Page 1

CAREERS | INTERVIEWING | EMPLOYERS | RESUMES

πππππππ

OFFICE

POLITICS πππππππ

13

SAVVY TIPS FOR CAMPAIGNING YOUR WAY TO THE TOP

YOUR RESUME

AS THANKSGIVING DINNER

WINTER 2011

HAIRY

DECISIONS CAN YOU KEEP THE BEARD?

HOW TO DISCLOSE YOUR

SALARY

REQUIREMENTS

SAVE YOURSELF from

INTERVIEW DISASTER!


ONE YOU One Credit Suisse CAITLIN WANTED TO EXPERIENCE ASIA. SO WE STARTED HER CAREER IN HONG KONG. Studying Chinese in college gave Caitlin more than just another language, it gave her entrée

into another culture. When she wanted total immersion, we gave her a job in Asia that helped her achieve that. We gave her a global outlook — and she gained a world of experience. Read her story at credit-suisse.com/careers

LOCATION: HONG KONG

Credit Suisse is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate in its employment decisions on the basis of any protected category. To the extent permitted or required by applicable law, a candidate who is offered employment will be subject to a criminal record check and other background checks before the appointment is confirmed. © 2011 CREDIT SUISSE GROUP AG and/or its affiliates, subsidiaries and branches. All rights reserved.


300

Honor. Inspire. Engage.

800


e r e h w now k u o y Do ath p r e e r your ca you? d  will lea

 

 

 

DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY. Be on the lookout for the 2012 IDEALTM Employer Survey in December!

DID YOU KNOW TOP EMPLOYERS WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU? Here is your opportunity to reflect on your career goals and tell employers how to recruit top talent (like you) out of college!

What employers did students put at the top of the 2011 IDEAL TM Internships rankings? Flip to pages 14–15 to find out!  

 WWW.UNIVERSUMGLOBAL.COM


Con t en t s WINTER 20 1 1

Insights 06 What I Didn’t Learn in College 09 play it smart Revealing your salary requirements. 11

Small Talk Small words can have a big impact.

50 PAGE

12 Hairy Decisions Can you keep the beard?

FEATURES 42 Interview Disasters Survival tactics for interviewing calamities. 46 What’s Your Emotional IQ? Recruiters want to see that you’re emotionally fit. 50 Office Politics Campaign your way to the top. 56 Exit Ramp Your resume as Thanksgiving dinner.

SPONSORED CONTENT 14-15 Top Employer Rankings: Business, Engineering, IT & Natural Sciences 16-41 Employee Testimonials

cove r a nd co ntents pho to s: S arah N uernberger (www. sarahnu e r nbe r ge r. c o m )


Online, all the time! Tweet, tweet! hey, that's my line!

Been There. Done That. LEARN FROM WETFEET'S INSIDERS

What you get in 140 characters or less @WetFeet_career

check us out at: www.WetFeet.com/blog

RESUME TIPS

INTERVIEW ADVICE

SALARY STRATEGIES

NETWORKING KNOW-HOW

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LETTER

from the

EDITOR

O N T H E C A MPAI G N T R AIL CAREERS | INTERVIEWING | EMPLOYERS | RESUMES

Politics get a bad name. With all the finger-pointing, mudslinging, and scandal Hairy that occurs on the national stage, it’s no surprise office Decisions Politics Can yOU we shy away. But an isolationist approach to keep the beard? 13 office life is not a smart bet. Though it may help Savvy TipS you avoid being sucked into workplace drama for How to CampaIgnIng and power struggles, you also run the risk of DIsClose your your way to salary The requirements being marginalized. That could mean being Top passed over for a deserved promotion or being viewed as expendable when budgets are cut. Your Save reSume r eS ume Our advice is to throw your hat into the YourSelf from as IntervIew tHanksg tH anksgII v I ng anksg tHanksgIvIng political ring, because success won’t be handed DIsaster! D I nner DInner to you—you’ve got to campaign for it. The good news is that there’s no need to be a smarmy, backstabbing, glad-handing politician. In fact, dirty office politics can only do your career harm and sully your reputation. Instead, take the high road. Turn to Office Politics (page 50), and you’ll see that running a positive campaign means networking effectively, building key relationships, and publicizing your accomplishments. The more people that see you can get things done—and done right—the quicker you’ll rise to the top. Before you have the chance to win over the hearts and minds of your coworkers, you’re gonna need a job. And between you and nearly any job stands the interview. In Small Talk (page 11), we look at what the little, often forgettable words say about you during an interview. And as Interview Disasters (page 42) demonstrates, it’s not just what you do right, it’s what you do when things go wrong. And lest we forget, we’re approaching the holiday season. It’s time to Give Thanks (page 11) and to stuff yourself with turkey. Read this issue’s Exit Ramp, Your Resume as Thanksgiving Dinner (page 56), and see if you can get through your meal without thinking about adding some flavor to your resume. πππππππ

πππππππ

Gobble Gobble.

DENIS WILSON Editor in Chief

WINTER 2011

EDITOR IN CHIEF Denis Wilson Associate Editor Liz seasholtz Staff Writer Dave allen Staff Writer emily Callaghan Web Manager Lindsay hicks Art Director alexis Cook Designer holly siemon Social Media Intern Julie feinerman Wetfeet magaZIne Is a meDIa property of unIversum Universum's media portfolio also includes the WetFeet Insider Guides, WetFeet.com, Springboardr, InternshipPrograms.com, and CareerTV.

unIversum 1518 Walnut Street, Suite 1800 Philadelphia, PA 19102 215.546.4900 www.universumusa.com CEO petter nylander Global Director of Media karin almcrantz unIversIty reLatIons, marketIng, anD DIstrIButIon Jonas Barck Kristina Matthews Christopher Campellone For information about advertising in Universum publications, please contact Merritt Carew at merritt.carew@ universumusa.com or 215.546.4900 ext. 107 saLes anD aDvertIsIng Chris Cordery Karl-Johan Hasselstrom Kortney Kutsop Emma Moretzsohn Devin Gorman-DaRif Entire contents copyright 2011, Universum All rights reserved. Universum’s goal is to improve communication and understanding between employers and young professionals. Our annual Undergraduate, MBA, Diversity, and Young Professional surveys are answered by more than 400,000 people in 32 countries.

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INSIGHTS W I N TER 2 01 1

WHAT I DIDN'T LEARN IN COLLEGE The founders of the G3Box turn s h i p p i n g c o n ta i n e r s i n t o m e d i c a l c l i n i c s

D

iscarded shipping containers and an alarming maternal death rate in Africa: These two factors prompted four Arizona State University engineering students to found G3Box, a nonprofit that converts shipping containers into medical-grade clinics. “A professor who had been to Africa told us how the used containers just lay idle in the ports,” says cofounder Susanna Young. “That, coupled with Africa having the highest maternal death rate in the world, made us decide to solve both problems at one time.” The group began the venture in 2009 in an engineering class focused on solving societal problems, but they’ve found the work goes well beyond engineering. In addition to installing windows, ventilation, lighting, flooring, and plumbing in each container, the students are learning to run a business. Determining the benefits of filing as a limited liability company versus a nonprofit, securing a registered trademark, and running focus groups were essential tasks outside their field of expertise. “We didn’t really know what we were doing,” says Gabrielle Palermo. Not having a business background required they do a lot of independent research, but it didn’t stop them from pursuing the project. “I think a certain boldness of not being afraid to cold-call a company or an individual is important,” says Young. When the group needed a shipping container, simply calling and explaining the group’s mission landed it a donation. “Being a student helps. Companies see us as the future and want us to do well. If nothing else, you get advice.” The first G3Box is being converted into a maternity clinic and will be shipped to Africa in summer 2012, but the long-term plan is to have various boxes: disaster relief, surgical, intensive care, and educational. Until then, they’re equipped with what an engineering competition judge once told them is vital to a successful venture: a great idea and the youthful enthusiasm to get it done.  READ MORE AT — Emily Callaghan WetFeet.com

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InSIghTS

tEAm mEmBERs (lEFt tO RIght) ClAY tYlER, aSU, mEChaniCal EnginEERing, 2011 sUsAnnA YOUng, aSU, mEChaniCal EnginEERing, 2011 gABRIEllE PAlERmO, aSU, BiOmEDiCal EnginEERing, 2013 JOhn wAltERs, aSU, mEChaniCal EnginEERing, 2012 (not pictured)

pho to BY JaS ON gr u b b


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InSIghTS

>> how to Disclose Your salary requirements by Emily Callaghan

I

n A gAmE OF POkER, showing your cards to your opponents would put you at a great disadvantage. No surprise, then, that when an employer asks you to list your salary requirements in a cover letter, you feel a tad vulnerable. But there is a simple logic behind this standard request: If you require compensation far beyond what a company is prepared to pay for the position, it doesn’t want to waste its time—or yours—going through the interview process. So if you’re asked for salary requirements, especially if applications without them won’t be considered, it’s time to tip your hand. 1 BEnChmARk

2 sEt A RAngE

Websites like Salary.com and Glassdoor can show you what you can expect to earn based on your industry, location, skill set, and experience. If you have industry contacts, inquire what entry-level employees typically make. Or go straight to the source, says Ellen Gordon Reeves, author of Can I Wear My Nose Ring to the Interview? “You can call the HR department of a company and simply say, ‘I saw a job advertised at your company and I’m wondering what the entry-level salary is for this department.’”

3 wIgglE It

Your benchmarking should help you determine a bottom line—the absolute minimum you’ll accept. But rather than a single figure, present your requirements in a ten-thousand-dollar range. This increases the chances that your expectations and the employer’s budget will overlap and gives you some room to negotiate later on. Reeves suggests writing, “My salary requirements are in the $30,000 to $40,000 range, depending on the type and scope of responsibilities.”

reSume HurDle

“wE DOn’t ACCEPt REsUmEs. YOU CAn A P P lY O n O U R w E B s I t E . ”

Don’t be discouraged if you hear this line at the next career fair. More and more, companies are refusing to accept resumes in order to comply with federal regulations or deal with a high volume of applicants. if you’re worried that your time spent chatting up recruiters will be wasted, fear not: there are several things you can do to ensure that recruiters keep tabs on you once you’ve applied online.

Unless the employer is feeling generous, you’ll probably be offered a salary on the low end of your range. But you still have some wiggle room. Salary is only one part of an employer’s offer; benefits also carry a lot of weight, and can be used as leverage. If you feel the salary is on the low side given the responsibilities of the position, it can’t hurt to bluff a bit and say that you expected more comprehensive benefits and will need a higher salary to offset this. 

COUntER wIth A CARD Offer your business card instead of a resume. Along with the basic contact info, include a link to a personal website, complete with a downloadable resume, or to your LinkedIn profile, which should be completely filled out. FOllOw thROUgh As you meet recruiters, ask for a business card, or at least an email address. Then follow up to let them know you’ve completed the online application. As you continue the conversation, send along a copy of your resume “for your reference.” JUst DROP It Find out from the recruiter if the company will have a resume drop—a short period of time when students can submit physical resumes, usually through the college career center. Recruiters use these resumes to screen candidates for interviews or networking events. —DaVE allEn Wetfeet

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9


GIVING THANKS

SMALL TALK

>> In an interview, the shortest words can say a lot by Dave Allen It’s essential to express thanks after a job interview in order to convey gratitude for the opportunity and reinforce the impression you’ve made. But a lot of the advice out there suggests a handwritten and mailed thank-you note is the way to go. We’re not so sure about that. It’s really the message—not the medium—that matters. Steven Levy, managing director for technology and social media with recruiting firm Twiller-Moore, looks for thought-provoking content in the note, not perfect penmanship. “I’m looking for a note that makes me say either, ‘huh, I didn’t think of that,’ or ‘oh yeah, I want this person’,” he says. “I could care less whether it’s handwritten or not.” The speed and ease of an email also allows you to follow up while the interview is fresh in your mind. Though some experts still stand up for the handwritten note, saying that it shows an extra effort, thankyou emails can still be thoughtful. If you interview with multiple people, for example, send an emailed thankyou to each one—no blanket messages or BCCs. �

t

hInk OF A JOB IntERVIEw like a fi rst date: In both settings,

you reveal who you are and what you’ve done in hopes that you’re what the other person is looking for. As you carefully describe yourself, you probably give little regard to those words that crop up most frequently, such as “I” and “me.” Though these words may seem forgettable, they actually say a lot about who you are. In the new book, The Secret Life of Pronouns, author James W. Pennebaker investigates what the language we use reveals about us. We caught up with Pennebaker to fi nd out what to consider when choosing your words in an interview. YOU & I In conversation, use of “I” shows self-awareness, while using “you” acknowledges and draws in your audience. The job interview calls for a balance of both. Focus on yourself too much—imagine an email in which every sentence starts with “I”—and you’ll isolate yourself from your audience. So be sure to include the interviewer in the conversation. A short phrase, such as “I’m glad you asked,” lets him know you have his concerns in mind.

nO “I” In tEAm When referring to team projects, it’s time to tone down “I,” “me,” and “my” and play up the collaborative nature of the work with “we.” “That would tell me you were psychologically a member of that team,” says Pennebaker. In contrast, references to “them” and “they” distance you from the people you worked with and raise doubts that you’re a team player.

mAtChIng UP Pennebaker’s research has revealed that people working in the same field often have common linguistic traits. For example, engineers tend to use articles (a, an, the) and concrete nouns (physical objects) at higher rates than non-engineers, but pronouns and emotion words (good, happy, sad) at lower rates. This indicates a greater focus on tasks and an unemotional approach to one’s work. Interviewers gauge cultural fit partly based on your language, so matching the speaking style of your interviewer can be helpful. A mismatch—discussing how you felt about your work when the interviewer wants to know what you accomplished—will keep you from really connecting. 

InSIghTS ILLUs tr atIo n BY MICh aeL WILS ON

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InSIghTS

haiRy deCisions

c o r p o r aT e – s T Y l e G r o o m i n G : c a n Yo u K e e p T h e B e a r d ? by Denis Wilson

w

hAt wORkED FOR ABRAhAm lInCOln may not work for you. The thing is, beards and corporate life are a tricky combo. You don’t want cling-ons from lunch tagging along to a meeting. And you don’t want to look like you just fell off Phish’s tour bus. That doesn’t necessarily mean that, once you start traipsing through the corridors of power, you have to bid your whiskers goodbye. But you do have to treat a beard just as you would an unruly puppy: It needs attentive care. “Facial hair and the skin underneath should be kept neat, clean, and conditioned,” says Eric Malka, co founder of The Art of Shaving, a shaving-products company. “You need to select a shape that suits you and know how to properly groom and maintain it.” Here are some quick guidelines to help you decide what kind of facial hair—if any—will suit you on the job.

|

12 Wetfeet WInter 2011 go to Wetfeet.Com FOR MORE TIPS ON HOW TO LOOK YOUR BEST


Look around Do you work at Goldman Sachs? Then it’s probably time to reconsider that soul patch. “Follow the same rules as for anything you do,” says J. Scott Omelianuk, co-author of Things a Man Should Know About Work and Sex (and Some Things in Between). “Look for guidance from coworkers. Survey the office.” At the most conservative companies, it isn’t a question of finding an appropriate look: Any beard at all is probably a lousy idea.

Get a second opinion You may think you can style your beard all by your lonesome. Your face, your beard, right? Think again: It’s next to impossible for a man to judge the quality of his own whiskers. “If you have a spouse or girlfriend, she’s gonna have an opinion,” says Omelianuk. Trust your significant other on this, and forget what your buds think.

