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IUPUI RECYCLING & SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT New System Design for Single-Stream Recycling

SPRING 2012


OVERVIEW BIG IDEA:

USER/AUDIENCE DESCRIPTION:

The experience and culture of recycling and sustainability on campus is improved by increasing its visibility and convenience, educating potential and current users, and creating a centralized space for students, staff, and visitors to connect with.

MAIN MESSAGES: 1) Reducing waste is the best way to help the environment. 2) There are many ways to reduce waste and reuse materials. 3) Recycling is simple, convenient, and no longer a guessing game. 4) By understanding how our personal decisions affect the environment, ourselves and others, both positively and negatively, we can make better, more informed choices in our daily lives.

EXHIBIT GOALS: The main goal of this experience is to encourage students, staff and visitors of IUPUI to reduce overall waste, reuse materials when possible, and to choose recycling over trash. Through detailed attention to the physicality of recycling bins and other areas of interaction, these spaces will be transformed from nearly invisible background structures into highly visible and welldesigned educational and cultural experiences.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

The Student In order to improve the culture of recycling and sustainability on campus, we must strongly connect with the student population. Students at IUPUI are a diverse group of people, but tend to be in the twenty to twenty-five year age range. This segment of the general population is tech-savvy and aware of new trends, especially dealing with connectivity and cross-platform communications. Educating and interacting with students should include current technologies and methods of information design, be visually appealing without overbearing text, and offer unique opportunities to connect with other students and new information. Staff and Faculty Staff and faculty are another important segment of IUPUI’s population, as many have an office or personal work space where sustainable choices can be strongly promoted and practiced. Staff and faculty are seen as leaders on campus and should then lead by example. Through continuous education and by providing the best possible sustainability and recycling infrastructure, we can give them the power to make better choices, advocate for sustainability in classrooms, and provide a strong foundation for this culture to take root and grow.

Visitors IUPUI’s reputation as a leading urban educator, offering experiences in civic and community engagement and service learning, must be supported by the experiences visitors have while on campus. The messages a potential student or visiting lecturer receives don’t come merely from the mouths of those they interact with, but from the tangible and sometimes intangible cultural cues they encounter. These cues are evidence of what IUPUI stands for. It is important that the school not only speaks of responsible and progressive thought and action, but actually lives it, and in turn provides cultural evidence for it. This way, the message is clear that sustainability is important to the school and the culture is supported through direct and observable actions.

Maintenance and Janitorial Personnel The success of the recycling program on campus is directly influenced by maintenance and janitorial personnel, as they are tasked with ensuring its smooth and timely operation. Without daily

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diligence, understanding of purpose, and overall support from this group, it will be difficult to maintain a truly innovative and successful program.

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PROBLEM SPACE: What is the real problem? USER-CENTERED RESEARCH:

ADDRESSING THESE PROBLEMS

Our team conducted several types of research to determine underlying causes of low recycling rates across campus. General recycling surveys, person-to-person interviews, observation, and secondary research were a few ways we gathered data to help us identify problems and opportunities.

As mentioned in the previous section, we have worked to address these main issues through the re-designing of the entire recycling experience across campus. This includes interior bins, exterior bins, roll-off areas and increased attention to each of these components via a student sustainability position.

WHAT WE LEARNED:

The most important thing to take away from this document is the fact that the current approach is not working. In order to fully realize change, educate the IUPUI population, and get people to pay attention, the school should seriously consider making recycling highly visible, provocative, and lasting. Recycling should be promoted as the default action and trash made to be reserved for only non-recyclables. The act of recycling must be easier than the act of throwing something in the trash. We must also look for ways to incentivize the act of recycling. With this approach, there is a synergistic power between a visible recycling campus culture and making people’s choices for them through the strategic placement of both recycling and trash bins.

1) Many people believe that recycling is not as convenient as it should be. We received multiple comments saying that though there are many interior bins in some areas, they are not as consistent or frequent as they could be. Some spaces have no bins at all; or they are tucked away and hard to locate. 2) Sorting recyclables is confusing. Many people who would choose to recycle are often put off by being unsure of what goes where. 3) Trash cans are everywhere. It is much easier to throw something in the trash when in a hurry than to search for a recycling bin. 4) People still perceive the common prompts of “reducing, reusing and recycling” as just feel-good words businesses and organizations use to sound environmentally friendly. 5) There is an impression that IUPUI isn’t really serious about recycling and does not do enough to promote it or make it a priority. 6) Overall, people are generally apathetic towards environmental causes and, though many know they should recycle for one reason or another, they feel disconnected from the problem and have no personal incentive or connection to it.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

There is also a need to connect all points of the system. Currently, (as we will outline further in later sections), the system does not meet the new needs of a single-stream system nor communicate the school’s dedication or seriousness to this cause. We have outlined proposals in this document that address the most important issues we have found with the current system components and also introduce additional ideas which will increase the recycling rate and culture across campus.

LEAD BY EXAMPLE Students and staff will, at best, half-heartedly make an effort to recycle if there is perceived to be a half-hearted attempt to make recycling a priority. Don’t skimp. People will notice and that mentality will be continued in more aspects than just recycling. MAKE IT HARDER TO USE TRASH, EASIER TO RECYCLE Much of the decision to recycle should be removed by making recycling the number one option. Trash cans should have no real function but to act as a place for only the last of the unrecyclables to end up. Therefore, trash cans should be placed further out of the way and made much less prominent. BE CONSISTENT! BE DILIGENT! Consistency and diligence is an imperative for making true change happen and last. The best books weren’t written in a day and the most enduring cultures take time and effort to grow and develop. Also, details are important. A missing piece of the puzzle can undermine the entire system. EMBRACE THE POWER OF INITIATIVE AND UNWAVERING ACTION There’s unlimited power and potential in being proactive. There will always be some risk involved in making change happen, but the results of being dedicated to a true change and doing what needs to be done in order to make it happen are often greater than first expected.

