Page 1

Lindsay Brisko Portfolio


Project Contents 1

4 Nomad

10 Apparitions

14 Ceremonial 16

Truck to Table

20

Dallas Fashion Institute + Museum

26

Chicago Philharmonic

30

Urban Frequency

34

Re路dux

40

Global Studio

4

20

42 Tangents


F A D E C

B I

G

H

10

14

18

26

30

34

40

42

1 ghost

+ story

_ A mere shadow or semblance, a trace; a narrative, either true or fictitious, in prose or verse, designed to interest, amuse, or instructions for the hearer or reader _ A site of a new mythology, earth’s energy _ Through the energy and the processional sequence an emotional connection is created. _ The [un]familiar unfolding of events


_ Decommissioned & San Joaquin Rivers+ Redding, Chico, Sacramento, Fresno oil platform+ Sacramento [California Architectural Foundation William Turnbull, Drylands Design Competition]

Nomad is a design proposal seeking to recharge California’s main aquifers by situating infiltration basins along the Sacramento and San Joaquin River systems. Recharging the aquifer seeds California with the potential for a future without water scarcity issues; a future in which water is readily available for drinking, farming, habitat growth and general needs of the population. The proposal’s premise envisions a post-oil future, rendering abandoned oil platforms located beside California’s west coast without purpose. Salvaging one such object may appear paradoxical, but re-using a prior infrastructural mechanism with a positive purpose reinterprets its previous negative denotation.

4


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Problem: Tightly compacted soil and an abundance of hard surfaces leaves no refuge for rainwater and the water currently forced back into the ocean. Once water gains salinity, it must undergo an expensive process in order to become usable to humans. The lack of water-retention swales and reservoirs has left California’s aquifers depleted, leading to an abundance of water shortages. Currently the state depends on ground water overdraft, a practice which cannot continue indefinitely because it is the process of extracting groundwater beyond the equilibrium yield of the aquifer.

Solution: There is a need to replenish California’s aquifers by introducing situations which promote the percolation of rainwater back into the soil. Infiltration basins built within close proximity to river systems fill this role. The creation of water supply resources lead to flood prevention measures, equalization of the hydrological cycle and re-growth of ecological habitat. Despite the hydrological degradation from previous generations, the earth’s elasticity allows the opportunity to reintroduce adequate volumes of freshwater back to natural ecosystems.


sacramento valley basin-fill aquifer central valley aquifer system subregions redding basin sacramento san joaquin delta san joaquin valley tulare basin

sacramento valley basin-fill aquifer central valley aquifer system subregions redding basin sacramento san joaquin delta

central valley drainage sanbasin joaquin valley tulare basin

central valley drainage basin

As an infrastructural insurgent, both direct and indirect effects proceed from the platform’s presence. It is directly responsible for excavating infiltration basins, installing contextually urban water turbines and incubating catalyst vegetation for each basin habitat. When docked at an urban site, the platform shifts to assume the needs of the public, reacting to the flux which characterizes a vibrant urban condition. Indirectly, the growth and health of the larger urban system is affected by the platform’s potential to alter the flow of the urban system additionally after the platforms departure. Established ecological rehabilitation zones surrounding the basins ensure the initiative’s legacy after the journey’s completion and platform demolition.

Life Cycle_progression of events This diagram depicts the journey of the reinstated platform and its valuable impact on California’s landscape. Once reaching its destination, the platform is dismantled.

2025

2047

2076

2112

2120


Redding_2025 An image siting the platform in Redding, California, marking its first hiatus of the long journey ahead.

Chico_ 2047

Sacramento River: water turbine installation Water turbines are installed upon the platform’s arrival at each city. The implementation of a water turbine field creates a renewable energy source for the city simply by utilizing the river’s current.


2088

Sacramento_2076

Basin_ 21 San Joaquin River: revitalization of California’s ecosystems

Basin_4 Sacramento River: progression of digging basin

Level one is accessible to the public when the platform is docked at various port cities. Interior programmatic flexibly allows for change of onboard functions depending on location or an era’s needs. The docking of the vessel at each port city marks the beginning of a new planting cycle in the nursery on level two. After departing, young plants are distributed to each sequential basin until the next city is reached. The cyclical renewal promotes native planting in each region of California. Level three is an outdoor/indoor observation deck.