Keep It Simple Don’t treat your facial hair like a topiary garden: It

shouldn’t look like you’re making a statement. “Stay away from edgy facial hair,” says Omelianuk. “Just make sure it’s well-kept and trimmed. You don’t want it going down the neck or up the cheeks.” Even trimming has its limits: The stubbleall-over look that’s worked for George Clooney all these years probably isn’t right for you. Why? You’re not George Clooney.

The beard may have to go, but don’t worry— You can always grow it back Cut! There’s always the sad possibility that you might have to give up your beard altogether—at least initially. Omelianuk thinks it’s best to go without until you’ve established yourself professionally. “You want to look like you’re a team player,” he says. “A beard could look out of place, like

you’ve grown one in seventh grade.” Take the example of Willie Nelson: When he was hacking away as a songwriter in the Nashville

system, he was clean-shaven. It was only after he became a star in his own right that Willie adopted his familiar whiskers. 

Famous Moments in Beard History These men are renowned for their cultural contributions, but their facial hair is just as memorable Charles Darwin The father of evolution is said to have had ten illegitimate children; surely the beard didn’t hurt his game.

ZZ Top Legend has it that Gillette once offered these rockers $1 million each to shave their beards. They declined.

Brian “The Beard” Wilson This fearsome pitcher has 336 strikeouts to date. Sure, his fastball has something to do with it—but so do his jet-black whiskers.

formed Welch’s Grape Juice as an alternative to unholy vino. It’s likely that his white beard turned a shade of purple when he indulged.

Sa nta C l au s Thomas Bramwell Welch An active Prohibitionist, he

He needs something to keep him warm in the North Pole. Wetfeet

| WINTER 2011

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2011

PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP EMPLOYERS

As the first company in history to reach one billion unique visitors per month, Google knows a thing or two about popularity. It’s no surprise, then, that the ubiquitous company holds the top spot as the place where business and IT students would most like to work, according to a 2011 survey. The survey, conducted by research firm Universum, also has two well-known government agencies snagging the number one position as most desired employer in Engineering and Natural Sciences: NASA and the National Institutes of Health, respectively. In the same survey, students also answered questions about their career preferences. A whopping  percent of respondents said they seek work-life balance,  percent said they want to be secure or stable in their job, and  percent want to be dedicated to a cause or feel that they’re contributing to a greater good through their job. These responses show increased interest in softer, less concrete career goals. To find out what it’s like to work at a variety of top employers, such as GE, Walt Disney, and Deloitte, read the employee testimonials on the following  pages. These companies are recruiting at college campuses across the country and are eager to see your application in their inbox. You will also find some employers listed as Companies to Watch: They’re vying for a spot on the rankings in coming years, and should not be underestimated as standout employers.

THE RANKINGS

The employer rankings on the next page are based on the U.S. Universum Student Survey, now in its th year. More than , students were asked to choose the five employers they would most like to work for. The rankings are then ordered based upon how many times an employer was selected as one of the five ideal employers.

TOP NATURAL SCIENCES EMPLOYERS

TOP BUSINESS EMPLOYERS Deloitte United Airlines UBS

16 17 18-21

TOP ENGINEERING EMPLOYERS General Electric Shell 1010001001010010010 0011 1101001001010101a01 1110001001101001100 1001010011010011001 0101010101010001011 1000100110100110010 0010011010011001100 0100110100110010000 0110 0111010101000101110

28 30 31

COMPANIES TO WATCH 22 23

TOP IT EMPLOYERS

National Security Agency Walt Disney Protiviti SAP Central Intelligence Agency

Genentech Toys“R”Us Monsanto

24 25 25 26 27

AECOM City Year Liberty Mutual DISH Network Ericsson Mars Salesforce.com TE Connectivity The Hartford Feeding America United States Postal Service Unilever

32 32 33 34 34 35 36-37 38 39 40 40 41


Top 25 Business 2011 Rank

Employer

Top 25 Engineering 2010 Rank

2011 Rank

Employer

2010 Rank

1

Google

1

1

NASA

1

2

Apple

8

2

Google

3 4

3

Walt Disney Company

5

3

Boeing

4

Ernst & Young

2

4

Lockheed Martin Corporation

2

5

PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP

3

5

Apple

10

6

Deloitte

4

6

Microsoft

6

7

J.P. Morgan

7

7

General Electric

5

8

Nike

10

8

U.S. Department of Energy

7

9

KPMG LLP

6

9

Walt Disney Company

12

10

Goldman Sachs

9

10

Intel

14

11

FBI

11

11

BMW

8

12

Facebook

N/A

12

Exxon Mobil Corporation

9

13

Microsoft

14

13

IBM

15

14

The Coca-Cola Company

13

14

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

15

Procter & Gamble

16

15

Northrop Grumman

16

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

15

16

Sony

23

17

United Nations

N/A

17

FBI

28

18

Morgan Stanley

17

18

Johnson & Johnson

18

19

U.S. Department of State

20

19

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

20

20

Johnson & Johnson

19

20

U.S. Air Force

16

21

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

26

21

Raytheon Company

21

22

U.S. Department of the Treasury

18

22

Procter & Gamble

17

23

Coach

29

23

General Motors

31

24

Sony

27

24

U.S. Department of Defense

11

25

Marriott

28

25

Ford Motor Company

25

2010 Rank

2011 Rank

Top 25 IT 2011 Rank

Employer

N/A 13

Top 25 Natural Sciences Employer

2010 Rank

1

Google

1

1

National Institutes of Health

1

2

Microsoft

2

2

Mayo Clinic

2

3

Apple

3

3

American Cancer Society

4

4

Facebook

N/A

4

Centers for Disease Control

3

5

IBM

4

5

Walt Disney Company

7

6

Electronic Arts

8

6

Peace Corps

5

7

Walt Disney Company

11

7

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

8

Amazon

19

8

NASA

N/A 6

9

Cisco Systems

5

9

Google

8

10

NASA

10

10

FBI

9

11

Intel

6

11

Apple

27

12

Sony

9

12

United Nations

13

FBI

7

13

Johnson & Johnson

13

14

National Security Agency (NSA)

12

14

Maxim Healthcare

10

15

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

15

15

U.S. Department of Energy

12

16

U.S. Department of Defense

24

16

Teach for America

14

17

Dell Inc.

16

17

Pfizer

11

18

Hewlett-Packard

23

18

Nike

23

19

Lockheed Martin Corporation

13

19

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

17

20

Oracle

22

20

U.S. Department of State

16

21

U.S. Department of State

21

21

U.S. Air Force

22

Yahoo!

18

22

U.S. Navy

N/A

18 N/A

23

Boeing

30

23

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals

32

24

AT&T

20

24

Facebook

N/A

25

Verizon

25

25

U.S. Army

25


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 TOP 100

Business Business

Deloitte “I‘m encouraged to have opinions, voice ideas, and try new things.” Key Facts

Q What appeals to you about auditing,

and why did you want to work for Deloitte?

I really believe in the value of a financial statement audit and the role it can play in contributing to investor confidence and to the ongoing vitality of the capital markets. It really is a service for the public good. A

Q How did you first become interested

in the field?

A geology-based camp in Wyoming geared toward sustainable energy first sparked my interest in auditing. The camp was focused on applied knowledge obtained in the field—we went to see oil rigs, solar farms, and alternative-energy sites, and talked to people in the field about their daily work. That’s a part of what we do as auditors: We go in and learn about the company from those who are involved in its day-to-day operations. A

Q

What surprised you about Deloitte?

As a new hire, I’m constantly surprised by the encouragement to have A

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

Anthony Ambroselli • Position: Auditor • Education: The University of Michigan, bachelors of business administration, 2010; masters of accounting, 2011

initiating contact with those you have common ground with is a great way to take on leadership opportunities when starting out in a large organization. Q

How is diversity addressed and

implemented at Deloitte? A Diversity begins with recruiting, and continues by finding the right fit for both you and the company. At Deloitte, success can be driven by diversity: You’re likely to do a better job and produce a better product when you’re working with people of different skills sets and backgrounds. Q

What is the best part of your job?

I love being challenged to have an opinion. I also enjoy developing technical skills and then applying them to real situations where I can add value. I’m encouraged to share my advice and opinions amongst my team. A

an opinion, to draw conclusions, and to try new things. It really is an open-door culture, and as a younger employee, I don’t feel as though I’m at the bottom of the corporate ladder; new-generation employees provide fresh faces and new ideas, and we’re encouraged to bring them to the people who implement them. Q

How and when did you get involved

with Deloitte’s diversity program? A My internship manager chairs the Michigan chapter of GLOBE and Allies, Deloitte’s LGBT professional network. When I returned full time, I reached out and she appointed me co-chair. Easy as it sounds, simply

Q

What advice do you have for recent

graduates? A Relax during job interviews. People are always so scared of interviews, but I really think an interview is an opportunity to talk about yourself for  minutes to people who are paid to listen. Interviewers have a vested interest in you and really want you to succeed. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.deloitte.com/us/careers

Employees: 45,000. Employees Profile: We’re looking for leaders across a variety of backgrounds who thrive in a team environment and have strong analytical and communication skills. Ways in: The opportunities we offer are as diverse as the professionals we hire. Multiple internship programs and positions abound in our four business areas. As used in this document, “Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.deloitte.com/us/ about for a detailed description of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Dwight Cendrowski

As a child, Anthony Ambroselli wanted to be an archaeologist, and specifically, an Egyptologist. As an auditor at Deloitte & Touche LLP, Anthony’s excavations are on a more figurative scale, but he still enjoys sifting through data to gain a better understanding of how things fit together. As a new employee, he dove right into the corporate culture, and within the first month was appointed co-chair of Deloitte’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) resource group and co-champion of the University of Michigan recruiting team, where he uses his recent-grad status to attract and place top talent.

Deloitte is one of the leading professional services organizations in the U.S., specializing in audit, tax, consulting, and financial advisory services with clients in more than 20 industries. We provide powerful business solutions to some of the world’s most wellknown and respected companies, including more than 75 percent of the Fortune 100.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 Business

United Airlines

Chris Kerns’ day starts and ends on the tarmac, which jives with his childhood love of all things aviation. These days, he only flies for fun (he has a private pilot’s license), while he spends his working days on the ground as United Airlines’ Director of Business Management at Washington Dulles, overseeing the financial management of United’s operation at the airport.

Key Facts On Oct. 1, 2010, United and Continental closed their previously announced all-stock “merger of equals” transaction to create the world’s leading airline. The new United will offer customers an enhanced travel experience, combining the best products and services each carrier has to offer.

Chris Kerns Q When did you become interested in

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Ezra Gregg

the airline industry? A It’s been a lifelong passion, but back in  when I was working in IT consulting I decided to reevaluate my career based on what I love and really enjoy doing. I decided commercial aviation would hold my interest until I retired, so I went back for my MBA. Q

What should students know about

working here? A It’s a fascinating industry. It’s very competitive and challenging, which means the opportunities are great. Airlines work across a broad spectrum of disciplines in a complex industry, so there are opportunities for anyone.

• Position: Director, Hub Business Management • Education: Purdue, aero engineering, 1995; Cornell, MBA, finance, 2009 Q Did you have preconceived notions

about the industry?

Airlines have a reputation for being poorly managed; however, during the past few years the industry has become much more disciplined and focused on shareholder value. That provides great challenges and plenty of opportunity for MBAs.

Employees: 86,500 globally.

A

Q What advice would you give to young

Demonstrate interest and understand what you’re asking for. Also, network! I’m surprised at how infrequently I’m contacted by students. You should definitely leverage alumni resources to help gain an unvarnished view of the company. 

professionals? A

Know the industry you’re applying to.

FIND OUT MORE: www.united.com

Employees Profile: We actively recruit students on campus for a variety of full-time and internship opportunities. Opportunities vary depending on student discipline, and exist within both operations and corporate roles.

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 TOP 100

Business Business

UBS “Talk about what’s not on your resume to reveal your strengths.”

Q How did you first become interested in

the finance industry?

My math degree naturally led me to financial services, as I saw how many options there were across the industry. A

Alex Cheriyan • Position: Client Service Manager in OTC Derivatives • Education: Boston College, mathematics, 2008

Q Has UBS met your expectations? A I think it probably surpassed my expectations. One surprise for me was how approachable people were. This was my first introduction to corporate culture and to investment banking, and even though it’s a very fastpaced world, people are very open. Historically, that’s pretty integral to the culture at UBS, as managers are very invested in regular performance reviews and mentoring. Q What does a typical day look like? A I handle a lot of client relations, so my role is to make sure top revenue-driving clients receive excellent service. A typical day would include a proactive meeting with the operations team, a strategy meeting differentiating the level of service to

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our top clients, and reacting to any client issues that might need resolving. Q

What is the biggest misconception

about your work? A One misconception is the amount of time people in my position spend interacting directly with the clients. Even though I’m in operations and dealing with many internal teams, I also build many lasting client relationships.

can be limiting and short-sighted, because in a year your priorities can change drastically. In a general way, I would want to be in a role where I was entrusted with an organization’s priorities and that would be because I’ve shown a track record of excellent performance. That role could be anything from being an excellent portfolio manager to being the most popular plumber in your town. Q What challenges do you face? A The job market is a lot tougher today than when I started three years ago, so the environment is that much more competitive and the expectations are significantly higher than when I started. The general challenge is to keep up with that, to keep standing out, and to make sure you’re being heard. Q What is the corporate culture like? A UBS is very loyal to their employees. When you put in an effort and want to learn and challenge yourself, it is clear to them and management makes sure you’re appreciated for that.

Q Where do you expect to be in five

Q

years?

students?

A I always hesitate to give a specific role or profession when asked this question—I admire someone who knows exactly what they want to be doing in five years, but I think that

A My best advice would be to leverage the interview as a means to talk about yourself and about the things not on your resume. Also, be confident in what you know. 

What advice would you have for

FIND OUT MORE: www.ubs.com

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Ron Glassman

When Alex Cheriyan was preparing for his interview at UBS three years ago, he knew that other candidates might have more experience in finance than he did. So he decided to leverage all of the things that weren’t on his resume in order to stand out, like volunteering in hospitals during high school, or teaching math to incarcerated men who were studying for their GEDs at a local jail. He nabbed the job, and three years later, continues to approach work at UBS from an outside-the-box perspective.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 TOP 100

Business Business

“Watch and learn to form opinions that are accurate.”

Outgoing and friendly, Laine Litman leveraged her personality and skill set to nab an internship after sitting next to and chatting with the CFO of a bank during an airline flight. These days, Laine uses her financial know-how and enthusiasm for a fast-paced environment to thrive in future sales and executive trading at UBS. Q Why did you choose to go into sales

and execution?

I’m a very external person. I like to chat, and don’t really have an “indoor voice,” so I knew corporate finance in a cubicle was not for me. A contact suggested that I look into sales and trading, where I could be my loud self. A

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Ron Glassman

Q Why do you think you got the job? A My ability to meet people, make contacts, and grow those contacts in a professional manner. While networking is an important part of the game, it’s also key to be respectful of peoples’ time when following up. You don’t want to harass people! Just maintain respectful contact.