The general guidelines below are important to keep in mind when

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

considering how IUPUI can make a difference and increase recycling rates while building a solid culture of sustainability.

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INTERIOR BINS

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

The design of the interior recycling bins has the potential to make a HUGE impact on the recycling rates across campus. However, in order to truly affect change and increase recycling, we must change the way people interact with these bins entirely. Upgrading to a single-stream system is only the first step of this process. Next, we must educate users and non-users alike to empower them and make them understand that recycling is easy, convenient, and something everyone should be doing, without a second thought. Not only will this be done through direct communication, but more importantly, by actually designing the system to make recycling easier and more convenient than using the trash bins - effectively taking the choice (and uncertainty) away from them.

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INTERIOR BINS: Research Findings LACK OF CONSISTENCY We found several points of inconsistency with the current bin system (far left). There are many more types of bins in use than are shown here. Much of the confusion caused by the question, “what goes where”? is due to the inconsistent nature of recycling bins everywhere - not just on campus. In this next section, we will introduce a new bin design and new graphics that will create a cohesive look and feel to all existing bins (if they need to be re-used). We make especially sure there are no references to a specific type of recyclable material, but instead communicate the new, singlestream system through a “One Bin, All In” message.

WRONG SYSTEM The bins pictured on the lower left and near left are no longer viable for the new single-stream system. Although functional for a multistream system, keeping these bins in place will only work to confuse and undermine the new system. Transitioning from a multi-stream to a single-stream system is a giant leap forward, however, the current bins in use will need to communicate this change. It is important to have a strong, clear communication convincing people that the new way of recycling is indeed easy and that there is no sorting or confusion necessary.

DISAPPEARS INTO THE BACKGROUND Aesthetic concerns are a large part of the decision process when introducing new products into a space. Low profile bins designed to disappear into the background work against the need to create the perception of ease, convenience...and importance.

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INTERIOR BINS: Form BIN FORM

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GRAPHICS PANEL

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8.0’ All 4 sides have an opening to drop recyclables in to a single vessel.

BIN OPENINGS

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The premise for our conceptual bin forms is to accommodate a new single-stream system and to give their presence more impact by designing them vertically. In order to mesh with existing architecture, we have designed these bins to mimic existing pillars in most buildings and create a sort of sculptural form. Furthermore, by designing the bins to be tall and visually compelling, they will be more recognizable and stand out to help people become aware of their presence rather than blending into the environment. This diminishes the presence of trash cans, and emphasizes the importance of reducing, reusing and recycling by communicating IUPUI’s dedication to making sustainability a priority.

MATERIALS Materials used for the bins should be lightweight and easy to mould. Aluminum or another comprable metal would be ideal. This will also help to maintain the sleek, modern look that is intended. The base will need to be weighted with a heavier material.

AFFORDANCE The placement of the openings and the access to one central bin makes it easy for users to see how this system works. Openings are between waist and chest height for most people, which reduces any need to bend or stoop. The single unit contains holes on all four sides which can be accessed from any direction. When placed against and existing pillar or wall, there are three openings. When placed in a corner (minus graphics panels), there are two.

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INTERIOR BINS: Facilities Access CAPACITY We designed these bins to allow for a greater capacity; cutting down on the need for frequent emptying, and at the same time, allowing for increased recycling. The center bin is just under two feet square and approximately 34” high. This is roughly over double the capacity of the current blue “slim jims”.

ACCESS DOOR One of our main areas of focus when designing this bin form was the ability for the facilities personnel to easily access the center bin. A simple magnetic door makes it easy to empty and replace the bin. The center bin easily slides out of the space and there is no need to lift the bin, except to replace it once its been emptied.

MOBILITY We designed this unit with locking casters so that it can be easily moved from place to place. Of course, these should generally remain in the same locations once they are placed. If need be, they can be moved and locked into place once set.

One side base panel opens (push and release?) to access central bin areas.

Internal frame not shown here.

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INTERIOR BINS: Top Option PANEL/TOP VERSATILITY The graphics panels are meant to be installed as an essential part of the bin design. However, we understand if existing architecture does not allow for the height of these panels. In this case, we have designed the unit to have an optional top which can be attached to cover the panel openings. This top will keep the unit clean by not allowing debris to be trapped in panel openings, and maintains a clean design overall. For these reasons, it is important that a top be used when panels are absent.

Internal frame not shown here.

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Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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INTERIOR BINS: Ideal Placement ART AND FUNCTION As mentioned earlier, the interior bin design is meant to attract attention through its sculptural and highly visible presence. By designing it to reflect the form of existing pillars and giving it a clean, simple shape, it works as utilitarian art, by changing the space that surrounds it and creating new movement and interaction with this space and the bins themselves. Placing these in high traffic areas will force people to interact with them.

TRANSFORMATIVE ABILITY These bins have the ability to be transformed depending on the need. To recap some of the ways it can adapt to needs, some options are listed below.

Bin can be placed in a central hallway or room to allow for traffic flow of all four directions, surrounding the bin. Bin can be placed flat against a wall to allow for three directions of access. Bin can be placed in a corner with two openings exposed. Panels can be replaced by a cap placed for areas where height or clearance is an issue.

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Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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EXTERIOR BINS

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

The exterior bin system is an integral part of the effort to increase recycling rates. The need to relieve oneself of unwanted trash does not end at the doorway, and in fact, often occurs outside when exiting one’s car or moving from one part of the campus to another.

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EXTERIOR BINS: Research Findings INCONSISTENT PLACEMENT We notice that there is no consistency in regards to exterior bin placement. Several buildings have one bin far away from any doors and others had several bins in the same small area. Because these bins are made to reflect the current multi-stream system, they will need to be adapted to reflect the change to a single stream system through graphics and placement.

