE?

A I was struck by how global this corporation really is, and I was impressed by the ways in which GE has revolutionized the idea of telepresence work. In my current role, I run development teams in Mexico and India: I’ll probably never meet these people, but because of how interconnected and well-structured GE is, I’m able to work with them on a daily basis.

Q How was the transition from intern to

Justin Behymer

• Position: Information Technology Leadership Program • Education: University of Cincinnati, Science and Information Technology, 2012

Q What did you expect to learn in your

internship? A

I was looking for a challenging opportunity to separate myself as a leader and grow as an individual. I didn’t want busy work; I really wanted work that would have an impact. The internship at GE exceeded my expectations: I can honestly say that the projects I’ve worked on have made a real difference in this corporation, which is not something many people can say about their college internships. Q What were some of the projects

you’ve worked on?

A During my first internship, I was able to help build and launch Windows

A When I returned to GE as a fulltime employee, I was actually surprised at how little had changed. As an intern, I was challenged and had to meet deliverables – I was treated as though I was already a full-time employee. Moving to a full-time role in the ITLP was really just about taking the next step and further developing my leadership skills. Q Who would fit in at GE? A

I’ve worked at GE in three different cities–Cincinnati, Albany, and Fairfield—and I have noticed a striking similarity among GE employees. Every person I’ve encountered at GE is someone who loves to be challenged, loves to succeed, and is always willing to help. GE is a team and we are all fighting for the goals that will make this corporation better.  Find out more: ge.com/careers

Key Facts GE works on things that matter. The best people and the best technologies taking on the toughest challenges. Finding solutions in energy, health and home, transportation and finance. Building, powering, moving and helping to cure the world. Not just imagining. Doing. GE works. For more information, visit the company’s website at www.ge.com Employees: GE employs about 300,000 people worldwide Future Coworkers: From engineering and information technology, to marketing and sales, to finance, manufacturing, and human resources, with GE you’ll find the career opportunities and leadership development you need to succeed.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

INTERNSHIP |

Liberty Mutual Insurance

T

aryn Smith's first encounter with Liberty Mutual Insurance was during the winter of her junior year through the company’s Responsible Scholars Community Project, Taryn and nine other students spent six days working in the Angeles National Forest and helped restore areas that were destroyed in the 2009 wildfires. Upon witnessing how much Liberty Mutual focuses on giving back, Taryn knew immediately that it was a place where she wanted to build a career. She joined Liberty Mutual as an intern and returned after graduation to a position in its Human Resources Development Program. Q What were your perceptions of Liberty

Mutual before you started? A

After participating in the Responsible Scholars’ program, I wasn’t really surprised by much when I started working at Liberty Mutual – my perceptions about how much they care about their employees and customers were simply reinforced. Before I started, I never really understood that an insurance company could have so many facets and be so dedicated to helping its customers. Q Can you talk about your participation

in the Responsible Scholars program?

A The Community Project is one of several Responsible Scholars service programs that Liberty Mutual offers for undergraduates. The program provides students the opportunity to give back to their communities through sponsored service trips. It’s a unique opportunity

Taryn Smith

• Position: Associate, Human Resources Development Program • Education: Bryant University, Human Resources and Sociology, 2012

photo: Stephen Sherman

“As an intern at Liberty Mutual, I really felt that the work I was doing was making a real impact.”

really felt that I was making an impact. One of my favorite projects was creating an intern video blog, which helped connect interns all over the U.S. In my current role, I really enjoy having the opportunity to interact with employees, help answer their questions, and make their days a little easier. Q What is one thing you wish you had

known during your internship?

A I wish I had known to take advantage of all the wonderful people and resources that were around. Everyone was always more than willing to help, but I didn’t always ask for it. Q What advice could you offer to students

interested in working at Liberty Mutual?

because it allows students to become familiar with the company and provides a chance for them to make themselves known to key members of the Liberty Mutual team – it’s beneficial for students, beneficial for Liberty Mutual, and also beneficial for the community. I can honestly say that I wouldn’t be where I am today if I hadn’t taken the few minutes out of my day to apply. Q What is your favorite part of your job?