Laine Litman • Position: Futures Sales and Execution • Education: University of Pennsylvania, economics, finance, and marketing, 2007 Q What does a typical day look like? A That’s what’s so great—there is no typical day. Every day I come in I’m doing different things, whether it’s sending out a morning recap, checking in on the European trading markets, executing trades, or calling to chat with clients to find out how I can improve our relationship. Q What are you most proud of about

your work at UBS? Q What surprised you when you first

started in your role? A During my internship I was surprised that we had so much access to senior management, and even more surprised when that continued after I got my job. The mentoring doesn’t stop after you’re no longer a candidate who they’re interested in recruiting; it’s still a very open atmosphere.

A There is a steep learning curve that I was not only able to keep up with, but in doing so, exceeded my manager’s and my own expectations. I’m proud that I have established myself as a point of contact among my colleagues. Of course, that means that I get a lot of phone calls that start with “I thought you might know who to send this to…”

Q Where do you expect to be in five

years? A I have no idea. The job has already changed so much during the past four years, so who knows where it will be in the next five. I’ll just keep changing and building my knowledge base to keep up. Q What do you enjoy most about your

job? A Entertaining clients and building relationships that turn into friendships. One of my clients asked me to go to a Lady Gaga concert along with people from his firm. I felt like I was a friend and not just a broker, which was a really nice feeling. Q

What advice would you give to

students? A Make sure you go to recruiting events, and have questions to show you’re informed about the role. You don’t have to be an expert, but have an understanding of the culture on the trading floor. Also, don’t rely on other people’s experiences or opinions. Get to know the banks, get to know the culture, and make your own opinions, which will ensure that you’re doing something you really enjoy. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.ubs.com

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 TOP 100

Business Business

UBS “Be positive, even when you’re working under tight deadlines.”

Q How did you first become interested in

this industry?

I have a love for business and finance. Some people love to work on cars, to make them faster, or smoother, and I have a similar passion for working on companies. A

Q Why do you think you got this job? A Mostly because of my positive attitude and strong work ethic. It’s all about attitude in investment banking —your colleagues want to know that when they’re in the foxhole with you and you’ve all been working nonstop that you’re not going to be a downer but will be committed and work toward the goal. Preparation also plays a big role, as today’s labor force is global and your competition for top positions is also global. And of course, hard work and dedication is essential in any pursuit—you’ve got to be able to put your nose to the grindstone. Q What surprised you when you started? A Everyone knows that investment banking is a difficult career. But you don’t really grasp how difficult it is until you get on the desk and start doing the job. Even though you’re prepared for it, investment banking

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Jumaane Ponder • Position: Investment Banking Analyst in the Financial Institutions Group • Education: Howard University, international accounting and economics, 2010

is kind of like being in finals all the time. I think in college, a lot of us are like “Finals? I eat finals for breakfast!”—but when you’re stuck in constant finals week and not only are they every day, but they’re eating you in the process—well, that gets tough. Q What do you enjoy most about UBS? A I really enjoy going to client meetings. It’s always fun to travel around the country for meetings, and we’re often dealing with large, successful companies with ornate penthouse offices and breathtaking views of the city. I also love working with companies in M&A transitions, where we’re giving them insight and advice on strategic operations. Q

What is the biggest misconception

about working for UBS? A The firm has been going through some rebuilding in order to make it stronger, as all banks have. At times,

that can be a rocky road, and there may be a misconception that UBS is not a strong firm and that is not the case. We’ve been doing very well in cutting costs, generating revenue, and getting our balance sheet in order so we can continue to be a major player globally in investment banking. Anyone should consider it as a first option in the financial sector. Q What is the most difficult part of your

job? A There is a lot of work to be done, often on a very tight deadline. We’re also working on projects that are financially significant in scope and there’s very low tolerance for mistakes. It’s not like college, where B’s are fine. They don’t curve grades in investment banking—you have to be up to a certain caliber and that’s where attitude comes in. You have to have the desire and commitment to work better and faster in order to improve. Q

What advice would you give to

students? A Go for it! UBS is a great firm with a broad range of opportunities. It’s also global, so you often have an opportunity to work overseas or to travel frequently. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.ubs.com

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Chris Gabello

Jumaane Ponder says he was interested in investment banking before he knew exactly what the name of the industry was or how to get into it. He credits his positive attitude for landing him the job, and thrives on tough assignments and challenging deadlines.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 TOP 100

Business Business

“Playing sports and leading college events helped me get my job.”

Growing up in a small suburb outside of St. Louis, MO, Zachary Emnet knew he wanted a fast-paced, big corporate environment, and set his sights on NYU Poly, where he hoped to merge his interest in business, finance, and technology. In addition to his education, playing on the varsity volleyball and baseball teams also helped Zach to develop the team mentality he employs daily as a project manager at UBS, where he helps set and maintain the budget for large corporate projects.

decisions take longer because of the regional differences, but sometimes it speeds things up, as decisions will be made in Asia or Zurich over night. As a project manager and budget holder, I also find it exciting to manage multimillion dollar projects. Q Are there any misconceptions about

Q How did you hear about the job at

UBS?

I had a classmate who joined UBS through the graduate training program. He recommended that I attend an information session on campus. I ended up receiving an offer and entered the -year rotational tech program. A

Zachary Emnet • Position: Project Manager in Group Technology Infrastructure Services • Education: Polytechnic Institute of NYU, business and technology management, 2007

A People sometimes think that since UBS is a Swiss bank, decisions made by the company only benefit the Swiss —but much of our Group Technology management is actually U.S.-based.

Q Did the job meet your expectations?

Q What challenges do you face?

It’s difficult to predict what working with technology will be like. You don’t know what facet of technology you’re getting yourself into until you start working. Luckily, I’ve enjoyed my work since day one.

A Personally, it’s hard to be a young person sometimes, as I don’t always know the answers and I’m working with people who have been here for  or  years longer than I have. Sometimes it can be a challenge to track down the person or the information you need when you don’t have the expertise to answer a question.

A

Q What is a typical day like for you?

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Chris Gabello

A Nearly three-quarters of my day is spent on the phone, working with my team and checking on the status of various projects. As a project manager, I don’t get as involved in the nittygritty tech details. Q Why do you think you landed the job

at UBS?

I had a diverse background in college, as I played volleyball and baseball, and was very active in student organizations and in residential life. It helped that I was in charge of running all projects and programs for oncampus students during my senior year, as that related directly to project management. A

UBS?

Q Did anything surprise you when you

started your job? A I started working immediately after graduation, and was surprised to find that I was definitely one of the youngest people in project management. Most of my colleagues were at least  to  years older than me. Q What do you enjoy most? A I enjoy that it’s a global company, so you learn a lot about different countries and cultures. Sometimes

Q What advice would you give to

students? A Go to any UBS informational sessions on campus to learn about the programs offered for students. Shop around to compare our programs with other companies, as you’ll find a wide range of differences. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.ubs.com

Key Facts UBS draws on its 150-year heritage to serve private, institutional, and corporate clients worldwide, as well as retail clients in Switzerland. We combine our wealth management, investment banking and asset management businesses with our Swiss operations to deliver superior financial solutions and manage CHF 2.1 trillion in invested assets. Employees: More than 65,700 globally, 37 percent in the Americas. Employees Profile: Our hires have degrees ranging from economics and finance to astronomy and political science. There is no one set of traits or background we look for as we have found that an individual’s education and experience are more important than a specific major.

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100

Engineering

General Electric “What I like best is working with people who share my passion.”

Key Facts

Q When did you first become interested

in engineering and energy? A As a kid, I loved taking all sorts of things apart and was curious to look inside and see how they worked. I’m most interested in renewable energy, and that solar-powered radio motivated me to figure out how renewable energy could be captured, transformed, and distributed.

Owen Schelenz • Position: Electrical Engineer • Education: University of Cincinnati, electrical engineering, 2006. Georgia Tech, master’s of electrical engineering, 2009/2010

Q What do you enjoy most about your

job? A I’m constantly stimulated by my work at GE, but what I like best is not only working in a field I find interesting, but also with people who have similar passions. I’ve been itching to build a do-it-yourself Segway since college, and through a coworker who was similarly interested, I finally got the chance to explore that engineering curiosity—and the Segway even works! Q

What challenges do you face?

Time management. Honestly, there’s not enough time in a day to work on all the cool things we do here. A

Q What sparked your interest in GE?

Q What advice would you give to

Q

I started interning with GE during college, and during my third internship, I met members of the GE Global Research Center and was just floored— their projects were the stuff of science fiction, and I just knew I had to try to work there.

recent grads?

Our work in the field of solar energy is really exciting to me. It’s not just about injecting power into the grid, it’s about making solar energy a reliable, grid-friendly power source for the global grid. Solar power has great potential, and we’re working toward to seeing more of it around us.

A

Q

What is a typical day like for you?

Today I collected some data on a solar inverter out in Arizona, analyzed a circuit schematic for in preparation for some testing, then taught an entry-level power electronics class for our engineers. Tomorrow I am pitching a proposal to get funding for a new inverter technology project to the CEO. And I’m always in the lab. A

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A As an engineer you should always learn something outside of your direct line of work. GE definitely encourages that, both through the internship programs and in the workplace. There are about , engineers and scientists all working on different technologies here and countless opportunities to help expand your knowledge in both formal and informal ways. Also, don’t underestimate the value of internships. About  percent of our new hires are the direct result of an internship or co-op program. As an added bonus, internships are key to gaining exposure to many different areas of GE in order to better focus your talents.

What excites you about working at GE?

A

Q

What competencies are in demand?

Anything related to energy is a hot topic, so we’re looking for engineering backgrounds, whether that’s electrical, mechanical, software, or materials engineering, or computer science—and we’re definitely hiring. A

FIND OUT MORE: www.ge.com/careers

Employees: GE employs about 300,000 people worldwide. Employees Profile: From engineering and information technology, to marketing and sales, to finance, manufacturing, and human resources, with GE you’ll find the career opportunities and leadership development you need to succeed. Ways in: GE offers leadership programs and positions that can help you make the most of your education. GE’s leadership development programs allow you to rapidly advance your career while working on important projects and building leadership skills. Internships and co-ops are a great way to get your foot in the door at one of the world’s most respected companies, giving you valuable leadership experience and networking opportunities.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Timothy Raab

For Owen Schelenz’s eighth birthday, his ecologically-minded parents gave him a solar-powered portable radio. Fascinated by the concept, Owen took the radio everywhere and would clip it onto the bus window on school trips so he could listen to sun-powered tunes. At GE, Owen delves deeper into his curiosity about free energy sources, and researches ways to make solar energy a viable part of the power grid.

GE is a diversified infrastructure and finance company taking on the world’s toughest challenges. From aviation and power generation to financial services, healthcare solutions, oil, gas, and rail, GE operates in more than 100 countries.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100

Engineering

Shell

Stacy Methvin first discovered an interest in geology during a summer spent as a park ranger in Olympic National Park while she was an undergraduate. When a professor told her about opportunities for geologists in the oil industry, she embarked on a career that she loves for its variety, complexity, and the useful products it supplies. Q What surprised you most about

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Mauricio Ramirez Uribe

working at Shell? A Within three days of starting my job, I was at a drill site in Louisiana. One thing Shell really prioritizes is providing experience in all of the critical skills, so I’d go on-site to learn how to use different instruments and what drilling truly entails. I quickly realized that I would take on many challenges early in my career, but that I would be fully supported with training and mentoring.

Stacy Methvin • Position: Vice President, Refining Margin Optimization • Education: Princeton, geological & geophysical sciences, 1979

are safe, and that we’re working with communities to minimize impact. Shell attracts some of the brightest and most energetic people, as evidenced by our strong internship program.

Q What do you want students to know

about Shell?

Q What is a typical day for you?

We are a diverse company that is evolving with the changing nature of energy demands, and we are making a conscious effort to be sure that the environment is protected, people

A Today I’ve done everything from talking to staff about their careerdevelopment opportunities, to evaluating growth projects, to optimizing profits in existing businesses.

A

Key Facts

Q

What do you enjoy most about your

job? A I enjoy the variety—I work with staff at refineries all around the world, and get to see the local challenges we face at each. The complexity is all very stimulating. 

FIND OUT MORE:

Shell is a global group of energy and petrochemical companies with an aim to meet the world’s growing demand for energy in economically, environmentally, and socially responsible ways. Employees: More than 93,000 people in over 90 countries. Ways in: Internships, Scholarships, and Shell Recruitment Day.

www.shell.us/careers

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 IT

NSA

There is working, and then there is working for a cause. The

National Security Agency has such a cause. Chief of Staff Deborah Bonanni discusses the virtues of feeling part of something bigger than you. Q What is NSA’s role in national

security?

Everything we do supports the nation’s leaders so that they can make the best and most well-informed decisions possible. To do that, we exploit the communication systems of our adversaries to gain information. We also work to protect U.S. national security information systems from being compromised. A

Q What is it like to work in such a

secret environment? A We have a compelling mission and a strong team spirit. Contrary to popular belief, NSA is not populated by antisocial geeks. There is a great mix of people with technical skills and liberal arts-based talents. What they all have in common is intellect, creativity, analytical skills, ambition, and motivation. Also, since you can’t take the work home with you, when you leave the office, you can focus on your family, and talk about things other than work.

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

Deborah Bonanni • Position: Chief of Staff • Education: Juris Doctorate, Columbus School of Law, Catholic University, 1982

backgrounds. People who join us get to work on significant projects and solve complex problems that are all crucial to the nation’s security. We also have great educational programs that enhance the knowledge of our employees and enrich our mission.

Q How did you end up at NSA?

I graduated with a degree in political science, but realized early that I would not make much money without a PhD and have the kind of life I wanted, so I decided to go to law school. When I finished, I considered NSA because my father had worked there and loved the place. I joined as a junior lawyer, fully anticipating that I would work for a couple of years, maybe get an MBA, and then move on. That was  years ago. I’m still here. A

Q

What can a new hire expect at NSA

today? A A collegial atmosphere where team spirit is strong, as well as working with brilliant people from diverse

Q

What kind of person fits in at NSA?

People with backgrounds in computer science, math, engineering, languages, or international relations are the norm. From a personality perspective, we are as diverse as any large organization. Over the years, I have watched the agency become far more diverse. For example,  percent of our senior leadership team are women. They are powerful talents and serve as strong role models. We embrace people from different backgrounds, cultures, and lifestyles now, and this diversity helps us to do our mission more effectively.  A

FIND OUT MORE: www.nsa.gov

Key Facts The National Security Agency (NSA) is a world leader in the protection and exploitation of intelligence. Their mission is to gather and analyze foreign signals intelligence to produce vital information for U.S. policy makers and warfighters. At the same time, NSA protects U.S. government information systems. Employees: Approximately 30,000. Employees Profile: NSA is looking for critical thinkers in fields such as computer science, computer/ electrical engineering, mathematics, intelligence analysis, and foreign language. Ways in: Apply for a full-time career or one of NSA’s many student programs at www.NSA.gov/ Careers. U.S. citizenship is required for all positions. Ways in: Apply for a full-time career or one of NSA’s many student programs at www.NSA.gov/ Careers. U.S. citizenship is required for all positions.

Text by Catrine Johansson, Photo by NSA

“I am proud to help lead an agency that embraces diversity.”


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 IT

Protiviti

From Joseph Rivela’s job title, you might picture a lone computer whiz cracking codes in a basement to help protect large companies from confidential data breaches, but he says that working in security and data privacy is nothing like the movies. In reality, he works closely across all divisions of a client company to protect confidential data, and has found job satisfaction in Protiviti’s collaborative culture.

Key Facts

Q Why is privacy and security

management so important?