Corresponding sequential sections diagramming the creation of a basin. The migration of the platform, based on excavation method, is visible in the sectional diagram.


2120

2120

2190

2190

Each basin repairs an area’s ecosystem by introducing native plants as catalysts, initiating the sequence to rebuild. Introducing percolation basins injects life into a previously declining system, promoting growth of new plants and animal species. These habitats also act as a legacy, continuing to flourish after the demolition of the platform.

Basin_ 19 San Joaquin River: percolation of flood water

Corresponding sequential sections + plans illustrating the water levels of a basin. The basin acts as an overflow reservoir in case of large quantities of rain, rapid flooding or snow pack accumulation. The water level recedes as liquid infiltrates the soil, fulfilling the purpose of recharging the aquifer.

Fresno_2112 The louver system distinguishes placement of plant species based on their required light levels.


[AC-CA] HONG KONG Alternative Car Park Tower

An incremental proposal to liberate Hong Kong from the toxic air trapped in its streets.

10


site

wind flow through bay

Wind patterns _pollution: Panels connected to the carbon fiber exoskeleton become activated by the presences of wind. Upon activation, the panels migrate to find positions around the parking tower with maximum wind exposure, cleaning large amounts of Hong Kong’s polluted environment.

secondary urban integration

Right: image depicting Hong Kong’s future development for the proposed design. As more structures are added to the city-scape, the cleansing systems have a greater impact reducing pollution from the city. tertiary urban integration


+ (

2015

proposed parking tower

2020

system accretion

2011

filtration system

podium-tower

hyperpodiumtower

hyper-block

shadow block

shophouse

2010

canyon effect

1950 1960 1970 1980 1990

x1500)

Future use Designing for a new era signifies fabricating an architecture derived from that which we cannot see. This was an exercise in visually designing the city’s future architecture and interpreting energies which are foreign to the eye. Macroscopic narratives are invented as the structure duplicates itself across the city to combat the canyon effect, which causes pollutants to coagulate between high-rise buildings with impermeable facades. Macroscopically, pollutants are removed from the atmosphere by the filtration panels and their movements are recorded daily to be replayed the evening while illuminated.

......................................................................................... Top: time line of Hong Kong’s pollution build up over the past half century. Right: events garden on the 21st floor Bottom Left: future use of the parking tower is described giving the increasing potential longevity to the project after the expiration of the current automotive model.


1 collection electrode plates

5 discharge electrode wires

2 openings

6 openings

3 rolling cable connection

7 pressure sensors, API laser

4 hydraulic arm

8 automated system panel box new or existing structure

1

2

5

3

6

4

7

8

spliced strands attach to pre-existing structure

woven carbon fiber fire-resistant resin applied

steel cable track + pollution-level (API) responsive scrubbers

pollution trapped in urban environments


1

ritual, cycle, procession, praxis, legacy

The pavilion represents a suggested narrative of the Grand Tour; a noble rite of passage in the construction of our profession. Through section, we are met with a familiar typology, each screen an iconic representation of its associated whole. The interim space between each section has a transitory quality due to its variable pattern. Through the ceremonial process of graduation, each year the construct renews itself by creating a new spatial scenario through the interchange of pieces and ceiling components.

14

villa rotunda

1

villa rotunda 2 pantheon

2

pantheon 3


3

parthenon

4

notre dame du haut

5

kimbell art museum

6

barcelona pavilion

7

2 4 1 5

6

notre-dame cathedral


parkFEST competition

The proposed design for Truck to Table is an application of new-life reuse and adaptation through transformation of material. Unused food trucks are decommissioned every year, unfortunately coming to rest in landfills or scrap yards. This street furniture seeks to find new meaning for the materiality and spirit of these once vibrant enterprises by modifying their use from serving food to residing as an eating surface. All surfaces and structural components for the design are patterned from the skin of a salvaged trucks utilizing side, front and underbody components. Due to the homogenous surface used for both table surface and structure, strength is derived by folding each material, generating more rigidity for pieces such as supporting ribs. Oddities in the truck’s skin are celebrated as they create uniqueness and variation between the final products. The tables are aligned on the site in a similar pattern to the arrangement of adjacent food trucks. Linear repetition beside the shoreline brings definition to the design by grounding the subjects as a whole, leaving variation to differences found within each design. Each table dynamically changes through time as people, bicycles and herbs are plugged into each component, resulting in a varied experience with each visit. The structure is complete with the addition of turf blocks, subsequently grounding the design.