A As an intern, I loved being in a position where I had challenging work, objectives to meet, and real projects that were my own personal responsibility: I

A A really common mistake candidates make is not dedicating enough time to proofreading and fine-tuning their resumes. One thing they could do to stand out is to take advantage of the programs that are available during their college years (the Responsible Scholars program, for example). They should also do research on the company, meet recruiters at career fairs, and follow Liberty Mutual in current events and social media. It’s really important to show a genuine interest in the company. 

Find out more:

www.libertymutualgroup.com/careers

Key Facts As one of the world’s largest property and casualty insurers, Liberty Mutual Insurance Group offers a wide range of insurance products and services. We help restore lives and, whenever possible, use our knowledge base, employee talent, and research capabilities to help prevent accidents and injuries from happening. Employees: More than 50,000 globally Future Coworkers: Liberty Mutual is looking for candidates with strong business and financial acumen, analytic thinking, leadership skills, and an understanding of a customer facing business.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

| INTERNSHIP

MasterCard “MasterCard is incredibly focused on technology and innovation.” photo: James Visser

Key Facts

J

arrett Northington wanted to pursue a career that impacted how people work and communicate. He was familiar with MasterCard as a credit card company, but it was his conversations with recruiters that really sparked his interest in the innovative technological side of the company. He began at MasterCard as an intern and returned after graduation to a fulltime role as associate software engineer. Q What was your perception of

MasterCard before you started? A

I got most of my information about MasterCard from commercials and advertisements, so I didn’t know too much more than the fact that it’s a credit card company. Once I started working, I began to see MasterCard as more of a tech company that happens to be in the payment space. The company is incredibly focused on innovation and technology, which is something I didn’t know before I started working here. Q What did you hope to learn as an

intern? Were your expectations fulfilled? A

I went in to the internship hoping to increase my knowledge of the business world and become familiar with the daily workings of MasterCard and the industry. Once I started, I got a lot more than I bargained for. I learned new skills like project development, time management and scheduling, and technical skills like HTML. I also learned a lot about the payments industry.

Jarrett Northington

• Position: Associate Software Engineer • Education: Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Computer Management and Information Systems, 2012

Q What surprised you as an intern? A

To be honest, I expected to be doing tasks stereotypical of interns: copying, emailing, filing, and so on. I was surprised by how much responsibility I was given right away. From the very beginning, I was in charge of a lot of information; I was working on real projects and even leading meetings. Q What's the best part of your job?

What are some challenges you face?

A My team has really good chemistry. When I first started at MasterCard, it felt like I had been there for years. Everyone was really open to the questions I asked and was willing to help me get up to speed on everything.

I think the biggest challenge has been the learning curve and getting familiar with the new systems, but having such a strong support system has made the process fairly smooth. Q Do you have any favorite projects? A During my internship, I was in charge of building a website that served as a central point of information – it was a repository of information for the different departments in order to foster more collaboration. It was a cool project with real results. Q What is the office culture like? A My department is very collaborative: It’s certainly not the kind of place where you sit in a cubicle all day without speaking to anyone. Our office has air hockey, a pool table, and even an Xbox 360 – we work hard, but have a lot of fun. Q Any advice for interns? A Be open to any opportunity that’s given to you: Get out of your comfort zone and venture into areas that you wouldn’t normally. Use your internship as an opportunity to learn as much as possible and try new things. 