As cyber attacks advance, companies are looking to protect their data and assets in alignment with corporate strategy, regulatory requirements, and governance programs. Preventing a data breach—or managing the fallout when one occurs—and executing a solution is a challenging yet exciting objective.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Marianne Barcellona

A

Joseph Rivela • Position: Senior Manager, Information Security & Privacy Solutions • Education: Utica College, Bachelor of science in economic crime investigation, 2004

Q Q

What skills are key for job success

Q Describe a memorable moment.

at Protiviti?

Our team was brought into an organization to conduct a security assessment of one of their internal web applications. With our proventesting methodology, we identified and exploited a system vulnerability, allowing us to cut a check for  million—but of course we didn’t keep it!

As a security and privacy consultant, you work closely with companies’ executives, so you need to have a strong understanding of technology, as well as good interpersonal and communication skills. These areas of expertise are critical to success across all of our solution offerings.

A

A

What do you enjoy most about

working at Protiviti? A I have always been impressed with the diversity and backgrounds of my coworkers. Not everyone is cut from the same cloth, and the collaborative approach that we take to consulting makes Protiviti a good place to develop skills and learn to apply them. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.protiviti.com

With a network of more than 70 offices in 20 countries, Protiviti (NYSE: RHI) is a global consulting firm that helps companies solve problems in finance, technology, operations, governance, risk, and internal audit. Employees: 2,500 professionals. Ways in: Get to know us via our careers website, as well as social media, diversity organizations, campus recruiting, and our intern program.

Walt Disney

When Chris Shrigley came to the U.S. from a small town in England with two suitcases and $400 in his pocket, he never dreamed he’d get a chance to visit Disneyland, never mind work for the much-adored company. A gaming and entertainment software whiz, he now heads the technology team building a brand-new online game for Disney Online Studios. And his friends and family at home? “Still massively impressed,” he says. “And for me, the novelty hasn’t worn off either.”

Key Facts

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Kenny Goldberg

The Walt Disney Company is a leading diversified international family entertainment and media enterprise. Each segment has its own unique technology organization that focuses on delivering exceptional media experiences for our consumers and Disney employees worldwide.

Q

Games are pushing technological boundaries across the board, so you have to be really sharp to keep up. That’s also one reason I love working at Disney— you never get bored.

Technology is key. We focus on hiring world-class talent, and we innovate a great deal here across the entire division. The teams are absolutely top notch, from our senior leadership to our engineers. A

Employees: 149,000. Ways in: We hire employees who are passionate about working on the highest-trafficked websites in the world, creating compelling video game experiences, and supporting the infrastructure of a brand known around the world.

Q What role does technology play at

Disney?

Q

• Position: Senior Manager, Technology at Disney Online Studios • Education: Wilmorton College, computer science, 1986

What is the working culture like at

Q Are there any myths about technology

Disney?

at Disney?

A I think people love the wholesome Disney brand because they grew up with it—maybe that sounds cliché, but it’s pretty special to be surrounded by truly invested and interested people. We are always thirsty for bright, enthusiastic people who are creative and passionate about technology. 

The perception is that Disney is not really a tech company, but more of a traditional media company. That isn’t true at all. We’re all about tech, and we innovate across the board, be it via the web, social gaming, cutting-edge AAA console titles, mobile, or MMOGs. A

Chris Shrigley

What challenges do you face?

A

FIND OUT MORE: www.disney.com

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 IT

SAP

Laura Thiele knows that job satisfaction often hinges on one word: flexibility. As Director of HR and mother of three young children, she knows that happy employees are those given the opportunity to mold and define their own roles within the SAP workplace to achieve business results.

Key Facts

A SAP is an innovative global company; it’s exciting, fast-paced, and positioned for growth. I was also attracted to the opportunities to work with individuals across different cultures, countries, and backgrounds. Q What do you enjoy most about

working at SAP? A Flexibility. I have three small children and my husband is also a SAP employee. Knowing that it is relatively up to us to balance our work and personal lives makes my commitment to SAP even stronger.

Laura Thiele • Position: Director, Human Resources • Education: BBA at James Madison University, 1997; MS, Villanova, human organization science, 2001

their scope, their purpose, and responsibilities. Then they can leverage their strengths to make the role come to life. If an individual is passionate about what they do, it will create more satisfied and engaged employees. Q What is the employee culture like at

SAP? Q How do you define successful HR

management?

A clearly defined job description is key, so an individual understands A

A It’s a very diverse, dynamic culture. SAP believes that innovation stems from a varied skill set. We want innovative thought leaders who think smarter,

simpler, and faster and who are on top of the latest and greatest technology. Q What advice would you give to recent

graduates? A Align to a role that emphasizes your strengths. Knowing what you’re good at and how we can leverage that as an organization is important. Also, never stop learning! 

FIND OUT MORE: www.sap.com

Rebecca McDermott knows firsthand how challenging it can be to standardize processes across all regions of a global company, but she thrives on the challenge while appreciating the flexibility SAP gives to balance her work with her role as a mother.

I was always interested in technology and how it enables businesses. SAP had a great reputation and impressive client list, and the global exposure at SAP was intriguing. A

Rebecca McDermott • Position: Program Manager for Content Strategy • Education: University of Albany, marketing and management, 2000, MBA, University of Albany, human resource information systems, 2001

Q What is a typical day? A I work in a global group, so I often start early, but that suits my “mom” schedule. I’ll make calls starting at 6 a.m., then get my kids off to school. The rest of my day is filled with conference calls for projects I’m managing, discussing content processes, sending emails, and creating presentations. Q What surprised you most when you

Q What do you enjoy most about your

job? A I thrive on the new challenges it brings, and I love working with people from all different regions. The flexibility is also important to me; because SAP has provided me with the freedom and technology to work remotely, I can be a great employee and a great mom.

first started at SAP?

Q What is it like to work for a global

A I came to work the first day expecting to ramp myself up and create my own success, and I was deeply impressed by how truly supportive everyone was.

company?

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

A While exciting and challenging, it can be complicated to define and standardize processes on a global level. There are

Employees: A diverse workforce of more than 54,00 employees, representing 124 nationalities worldwide, is a source of our innovative strength and a fundamental driver of our business results. Employees Profile: Every employee impacts the way business is run by creating change, working in an environment that cultivates engagement and collaboration among employees and encourages the open, free expression of innovative ideas.

Q What appealed to you about working

for SAP?

SAP is the world’s leading provider of business software, offering applications and services that enable companies of all sizes and in more than 26 industries to become best-run businesses. With more than 172,000 customers in over 120 countries, and 74 percent of the Fortune 500 companies running SAP applications, you can consider SAP to be practically everywhere.

many regional differences, so nothing is one size fits all—we have to extract the best from all regions. FIND OUT MORE: www.sap.com

Ways in: The company culture with a clear focus on success, accountability, professionalism, integrity, teamwork, and trust is a good starting point for highly motivated employees. In addition, the driving force behind SAP is the different ways of thinking and innovative ideas each employee brings to SAP. We offer yearround internships and graduate programs.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photos by M. Scott Whitson

Q What attracted you to SAP?


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100 IT

Central Intelligence Agency

“This is not a regular job—you will be a part of history.”

Q What perception of the CIA would you

like students to have?

Just to understand that it’s not just another regular job. If they are hired as an intern, co-op, etc. they are working alongside senior officers on some the CIA’s most important projects. They will be making valuable contributions. They will be part of history. On the other hand, applicants should know that the CIA is an amazing place to learn more about the world, about the impact and reach of other nations, and about how the United States is viewed elsewhere. A

Q Are there any misconceptions or

myths about the CIA? A There are many misconceptions and myths about the Agency, like you’ll never see your friends and family again, that we live glamorous lifestyles like , or even that we are so secret that we only recruit covertly. They are surprised to see us at career fairs. Another misconception: everyone

Alishia • Position: Outreach Program Coordinator • Education: George Mason University, communications and business

looks like an Angelina Jolie or Matt Damon action figure. For most of us, our chances of being the next action figure are slim to none.

Key Facts Q What are the company’s plans going

forward? A Moving forward, the Agency is looking to increase diversity within the organization to be representational of the nation we serve, and to ensure we meet mission critical needs. The Agency takes its mission direction from the President, and with the oversight of Congress. When policy goals change, the CIA’s mission may change—at all times, however, CIA employees strive to fulfill our credo: We are the nation’s first line of defense. We accomplish what others cannot accomplish and go where others cannot go. Q What advice would do you have for

those entering the work force right now?

Do what you love! Choose a career path that you will have opportunity for growth and where you are challenged. Many people don’t seem to mind being challenged when they are in love with what they do. Choose something that is meaningful, fulfilling, and rewarding for you and for the greater good. Choose an organization that will value your input and utilize your skills or business, the place that creates and cultivates the best you.  A

Q What have you done today so far? A As a young Intelligence Officer, I have had the opportunity to work within several different parts of the Directorate of Support, and have worked closely with the National Clandestine Service. Currently, I am creating awareness of the Agency career and student program opportunities in the CIA Recruitment Center. So I get to engage and talk to students across the U.S., presenting “a day in the life of a CIA officer” experiences—and I can help dispel those myths I mentioned earlier.

FIND OUT MORE: www.cia.gov

The CIA has four basic components: the National Clandestine Service, the Directorate of Intelligence, the Directorate of Science & Technology, and the Directorate of Support. Together they carry out “the intelligence cycle,” the process of collecting, analyzing, and disseminating intelligence information to top U.S. government officials. Employees: Undisclosed. Employees Profile: Presently, the following majors are in demand: science and technology backgrounds such as computer science majors, engineering, international affairs, and business, as well as critical foreign languages. We need individuals who have excellent communication skills, whether written or oral, and critical thinking skills.

Text by the CIA, Photo by the CIA

Before working at the CIA, Alishia’s image of the secretive government agency was what comes to mind for most people: what is seen in action-packed movies. A few years after 9/11, a friend mentioned the agency was hiring and Alishia went online to apply. She says the lifestyle isn’t as glamorous as what you see in the movies, but the CIA’s mission makes up for it: Alishia and her coworkers all share a common passion to be a part of an organization that helps protect Americans and to be a part of something greater than ourselves.

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100

Natural Sciences

Genentech

Michael Hwang, a junior at MIT, had spent plenty of time in a lab coat, but had never seen his research put to practical use. His internship at Genentech opened his eyes to the role biotechnology plays in cancer research and treatment.

A The best part about going to work every day was knowing that our work in the lab was directly related to helping people. That knowledge really grounds you when you’re doing research, because you can see how your daily work makes an impact on real patients. Q Did you have any misconceptions

about Genentech? A Because I had only worked in an academic research lab, I thought biotech might be different—maybe utilizing big, automated robotic machinery to speed up assays—but I found that it wasn’t too different from working in a lab at MIT or anywhere else. Science seems to be the same everywhere. The only difference is the business-like, timelineoriented environment of the company.

Michael Hwang • Position: Intern, Dept. of Molecular Dx & Cancer Cell Biology

Key Facts

• Education: MIT, biological engineering and management, 2013

Q

What was a typical day like at

Genentech?’ A I’d work at the bench, run experiments, and report to managers. One great thing about Genentech is that you work closely with your manager. We’d talk about the experiment and next steps, but also about things like school and career advice. The atmosphere was very open and collaborative. Q What advice would you give to

current students? A Be persistent and don’t be afraid to contact upper-level management. Also, a

big advantage for me was doing research really early on in my academic career. If you like doing something, start early and do it often.  FIND OUT MORE: www.gene.com

Considered the founder of the biotechnology industry, Genentech has been delivering on the promise of biotechnology for more than 35 years, using human genetic information to discover, develop, manufacture, and commercialize medicines to treat patients with serious or lifethreatening medical conditions. Today, Genentech is among the world’s leading biotech companies, with multiple products on the market and a promising development pipeline.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Chris Sanchez

Q What was the most rewarding aspect

of your internship?

Employees: Over 10,000.

Cristina Sanchez trained as a mechanical engineer, but soon found that she was more interested in connecting with people than in designing refrigerators. At Genentech, she is a key liaison between the company and outside suppliers, and is constantly inspired by the company’s desire to put the patient first.

Ways in: Genentech offers full-time positions, internships, and co-ops as well as clinical fellowships and postdoc opportunities.

Q What surprised you most about

Genentech?

Cristina Sanchez

I was surprised to see how many • Position: Associate Procurement individuals and departments are involved Manager in developing a drug and getting it out • Education: Tufts, mechanical engineerthe door. I was also amazed at how ing, 2007; biomedical engineering, 2009 patient-focused everything is here— every single conversation revolves around what is best for the patient, even if you’re Q What kinds of competencies are in not directly involved in patient care. demand? We don’t just think about things from A Genentech is focused on innovation a corporate perspective, we put people and developing new therapies and treatments, so we really look for diverse first. Q What’s a typical day like for you? thought and creativity. What really A As a sourcing manager, I work with spawns innovation is anyone who can external suppliers to optimize processes bring something different to the table. and ensure that Genentech has the raw materials it needs. We’re a global Q What advice do you have for recent company, which means a lot of early graduates? morning teleconferences with colleagues A Professional networking societies really helped me to understand the across the world and site visits. A

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

industry—I don’t know if I would have landed my job if I hadn’t been so involved in professional groups as an undergraduate.  FIND OUT MORE: www.gene.com

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Jason Doiy

Employees profile: Science, research, engineering, marketing, manufacturing, law, operations, HR, IT, and finance.


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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100

Natural Sciences

Toys“R”Us, Inc. “The culture and training Toys“R”Us provided made my transition from college so easy.”

Key Facts

Q Why do you think you got this job? A I was right out of college when I applied, so I think I had a refreshing excitement about applying for jobs. By the time I got to the Toys“R”Us interview, I’d had a few interviews, but it was still one of my first. I was excited, motivated, and I wanted to start my career. My whole attitude stood out. Q

Has the job met your expectations?

It’s exceeded my expectations. One of the fears I had was failing within the first week. I was so nervous and had no management experience. But the culture of Toys“R”Us and the training made my transition so easy. They spent a lot of time on my development, which is something I didn’t expect. It’s been a lot more than a retail job, like I had in college. As a store manager, you’re a leader; you’re accountable and responsible for everything that goes on. A

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

Samantha Colilla • Position: Store Manager • Education: Ramapo College, psychology, 2009

Q What are you most proud about in

your work? A I was given a long-term assignment, which was to oversee the remodel of the store where I currently work. A lot of the stores are converting to a new design, and I was put in charge of one of these remodels. I think I did an amazing job. I received a lot of recognition and I believe it’s one of the reasons I got promoted. Q What is your advice to students who

Q What surprised you the most when

want to work for this company?

you started?

The opportunity is there. Don’t be narrow-minded and think of it as a retail job. I had no idea how my psychology degree would relate to the store manager position, but I use it everyday in my job. Also, there’s a lot of room to grow here.

A The involvement of the district manager in my training. At a lot of retail companies the District Manager wouldn’t spend that time with the assistant manager, but it was almost like I had a mentor. He took me under his wing and led me. I was surprised by that.

A

Q What is the most difficult part of your

job? Q How does a typical day look?

What I like most is that every day is different. There’s always a new challenge, a new opportunity, and it’s not so structured. Doing the same thing everyday can become boring. But here, it’s always something new. And I love the people part—you’re always spending time and interacting with people, whether it’s customers or coworkers. A

A I would say looking at the big picture. I think for me, I can’t be as hands-on as I’d like. I need to step back and make sure everything is getting done as a whole. Your instinct is to jump in and help, but as a manager you need to step back, take in the situation, and lead.