1 16

A decommissioned food truck is used as the material choice to create the proposed design.


A

F

D

C

I

B

H

E

G

3

2

All surfaces become usable material for the design as the truck unfolds.

As the truck is reduced to a collapsed version of itself, patterns of the proposed design pieces are transcribed on to the reclaimed surfaces. A single truck has enough metal material for two complete tables.


F A D E C

B

4

5

The pieces of a single unit are retrieved and grouped together. Parts A,B,C,D are related to bench surfaces. Part E forms the lip of the trash receptacle. Part F is the channel component helping brace the three table surfaces and holding soil required for herb growth. Parts G,H,I all serve structural roles supporting material and live loads.

In the instances where the table heights differ, herbs dwell along the divides bringing a sense of life from within the decommissioned truck skin. Each design will have a unique herb associated with it to promote a sense of community within the park as visitors explore each table.

......................................................................................... Perforations in the table skin allow for the growth of the herbs from the channels below and recipes are etched into the steel table surface.

I

G

H


6

In this set of images, multiple skins are imagined as potential surfaces. Each design has an essence all its own and shares the history of the original food truck.

............................................................................................. Skin #36 Cha Cha Chow food truck St. Louis Missouri *Depicting bicycle interface

Skin #9 Joyride food truck, Sacramento, California *Depicting herb and trash interface

Skin #29 Threadless airstream truck, New York, New York


The proposed design lies in the heart of the Arts District, a vibrant and culturally significant area of Dallas, Texas. The project intends to create a suitable educational hub for the rising Dallas fashion scene, while incorporating a museum component as a effort to welcome visitors to the site. The DFI+M is a program for upper level study abroad students to advance in aspects of a collection design. The DFI+M bridges the gap between the private and public realms of fashion offering the general public insight into this intimate industry. This idea is accomplished by exploring the universality of a runway. The highly visible location of the second floor runway activates the plaza by unifying view, as a central focal point is established. During the day collections of dresses are visible in the runway corridor while on select evenings the space transforms into an event location displaying up-todate fashion trends. The runway also operates as the building spine central circulation corridor, feeding all other spaces. The monumental museum space, located on the first floor, displays historically influential clothing collections representing the industries past life. The uppermost floors are reserved for the fashion institute. The cyclical nature of fashion is reinforced as DFI’s programmatic organization from bottom floor to top floor represents the past, present and future of fashion.

20

................................................................. Above: The drawing depicts visitor relationships created though natural view. The elevated runway space is a main focal point drawing attention from the adjacent supporting spaces.


1

2

3

......................................................................................... 1 An early model depicting the movement visually and physically from The Park to the DFI+M 2 A later variation focusing on formal shape of the building. Two scored lines in the top layer of foam represent the continuation of the previously described idea. 3 In this model, the institute/museum and the runway (housed in the skewed middle section) started to define themselves using two different languages. The institute and permanent museum collection with a more subtle tone and the runway as another entity. 4 This model was placed in the site as to begin building context with the surround land. 5 The final design

5

4


4 ply built up roofing Gutter Rigid insulation

Aluminum panel exterior finish Aluminum head channel Flashing

Stone facade

Air pocket vaper barrier Insulation Drop down lighting grid

Aluminum sill

Metal clip W14 I beam Slip shim

Vertical aluminum mullion 5” Concrete slab on 2” metal deck 6th angle slab edging Filler channel W18 I beam Joist

5” Aluminum structural facade system

3” Thick stainless steel knife plate

Alucobond panel Coil-coated anodized finish .02” Aluminum Fire retardant core Thermal barrier .02 Aluminum

18” Angled steel column

Concrete floor slab

Compacted fill

......................................................................... Diagram showing the perforated façades’ ability to draw cool air up beside the curtain wall, creating a buffer of air and preventing heat loss. The yellow arrows indicate the facades’ ability to block and diffuse sunlight.