Find out more:

www.mastercard.com/careers

MasterCard is a global payments and technology company that operates the world’s fastest payments processing network connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard’s products and solutions make everyday commerce activities easier, more secure and more efficient. Employees: Approximately 6,700 in offices around the world Future Coworkers: The MasterCard College Programs were created to attract and source college hires, building a pipeline of multidimensional talent with fresh perspectives, capable and empowered to make important and independent decisions. The program is aimed at bright, driven and adaptable undergraduate students who are innovative, inquisitive and willing to challenge the status quo.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

INTERNSHIP |

Royal Bank of Scotland “There is a true sense of loyalty at RBS: Everyone wants to help each other succeed.”

K

elly Steele, a native San Diegan, was initially attracted to the fast-paced, constantly changing environment of the financial services industry. After studying finance at The McDonough School of Business at Georgetown, Kelly met an alumnus who encouraged her to apply for an internship at RBS. She was instantly drawn to the bank by its global footprint and collegial environment, and joined as a summer analyst in the 10-week rotational program. After graduation, Kelly returned to RBS as an Investment Grade Debt Syndicate Analyst.

A As a college athlete, I thought the lifestyle of the financial industry would be a perfect fit: I was eager to experience the high-intensity, fast paced environment, and I was fascinated by the constant change. Every day is different, driven by the market and global events. After interviewing with many other banks, I was intrigued by RBS's loyalty to employees, culture, and a specific focus in fixed income with an expansive global footprint. Q What surprised you the most when

you first started as a summer analyst? A I was most impressed by how much people wanted me to learn and succeed. They were truly invested in me despite not knowing whether that investment was going to pay off: They didn’t necessarily know if I was going to be with RBS for a longer period of time,

A There is a true sense of loyalty at RBS: Everyone is committed to helping each other learn and succeed. The people, culture, and environment of the Bank are what originally drew me in and are what make me really enjoy my current job. There is a strong sense of camaraderie among my team, which makes the long hours we work together enjoyable. Q In what ways did the summer

Q How did you become interested in

finance? What attracted you to RBS?

Q What is the work environment like?

experience with RBS benefit you?

Kelly Steele

• Position: Investment Grade Debt Syndicate Analyst • Education: Georgetown University, Finance and Management, 2011

but were extremely welcoming and supportive throughout the Program. Q What made you return to RBS as a

full-time analyst? A

There were many reasons but the most important were the culture, the loyalty to its employees and the line of business in which I was hired. Even though I thoroughly enjoy my job, another very attractive aspect of RBS is the potential opportunity to move within the bank later on in my career. Additionally, everyone is treated fairly, which is exemplified by the meritocratic flat structure where you receive a lot of responsibility right off the bat.

A

My experience as a summer analyst was instrumental in getting a job after college, especially in the economic downturn. It gave me exposure to many different areas in the Bank: I wasn’t just working with one group or product, which allowed me to see the big picture and enabled me to make an informed decision during the full-time job search. Q What do you wish you had known as a

summer analyst?

A I believe it’s important to find a mentor early on in your career – the internship program at RBS provides a mentor, but I wish I had kept up my communication a bit better. It’s very beneficial to have someone supporting you and giving you advice as you start your career. 

Find out more:

www.rbsbankyoubuild.com

RBS Markets & International Banking is wholesale banking division RBS Group, which is committed to supporting our clients’ needs globally with worldclass debt financing, global markets, risk management and transaction services to corporates, financial institutions, sovereigns and the public sector. We use our global connectivity and deep sector knowledge to build strong, enduring client relationships and offer a variety of products and services, including: debt capital markets and credit, electronic trading, derivatives, foreign exchange, prime services, futures and options, rates, and transaction services. Employees: Approximately 2,400 in the Americas Future Coworkers: RBS is committed to recruiting and retaining top talent across our Markets & International Banking businesses. Analysts will help shape the future of our business. The combination of new ideas in addition to existing knowledge and expertise provides an ideal solution to improve our competitive advantage and become the partner of choice for our clients. RBS offers a robust training and career management program, which has received reputable accolades from various third-party organizations.

photo: Ronald Glassman

Key Facts


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

photo: Satin Dreams Photography

Toys“R"Us, Inc. “Enter your internship with an open mind and treat it as an opportunity to learn.”