NON-EXISTENT IN MANY KEY AREAS One of the most surprising findings of our system audit was the complete lack of exterior recycling bins in several of the exterior eating areas. The picture immediately left is of one of these particular areas. Though it is cropped in fairly tight, if zoomed out, one would still not see a single recycling receptacle. Areas such as these provide the potential to collect huge amounts of recyclable materials that would normally be tossed in to the trash bins - which are quite visible in this photo and therefore, easily accessed.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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EXTERIOR BINS: Form & Materiality RE-PURPOSE EXISTING BINS Because the interior bins have been completely re-designed, the existing exterior bins should be repurposed using the new visual materials to reduce costs while also maintaining a cohesive message across the entire system. This is especially important in communicating the change from a multi-stream to a single-stream system. Currently, the exterior bins graphics visually get lost in the crowd of other visual content. The proposed graphics (to be discussed in the Graphics & Text section) are bold, colorful, and will stand out.

REFINISHING OPTION Though these existing bins are functional and work well with the new system, there is the potential to make them look newer, fresher and to better fit with the look and feel of the new interior bins. We suggest doing further research on refinishing methods to update the metal to look like aluminium or steel.

Existing exterior bin form.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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EXTERIOR BINS: Placement/Frequency INCREASE EXTERIOR BINS ACOSS CAMPUS

THIS ILLUSTRATION DOES NOT REFLECT THE EXACT PLACEMENT OF BINS. IT IS ONLY USED TO VISUALIZE IDEAL AREAS OF CONCENTRATION AND GENERAL FREQUENCY.

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Strategic placement of exterior bins is key to recycling success. Because of the transition to single stream, the locations and frequency of exterior bin placement must be re-visited. After watching and surveying many students, staff, and visitors to IUPUI as well as observing high and low traffic areas, we feel the best way to approach the placement of exterior bins is similar to that of the interior bins. The main goal is to increase the visibility of these bins and make them easier to access than trash cans are. In fact, trash cans should be placed further out of the main path than recycling bins. Communicating IUPUI’s committment to sustainability should begin before anyone even enters a building. We found that many people bring waste from their cars as they walk from the parking garages and lots to campus buildings. The main walking paths from parking lots and garages and other high traffic areas are important areas to focus recycling efforts. Below are our suggestions for exterior bins.

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SUGGESTED PLACEMENT/FREQUENCY ONE BIN AT EACH ENTRANCE TO EVERY BUILDING

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AT LEAST ONE RECYCLING BIN FOR EVERY TRASH CAN.

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ONE BIN FOR EVERY BUS STOP AND AT LEAST ONE CORNER OF CROSSWALK INTERSECTIONS. A BIN AT THE MAIN PATHWAYS IN AND OUT OF EVERY PARKING LOT

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER

Improving the culture of recycling and sustainability on campus can be improved by increasing its visibility and bringing awareness to IUPUI’s commitment to the cause. The idea of recycling and sustainability will be reinforced and spread through the centralization of information, education, and awareness. We propose the installation of a space that students, staff, and visitors can easily access and interact with. There are two main reasons for this space: 1) EDUCATION: to provide a central location for students, staff, and faculty to gain knowledge, inspiration and education for recycling and other sustainable practices. 2) AWARENESS: to communicate IUPUI’s commitment to reducing, reusing, and recycling, thereby influencing others to adopt and uphold these values. Without a highly visual and provocative recycling presence on campus, recycling rates will remain as they have been, or perhaps even decrease. It is imperative that IUPUI take the initiative to adopt a progressive and aggressive approach to sustainable design in order to encourage a recycling culture on campus. This center is an integral part of the entire system.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Site IDEAL SITE/LOCATION We propose a very centralized location for this experience in order to maximize exposure to students, staff, and visitors. The most ideal location will be at the entrance to the food court on the first floor of the campus center. This site draws attention to recycling and provides education in an area where recycling is generally lacking; the food court. By placing it in a conspicuous and high visibility area, people have no choice but to interact with it as they enter and exit the area. This area currently has a recycling presence. However, it lacks impact. We propose to maximize this space and take advantage of this area’s potential by creating an immersive environment that cannot be ignored; that provokes thought and discussion.

OPTIONAL SITES Other sites might include the space to the left of the south Campus Center entrance, just inside the doors. There is a large nook area which can provide enough space for everything to be included.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Plan View + Content SPACIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Video screen

Angled countertop

We designed this space to maintain plenty of open area for people to enter and exit the food court. The main pathway remains open and the line of the proposed structures reinforce this path. Currently, there is a large section of wasted space here which ends abruptly in a corner. We propose turning this void into something useful by inserting a center for sustainability education.

CONTENT More details about content will be covered on the following pages, but are also listed here to introduce the overall concept of the space in order to make sense of the plan view.

GreenBean (or other) recycling machine

HIGH CORNER WALL This small wall was designed to reinforce the exact placement of the recycling machine which sits to its right. It also hides the background panels to create a smooth clear surface to place recycling graphics or a solid color on to.

High corner wall

19’ 2’ Pillar (existing)

Main pathway in/out of food court

RECYCLING MACHINE (page 18 ) This is covered in detail later. This machine is the central feature of the center, allowing users to track recycling and provides many other opportunities to be discussed. ANGLED COUNTERTOP (page 17 ) This 34” high countertop helps to reinforce exact placement of the recycling machine while providing a location for educational materials and other takeaways on sustainability. The front also provides a large area for graphics to be placed.

Opposing half wall (existing)

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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VIDEO SCREEN (page 19 ) A large video screen will be placed at the edge of the space and will show revolving videos on recycling and other sustainability issues. It serves as a way to attract and educate viewers.

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Existing Architecture USE OF EXISTING PANELS Back Wall and Existing Panels Exisitng

In order to make best use of space and integrate this center in with existing architecture, we propose using the existing panels to present graphical information (see graphics section for details) and raise the visual impact (both literally and figuratively speaking).

OPPOSING WALL

Pillar

The existing half-wall which lies immediately opposite the proposed center space forming the path in and out of the food court offers a wonderful blank canvas on which to continue the visual aspect of the campaign and to frame the entire area with sustainability messaging.