1

+

+

2

3

5

4

6

7 1 _ uniform perforated metal screen

5 _ outcome: diameter of perforations were generated based on

2 _ sun path study using the main south facing facade as focal point.

factors 2,3 and 4.

3 _ glazing

6 _ entire perforated facade.

4 _ placement of back projection screens located behind mesh facade

7 _ south elevation


......................................................................................... Right: Dallas is a city of retaining walls and fences, rendering views into interior spaces nearly impossible. This observation led to multiple iterations of balcony and bridge details, elevating the public above the “top of the fence� threshold. This idea finally found fruition in the elevated public runway/museum space and lawn plaza sitting to the south of the proposed design.


......................................................................................... Above: 1/2”=1’ sectional model; basswood, plexiglass, mdf base

Ground Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

4th Floor


The site for Chicago’s Philharmonic Hall completes Burnham’s envisioned plan for the city’s waterfront. The Philharmonic Hall was formed as a complex; a peninsula of suspended parts over Lake Michigan, leaving the north part of the site as public park space. The climatic conditions of Chicago offered an opportunity to examine a new perspective on adaptive architecture; an architecture responding to seasonal change as humans do with clothing. Therefore, an architectural typology was created to transform into its own micro climate based on external weather conditions. In this mechanistic approach, Chicago’s summer heat is more comfortable and the severity of the winter wind is diminished. In summer, the individual buildings are revealed and an openness is experienced as visitors walk through the open air promenade.

This scenario utilizes wind from Lake Michigan to cool visitors as well as shading devices. In colder temperatures an external shell, formerly collapsed around the perimeter of the entire structure, encapsulates the complex. The interim enclosure captures the sun’s heat, offering an alternative to actively heating the space. A buffer is simultaneously formed transversely reducing the amount of energy needed to heat the interior buildings. The perceived sense of enclosure additionally enhances innate emotions of warmth and safety. Aesthetically and emotionally, the dichotomy between summer and winter spaces fuse the natural and built worlds, both participating in cyclical processes.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Winter

The outside glass facade of the building folds up and down due to seasonal change. The diagram to the right demonstrates the progression of the triangular facade structure condensing. Designated in grey, the internal volume compresses to a thin plenum. The winter roof plane thus becomes the summer structure’s floor.

Summer


2 5

3 18

7

18

1

Level 2 Program + Top Concert Level

2 4 3 9

8 9 7 19 9

18

Level 1 Platform + Bottom Concert Level

14 15

11

6

7 10

Performer’s level

13

17 16

12

1. Gardens 2. Restaurant 3. Shop 4. Patron’s Lounge 5. Elevated stage 6. Auditorium 7. Stage 8. Bar 9. Display Spaces 10. Choir Stalls

0

11. Performers’ Entry 12. Instruments Room 13. Conductor Dressing 14. Guest Conductor 15. Dressing Rooms 16. Practice Rooms 17. Green Room 18. Lobbies 19. Mechanical 20. Structural Members

60’

120’

180’


From the beginning of the design phase, the aim was to provoke a sense of community by giving the public ample plaza space with nodes of informed activity. To achieve this notion, a walkway extends around the entirety of the complex and is open to the public all year round. Two enclosed gardens give visitors a place of respite in summer or winter along with a sculpture garden which occupies the roof level of the restaurant. Adjacent to the shop and lounge is a small elevated stage and gathering space intended for impromptu performances.