Key Facts

L

ety Alejandrez has always loved working with people, so when the time came for her to do an internship for her business administration major, she knew she wanted to try something different from her previous jobs at banks. Lety’s ten-week internship at Toys“R”Us, Inc. allowed her to take on real responsibility and helped prepare her for her current role. As a human resources department supervisor and a store management trainee in the Toys“R”Us, Inc. Leadership Development Program, Lety understands the value that every single employee contributes to the team. Q What makes a Toys“R”Us, Inc.

internship unique?

A I think it’s important to go into the

internship with the right expectations. I initially anticipated working in an office and doing a lot of paperwork all day, but my actual experience at Toys“R”Us was really hands on. I was working in the store on my very first day as an intern, and I really loved getting that experience from the very beginning. Q Are there any misconceptions about

working at Toys“R”Us, Inc.?

My own misconception was about the level of work that goes on – I always assumed employees just shelved toys, cleaned up the floor and interacted with customers. In reality, everyone at Toys“R”Us is doing so much more every day to ensure that everything in the store is running smoothly. A

Q How did your internship help you? A

The experience benefitted me in so

| INTERNSHIP

Leticia "Lety" Alejandrez

• Position: Store Management Trainee in Leadership Development Program, Human Resources Department Supervisor • Education: California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, B.S. Management and Human Resources, 2012

many ways. I learned what it takes to run a Toys“R”Us store and that an entire team is needed to make everything work well. I was also given the opportunity to manage a diverse group of employees. I am a more efficient manager today because I treated my internship as a learning experience, not just as something that would earn me credits for school. Q How did you make the transition from

internship to a full-time role?

A The people I met along the way made my transition pretty easy. During my internship, I learned as much as possible and the seasoned Toys“R”Us team members took me in and mentored me.

They helped me develop from an intern to a supervisor and made me feel like I was part of the team from the very beginning. Q What is your favorite part of your job,

and what are some challenges you face?

A I’m not a big fan of repetition so I love the fact that working at Toys“R”Us is fast-paced and things are constantly changing. I love interacting with different people every day, dealing with diverse situations and not knowing what the next day will bring. I think my main challenge is that there is simply not enough time in the day! Q What is the one thing students should

know about working at Toys"R"Us, Inc.? A

Don’t assume that all we do is play with toys all day. We do have a lot of fun, but there is no time for slacking. Every team member has a very important role and we take our work very seriously. Q Any advice for students? A Look for an internship in an industry that interests you and treat it as a career opportunity. Go into it with an open mind and make it a learning experience – don’t intern somewhere just to get your diploma faster. I came to my internship at Toys“R”Us eager to learn and gain work experience and it turned into a fulltime position at a great company. 

Find out more www.ruscareers.com www.facebook.com/ruscareers

Toys“R”Us, Inc. is the world’s leading dedicated toy and juvenile products retailer, offering a differentiated shopping experience through its family of brands. Merchandise is sold in 874 Toys“R”Us and Babies“R”Us stores in the United States and Puerto Rico, and in more than 625 international stores and over 145 licensed stores in 35 countries and jurisdictions. In addition, it exclusively operates the legendary FAO Schwarz brand and sells extraordinary toys in the brand’s flagship store on Fifth Avenue in New York City. Employees: 70,000 worldwide (and 110,000+ during the holiday season) Future Coworkers: A sense of humor and a love of kids are paramount requirements, along with hard work and determination to excel. We have a saying here, "5% Responsible, 100% Accountable," and what we mean by that is empowerment. At every level within the "R"Us family, our team members are empowered to use their initiative to seek out and find fresh, new and innovative solutions to old problems.


I’ve arrived. I was tired of spinning my wheels in a dead-end job. Then I found State Farm®… so many career paths and one real destination. It feels good to know I can stay put still go places. Find your path.

statefarm.com/careers Kelly Finance Supervisor

So many career paths.