FIND OUT MORE: www.ruscareers.com and www.facebook.com/ruscareers

Employees: 70,000 worldwide (and 100,000+ during the holiday season). Employees Profile: A sense of humor and a love of kids are paramount requirements, along with hard work and determination to excel. We have a saying here: “5% Responsible, 100% Accountable,” and what we mean by that is empowerment. At every level within the “R”Us family, our team members are empowered to use their initiative to seek out and find fresh, new, and innovative solutions to old problems.

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by Rich Green

Samantha Colilla worked retail jobs in college, but never thought of pursuing a career in the retail industry. After seeing a job posting for a position at Toys“R”Us on a job board, she thought it may be a good fit for her child psychology degree. Since starting, she’s been amazed at the training she’s received, and quickly earned a promotion to be a store manager. Now she gets to work in a hands-on atmosphere every day, and help children and parents find the perfect toy.

Toys“R”Us, Inc. is the world’s leading dedicated toy and juvenile products retailer, offering a differentiated shopping experience through its family of brands. Merchandise is sold in 873 Toys“R”Us and Babies“R”Us stores in the United States, and in more than 520 international stores and over 200 licensed stores in 33 countries and jurisdictions. In addition, it exclusively operates the legendary FAO Schwarz brand and sells extraordinary toys in the brand’s flagship store on Fifth Avenue in New York City.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

TOP 100

Natural Sciences

Monsanto

As a native Nigerian, Oseyi Ikuenobe understands the challenges farmers in Africa have growing food in drought conditions. At agriculture company Monsanto, Oseyi works in the IT department, helps with recruiting, and is passionate about the company’s drought-tolerant seed research. Q What kinds of skills are in demand at

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Brian Schmittgens

Monsanto? A We’re looking for leaders, and by that I don’t mean just executives and managers, but people who have the mentality and drive of a leader at any level. Half of my day is spent thinking on the fly, being creative, thinking outside the box, and pulling in the right people to solve problems. Q What would you like students to know

about Monsanto?

Students should know that we’re very passionate about what we do and are very focused on helping farmers produce more crops while using less resources like water and land. We’re also committed to sustainable agricultural practices that can help improve lives around the world. A

“In our opinion, Oxy is one of the best managed companies, if not the best managed, in its peer group.” Phillip Weiss, Argus Research Company

July 27, 2011

Key Facts Monsanto is one of the world’s leading agricultural companies. We’re a company committed to innovation and focused on working with farmers to help them produce more with less natural resources.

Oseyi Ikuenobe • Position: SAP Enterprise Portal Lead • Education: Truman State University, Computer Science, 2005; Washington University in St. Louis, Masters in Information Management, 2010 Q What do you enjoy about your job? A I’m motivated by the fact that decisions I make affect the future of our company and that I’m trusted with that responsibility. I also appreciate the freedom to get involved in recruiting the next generation of leaders, volunteering in the community, and organizing events outside of my everyday responsibilities. Q As someone with recruiting

A Do research on the company you’re interested in and seek out companies doing things you’re passionate about. Be confident and relentless in applying, and you’ll stand out as being passionate and motivated.

experience, what advice would you give

FIND OUT MORE:

to young job seekers?

www.monsanto.com

Employees: Monsanto has over 20,000 employees worldwide. Ways in: The majority of our new graduate hiring comes from our intern and co-op programs. It’s a great way to learn how Monsanto works.

Growth and financial stability are at the core of our company. We’ll promise you the same focus – opportunities for growth, development and success througout your career. Apply today at www.oxy.com/careers.

www.oxy.com


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

AECOM

Key Facts We are a global provider of professional, technical, and management support services to a broad range of markets, including transportation, facilities, environmental, energy, water, and government.

The daughter of a Samoan-born mother and an African-American father, Teuila Hanson lived in a small village in Samoa for a year, which instilled in her a passion for multicultural studies. She has since taken this passion to people worldwide, working as vice president, Diversity and Inclusion for AECOM.

I love to talk to young people about the impact AECOM has on the world, from transportation modes, to a city’s skyline, to enabling a community to access fresh water. A

Teuila Hanson • Position: Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion, AECOM

Employees: We have approximately 45,000 employees around the world.

• Education: JD, Golden Gate University School of Law, 2000 Q How do you implement diversity and

Q What does fostering diversity mean

inclusion globally?

to you?

A What drives diversity programs are the communities we serve. If you’re trying to solve a local problem, you can’t just parachute in a solution—you need to develop local talent to enable them to find sustainable solutions for their communities.

Different generations have different views of diversity, and it’s important to note that we’re not just talking about gender or skin color or ethnicity—we look at diversity from  different dimensions. Part of my challenge is to maximize diversity to spark innovation and to help managers ensure that ideas from all of our people have a pathway to decision makers. A

to be different people in order to reach their true potential at a company, they’re going to leave. We focus on inclusion by highlighting our people’s diversity, different perspectives, and individuality to allow them to be authentic. 

Q How do you ensure diversity and

FIND OUT MORE:

inclusion at AECOM? A

If employees believe that they need

www.aecom.com

Ways in: We offer tremendous potential for bright students who are keen to make a career in the fields of engineering and design, transportation planning and development, and environmental science among other professional disciplines.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Jason Doiy

Q What’s important for young people

to know about AECOM?

City Year

Anthony Teague was pursuing a high-tech career until a service trip to post-Katrina New Orleans opened his eyes to how community involvement can positively affect at-risk youth. He is in his second year with City Year, now working as a team leader in Miami. Transformed by the experience, he plans to pursue a master’s degree in community and social change.

City Year is an education-focused organization that unites young people for a year of full-time service to keep students in school and on track to graduation. At 21 locations across the U.S., City Year teams serve full time in schools as tutors, mentors, and role models.

Q Can you describe a typical day?

Q What misconceptions surface about

I’m up early every morning because we strive to be the first ones at school and the last to leave. We work as tutors, mentors, and role models in America’s highest need schools. We facilitate study groups, run after school programs, provide one-on-one tutoring, and support students through initiatives that boost school morale.

City Year?

A

Employees: 2,000 young adults.

Q What skill sets are in demand at City

Ways in: City Year recruits from all backgrounds and majors. Unique skills and perspectives are needed and deeply valued. We look for leadership, team experience, and a 10 month commitment.

Year?

Anthony Teague • Position: City Year Team Leader • Education: University of Illinois, Bachelors of Science in technical systems management; minor in Spanish, 2009

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

A We have an immense diversity of backgrounds and majors at City Year, from business or law majors to those who are entering a career in social work. You need to be an idealist, have a desire to serve others, and believe that social movements can truly have a real impact on our communities.

A People sometimes think that this is a year off, but it’s really a very challenging experience. We put in rigorous - to- hour days, but once you see the impact you can have, you’ll cherish those moments for the rest of your life. Q How does the program support you? A It’s always about the students, but City Year has formal leadership development programs to build leadership qualities, including mentorship programs with corporate partners. I’ve been able to build project management, team leadership, and public speaking skills, and gain a deeper understanding of the challenges in our communities. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.cityyear.org

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Elliot Haney

Key Facts


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

Liberty Mutual

“I chose Liberty Mutual because of the variety of experiences and level of exposure I had access to.”

Q How did you first become interested in

insurance and Liberty Mutual? A When I was researching jobs in college, I wasn’t as interested in the insurance industry as I was in the IT jobs insurance companies had available. My interest in Liberty Mutual came from the entry-level rotational programs they had, specifically the technical development program. I chose Liberty Mutual because of the variety of experiences and level of exposure that I would have access to right away. I was also excited to work at a Fortune  company. Q How does a typical day at work look? A On a typical day I am multitasking between project management items such as monitoring status, risks, issues, and keeping schedules updated. I’m also engaging with my staff as a resource manager, helping them resolve roadblocks, working on domain planning and future state initiatives, and finally the administrative work that comes along with managing resources.

Ashley Fitzgerald • Position: Manager of Software Development • Education: Purdue University, networking engineering technology, 2005; Masters in cyber forensics and IT management, 2007

Q What are you most proud about in

your work? A When the team of people that I’m working with are able to accomplish a major milestone or finish a large project. There is a feeling of satisfaction that we were able to deliver something to our business partners which will help them and our company be more profitable. I feel proud that I can coordinate those efforts and ensure we are meeting their expectations. Q

What’s the most fun thing you’ve

done since starting? A I was fortunate enough to attend a roundtable with the CEO, CIO, and a

group of my peers from my rotational program. It was interesting to hear their takes on our career paths and what we should do in terms of making decisions that work, what to take seriously, and what not to. Q

Has the job met your expectations?

All the entry-level rotational programs give you the opportunity to try different seats before finding a permanent home. Because of my rotations, I am able to understand many perspectives within our company because if even for a short time, I worked in a variety of roles and on a variety of projects. It’s helped me be successful and get the job I have now. A

Q

What is the biggest misconception

Key Facts As one of the world’s largest property and casualty insurers, Liberty Mutual Group offers a wide range of insurance products and services. We help restore lives, and whenever possible, use our knowledge base, employee talent, and research capabilities to help prevent accidents and injuries from happening. Employees: 45,000 globally.

about working for Liberty Mutual?

I think there is a misconception that insurance has an older workforce and that young college hires won’t find peers here. We have a large population of college hires coming in the door each year, and they stick around.  A

FIND OUT MORE: www.libertymutualgroup.com/careers

Employees Profile: Liberty Mutual is looking for candidates with strong business and financial acumen, analytic thinking, leadership skills, and an understanding of a customer-facing business.

33

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by Chris Sanchez

Ashley Fitzgerald joined Liberty Mutual in 2007 through the company’s technical development program. Four years later, one of the reasons she most enjoys working at the insurance giant remains the open access to training and continuous learning. She was recently appointed manager of software development overseeing a team of six.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

DISH Network

For self-proclaimed sports junkie Michael Bean, working at DISH Network is just an extension of his everyday routine, as his work as a programming specialist enables (and encourages!) plenty of sports-related research. Monitoring the sports industry is only part of Michael’s job, but he thrives in a corporate culture that rewards and encourages motivated employees. Q Did you have any preconceived

notions about DISH?

Until college, I thought “TV programming” entailed sitting behind a computer to code HTML or something– but it’s actually choosing what’s on TV. My team and I negotiate the terms of carrying a station like NFL Network; I also do the financial and product analyses that relate to our customers. A

Q What do you enjoy most about your

job? A I love that the research that adds to my job competency is the same as my pleasure reading—that’s proof you’re doing something you really like. I also enjoy working on big-money deals and with high-profile networks.

Michael Bean • Position: Programming Specialist • Education: University of Virginia, economics and history, 2009 Connecticut, economics, 2011

Q Q

What is it like to be a new hire at

DISH?

Do you have any recommendations

for recent graduates?

Look for a company that doesn’t limit you. I have no interest in going to a place with artificial barriers. I want to go to somewhere I can excel with all of my skills and energy, and where I’m rewarded for doing the work I love to do.  A

A Outstanding—there’s more than enough work to go around, and if you have the talent and energy to complete it, they’ll give you more. That doesn’t mean it goes unrewarded–there’s so much room to grow and they’ll allow a kid who just turned  to work on important projects and with top-level executives.

FIND OUT MORE: www.dish.com

DISH Network is the nation’s third-largest pay-TV provider and a leader in digital television. We are industry pioneers known for driving technology to provide the best in TV and movie entertainment. Employees: 20,000 DISH Network employees, plus 15,000 from Blockbuster. Ways in: Visit www.dish.com/ university for information on our internship and undergraduate/ graduate full-time hiring opportunities.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Larry Laszlo

Key Facts

Ericsson

Nathan Robbins has been interested in cell phones and how they work since the first time he used one as a 13-year-old. So when he first heard about Ericsson, it seemed a perfect fit, career-wise. What he didn’t realize was the impact Ericsson has, not only on mobile technology, but on communications and society across the globe. Ericsson is in  countries, so the company is very diverse. It can be challenging at first since we have so many ideas, but at the end of the day, our collaborative approach makes what we do better. Also, the culture is such that when we have a project, corporate titles tend to go out the door. My opinion is valued as much as anyone else’s.

Key Facts Ericsson’s leadership in network, multimedia, and telecom technology enables businesses, communities, and societies to easily connect, communicate, and share. Employees: 14,000 in North America. 90,000+ worldwide. Ways in: Summer jobs, internships, recent graduate openings, job fairs, global leadership programs, and through Ericsson. com/careers.

Q Are there any misconceptions about

• Position: Business Analyst, Engagement Practices • Education: Chapman University, BS in business administration, 2007; Boston University, MBA and MS in information systems, 2011

• Read More @ www.wetfeet.com

Q What is your favorite aspect about

Ericsson? A Every day brings new challenges. That’s mostly because the technology and the way we use it changes so quickly. There’s always something to innovate on, and you have to keep up on a global level.

Ericsson?

Q What competencies and educational

Sometimes people think that Ericsson only makes phones, but if you’ve used broadband, you’ve used Ericsson. Our work in global communications has a great impact on society. For example, our mobile broadband has helped fishing villages in Africa and Asia to increase productivity and sales. It allows fishermen to track the weather and learn

backgrounds are in demand?

A

Nathan Robbins

current market prices, whereas before, they were just going on luck.

A Naturally, we need technology and business minds, but more than that we need people who not only share our vision for the future, but who are innovative. Creativity is essential. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.ericsson.com

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Karen Campbell

Q What is the corporate culture like? A


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

Mars “Don’t be afraid to take a risk or to make a big move.”

Key Facts

Q How did you become interested in

Mars?

When I was a kid, I wasn’t sure what career path I’d take. I knew I liked being very involved with people, so, it’s not surprising that I landed in a role that lets me work with and lead large teams. After starting my career working in the finance industry, I decided I wanted to have a career with hands-on product and brand experience, and where I’m accountable for delivering results and for building teams. A

Q How would you describe the office

culture like at Mars? A The Mars office where I spend much of my time is extremely collaborative. The corporate culture is such that we all work together in an open environment, and in fact, every single person from top to bottom has the same-sized desk. It’s a high-energy environment where the ideas are constantly flying. If you want to work in a company with thickly carpeted floors and mahogany walls and desks where it’s so quiet you can hear a pin drop, then you don’t want to work at Mars!

Todd Lachman • Position: President, Mars Chocolate, Latin America and North America • Education: Colby College, economics, art history, 1985; J.L. Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, MBA, 1991 Q Are there any misconceptions about

Mars? A I think sometimes people believe that because we’re a private, family business that we’re very secretive. Yes, we keep some things close to our chests, but being private means we operate with the consumers as our boss, not Wall Street. Mars is also committed to creating jobs in the U.S., and recently announced a new U.S.-run factory this year. Also, I’m not sure most people realize that Mars has such a varied presence in the U.S. as a global food business that goes far beyond chocolate, but we also manage petcare, Wrigley Gum and Confections, drinks, food, and symbioscience. Q What educational backgrounds are

in demand? A We look for people with strong educational backgrounds, but we don’t really

mind what the discipline is. I’m a good example of that. My bachelor’s degree was a double major that included art history. We’ve even had people who have voiced an interest or passion—such as sustainable cocoa practices in Africa—where we’ve been able to give them the opportunity to pursue that passion in their jobs. And, we have a robust program for MBAs. Q What is your favorite thing about

working for Mars?