Recycling Machine

Proposed Counter

Opposing Half Wall

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Counter Area COUNTER FUNCTION The counter area is designed to house the campaign pamphlet we have provided as well as other materials which might serve to promote sustainability practices.

COUNTER FORM The counter is roughly 3.5’ high with a clear top, separated from the base by several partitions. This creates shelves or pockets where materials can be placed. The faces or covers of the materials can be viewed and read through the top of the counter and viewers can access them through the front of the counter. This is designed in such a way as to keep clutter off of the counter top while providing a clean, minimalist design to set off the bold graphics and colors of the rest of the center area.

The counter shown above is the ideal design to hold additional printed materials. This counter will need to be sourced or built according to measurements taken at the site. These measurements and further design work will need to be done to fit all parts into the center.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Content: Recycling Machine M.I.T. GREENBEAN RECYCLING MACHINE We had planned to design a recycling machine like the one shown here, with the ability to track recycling and provide users with feedback. Because this would take some time and additional funding, we propose that this be something to look into further. We have, however, found a machine that is similar to what we would have designed. This machine, called the Greenbean, was designed and built by students at M.I.T.. It functions as a recycling counter, scanning the barcodes on most of the materials that are dropped inside. Users of the system can enter a phone number or swipe a student I.D., and have their contribution to the machine tracked each time. Users can see a history of their recycling habits, aquire and track thier sustainability score, and compete with other students or schools for prizes or perhaps just bragging rights. There are many ways this machine can be used to promote and invite recycling. We feel it would have a huge impact on IUPUI’s recycling culture if featured front and center at the Sustainability Center. M.I.T. is looking to place these machines at colleges and university campuses around the country. They have already placed several, and schools are competing against one another to see who can recycle the most. It would be ideal for students at the School of Informatics and Herron Visual Communication Design students to collaborate on designing and building their own machine, but if that is not feasible at this time, the Greenbean will suffice.

{Immediately after putting the recyclables into the machine, users get information on the environmental benefits of their recycling efforts, numbers of kilowatt hours of energy saved and a running tally of the number of containers they have prevented from entering landfills, according to a news release.} http://www.wasterecyclingnews.com/ email.html?id=1321547280

“We like Greenbean because it promotes recycling by making it convenient, competitive and rewarding,” Roberto Melendez, an MIT student, said in a statement. “Before they moved into campus, all of our aluminum cans and plastic bottles would end up in a dumpster. Now we are motivated to recycle them, which not only gives us monetary rewards but also helps out the environment.” http://www.wasterecyclingnews. com/email.html?id=1321547280

More information an contact info can be found at:

http://gbrecycle.com/

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Content: Video Wall “THE STORY OF STUFF”

Downloadable online.

VIDEO SCREEN/VIDEO SELECTION The video screen acts to draw attention to the site and to provide interesting educational content on various sustainable practices including reducing, reusing, and recycling. Video clips should be relatively short, though there are a couple longer existing clips which are extremely educational such as “The Story of Stuff” which might be shown. Otherwise, three to five minutes per clip is ideal. Videos with high visual impact, especially animated clips, and less need for sound would make the best choices. However, having audio will also work to attract attention. Addtional research on possible videos will need to be done. Use the guidelines above when seeking these out.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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SUSTAINABILITY CENTER: Pamphlet and other materials NEW SYSTEM INTRODUCTION PAMPHLET We have designed a pamphlet which introduces students, staff, and visitors to the new recycling system and updated bins. In this pamphlet, we discuss the reasons for the change and offer helpful tips for reducing consumption and re-using old items.

OTHER MATERIALS We suggest looking into other possible educational and informational materials to include at the Sustainability Center. The Indiana Dept. of Sustainability should provide numerous printed resources to add to the site.

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EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

Interior and exterior bins placed strategically and frequently throughout campus offer users the ability to rid themselves of small amounts of waste in certain areas. However, through our research, we learned that many people have a hard time or find it very inconvenient to locate and access recycling roll-offs for larger items and larger quantities of waste. Many people would prefer to recycle, but do not have readily available recycling recepticles near their homes or offices. This can mean they end up throwing many items in trash dumpsters that are often very convenient. We propose dedicating at least one drive-up area for a recycling roll-off that can easily be accessed by students, staff, faculty, and others.

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EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF: Purpose & Site Selection PURPOSE R4

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The roll-off area we propose will serve as a central hub for larger recycling items and large quantities of items. It should be able to be accessed by car since most people will be unable to carry large items in from a parking area. The area itself should be fairly central to most buildings and streets in and out of campus.

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We have identified four possible sites for the exterior roll-off center. They are numbered one through four, with number one being our first choice and so on. Each of these areas reserves space for users to drive up to unload larger items. XC

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Ideally, there will be at least two sites dedicated for this function. This will offer greater access to each roll-off and distribute the amount of recycling material so that each roll-of won’t need to be emptied often. On the following pages, we outline the benefits and drawbacks of each proposed site.

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EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF: Proposed Sites SITE #1

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This area of campus is centrally located with the added possibility of having a two-way lane in and out of the area. There is also plenty of space for a recycling roll-off and the site already supports other waste receptacles in abundance. Another advantage of this site is that it sits immediately beside Democracy Plaza, a high traffic area that is all about ideas, change, and progress, and would work to increase recycling visibility and awareness on campus.

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There are two placement options we identified for this space. Each sit just under the building overhangs on either side of the foot-bridge spanning University Library and the Business/SPEA Building. There is a driveway through this area which is wide enough to allow for a parallel parking area beside the bin, or close to it. See car parked in top photo and space available in bottom photo. There is also and existing parking area for handicapped individuals which might allow for one of those spaces to turn into a five-minute roll-off parking space. However, we also noticed an under-utilized seating area where chairs and tables exist on one side, but the area closest to the driveway was empty. This could perhaps turn in to temporary parking for roll-off use as well. (Center pic, area just above grass area.)