State Farm • Bloomington, IL State Farm • Bloomington, IL

statefarm.com/careers

An Equal Opportunity Employer An Equal Opportunity Employer


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

| INTERNSHIP

State Farm “State Farm has a genuine interest in developing every employee: There are so many opportunities to grow here.”

W

hen Neil Jackson was a student, he was selected to participate in State Farm’s internship program. Though Neil was unaffiliated with the insurance industry before his experience, he immediately knew he wanted to be a part of the State Farm family. He interned in the Corporate Law Department and returned after graduation to a full-time role in human resources. Q Are there any misconceptions about

State Farm? How would you respond to them? A

There is more to State Farm than just insurance. You do not need to have a risk management or insurance degree to find a career here. I know interns with incredibly diverse backgrounds. Find your internship at statefarm.com/careers. Q What are the opportunities for

advancement at State Farm?

Our leadership has a genuine interest in developing every employee, and really wants to provide opportunities for advancement. As State Farm continues to grow, the company continues to attract and retain younger employees for their fresh perspectives and new, innovative ways of thinking. This goes for interns too. The internship program offers built-in business acumen sessions and mentoring opportunities. Our internal State Farm University offers tools that A

company and can see myself building a career here – this isn’t just a job for me; it’s a part of who I am. Q What made you return to State Farm

after your internship?

employees may use to proactively take steps toward their career goals.

A State Farm’s rich history, character, culture, and support of communities and education, made me want to be a part of the State Farm family. I see myself having a long career here. The testimonials and tenure of current employees proves that: There are people who have been here for 5, 15, 25+ years. I could not imagine applying to just any company where I did not know the history and culture; State Farm impressed me in both areas.

Q Describe your involvement in the

Q Do you have any advice you would

Neil Jackson

• Position: Employee Relations Analyst, Human Resources Department • Education: University of Wisconsin– Madison, Political Science and Economics, 2012

internship program. A

The experience really exceeded all of my expectations. In the Corporate Law department, I was able to research and write white papers, work on various legislative issues, and even travel to experience trial law. Q What is the office culture like at ­

State Farm?

A State Farm is a great place to work – the culture is collaborative, resultdriven, and professional, but at the same time, respects work/life balance. I really have a personal stake in this

offer to current students?

A For students interested in State Farm, don’t assume that you need a background in risk management to succeed here – that’s definitely not the case! Whatever you want to do after graduation, make the most of your summers to gain professional experience. Internships are essentially interviews that last for ten or twelve weeks, and they can be an important factor when competing for a full-time job. 

Find out more:

www.StateFarm.com/careers

State Farm and its affiliates are the largest provider of car insurance in the U.S. and is a leading insurer in Canada. In addition to providing auto insurance quotes, their 17,800 agents and more than 65,000 employees serve 81 million policies and accounts – more than 79 million auto, home, life and health policies in the United States and Canada, and nearly 2 million bank accounts. Commercial auto insurance, along with coverage for renters, business owners, boats and motorcycles, is also available. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company is the parent of the State Farm family of companies. State Farm is ranked No. 43 on the Fortune 500 list of largest companies. For more information, please visit http://www. statefarm.com or in Canada http://www. statefarm.ca. Employees: More than 65,000 Future Coworkers: One company, many careers - there’s more here than just insurance. At State Farm we seek a wide range of candidates with various skills and experiences to fill internships and opportunities ranging from entry level to management. From customer service to creative services find your path!

photo: State Farm

Key Facts


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

INTERNSHIP |

UBS

photo: Christopher Gabello

“I love gaining exposure to so many different facets of the business.”