I love the associates here, and combined with the creative, collaborative work environment, it’s a very energizing workplace. We really try to foster an environment where who you are outside the office is the same person you are inside. A

Q

What challenges do you face?

We’re in five continents and  countries, so it’s a challenge to make sure we have enough great talent to maintain our edge. Mars is in an expanding market, so we’re always looking for new talent to help drive that forward. A

Q

What advice would you give to recent

graduates? A Choose what feels different and is the biggest challenge—those experiences will stretch you. Take risks, make bold moves, and look for new opportunities.

FIND OUT MORE: www.mars.com

When people think of Mars, most often they think of chocolate. But we’re much more. We’re a privately owned company with net sales of more than $30 billion and six business segments including Petcare, Wrigley Gum & Confections, Food, Drinks, Symbioscience, and of course, Chocolate. Employees: More than 65,000 associates worldwide are putting our Mars Principles in action every day to Make It Mean More for people and the planet through our performance. Employees Profile: We offer rotational, full-time, and internship roles. Areas include Finance, HR, IT, Marketing, R&D, Sales, Supply Chain, Engineering, and Veterinary Science. Ways in: We offer rotational, full-time, and internship roles. Areas include Finance, HR, IT, Marketing, R&D, Sales, Supply Chain, Engineering, and Veterinary Science.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Rich Green

Todd Lachman’s enthusiasm for his job is infectious. As president of Mars Chocolate Latin America and North America, he builds winning teams and brands along with shaping regional and global business strategy. He travels frequently—but still finds time to enjoy a full family life and even a few favorite indulgences (though he says it’s tough to choose between Peanut M&Ms or Snickers).

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Salesforce.com

Companies to Watch

®

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by Jason Doiy

“We want to hire someone who is smart and gets things done— you don’t need to come in and be an expert on cloud computing.” Brett Schuenemann has only been with salesforce.com for a little under six months, but he already feels the salesforce.com family has embraced him. Brett says employees come from all backgrounds, are fun, and very team-oriented. In just a short time, he’s been exposed to some of the most innovative social and mobile technologies in the industry and feels this is a huge selling point for other new grads considering employment opportunities with salesforce.com

team. As a new hire, that’s awesome to hear and really reinforces why you’re waking up and putting  percent into what you’re doing everyday.

Q How did you first become interested

A When you’re talking to University Recruiters, just be yourself. We want to hire someone who is smart and gets things done—you don’t need to come in and be an expert on cloud computing.

in salesforce.com?

When I was a freshman in college, a class I took discussed cloud computing and I was fascinated by the technology. I wanted to work for someone who was on the cutting edge of technology, and salesforce.com is the enterprise cloudcomputing company to work for. From there, I spoke to a University Recruiter at a career fair on campus and applied for the position. A

Q Why do you think you got this job? A I think I got the job because in addition to being strong technically, I also have very good communication skills. At salesforce. com, you’re constantly working in a team atmosphere, so you need to be able to communicate well with your peers and superiors. I think it’s a common misconception that

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Brett Schuenemann • Position: Software Engineer • Education: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, computer science, 2010

people in technology are modular in their thought process, abrasive, and hard to work with. Salesforce. com employees are none of these things—the people here really wowed me. Q

What are you most proud about in

your work? A We work in month-long “sprints” with our work, and at the end of each sprint we evaluate each other. At the end of last month, every person on the team said I was a strong team member, they enjoyed working with me, and they are glad I’m part of the

Q

What is your advice to students

who want to work for your company?

Q What is the most difficult part of

your job? A Delivering a product that is user friendly for the customer. Being in engineering, often times the easiest programming is not the best solution for the customer. It takes a lot of extra time to make our products as user friendly as possible, but our customers mean a lot to us, and we need to make a product that they enjoy using. 

FIND OUT MORE: www.salesforce.com/college


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

Key Facts Salesforce.com transformed the enterprise software market with cloud computing. We’ve launched business apps and platforms that are as easy to use as Amazon.com and as social as Facebook. And now we’ve got our sights set on the next generation of cloud computing. Recognized by Forbes as the world’s most innovative company and the 4th fastest growing company according to Fortune magazine, our portfolio of cloud computing technologies has revolutionized how companies manage and share business information.

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by Jason Doiy

“Since I was so passionate about sales, the company created a position for me.”

Romi Jordan first came to salesforce.com the summer after her freshman year of college. At the time, there was no internship program in the Sales department, but Romi was passionate about selling and salesforce.com created a role for her. Three summer internships and two fulltime positions later, she now works as an Enterprise Business Representative, supporting five account executives to generate new business for the company. Q How did you first become interested in

salesforce.com?

A good family friend worked here, told me how much he loved working at salesforce.com, and really piqued my interest. I’ve always been interested in technology since it’s fast paced and ever changing. I was also drawn to the concept of cloud computing—whenever I did research on cloud computing, salesforce.com always came up as the pioneer in the field. A

Q How did you hear about the internship? A I wanted to shadow my family friend for a day at salesforce.com and when I called his assistant to set it up, she asked if I would also like to apply for an internship. I decided to go for it, and began conversations with University Recruiting, which led to an interview. I knew I wanted to do sales, because I’ve always been outgoing and wanted

Romi Jordan • Position: Enterprise Business Representative • Education: University of California at Berkeley, business administration, 2009

to have a job where I’d be interacting with people. At the time, there weren’t any Sales internships, so I had to be persistent. Since I was so passionate about sales, the company created a position for me—now we have around  sales interns each summer and another  on-boarding throughout the year. Q

What surprised you the most when

you started? A For one, the promotional path— you can move up pretty quickly. After a year of working in my first role as a Sales Representative, I got promoted.

I also love how many friends I have made here. I have developed several great friendships from having this job. The office is young and fun, everyone in my role is a similar age, and we all work really well together. There are a lot of people that move to San Francisco to work here, and they’re easily able to make friends at the company. Q

What are you most proud about?

The volunteering programs we do. We get six paid days vacation to volunteer each year. In my current role, I’m the “Chief Foundation Officer,” which means I am in charge of coordinating foundation events for my team. So far, my volunteer projects have included serving food to the homeless at Glide Memorial Church, gardening at the San Francisco Zoo, working at the San Francisco Food Bank, and an upcoming project at PlayWorks, which will involve volunteering at a local school. The fact that we are able to get into the community and make a difference outside of our work life is something I’m very proud of.  A

FIND OUT MORE:

Employees: More than 5,500 employees with headquarters in San Francisco, CA. Employees Profile: You’ve invested heavily in your education—not only financially, but also in terms of the sacrifices you’ve made to achieve your goals. Now it’s time to apply what you’ve learned and explore your potential. Salesforce.com offers internships and full-time opportunities for undergraduates and graduates in areas such as software development, quality assurance engineering, usability, UI design, security, documentation, sales, and marketing. Recent grads come from top universities and programs across the U.S. Salesforce. com has become an employer of choice among students.

www.salesforce.com/college

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PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

“The opportunity to make an impact early was a surprise to me.”

As an operations rotational engineer, Michael Esema has seen many sides of TE Connectivity. So far, he’s rotated through positions in development engineering, material planning, industrial engineering, purchasing, and even accounting. He says the rotational program has given him a complete view of how TE operates, not to mention some high-level access: he’s been able to speak in front of top-level executive management.

do for a career. Be open-minded to new and different things, and don’t make the mistake of letting opportunities pass you by. Don’t just work hard, work smart. Q What is the most difficult part of your

job? Q How did you first become interested in

supply chain management?

I’ve always had an interest in business and engineering, and supply chain management bridges those two functional areas. Through supply chain, I have the opportunity to resolve both engineering and business functional issues and it has been exciting. A

Q How did you hear about the job? A One of the sponsors of my graduate program was a previous graduate of Penn State and a TE employee. He would occasionally visit our group and speak about TE and the opportunities available, which sparked my interest. Shortly after, TE was present at our campus career fair. I was given the opportunity to interview on campus and eventually onsite at TE, which led to the opportunity to work here. Q

What surprised you the most when

you started? A The opportunity to make an impact early was a surprise to me. My initial impression was that for the first year I would be likely cruising under the radar—I’d take a year to learn the

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Michael Esema • Position: Operations Rotational Engineer • Education: Penn State University, Masters in Manufacturing Management, BS in Marketing & Supply Chain, 2009

company and develop. When I came in, I had immediate responsibility; I had opportunities to engage in major cost savings projects, work on supplier relations, and support and manage product lines. Q How does a typical day at work look? A Every day can be different, especially because I’ve been rotating through different departments. Generally, I do have standard tasks I’m responsible for, but when you’re in the manufacturing environment, it’s dynamic. Things are always changing on the manufacturing floor, and you need to be able to adapt. Everyday is a new day. Q What is your advice to students who

A Learning how to be patient and learn from the people whom are ahead of you. After five years of theory and coursework, it is easy to be anxious to come out of school and want to apply all the knowledge you’ve developed. I had to learn that work is a different environment than school. It isn’t enough to think you know it all. I needed to take the time to learn how to apply my insight, so I can add value to the company. Q What’s the most fun thing you’ve done

since starting this job? A I had some time to work on applying lean manufacturing, which was cool. We would do value stream mapping, where members from different functional areas get together and map out our complete manufacturing processes. We identified areas for improvement then highlighted action plans to drive improvement. It’s fun getting away from the day-to-day issues and brainstorming with your coworkers. You discover new and exciting ideas that have the potential to make a big impact. 

want to work for TE Connectivity? A Start now to grow and learn, figure out what you like and what you want to

FIND OUT MORE: www.te.com/campus

Key Facts With a 50-plus year history of leadership, TE Connectivity is a global, $12.1 billion company that designs and manufactures over 500,000 products that connect and protect the flow of power and data inside the products that touch every aspect of our lives. Our nearly 100,000 employees partner with customers in virtually every industry—from consumer electronics, energy, and healthcare, to automotive, aerospace, and communication networks—enabling smarter, faster, better technologies to connect products to possibilities. TE Connectivity is an independent, publicly traded company whose common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker symbol “TEL.” Employees: 97,000 employees globally and 23,000 in U.S. Employees Profile: TE Connectivity is looking for smarter, faster, better people to join our team. You’ll interact daily with colleagues across the world as you’re exposed to the internal operations of a $14.3 billion (projected 2011 revenue) global corporation. You’ll learn leadership skills and help grow a fast-paced, dynamic organization. The positions include (but are not limited to): Engineering, Finance, IT, Procurement, Business, Logistics, HR, Marketing and Communications. Positions are available in a variety of locations across the U.S. including: Pennsylvania, North Carolina, California, Minnesota, Oregon, and others.

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by Brian Tolbert

TE Connectivity

Companies to Watch


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

The Hartford “We’re a creative, innovative team that challenges the status quo.”

Key Facts

Q What appealed to you about

The Hartford?

The Hartford stood out as an ideal place to start my career with great people and a culture that fit my values. The Hartford’s Leadership Development Programs provide an opportunity to see multiple businesses and see where one fits best. Seeing the history on the walls— specifically, Abe Lincoln’s insurance policy—gave me a sense of pride. A

Q What is the corporate culture like at

The Hartford? A There’s a huge emphasis on mentorship and collaboration. In my group, when you first come on board, you’re matched with a peer mentor who is also relatively new to The Hartford. After a year, you’re matched with a more experienced mentor who can give advice on day-to-day issues, but also big-picture career development. Collaboration occurs through team projects and team-building activities, ranging from community service to paintballing and go-karting. Another great opportunity is the Reverse Mentor Program that connects high-potential, tech-savvy millennials with executives to mentor them on emerging technologies and social media. Real relationships are

Florian Schäfer • Position: Manager, Technology Leadership Development Program at The Hartford • Education: Boston University, accounting and finance; Spanish minor, 2008

around for  years, but during that time we constantly adjusted to new trends, challenges, and opportunities. Q

A The Hartford is a great place to start a career, not just a “job.” It affords recent grads with tremendous opportunities to impact the success of the organization. You are expected to make an impact here, and you will. Q

built at The Hartford—that’s why I love it here. Q

Can you discuss a few of your keys

to success? A Relationship building and enthusiasm helped me the most. Taking the time to get to know people and maintaining your network is key. Enthusiasm becomes a habit and is contagious—spread the love! Volunteerism is big—and by that I mean service to nonprofits, but also showing enthusiam for the more tedious assignments at work that make a huge difference. Make sure you give back. Q

Are there any misconceptions about

your company? A The stuffiness of the financial services culture. At The Hartford, we do business conservatively, but walking through the halls you witness business-casual dress and a creative, innovative team that challenges the status quo. We’ve been

What would you want current students

to know about working at The Hartford?

What kinds of competencies or

educational backgrounds are currently in demand? A Process improvement, simplification, and technology stabilization. We look for self-motivated leaders of all backgrounds who are forward thinkers, inspire excellence, and work as team to support the changes in a variety of roles, including project management, process management, business analysis, development, database management, and technical analysis. Q What is the biggest challenge you face

in your job? A No challenges, only opportunities! In my role, it’s getting people to go outside of their comfort zones. It goes against human nature, but by doing something simple—like saying hello in the hall— you can effect great changes.

FIND OUT MORE: www.thehartford.com

Employees: 25,000. Employees Profile: The Hartford is seeking future leaders across a wide range of study disciplines who share our values and bring passion to their work. Ways in: We offer leadership development and early-career programs in various areas of our business, including finance, technology, sales, underwriting, actuarial, claims, risk management, operations, investment management, and human resources. Summer internship opportunities are also available for undergraduates and MBA students.

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Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Al Ferreira

Florian Schäfer’s first foray into financial services began as a student at Boston University, when he started investing (modestly) out of his dorm room. Now he is a manager for The Hartford’s Technology Leadership Development Program, where his enthusiasm for mentoring and coaching is channeled toward helping his teammates reach their highest potential.

The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. (NYSE: HIG) is a leading provider of insurance and wealthmanagement services for millions of consumers and businesses worldwide. We help our customers pursue a financially secure future by anticipating their needs and providing competitive financial products. The Hartford is consistently recognized for its superior service and as one of the world’s most ethical companies.


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

Feeding America

Working in corporate America for 15 years, Albert Gonzalez didn’t think of hunger as a problem in the U.S. But after learning about the nearly 50 million Americans living in food insecure households, Albert realized a career at a nonprofit would give him the fulfillment he needed. Albert now works in the IT department at Feeding America, the leading hunger relief organization in the country.

Feeding America is the nation’s leading domestic hunger-relief charity, with more than 200 member food banks serving all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

Q How did you first become interested

in Feeding America?

I worked in IT for a long time, but September th changed the IT industry completely, and I was laid off. I then realized I had options for my career: I wanted to find a deeper meaning to life and work somewhere I could make a difference. I started to look into nonprofits, and heard about Feeding America from a friend. Truthfully, at that point I realized how ignorant I was about hunger in the U.S. Now I’m helping to solve the problem. A

Q What is your favorite service offered? A Selfishly, because I work on it, the Choice System. The Choice System is a web-based application that allows

Albert Gonzalez • Position: Online User Support Specialist • Education: DeVry University, computer information systems, 1991

members to acquire product donations made available through the national office. I’ve been working with it for five years and I’m involved in all aspects of it. Q What perception of Feeding America

do you want others to have? A When I started working with Feeding America, there was a stigma associated with working for nonprofits, that it may not be as rewarding as the corporate world. I now know better and disagree.