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The main issue we see with this space is that one end of the driveway is controlled by a gate. We propose that this be opened to roll-off users and people allowed to drive from Michigan to New York and vice versa for the purpose of using the bins only of course.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

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EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF: Proposed Sites

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SITE #2 This site has plenty of upside. It is located on the west side of the Dental School Buildng and is accessed by a short driveway entering the main loading area to the building. The small turnaround area is still large enough to outline a few temporary parking areas for roll-off use. These would need to be established in a way to not inhibit loading and unloading of supplies for the building. There are already waste receptacles in the space, so adding a recycling roll-off, organizing, and tidying up the space more will go a long way to making it more usable overall.

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There is also a parking lot nearby which can be helpful for people who park there and don’t have an overly large amount of recycling to drop off.

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This site also provides a unique opportunity to do a large mural of the recycling campaign graphics on the side of the brick building (bottom photo) where currently it is a blank slate. This will serve to call out this area as a recycling station.

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The main issue we see with this particular site is that there is not much foot traffic in this area. It is also fairly light in regards to driving traffic, and so it will not have the visibility of some of the other sites. However, given the opportunities it presents, the amount of available space to work with, and its multiple access points, we feel this would make an excellent choice for a recycling station.

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EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF: Proposed Sites RI

SITE #3 Site #3 is a natural selection for a roll-off station. It sits at the end of a small parking area next to the Clinical Building (Gatch Hall). It already has several waste receptacles in place and is fairly centrally located. The main issue here is the narrow driveway in and out of the area and the cluttered look it currently has. The haphazard and unfinished feel it gives off detracts from the clean, new buildings and the abundance of trees and foliage in the area. This can be easily fixed.

MS FH

NU CL

EH RT

BARNHILL

LO

3

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

We propose that this site be cleaned up and organized to provide more area for roll-off parking and to communicate IUPUI’s appreciation for all of its spaces; even those dedicated for waste removal. Once this area is organized, there should be plenty of room to establish a couple of additional parking spaces alongside the bins. There is also an alleyway between the buildings that might provide an alternate exit to allow more room for incoming cars. This will need to be explored further, but may provide a fitting solution to the potential bottleneck the narrow drive and parking area is likely to produce during busy times.

PAGE 25


EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF: Proposed Sites SITE #4

R4

R3

WALNUT

R2

Our final site selection lies alongside a fairly busy street on campus, across from Riley Hospital. There is a short driveway and loading area which enters the Meical Research/Library Building from Walnut. Though it is a fairly small space, there should be enough room to establish a temporary parking space or two near the receptacle. Currently, there is a trash roll-off and other small vessels nearby.

WX

4

XA

IB

Being that this is a highly visible area, this site will work well to increase awareness of recycling on campus and communicate this not only to students and staff but to much of the general public who come in and out of Riley and nearby buildings. Since this site is smaller than the other three, it could serve as a secondary roll-off station to a larger one

MS

WALNUT

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 26


EXTERIOR ROLL-OFF: Materiality and Form FORM/STRUCTURE

Option: Attach a mechanism to the structure or to a wall which can hold the lid open.

Shown: Create an access door on one side for easy access to bin.

Top of structure should sit below the lid of the roll-off so that the lid can easily be accessed/opened.

Design matters. Aesthetics matter. A roll-off by itself can be quite an eyesore, and can come across like an afterthought. We feel strongly that the roll-off area be treated as if it were located in the middle of the campus center, by making it look as well-considered as any interior structure or architectural feature. We suggest erecting a simple housing for the roll-off that will allow users to access the bins, yet provide a clean and tidy look and feel. This structure will need to be designed around the type of roll-off bins that the recycling company will provide. Because of this, we do not have a design measured out. However, there are many possibilities and the drawings to the left show one possible solution. It should be simple, clean, and allow for easy access as well as provide a way for the recycling company to easily roll the bin in and out of this space.

MATERIALS Whatever materials are eventually used for this housing should be strong and durable. Stability can be increased by attaching the housing to the side of a building or wall and designing it with an access door. Other freestanding options are possible. This needs to be looked in to further.

Roll-off should fit inside the structure snugly with a few inches on each side. This will help reduce the chance of any recyclables ending up on the ground.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

GRAPHICS Ultimately, the exterior surface of this housing should be used to display the recycling campaign graphics we have created or future campaigns as needed. Visually, this will tie the roll-off area to the rest of the recycling bin ‘system’ and make it easy for people to identify the areas.

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GRAPHICS & TEXT system

Other than the bin re-designs, the campaign graphics and text we have created for this new system are a central and important part of our overall design. We researched existing graphics and campaigns used in other locations: both those that work well and those that have not. We have researched reactions to various forms of communications and have produced several ideas on how to reach people and persuade them to reduce, reuse, and recycle. The campaign we have chosen to propose here is designed to be quite different from much of the existing campaigns by being edgy, humourous, and thought provoking at the same time. The content connects people with information in a more personal way: specifically speaking to students and Indianapolis residents. We also designed it to be visually impactful and to draw people in using interesting yet simple info-graphics. This campaign should be used across all recycling and sustainability platforms to visually tie the system together and communicate a consistent message wherever people are exposed to the system.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 28


INTERIOR BINS: Etchings ONE BIN, ALL IN The bin works to attract viewers through its simplicity and sculptural appearance. However, once viewers take notice of the bins, it is important to educate potential users of the new single-stream system. The slogan, “One Bin, All In” is simple and catchy, and does just that. Etched into the sides of each bin, it is a permanent message that helps to alleviate recycling confusion and give users confidence in their recycling actions.

NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS Etched near each opening of the bin is a small reminder that no food or liquids should be thrown into the bin. This will lessen the chance of contamination.

Ideal placement of etching on all sides of bin (aprox. 2-3 inches down from base of opening).