J

anelle Adams' interest in financial planning was sparked when she was applying for college and going through the process for herself: She was intrigued by the idea of figuring out her financial aid package, understanding how she could make up the gaps, and planning for the future. As a firm that places strategic focuses on wealth management in addition to investment banking and asset management, UBS seemed like the right place for her. She began as an intern and later returned to the firm as an analyst in the Graduate Training Program. Q What made you stand out as a

candidate for an internship at UBS? A

I really made an effort to connect with my interviewers, and not just about work: I showed a genuine interest in the industry, but also made sure that my interviewers remembered me. Social and communication skills are extremely important in this industry, so being able to make a connection with the people you talk to will definitely give you an advantage. Q Where do you expect to be in five

years?

A Once I really develop a holistic view of the products and services we offer our clients, I could see myself moving into an advisory service role at UBS, giving advice and delivering financial plans for clients. Q What is the office culture like at UBS? A The environment here is open and client-oriented with a strong focus on

Janelle Adams

• Position: Graduate Training Program (GTP) Analyst, Wealth Management • Education: Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Management, 2012

delivering results. Some banks may apply pressure to stay late or show off for upper management, but I never feel that way at UBS. As long as I am able to professionally and correctly finish my work, I never feel pressure to spend additional time in the office. Q What do you enjoy about your job?

A I think the Graduate Training Program represents a unique opportunity because it allows me to see so many different divisions and touch multiple areas of the business. There is so much variety in my day: As a member of the middle markets management team, I work with various financial adviser teams across the country,

each with a different area of expertise. Balancing the various issues that the teams present can sometimes pose a challenge, but I love gaining exposure to so many different facets of the business. Q What are you most proud of about

your work at UBS?

A I’ve taken on projects that are making a difference both in my internship and in my current role. Earlier this month, I worked on a project that was later presented to upper management. The data I collected for the project are currently being used to make decisions about our platform and business structure. It’s exciting that the work I’ve been doing is being used and is important to UBS. Q What advice could you offer to

students interested in working for UBS? A Be able to pinpoint why you want to be at UBS versus another firm. Every single person I spoke with during the interview process asked me why I was interested in wealth management, and why UBS in particular. Also, take advantage of networking events and make an effort to speak to junior members of the team. I always see students going straight for the directors, which is great because they have experience and can offer advice, but it’s really important to connect with junior analysts as well. After the events, it’s often the junior members who speak with HR and can put in a good word for the candidates. 

Key Facts UBS draws on its 150-year heritage to serve private, institutional and corporate clients worldwide, as well as retail clients in Switzerland. Its business strategy is centered on its preeminent global wealth management businesses and its universal bank in Switzerland. Together with a client-focused investment bank and a strong, welldiversified global asset management business, UBS will expand its premier wealth management franchise and drive further growth across the firm. Employees: About 64,000 globally, 35 percent in the Americas


photo: Christopher Gabello

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| INTERNSHIP

“UBS provides you with opportunities to work on projects that matter.”

D

evon Dobson was drawn to investment banking because of the diversity of opportunity the industry offers. “I figured it would be interesting to work with clients while also being exposed to the information flow that comes across your desk.” He was introduced to the internship program at UBS through an alumnus and returned as a full-time analyst in fall 2012. Q What surprised you most when you

first started?

A I was amazed at how many different financial products exist in the world. I knew about the basics, but I was surprised to see such a vast amount of products being traded on a day-to-day basis. Q What are the opportunities for

advancement in UBS? A

In a large global bank like UBS, there is plenty of room for advancement. You definitely get a taste of that as an intern—nothing is set in stone, and you are able to make what you want of the experience. There are so many ways to prove yourself and add value to the company. Q What is the office culture like at UBS?

A There is a strong support system at UBS, which is critical in your development as a new hire. I could go up to anyone and ask for help and they would make time for me. There’s also a really cool culture among my class of new hires – we frequently socialize

a keynote speech. This is interesting because it allows you to meet and hear important industry experts. There are also a lot of fun intern events that allow you to network with senior leaders and connect with upper management. Q What made you stand out as a

candidate for the internship program?