In the nonprofit world, I have found personal gratification, talented and very diverse colleagues, and a family-like atmosphere with people that care about their jobs and care about the mission. I am no longer making the rich richer. I am Feeding America! And there’s nothing more attractive and important to me than that. FIND OUT MORE: www.feedingamerica.org

Employees: 242 employees including the Child Hunger Corps and interns. Ways in: Recent college grads and experienced professionals are encouraged to apply. We also offer internships for current students.

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by www.panayiotou.com

Key Facts

Key Facts Mail is big business. The United States Postal Service is a $67 billion organization. If it were a private sector employer, it would rank 29th in the Fortune 500 in 2010. USPS is the nation’s second largest civilian employer, the world’s largest alternative fuel-enabled fleet, and has a larger retail network in the U.S. than McDonald’s, Starbucks, and Walmart combined.

United States Postal Service Like most people, Justin Kai Zhu took for granted that the mail is delivered daily to his house—until he started working at the United States Postal Service. As a participant in the Accelerated Career Entry (ACE) program, Justin works in IT purchasing in the supply management department, and helps streamline processes to ensure your mail gets where it needs to be. contracts. It’s really interesting to do the negotiations with suppliers for these A In college I was really interested in goods, because of the high dollar value. logistics and process improvement, and It’s intense, but rewarding when you get USPS is one of the largest logistical in- the best value for your organization. frastructures in the world. Because of the size and scope of USPS, I knew there Q What’s the most fun project you’ve done since starting? wasn’t any better place to work. Q How did you first become interested

Employees: 574,000 career employees throughout the U.S. Ways in: The Accelerated Career Entry (ACE) is a two-year rotational professional development program designed to provide future leaders in IT, engineering, supply management, finance and other businessrelated disciplines.

Q What is the best part about your job?

Justin Kai Zhu • Position: Accelerated Career Entry program participant • Education: Michigan State University, applied engineering sciences, 2009

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A Negotiating with suppliers. Supply management basically buys anything that the Postal Service needs to use. We do procurements where there’s a need from an internal business customer. For and anything they need to purchase, whether it’s complex ERP systems to cleaning goods, we do the deals and the

A I can’t go into too much detail because I’m under nondisclosure, but I sourced a pretty complex system to help us track mail. This system will be implemented across the country. I got to see a lot of new cutting-edge technology, like advanced Optical Character Recognition, and embedded platforms.

FIND OUT MORE: www.usps.com

Text by Liz Seasholtz, Photo by Ezra Gregg

in the Postal Service?


PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Companies to Watch

Unilever “We’re a big company, but you’re never just a number here.”

Key Facts

Q What was your perception of Unilever

before you started? A From the outside, you’re only aware of the products. I was a loyal Unilever consumer but when I got on the inside, I was amazed by the passion and excitement brand managers have for their brands—they take great pride and are very emotionally connected. Q Can you describe a typical day?

I sometimes work from home, as Unilever supports an agile work environment. I manage the media portfolio for Unilever, and help drive world-class campaigns for more than  brands across North America. A

Q

What roles do sustainability and

Gail Tifford • Position: Senior Media Director, North America • Education: Tufts University, psychology, 1991. Brooklyn Law School, 1994. Q

Are there any misconceptions about

working there? A A common misconception is that at a big company, you become a number. You never, ever feel that way here. So whether it’s due to the strong investment in training and mentorship programs, or an opportunity to manage one of our iconic brands, you feel like you’re part of a small, intimate community rather than a large, global organization.

called a few years later and offered me my current opportunity. Looking back on it now, it was quite serendipitous—I knew the brands, I knew the people, and finally had the media experience to merge it all together. Q

What is your favorite aspect of

working at Unilever? A The endless opportunities. I’ve been able to work across sales, marketing, training and now media, which really demonstrates Unilever’s -degree point of view and its commitment to valuing each individual’s skill sets across disciplines, across brands, and across the world. Q

Do you have a favorite Unilever brand

or product? A I’m very partial to the ice cream brand Magnum—if you haven’t tried that, you haven’t lived! But I’m also fond of Q-tips because it was the first brand I worked on when I came to Unilever (and they really do have  percent more cotton at the tip!).

What prompted you to leave Unilever,

innovation play in the workplace?

Q

They are broadly deployed across the workplace. It inspires me to work for a company that is so committed to people, consumers and the environment, whether that commitment is demonstrated through consumer educational programs, developing products that make consumers’ lives better, or reducing our environmental footprint.

and what made you decide to return?

Q

During my first job at Unilever, I discovered a passion for working with our media partners and about finding new and innovative ways to reach our consumers. So when a large media organization offered me an opportunity, I decided to pursue it because it gave me a chance to learn how global media companies operate. Unilever

Be patient, persistent, and get out there and network. You never know when your next boss could be in an elevator with you or sitting next to you in a restaurant. It’s happened to me! 

A

A

What advice do you have for students?

A

FIND OUT MORE: www.unileverusa.com/careers

Employees: Unilever employs more than 13,000 people across North America. Employees Profile: Each year, we recruit from some of the top schools across the United States. We offer career opportunities in the following areas: Marketing, Finance, Sales, Research & Development, Supply Chain, and Information Technology.

Text by Lindsay J. Westley, Photo by Chris Gabello

Gail Tifford was an attorney when she first started consulting for Unilever. That eventually led to a job offer, and, impressed by the caliber of its employees and already loyal to Unilever brands, Gail jumped at the opportunity. Now that she’s on the inside, she benefits from a supportive and flexible workplace—but still finds time to sing the praises of Unilever’s brands, from Hellmann’s to Q-tips.

Unilever is one of the world’s leading suppliers of fast-moving consumer goods with strong operations in more than 100 countries and sales in 180. With products that are used over two billion times a day around the world, we work to create a better future every day and help people feel good, look good, and get more out of life with brands and services that are good for them and good for others.

Ways in: Unilever hires full-time employees, interns, and co-ops into a variety of entry-level positions across the United States and around the world.

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INTERVIE R E T S A S I D

Don’t be caught off guard. w e i v r e t n i r o f s c i t c a t l a v i v r u s e l b a s n e p s i d n i 9

Y

our resume is impeccable, your outfit spiffy. You’ve studiously researched the company. And while it may initially seem you and this job were meant to be together, the interview, like a date, can go either way. You might say something stupid. You might not hit it off with the interviewer. Your cell phone might ring right in the middle of one of the recruiter’s questions. But experts say you can save your skin (in most cases). Here are some pointers to do just that. story by: KEMBA

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T GH RI E TH R FO G IN OK LO E AR RS TE UI CR RE WHILE 1. You’ve embellished one of your roles at a previous employer—and the recruiter caught you. You told yourself it’s fine to say you “managed a team,” when you really just sent emails to coworkers to set up a March Madness pool. You also told yourself everyone has fudged, although no one will ever admit it. But try telling that to the interviewer sitting across from you with a furrowed brow. Recruiters say if you’re caught flat-out lying about your credentials, you have little to no shot of getting an offer. This is a tough one to get out of, so Arnnon Geshuri, vice president of human resources at Tesla Motors, suggests falling on your sword is the best bet. Geshuri recalls grilling a candidate about a position he had clearly embellished. After the candidate realized he had no choice but to come clean, he admitted he hadn’t done everything he stated on the resume. He then decided to pull himself out of the application process. In the end, the fiction writer didn’t get hired because he wasn’t qualified, says Geshuri, “but in that instance, he scored some points and left the interview on good terms.” In some cases, you can overcome resume fudge, depending on how much wiggle room you’ve left yourself. Janet Raiffa, former head of campus recruiting at Goldman Sachs, says if a recruiter tells you point blank you are too junior to have done what you claimed, you can always respond, “I didn’t have the highlevel responsibilities on every project, but I highlighted the efforts I really got to stretch on.” 2. You arrive late to the interview. A 21-car pileup on I-95, a snowstorm that swept in the night before, and your father’s bypass surgery are acceptable excuses. The alarm not going off or thinking you were still on daylight savings time are not. “Being tardy does leave a negative impression and makes us question your ability to be responsible,” says Marissa Cherian, global director of management consulting recruitment at Accenture. If you have a legitimate excuse, immediately call and let the recruiter know, giving as much information as you can about your arrival time. Acknowledge in the process that you might have thrown off the interviewer’s day and offer to meet him at another time—at his convenience. If the excuse falls into the “not acceptable” category, just tell the truth—and fasten your seat belt for a tough interview.

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Either way, once you do finally meet with the hiring manager, apologize immediately— and profusely. 3. The interviewer asks you a brainteaser of a question and you’re completely stumped. Some candidates in this difficult situation say they don’t have the foggiest and wait for the next question. Others try to fake their way through it. But while recruiters are looking for the right answer, they are equally interested in seeing how candidates handle themselves when the answer isn’t on the tip of their tongues. “You should start solving the problem by thinking aloud,” says Caitlin McLaughlin, director of talent acquisition at PNC. “It shows the person has some facility with the concepts. Say, ‘I don’t know the answer, but if I were going to think through it, here are some key criteria I’d use.’” 4. You say something truly stupid or grossly inappropriate. You and the recruiter are really getting on together. Then, for a split second, you forget you’re not on campus and let one of those lovely expletives slip out. The recruiter may not have blinked, but make no mistake—he caught it. Let’s hope you immediately realize your mistake and apologize, claiming that in the heat of the moment, you blew it. No matter how sincere the apology, you’ll most likely be remembered for that verbal jewel. Sarah Quarterman, senior vice president of human resources at Bank of America, recalls chatting with a student who fired off some bad language and didn’t acknowledge it. “It speaks to how professional someone is going to be with a client and points to someone’s judgment.” So, depending on the degree of the profanity, context, and the perspective of the interviewer, “this could be a fatal error,” says Juan Morales, a managing director at the Miami office of Stanton Chase International, an executive search firm. A “hell” is easier to recover from than an F-bomb. Just make sure the mistake isn’t repeated. 5. Twenty minutes into the interview, the recruiter calls you by the wrong name. “So, Christine, it looks like you accomplished a lot in your past job,” says the marketing director. Yeah, he got that part right.

Problem is, you’re Michelle. Your inclination might be to brush off the mistake to keep the conversation flowing. Wrong move. A recruiter sees a lot of people and if you don’t give a solid impression of your name and identity, your entire interview might get lost in the black hole of her BlackBerry. Plus, not correcting the person might say something about you. “I once called a student by the wrong name and she didn’t set me straight,” says Connie Thanasoulis-Cerrachio, partner at SixFigureStart, a career coaching firm. “I later realized [the error], but it made me wonder why she allowed me to call her by the wrong name.” Simply interrupt and say, “Just to let you know, my name is Michelle. I know you’re doing a lot of interviews, so it’s tough to keep track of everyone.” 6. The recruiter says something you know is plain wrong. “We’ve had six straight quarters of earnings increases,” says the manager conducting the interview. But because you pored over the company’s earnings like it was last month’s bank statement, you know for a fact that one of those quarters had a decline. Sure, this might seem like the perfect time to show you’ve done your homework. But making the recruiter feel like an idiot in the process is a surefire way not to get the job, says Brian Drum, president and chief executive of Drum Associates Inc., an executive search firm in Manhattan. Drum suggests moving away from the false statement and back to your accomplishments. On the other hand, the interviewer could be testing you, “and you have to assess that as well,” says Drum. You could tactfully mention (preferably with a smile) you understood something else to be the case. The key, says Drum, “is to maintain your equanimity.” 7. Your cell phone rings. It’s annoying and short-sighted not to have turned it off in the first place. But you will seriously limit your chances of getting any offer if you check to see who is calling. Thanasoulis-Cerrachio of SixFigureStart found it “infuriating” when a candidate glanced at the number before shutting it off. Recruiters say there is nothing else to do but apologize and say you thought you had shut it off. The key is to assure the recruiter nothing is more important than the interview.


K. IN TH U YO W HO E SE TO T AN W SO AL EY TH , ER ANSW

8. The recruiter is stiff as a board—and you’re convinced you’re flubbing it. When an interview feels like a casual conversation over a beer and some cheese dip, most candidates think they made a connection and have a greater shot at snagging the gig. However, recruiters say good rapport has only a marginal bearing on whether you’ll get the job—they’re interested in the right fit, not a new best friend. Still, if it seems as though the recruiter is more worried about whether he’ll make the Mets game that night than hearing out your pitch, it’s a good idea to get him back into the

conversation. One approach is to ask him about his history and career. “That’s a good way to engage them,” says Raiffa, formerly of Goldman Sachs. Or at least wake him up. You might also want to try a more direct route: “You can say, ‘Is there something I’m doing that isn’t working? I want to make sure I’m using your time appropriately,’” says Accenture’s Cherian. 9. You’re asked a personal question that’s none of the interviewer’s business. You’ve always been told personal questions such as “Are you married?” or “Do you have kids?” are out of bounds, and shouldn’t

be answered. And generally it’s not a good idea to volunteer too much personal information, especially if it could put you at a disadvantage. On the other hand, you don’t want to snub the interviewer by saying, “Hey, dude, don’t ask me that.” Your best bet is to go with your gut: If you have no problem answering one of these red flag questions, go ahead and do so, says Drum. But if you’re not fully comfortable you could say something like “I look forward to discussing that with you after I’m employed here.” Then move on to another topic, such as the skills that qualify you for the position.  WETFEET

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W h at ’ s Yo u r

Emotional

Good grades and technical skills are important, But recruiters want to see that you’re emotionally fit, too. by J a r e d S h e l l y

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M

eet Wayne. Coming out of college, he had terrific accounting skills, completed a solid internship, and was an A-student. But Wayne can be a bit arrogant, has trouble working with teams, and frequently blames others when things go wrong. Meet Charles. He has also earned an accounting degree, was a B-student, and will need plenty of training from a future employer. But when it comes to working with him day-to-day, he’s polite, relates well with others, easily takes direction, stays focused, and has leadership potential. So which one would a recruiter hire? Without question, recruiters want Charles. That’s because Charles demonstrates emotional intelligence, defined by experts as a person’s ability to manage his or her emotions effectively, relate to others, read and adapt to a cultural environment, and influence other people positively. In the workplace, an employee who demonstrates emotional intelligence can lead, work effectively with others, deal with change, take criticism, and stay positive in the face of adversity. Sure, skills, education, and experience are important to recruiters, but they’d rather hire a less skilled worker with high emotional intelligence than a highly skilled person who is lacking it. A company can teach new

employees the technical skills needed to be proficient in a given position. It’s much harder to train them to manage their emotions—and employers would rather not try.