Ideal placement of “no food or liquids” etching. This would allow for message to be read if panels are being used.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 29


GRAPHICS & TEXT: Interior Bins CONNECTING INFORMATION TO PEOPLE

Recycling

Recycling

GAS

bank

gives you

saves

Recycling

Recycling

cleans your

AIR

cleans your

AIR

CURRENT annual recycling reduces emissions eQUIVALENT TO TAKING 620K indianapolis vehicles OFF THE ROAD for 58 years!

=

IUPUI

RECYCLING

3 driving miles aprox.180

Annually, RECYCLING SAVES LAND AREA EQUAL TO 2x Downtown indianapolis By DIVERTING WASTE FROM LANDFILLS. IUPUI

total annual recycling saves enough energy to power all 352k indianapolis households for 17 years.

RECYCLING

IUPUI

recycling 16 aluminum cans saves the energy EQUIVALENT of 1 gallon of gas. IUPUI

RECYCLING

RECYCLING

RECYCLING SAVES $5.2 Billion per year. That’s 170k for each undergrad at IUPUI. IUPUI

RECYCLING

CURRENT annual recycling reduces emissions eQUIVALENT TO TAKING 620K indianapolis vehicles OFF THE ROAD for 58 years! IUPUI

RECYCLING

Our infographics and accompanying text were designed to make the information and the benefits of recycling more digestible and personal. They are designed to demand attention. Large areas of solid color and simple infographics create interest, communicate the idea quickly, and make a lasting impression upon viewers. The campaign messaging is direct and spoken in a voice that college students will easily relate to, unlike much of the current sustainability campaigns. By including informational statistics tailored to the student body and selected to reflect the things that are of value to most students, viewers will more readily remember and be better persuaded by the information.

DRAWING ATTENTION FROM AFAR The interior bins are designed so the visual impact will be greater from afar and will work to help people quickly and easily locate interior bins. Many of the buildings on campus are designed to draw the eye upward, with a lot of airy space and tall windows. These bins and graphics mimic this reaching quality and extend upward with the rest of the architecture.

A VARIETY OF OPTIONS We designed several panels for the interior bins, each with different graphics and text so each of the four panels on the bins will contain a seperate piece of information. They can also be configured so there are two of the same panels on opposite sides to one another. Having four different panles is ideal. This should work to inspire a bit of curiosity and encourage viewers to look for other panels of information they have not yet seen.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 30


GRAPHICS & TEXT: Exterior Bins RE-FRESH WITH NEW GRAPHICS The exterior bins will get a new look and communicate the singlestream system once new graphics are applied. The boldness and color of the graphics will help make these bins stand out more than they do currently, and since it all matches the interior bins and rolloff graphics, all parts of the system will be connected visually. Dirt will also be less noticeable.

YES WE

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

IUPUI RECYCLES

WE

MAKE AN

IMPACT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

IT BE ANY EASIER

PAGE 31


GRAPHICS & TEXT: Sustainability Center EXISTING ARCHITECTURE The existing architecture at the site we propose for the sustainability center can be used to display graphics and text in a simple and integrative way. We propose using the panels along the back wall as shown here. By alternating and staggering the graphics in this pattern, the space becomes visually dynamic and plays off of the other visual components of the space. Each of the three staggering panels will contain the words ‘Reduce”, “Reuse”, and “Recycle”.

REcycle

REDUCE

OPPOSING WALL

REusE

The opposing wall offers a unique opportunity to frame the space visually by extending the graphics and text to the opposite side of the path in and out of the food court. This effectively causes people to unintentionally interact with the space and brings them through the middle of the center each and every time they use the food court. This has the potential of turning an unintentional interaction into an intentional one. Talk about visibility and awareness! The graphics on the opposing wall contain the same information as thaose on the interior bin.

Opposing Half Wall

Annually, RECYCLING SAVES LAND AREA EQUAL TO 2x Downtown indianapolis By DIVERTING WASTE FROM LANDFILLS.

Recycling

saves

bank

RECYCLING SAVES $5.2 Billion per year. That’s 170k for each undergrad at IUPUI.

WE

MAKE AN

IMPACT

Recycling

gives you

GAS recycling 16 aluminum cans saves the energy EQUIVALENT of 1 gallon of gas.

total annual recycling saves enough energy to power all 352k indianapolis households for 17 years.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 32


GRAPHICS & TEXT: Exterior Roll-Off HOUSING GRAPHICS

WE

As mentioned in the Roll-Off section, the yet-to-be-designed structure which houses the roll-off will provide an excellent place to display graphics and text and visually connect all parts of the system.

ONE BIN, ALL IN! RECYCLE HERE! NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE.

OTHER POSSIBILITIES

MAKE AN

IMPACT ALUMINUM

WE

CARDBOARD

ONE BIN, ALL IN!

PAPER

PLASTIC

RECYCLE HERE! NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE.

RECYCLE HERE! NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE.

MAKE AN

IUPUI

IMPACT ALUMINUM

CARDBOARD

PAPER

RECYCLES PLASTIC

SIDE

FRONT

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Aproximate height of structure and bin.

Depending on the sites chosen for the roll-off areas, other surfaces might be available to display graphics. One could possibly include the wall behind a roll-off - even extending to the top of a building (as proposed for site #2 in the Roll-Off section). All possibilities for spreading the visual messages we have designed (and future campaigns) should be explored on a case by case basis with regard to Roll-Off areas, taking into consideration roll-off designs, existing structures, and potential architecture.

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 33


ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

In addition to the designs and proposals we have already outlined, there are other components that should be developed and will work to create a consistent and streamlined system.

PAGE 34


ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Existing Granite Bin Counters in Food Court COUNTER Existing Counter

A small metal information stand should be placed on counter to communicate and reinforce the idea of an easy to use singlestream system.

it be any easier?

NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE

NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE

This counter is where recycling begins. it’s one bin, all in! no sorting!

NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE

But remember to scrape your plate at our compost bin first.