Devon Dobson

• Position: Graduate Training Program Analyst, Exchange Trade Derivatives • Education: University of Notre Dame, Finance, 2012

outside of work, which builds a strong team mentality. Q How did you become involved in the

internship program? A

I was looking for programs through my school’s career site, and was attracted specifically to UBS through an alumnus. It’s a 10-week rotational program, so I got to experience different desks. UBS runs a direct desk hire program, so if you get a full-time offer, it will be in one of the areas where you spent your internship. Q What were some opportunities the

program exposed you to?

A UBS runs a speaker series every week – the “Best and Brightest” series. Every week a very well-known individual in the industry presents

A I think it was my relentless pursuit of it—I was constantly emailing, calling, and meeting people to make them aware that I wanted to be a part of the program. I was really persistent, and people caught on to that. Q How do you think your internship

benefitted you as a full-time employee? A When I started full-time in July, I walked onto the trading floor and I knew a lot of people already, both other new hires and more senior people – that alone took a lot of stress off. I also came in with a general knowledge of how the bank works and what products it produces, which gave me an advantage. Q Do you have any advice you’d offer to

students interested in working at UBS?

A Being proactive is critical – you can’t be afraid to pick up the phone and call someone who can potentially help you. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.ubs.com

Key Facts Future Coworkers: We’re looking for people who have the integrity, drive, and team skills to help us deliver on our promises to our clients. Our hires have degrees ranging from economics and finance to astronomy and political science. There is no one set of traits or background we look for; your education and experience are more important than a specific major.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

INTERNSHIP |

photo: Christopher Gabello

“UBS is a meritocracy: If you take on responsibility and perform well, you will be rewarded.”

W

hen Seun Olu-Ayeni was in the School of Business Executive Leadership and Honors Program at Howard University, he was surrounded by information about Wall Street. With his curiosity sparked, he began to do his own research about the finance industry in order to find a job that synthesized his technical background and his interest in business. Seun loves the diversity of people and projects at UBS.

its events, its products and services, and its people. I can see five people from the desk where I sit, and four out of those five people are from different places of the world. That kind of environment is inclusive by nature. I love how supportive everyone is – everyone wants you to succeed here.

Q What attracted you to UBS?

Q What are some challenges you face?

A

I met a lot of corporate sponsors through my honors program, but I was really interested in UBS because they had a different approach to everything. They seemed less traditional and more informal than other banks: Whenever corporate sponsors came to do information sessions, for example, they would lead icebreakers instead of straightforward presentations. Things like that really stood out to me and set UBS apart from the rest. Q What were your perceptions of UBS

before you started working?

A From the research I had done about the bank, I could tell it was very large, cultured, and diverse. I spoke to Howard alumni who had connections to UBS and learned that it was a welcoming place, especially for new hires – almost a family-like atmosphere. These perceptions were all confirmed once I started working. Q What made you stand out as a

candidate for an internship at UBS?

A One thing that made me stand out was all of the research I did. When I

Seun Olu-Ayeni

• Position: Graduate Training Program Analyst, Group Technology, Group IT COO Office - IT Shared Services Cost and Business Management • Education: Howard University, Information Systems, 2012

A UBS is a large global bank, so keeping track of where you stand within the organization is sometimes difficult. The complexity of the structure can be challenging, but it’s also something to be proud of. Q How is being a full-time employee

interviewed, I knew a lot about the bank and asked relevant questions. I also made myself unique and connected with my interviewers to ensure that I was remembered. Q What did you learn from your

experience as an intern at UBS? A I had the opportunity to work in a project management role, which really enhanced my leadership skills. I also learned a lot about networking and communicating with people. I was always encouraged to understand why I was doing the projects I was, which helped me see how the work I did affected the bank as a whole. Q What's the best part of your job? A

Every aspect of the bank is diverse –

different from being an intern?