T

F i nd i ng Emo he t erm emotional intelligence

was popularized in 1995 by author and psychologist Daniel Goleman. He analyzed jobs at 121 organizations, finding 67 percent of the 181 competencies that distinguish the best performers at work are emotional

competencies. Compared to IQ and expertise, emotional intelligence (sometimes called EQ) mattered twice as much. Today companies are increasingly using EQ to evaluate job candidates. Not only do they buy into the value of emotionally intelligent employees, the incredibly competitive job market has given them large pools of candidates to choose from—so why wouldn’t they try to hire employees who are emotionally fit? They’re even including words and phrases such as mature and resilient in the face of setbacks in their job postings. “The balance of power has shifted to employers,” says Ben Dattner, an


B E H aVE yoURSELF

“IF A PERSON CAN’T PLAY IN THE SANDBOX WITH OTHERS, THAT’S A PROBLEM AND VERY DIFFICULT TO CORRECT.” —D M I T RY Z H M U R K IN, T E CO N N ECT IV ITY organizational psychologist, author, and former professor at New york University. “They can be more discerning and stringent in what they’re looking for.” Being emotionally intelligent will help you break down the stereotypes many hiring managers have about Generation y workers— namely that they’re entitled, need constant encouragement, and have inflated self-worth. “emotions need to be taken seriously,” says Sigal Barsade, professor of management at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. “They can provide a company with information [about] what people really feel and can help predict what kind of decisions will be made, what kind of behavior will occur, and what types of relationships will be formed.” Take Zappos.com for example: The online shoe retailer purposely weeds out job candidates who don’t have their emotions in check. “We ask a lot of questions to make sure they’re humble,” says Christa Foley, senior hr manager at Zappos. “People who are arrogant don’t have the patience to talk to people in a constructive, positive way. ‘I’m better than you’ is not something we want hear.” One question Zappos interviewers ask to get to the heart of the issue is, “Can you tell me a common perception people have of you?” If someone answers, “I always have an opinion on something” or “People think I’m a know-it-all,” that’s a sign that person may be arrogant—and it’s a red flag for recruiters. even high-tech companies—where you might think skills are trump—are placing a high value on emotional intelligence. Te Connectivity, makers of electronic components for automobiles and consumer devices, would rather have a new hire with limited technical skills but a high emotional intelligence. “We as a company offer lots of good training. If a person can’t play in the sandbox with others, that’s a problem and very difficult to correct,” says dmitry Zhmurkin, manager of university relations.

a

J oB int erView can be your

best chance to show your emotional intelligence to a prospective employer. Be on the lookout for behavioral-based interview questions. (They typically begin with “Can you tell me about a time when…?”) While companies have used these types of questions for years to predict how you would behave on the job, they’re increasingly employed to determine how you will react to problems on an emotional level. how did you deal with adversity? did you remain calm under pressure or panic? The key to nailing behavioral questions is to not be caught off guard. Think about how you can answer this kind of question in advance. “It’s important to pick specific examples that can show the ability to stay cool during stressful situations or perhaps illustrate your compassion,” says Joe Bohling, senior vice president and chief human resource officer at aflac Inc. recruiters also ask references about a candidate’s emotional intelligence, so it’s a good idea to remind your references of a time you excelled on collaborative work or dealt with uncertainty.

Conflict Showing you can manage conflict is very appealing to employers. Often, the opportunity will arise when interviewers ask something along the lines of: “Can you tell me about a time something didn’t go as planned on a project and what you did to correct it?” here, you want to provide examples of times you’ve managed conflicts, solved problems effectively, and used your influence to achieve positive results.

Uncertainty In today’s volatile business climate, employers want to hire people who can adapt to change. For example, health-care reform has made sweeping changes to the insurance landscape, and aflac wants to make sure its people are ready. “The business is always changing and we need talent that is capable of adjusting to change and contributing positively,” says Bohling. To demonstrate your adaptability, try to illustrate to recruiters times when you’ve faced the unexpected and persevered. 

TESTING… SOME EMPLOY ERS are using eQ

tests to screen candidates. these assessments are often developed by organizational psychologists, and aim to get to the heart of your emotional fitness. some typical questions include: do you stay cool under pressure? do you identify negative feelings when becoming stressed? can you receive criticism without becoming defensive? to prepare, try doing a self-assessment. how do you cope with stressful situations? can you deal with stress with humor or play, or do you always get negative? there are also plenty of eQ tests online. take one and see what you learn about yourself. many websites will offer tips to improve emotional intelligence based on how you scored.

Self-Awareness demonstrating you’re self-aware can convey high emotional intelligence. It may be tough, but try to figure yourself out. Can you be rude? Impatient? do you often blame others when things go wrong? are you impulsive? Make sure you can control those compulsions rather than just jumping to conclusions quickly. “By understanding yourself, you have a better opportunity to be aware of your emotions, particularly strong emotions that may affect job performance,” says Casey Komnick, campus relations program manager at ecolab, a cleaning and sanitizing company. you can acknowledge your self-awareness in an interview to show you know your emotional weaknesses. For example: “I realize I have very strong opinions, so I try to keep those in check and ask what others are thinking before offering my own opinion.” WETFEET

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ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ π π π π π π πSavvy π π π π π Tips ππππππππππ π π π π π π π π π π for ππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ π π π π π π Campaigning ππππππππππππππππ π π π π π π π πYour ππππ ππππππππππ Way ππππππππππππππππππππππ π π π π π π π πto ππ π πTop ππππππππππ the ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ ππππππππππππππππππππππ

Office Politics 13

by Jeff Ousbor ne Photogra phy by Sarah Nuer nberger

WET F EET • PAG E 5 1


Aristotle wrote that “man is by nature a political animal.”

For evidence, look no further than the workplace. Glad-handing. Gossip. Competing interests. Yet few people proudly self-identify as an office politician especially at the entry level. “Young people are often idealistic and see politics as pathological,” says Richard Shell, professor of legal studies, business ethics, and management at the Wharton School of Business. “They want to be conscientious objectors to office politics, but doing so will limit their effectiveness and leave them marginalized.” ¶ Neutrality is not an option: Ignore office politics, and you put your career in peril. Here is what the experts have to say about unleashing your inner political animal.

1 Politics? What Politics?

“Young workers think, ‘I’ll keep my head down, my nose

to the grindstone, and be impervious to everything around me,’” says Wayne Hochwarter, professor of management at Florida State University and expert on organizational behavior. “But your actual job function in the office is only one component of work. You need to be aware of an entire social environment, or you’ll end up cut off from reality.” Develop your peripheral vision and accept that politics is neither good nor bad. No organization has infinite resources, so inevitably people must jockey for time, money, power, promotions, and recognition. In a word: politics.

2 Press the Flesh

Think you’re going to thrive by hunkering down in your cube with your headphones on? Think again. Presidential hopefuls practice retail politics—informal campaigning spent shaking hands, chatting at diners, and making personal connections—and so should you. “Nudge yourself to get out, socialize, and network,” says Rick Brandon, coauthor of Survival of the Savvy: High-Integrity Political Tactics for Career and Company Success. “Build your visibility.” Whether it’s a cocktail party or a beer-pong tournament, go. If there’s a group of colleagues traveling to hear a speaker across town, join them. Get other people invested in your career—both inside and outside your office. “Think of your contacts and political alliances as a bank account,” say Marilyn Puder-York, author of The Office Survival Guide. “Make contributions to it regularly.”

3 Beware of Cling-ons

Remember the first day at your new school? Remember that kid who seemed a little too needy, the kid who wanted to be best friends by recess? Well, that kid grew up and works at the company that just hired you. So be friendly, but cautious. “When you join a new organization, hold back a little,” says Don Asher, author of Who Gets Promoted, Who Doesn’t, and Why: 10 Things You’d Better Do If You Want to Get Ahead. “Often, the first thing that happens is that the person with no friends and no power will seek you out, looking for an ally.” The takeaway: Take a breath and get a sense of who’s who before you commit to a BFF.

4 Cultivate Key Relationships

You know your boss and your immediate colleagues. But how well do you know your boss’s assistant? The IT guy? People in finance? The HR department? “Look beyond titles,” says Marie McIntyre, author of Secrets to Winning at Office Politics. “For example, many mistakenly assume that people in HR have no power. Well, you’d be surprised at how many problems they solve, how many decisions they influence— even on the level of promotions and layoffs.” Bonus: people in departments such as HR and IT sit on a lot of insider knowledge. When an HR person says, “Don’t tell anyone, but . . .,” listen up. Get to know people in finance: They manage long-term budgets and know where the company is headed. Developing relationships outside your division will help you avoid potential conflicts on projects too. “If you know people on the manufacturing end, in marketing, in sales, you’ll be able to anticipate their points of view, their needs, and their agendas,” says McIntyre. If you understand these competing interests, you’ll be able to navigate the wider political landscape.

5 Good Gossip

Sure, gossip has a negative connotation. But it’s not always a bad

thing. “Gossip is information,” says Asher. “If a colleague you trust warns you before a business trip, ‘Hey, that guy always hits on women when he travels,’ that might be necessary information for you.” Just consider the source. Likewise, you can use gossip for good: If a superior compliments one of your colleagues, tell the colleague. She’ll remember your kindness. Gossip can be a valuable currency—especially if you have a reputation for being perceptive, trustworthy, and discreet. When you come across a nugget of information that’s genuinely useful to a political ally—a colleague, a networking contact, even a superior—use it to build your alliance: “Normally, I don’t share this kind of stuff, but I thought it might help you.” That said, keep a couple of rules in mind. First, don’t initiate negative gossip or pass it along. Second, be wary of relationships built on too much gossip. “Remember,” says Puder-York. “That person who’s gossiping with you will probably gossip about you too.”

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6 RISE ABOVE Conflict

When disagreements arise, try to identify the work-

related issue at the source of conflict. If you can’t find one, let it go. Head games? Needling? Disengage. “I had a younger client who was working with an older colleague who didn’t have a college degree,” says McIntyre. “The older guy was always Googling obscure information and quizzing the younger guy, trying to trap him. The younger guy was going to go to his boss about this.” Bad idea: Generally, do not use your boss as a playground referee to mediate disputes. An exception: If you know someone is going to trash you to your boss, get to your boss first. The trick is to not return the trash talk, says Brandon. Instead, be the strategic-thinking grown-up, and you can make your nemesis look like an ass. Go to your supervisor and say: “You might be hearing from Tom. We had a disagreement and neither of us was at our best. But if we need to sit down and talk about this, I’m happy to do so.”

10 If You’re a Pawn, Be a Smart One

Backing the wrong candidate—a person, a proposal, a new software platform—can have major consequences. You can often demonstrate your judgment by withholding your opinion, according to Asher. So, two candidates are up for a leadership position, and someone asks you which one you prefer? The correct answer: “I’d be happy to work under both of these people.” Honesty is fine—to a point. Executives and managers may say they want truth-telling or “healthy conflict,” but in reality, this is politically risky territory for younger employees. So be strategic with your honesty, especially in meetings. “Don’t always put your heart and mind on the table,” says Asher.

11 Please the People Who Matter Most

It ’s not enough to get good results: You need to satisfy the people

who matter. That may require hard choices, but you have to make them. “When there’s a conflict between the two, choose pleasing your boss over pleasing your colleagues and subordinates, or you will never advance,” says Asher. Two prime directives: First, never go over your Yes, colleagues may steal your work—and the credit—so get boss’s head without explicit permission. things time-stamped. That means taking Second, never start a war with your boss. your ideas in their available form and You will lose. Still, keep your first loyalty in running them by your boss or another the back of your mind: It’s not to your boss, person with power before they’re due, “Think of your your colleagues, or your company. “Your first before the big meeting, before anyone contacts loyalty has to be to yourself—your brand, your has an opportunity to pull a heist. Just and political long-term job continuance,” says Hochwarter, be careful: It might just be the custom alliances as a of Florida State. “That includes your profile and culture in your company for the head bank account. outside the company where you work in case of a team or supervisor to take all the you need to move on.” credit for group accomplishments. Try to sidestep the chain of command and you could burn a few bridges.

7 Guard Against Idea Theft

8 Influence, not Power

Make contributions to it regularly.”

12 DON'T Complain

You may be low on the political power chain, but you don’t have to be a doormat. The key is to turn complaints into questions. Power comes from control over For example, if people are offloading resources, hiring, and firing. Early in your Marilyn Puder-York, their work onto you, find the substantive career, you may not have much power. But you author of The Office business issue in your complaint, then can build influence by being knowledgeable, Survival Guide frame it as a request to get the backup you competent, trustworthy, and dependable. That need. “Prioritizing your work is different sounds obvious, but you need to think about from complaining about being overworked,” these qualities strategically: not just as virtues says McIntyre. Don’t whine to your boss. Do go to her and say, “I can in themselves, but as tools to career advancement. Your short-term help them handle this other work, but could we sit down and I could goal is to make yourself someone whose opinion is valuable. Your show you a list of tasks and we could prioritize them?” When others long-term goal is to become indispensable. “That means anticipating approach you with extra work, say, “I’m glad to help—let me check and knowing what your superiors and colleagues need,” says Shell. with my supervisor about that.” “It might be your special technical knowledge. It might be your willingness to work on weekends. It might be project-specific. But you’ll know when people say, ‘We can’t start the meeting until Jones gets here.’ You want to be Jones.” People need to know what you’re doing. “I always hear this complaint: ‘People just don’t know my contributions,’” says McIntyre. “I always ask, ‘Why don’t they?’” Here’s the point: You cannot rely on your accomplishments to speak for themselves. It’s When you receive criticism, you can gently push back by up to you to show people your contributions. But when it comes to asking specific questions. If you’re told you need to be more of self-promotion, think storytelling, not advertisement. “Weave your a team player or do a better job on your weekly reports, be accomplishments into brief narratives that communicate passion, diplomatic: “Thanks for telling me what I need to work on. Can energy, and delight,” says Peggy Klaus, the author of Brag!: The you be specific about how I can improve?” When you need to give Art of Tooting Your Horn Without Blowing It. If your boss’s boss asks criticism, do it in a tactful way that’s unlikely to trigger personal how things are going, don’t just chirp, “Fine.” Use the opportunity conflict. Phrases that pay: “I’d be doing you a real disservice if I to mark a specific triumph: “I’ve been trying to get this difficult didn’t bring this up.” “I am concerned about ______ and let me tell customer on the phone for the last two days and I finally did it. you why.” “I understand what you are saying and how you see He’s really on board with us now and I’m thrilled.”  the issue. Let me give you my thoughts.”

13 Toot Your Horn

9 Phrases that Pay

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EXIT

Ramp

YOUR RESUME

AS THANKSGIVING DINNER Resumes and Thanksgiving dinner: both take painstaking preparation and can leave you sleepy. And like the autumnal feast, your resume has some basic components that no Pilgrim should be without. Here’s how each item on your Turkey Day plate corresponds to a fulfilling resume. T U R K EY = E XP P E RI E NC E If you host Thanksgiving dinner and don’t serve a protein—turkey, turducken, bean loaf (poor vegans)—it won’t be received well. The same goes if the meat is missing from your resume: recruiters will be left feeling empty.

P O TATOE S = E DUCATION UCATION It’s not the potatoes themselves, but the flavoring that kicks things up a notch. Butter, rosemary, and garlic please the palate just as the pedigree of your school, your GPA, or a unique minor can entice employers. If the hiring manager is a fellow alumnus, that’s seasoning gold.

S T UF FI N G = SK KII LLS Like a box of off-the-shelf Stove Top Stuffing, some skills are rather generic. Nearly everyone knows Microsoft Word. But fluency in Arabic is the homemade chorizo-apple-walnut stuffing of skills: Include the ones that make you stand out.

C R A NB E RRY SA UCE = AWARDS & HONORS A little bit complements your meal, but too much will turn your plate tart. Listing a few awards, such as Dean’s List or academic honor society, will help set you apart, but don’t overdo it.

V EG ETA B LE S = I N T TE ERESTS RESTS & TRAVEL A medley of country vegetables adds some color—and vital nutrients—to an otherwise drab Thanksgiving spread. Likewise, studying or traveling abroad paired with your unique interests brings a personal touch to your resume. Let there be life. —EMILY CALLAGHAN

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presents:

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WetFeet magazine, winter 2011  

Turn to Office Politics (page 50), and you’ll see that running a positive campaign means networking effectively, building key relationships,...

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