NO FOOD OR LIQUIDS PLEASE

Add black acrylic strips, with reminders of “no food or liquids please” etched onto surface. Sign refers to compost bin to remove food before recycling. Please see following page for more info on compost bin.

BIN We suggest placing a large central bin directly under all counter openings. This bin should have locking casters to allow for easy emptying by facilities personnel. It will collect recycling materials placed in any of the counter shapes.

SIGNAGE On the outside of the bin, the “One Bin, All In” slogan will be etched so that people will notice this as they approach from the seating area. Also, the edge of the counters will be wrapped with narrow acrylic plates with “No food or liquids please” etched into them. This will be the first line of defense against contamination. However, we also suggest creating a small permanent sign that sits atop the counter to communicate both the single-stream system and remind people to remove food and liquids from recycling materials before placing them in the bin. In order to close the loop and actually provide a place for people to do this, we propose installing a food debris (or composting) bin (to be outlined on next page).

Place large metal bin under all three openings. Etched message on side of bin is easily seen by viewers approaching from this direction. A wheeled platform allows for easy moving and emptying of bin.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

The food court is one area where increased diligence is needed in order to make this system work. It is imperative that all references to and structures built for recycling are promoted and used in the correct way. The exisiting recycling counters in the food court areas are ineffective if they are not set up to properly collect materials. Currently, they do not have bins underneath, so they are not being utilized.

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Composting FOOD COURT “SYSTEM”

MR. COMPOST GOT leftovers? FEED THEM TO ME.

yumm!

The sign on this counter directs people to the compost bin to remove food before throwing recyclables in the counter bins. In this way, these two vessels work together to increase the recycling rate. A compost bin is placed immediately opposite the existing recycling counter to provide easy access to those with leftover food. By placing a compost bin in this area, contamination of recyclables is greatly reduced.

The food court area produces a lot of waste on a daily basis. Much of this waste is recyclable, however it is being thrown in the trash instead. Making the existing recycling counters functional by placing a bin underneath and promoting recycling through signage is just one part of the effort to increase recycling. The remaining need lies with the fact that many people will find themselves with food leftovers on their plates as they exit the seating area. In order to make it convenient for people to recycle, we must provide them with a way to separate their food and liquids from recyclable materials. Without this, there will be little to no increase in recycling, even with the new bin and signage.

BIN A tall compost bin should be placed immediately across from the recycling counter. Signage from the recycling counter top will direct people to the compost bin. The compost bin itself will read “Food Only” and “No Trash” etched into it to ensure that only food gets tossed in.

SIGNAGE On top of the bin, a sign in the same style as the rest of the recycling visuals will indicate the purpose of the bin. We designed this to be fun and give it a bit of a personality so that people relate to it a bit differently than other bins. By giving it the name of Mr. Compost and making it something that also eats food, it further communicates the type of materials that should go inside.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Trash Cans - Graphics/Treatment USE EXISTING BINS The existing trash bins work well with this system because they should remain as unadorned and commonplace as they have been.

COMMUNICATING POLLUTION We propose using a stencil of the artwork shown to spray black or dark gray paint onto the face of each trash can. This treatment communicates “pollution” with the uneven and dirty feel of the paint, and of course through the image itself. These images and text also serve to communicate exactly where trash ends up, causing people to rethink their decision to use the trash bin.

TO THE INCINERATOR

“NO RECYCLABLES PLEASE” Another suggestion for trash can treatment is to add the message “No recyclables please” to the lid of each can. This will make people stop and think about what they are about to throw away and potentially direct more people to the recycling bins.

PLACEMENT Eradicating the trash can presence at the entrances of all campus buildings is an integral part of making IUPUI’s recycling’s presence more prominent and accessible. Trash cans should be no closer to high traffic areas or doors than recycling bins are. The main point here is to make them less convenient. A single-stream recycling system pretty much removes the need for so many trash bins by making recycling less confusing and accepting more materials.

TO THE LANDFILL

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 37


ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Classroom & Office Bins FORM

Lid: top view

it IT be ANY any BE easier? EASIER

This design is a simple dock for the interior slim jims, making them more of a consistent and prominent feature of a classroom or office. The aluminum lid and base and the overall shape reflect the main interior bins. The design makes it easy to access the slim jims for emptying.

MAINTAIN VISUAL/VERBAL MESSAGING This docking station for the slim jims was designed to continue the visual and verbal messaging from the public area bins, sustainability center, and other parts of the system. These will continuously serve to create awareness, educate, and remind people of ease of use by communicating the “One Bin, All In� slogan.

FREQUENCY Each and every classroom should have a recycling bin with a docking station in an area that is easy to access, such as at each door or at the center of the room. This will ensure the bins will be noticed and it also works to provide a consistent place for the slim jims to reside. Larger classrooms or rooms which produce more recycling waste than others should have at least two. Each office should have a docking station as well. Staff should be made aware of their responsibilities when it comes to emptying the bins. In our research, we learned that some faculty and staff are not aware they need to empty their own bins. Instructors should also inform the students of the importance of using these bins. It is especially important that each and every dock have a permanent slim jim in place. Empty docks communicate a lack of cohesion and dedication to the system and to recycling itself.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Augmented Reality/QR Codes WHAT IS AUGMENTED REALITY? INTERACTIVE PROMOTIONAL FORWARD THINKING/CUTTING EDGE INFORMATIVE Augmented Reality or QR Codes would provide an interesting and interactive way for users to experience the new system. Providing links to useful and entertaining online content centered around sustainable practices is a great way to keep people interested and communicate a progressive agenda. Possible links could include:

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

Sites that offer creative ways to reuse common items.

Link to IUPUI recycling site/Informative updates to recycling system.

Access to contests/competitions.

Access to videos and other digital content.

Any addtional links that seem appropriate.

PAGE 39


ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Student Coordinator Position PURPOSE/NEED

DUTIES

The new designs and ideas we have proposed to support the change to single stream recycling work together as a system, synergistically increasing awareness of recycling and of IUPUI’s position. It educates students and staff of the importance of sustainability practices, and increases the culture of recycling on campus. It does this through strategic bin placement and messaging, and through consistency and dedication to maintaining all parts of the system.