A Because I am a more experienced professional now, I have more responsibility and am entrusted with more difficult projects. The transition wasn’t too difficult, because UBS offered me a rigorous five-week training program. It prepared me well and allowed me to network with fellow graduates, so I had an instant support system once I actually started working. Q Do you have any advice for interns? A If you are confident, accountable and take on responsibility, you’ll be rewarded. That’s something I learned in my internship: My manager taught me that if opportunities aren’t knocking, you need to build your own door for them to come knock on. 

Key Facts Future Coworkers: We’re looking for people who have the integrity, drive, and team skills to help us deliver on our promises to our clients. Our hires have degrees ranging from economics and finance to astronomy and political science. There is no one set of traits or background we look for; your education and experience are more important than a specific major.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

| INTERNSHIP

photo: Christopher Gabello

“We want to help our clients make good decisions, and it's really rewarding to be a part of that process.”

C

harlotte Revol became interested in finance from a young age as she watched her brother pursue a career in investment banking and was impressed by the level of exposure and responsibility he received as a recent graduate. As a first generation Argentine-American, Charlotte was searching for an opportunity to use her Spanish-speaking skills in a professional setting, and joined UBS as an intern in its Latin America group. She returned after graduation as a full-time analyst. Q What were your initial perceptions of

UBS? Were they accurate? A

The financial industry in general has received a lot of negative press during and since the financial crisis, which I do not believe is fully justified. Investment banks provide necessary services to corporations, and during economic downturns companies look to banks to receive sound and strategic financial advice. I have found that the past year and a half has been very active as companies look to improve their businesses—UBS has certainly provided me with the opportunity to be a part of this changing industry. Q What would make a candidate stand

out to recruiters?

A Much of the job is actually learned on the job, so a strong academic record shows an ability to learn quickly and take in new information. It’s also important to be familiar with what is happening in the world: In college, it’s easy to get caught up in exams and homework, but you need to go into an interview with an awareness of the economy and current events.

Charlotte Revol

• Position: Graduate Training Program (GTP) Analyst, Global Industrials Group, Transportation and Capital Goods • Education: Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Business and Public Policy, 2011.

Q How did your internship benefit you?

A The internship reaffirmed my interest in banking. It was an opportunity to get to know my future colleagues, make good first impressions, and become familiar with the internal processes of the bank, all of which helped a lot when I returned to UBS as a full-time analyst. Q What are the opportunities for

advancement at UBS? A

UBS aims to recruit people out of the internship program, so if you prove yourself as a hard worker during your internship, there is so much room to grow. I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the support I’ve received and by the opportunities I’ve been given, not only to grow in terms of rank, but also

in terms of exposure to different types of companies within industrials and becoming a sector expert in those that interest me. Q What do you like most about your job? A I love the team that I’m a part of and the everyday challenges we face. At the end of the day, our clients care a lot about the successes and failures of their businesses, and we want to help them make good decisions. Being part of that decision-making process is really rewarding. Q What are some challenges you face

at work?

A The learning curve can be steep and challenging, especially when you’re first starting out, but over time you learn more and become comfortable in your work environment. Another challenge is finding work-life balance. My work hours are long, but there is definitely opportunity to be social and enjoy living in New York if you learn to manage your own time, become more efficient, and communicate your schedule well to others. Q Any advice for students interested at

working for UBS?

A After graduation, take a trip you’ve always wanted to take, relax, and get ready to hit the ground running. Your first few years in the workforce are extremely rewarding, but also very challenging, so take some time beforehand to reflect and reset yourself. 

Key Facts UBS is proud to be an equal opportunities employer. We are committed to providing equal access to employment opportunities to all prospective employees within the recruitment process. UBS complies with and supports all national and local laws pertaining to nondiscrimination and advancement opportunities, including those relating to making reasonable accommodations to the recruitment process for applicants who require them. FIND OUT MORE: www.ubs.com



Wetfeet Magazine Fall 2012