The main duties of this position are listed below.

In order to successfully and continuously implement what we have outlined here, we propose introducing a new student position, either work-study or internship, whose duty it is to work with campus sustainability staff to make sure the system is operating smoothly. The main objective of this role is to maintain all of the system’s components and, by being pro-active, initiating new ideas and looking to the future in a strategic manner, helping the system to evolve to address changing needs.

Check all interior and exterior bins (including classroom/ office bins) to maintain correct placement throughout campus. Keep in contact with proper departments regarding needed maintenance to bins. Ensure all parts of the system are in place and functional (sustainability center, exterior/interior bins, roll-off areas, trash bins, etc). Update any graphics or other materials (such as the pamphlets) at the sustainability center, replenish them as needed (including finding/creating new videos). Perform research on additional updates/additions to parts of the system. Perform research on possible partnerships, programs and events locally and otherwise. Work to promote these programs. Perform user-centered research surrounding usage of recycling bins and other components. Identify and work to address any problems/opportunities that may be present.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 40


ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Patent and System PATENT & COPYRIGHT The bin designs including the main bin, classroom docking stations, and compost bins provide the potential to carry a patent and provide IUPUI with the ability to license these designs to other institutions that need a cohesive and effective system for recycling. We also propose a copyright for the slogan, “One Bin, All In”. It is not currently being used and the domain name: Onebinallin.com is currently available.

EASY TO USE/CONVENIENT The bins and other components were designed for affordance (to be easy to understand and use) and provide access for all types of recycling in many areas across campus. TRANSFERABLE This system can be used by other institutions who look to increase recycling. The bin designs are varied enough to be placed in many different environments

Recycling

cleans your

AIR

Not Shown: Roll-Off and Sustainability Center

BENEFITS & POTENTIAL

based on need and other components, such as the sustainability center and roll-

The potential for this system goes well beyond what it can do for IUPUI’s immediate recycling rates. In addition to increasing awareness and educating students and staff on sustainability practices, it is also designed to remove some of the decision-making that makes it hard for many people to recycle. Using the physicality of the bins and strategic placement, people are more likely to treat recycling as the first option and using trash receptacles as the last option. Among other things, this system is designed to be:

off areas, can be translated and configured for new spaces.

VERSATILE The vertical panel designs and ability to easily add or remove them to the bins

CURRENT annual recycling reduces emissions eQUIVALENT TO TAKING 620K indianapolis vehicles OFF THE ROAD for 58 years! IUPUI

RECYCLING

allows new campaigns and graphics and well as physical configurations of the

it IT be ANY any BE easier? EASIER

bins themselve. (Center hallway, against wall, corner, etc.) COHESIVE The bins and other components of the system are designed to work together, creating a consistent look and feel and communicates IUPUI’s diligence to the cause and it’s willingness to lead by example. IT BE ANY EASIER

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 41


ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: Interactive Attractions RECYCLING CAN BE FUN In addition to standard use bins, we had come up with several new, interactive ways to get people to recycle. We researched novelty bins which provide users with feedback and make it fun to recycle. Some of these bins made sounds when users dropped things in, others walked and talked to people around them. The recycling rates of these bins were dramatically higher than for those even a few feet away, but without the built in fun. Below are some interesting ideas we had to make recycling fun. These ideas should not be dismissed because of their novelty. We hope that one day soon these can be realized as part of this re-design. BANK TUBE You know those bank chutes that suck up the canisters at drive-up teller windows? How fun would it be to see your bottle or can (or other recyclable materials) be sucked up through a clear tube, high into the air and finally into a bin?

Rube Goldberg Machine

MOUSE TRAP (RUBE GOLDBERG) MACHINE Another way to mesmerize people and keep them coming back for more is to create a mouse trap system that takes materials on a journey. This can be built to Bank Tube

be quite consistent and durable. Science students, where are you? PLINKO The Price is Right games are great for simple actions like dropping materials in to a recycling bin. Perhaps prizes can be won if your material actually makes it into the right slot. This basic concept can be translated into a design that works with the materials and space it needs to support/fit into. The sustainability center area may be a good area for a smaller version of this game. NOISE MAKING BINS Options for noise-making or talking bins can also be explored.

Plinko

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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ADDITIONAL SUGGESTIONS: New Student Orientation REACHING NEW STUDENTS Reaching new students with information on the recycling system and IUPUIs committement to sustainability is an important step to take to ensure increasing recycling rates. We recommend that student orientation include an introduction to the bins and sustainability center (with a explanation of how to use the recycling machine), as well as pointing out the roll-off areas.

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 43


ADDENDUM

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

PAGE 44


ADDENDUM: Sites/Resources SITES http://www.recycling-revolution.com/recycling-facts.htmlv http://recyclingfacts.org/ http://www.nrdc.org/cities/recycling/fover.asp http://archive.grrn.org/zerowaste/articles/enough_spring_2003.html http://earth911.com/news/2008/11/10/the-future-of-recycling/ http://www.globalindustrial.com/c/janitorial-maintenance/garbagerecycling/containers-recycling http://www.landscapeforms.com/en-US/site-furniture/pages/all-litter-ashrecycling.aspx http://www.indywaste.com/Pages/Home_St.aspx http://www.kibi.org/recycle_and_reuse_guide http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recycling http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/rrr/recycle.htm http://earth911.com/recycling/ http://www.wireandtwine.com/green/50/

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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ADDENDUM: Group Timesheet

DATES: 2/8/2012 - 5/4/2012

HOURS: REBECCA GLEASON: 150 LINDSAY CALLAHAN: 132 KENNETH GREENE: 120 TOTAL HOURS: 402

IUPUI SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

Kenneth Greene I Lindsay Callahan I Rebecca Gleason Exhibit Planning + Design Spring 2012

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