Entire complex 124,800 sq. ft. (Concert hall 1,500 seats)

......................................................................................... Above: The lobby space with hanging display elements Bottom Left: An early process sketch exploring the organization of buildings within the complex Bottom Right: Looking into the concert hall

20

18 11

6

2 17

1


concert pavilion + urban renewal for Newcastle, AUS

The site given is the Newcastle Harbour Front Honeysuckle Development. This project called for an open air music facility including a public plaza and developed liminal condition between land and sea. The solution was a holistic proposal, blending green space with the urban, industrial context of Newcastle. To accommodate the necessary volumetric needs for the concert venue, a large span roof provides shelter while minimizing vertical structural elements. The large scope of the project also included examining circulation paths from the train station to the venue. Wickham train station is the final station line; thus, high quantities of pedestrians are expected. A bridge was proposed to control and transport crowds across a busy roadway. The harbour is the lifeline of the city, acting as the main artery, transporting coal from Newcastle to locations around the world. Large vessels consistently pace the harbour, becoming a visual skipping stone to the iconic landmarks intermittently dispersed upon the opposite side of the waters edge. Nobbies point, the granary and sailboat dock are three such notable markers. I sought to reconnect these seemingly unobtainable objects of desire to the viewer on Honeysuckle Drive through the viewing portals, while the stage backdrop focuses attention on the lyrical quality of a tanker gliding effortlessly to its loading dock.

30


......................................................................................... Top Right: This diagram defines the delineation between the environmental rehabilitation zones (green space) and parcels designated for human use (red spaces). Each sector was created maximizing human interaction with the waterfront and green space while promoting a healthy environment for the re-growth of mangrove trees native to NSW. Bottom Right: An exploded isometric of the designed project. Few walls provide the essential structural requirements to hold the space-frame while promoting airflow for natural ventilation.

SF

BL

SF. Space-frame BL. Boardwalk level R1. Ramp 1 R2. Ramp 2 GL. Ground level

L4

LL. Lower level

L3

L1. Stage

SF. space frame BL. boardwalk level R1. ramp 1

L2. Folding wall system

R2. ramp 2

L3. Interior walls

L2

R1 L1

GL. groud level LL. lower level

L4. Storage/mixing station

R2

L1. stage

L2. folding wall system L3. interrior walls L4. storage/mixing station

LL

GL

a.

a aa 0m

5

10

20

aa


5

1

6 7

3

2

4

1. Stage

5. Storage

2. Seating

6. Secondary stage

3. Changing area7. Hill seating 4. Rest rooms

As a result the roof structure becomes a device for describing and challenging the notion of viewing using channels located in the space-frame. A portion of the channels strictly frame historical icons located in the view ahead. Other channels have an added periscopic mechanisms which results in viewing the scene directly behind the viewer, challenging ideas of habitual viewing.


Skylights/ periscopic mechanisms

Secondary structural system for roof panels

Channels

Steel vierendeel truss system

......................................................................................... Right. Exploded isometric of the space-frame roof structure. The periscopic mechanisms double as skylights providing natural daylight deep within the large-span roof. Channels provide lanes for airflow as well as sight contributing to cool an audience underneath.

Wire mesh, defused light


a

adj: brought back -used postpositively

a

aa

0

2

4

8 aa

34


This was an exercise in using reclaimed materials that would have likely been destined to a landfill. Our precedents included products from Modern Cabana, Kithaus and Modern Shed - all prefabricated kits/spaces designed for the suburban backyard and assembled by the consumer or by hiring a contractor. The precedents we examined were expandable and considered as outbuildings linked to the primary structure by walkways and other landscape features. The precedents utilized a range of programs: i.e., a guesthouse, a pool house, a workshop, an art studio, etc. Our prototype, developed and built full scale by the entire studio, is 100 square feet and was conceived as a series of flat and L-shaped components for the floor, roof and walls. We chose to locate the unit behind the 1954 Snower House in Kansas City by Marcel Breuer. This example of Fifties Modernism was chosen over typical suburban homes as a means of focusing on the abstract patterning that is apparent in its use of plain and patterned concrete block, wood siding and De Stijl characteristics. Our prototype attempts to draw on “pattern” as a systematic guideline to assemble found materials that often require overlap and stagger in order to function as structure or skin. This notion of “pattern” is also found in the transformation of suburban areas over time, where boats, pools, porches, sheds, landscape features, etc., were placed in the back and side yards of homes in order to provide the owner greater functionality or the sense that their home is episodic with ever changing function. Snower House


Our prototype operates on a simple variation (an anecdotal theme) as the black paint renders the “patterned” and reverse mounted vinyl siding and modulated wood trim, into a mostly autonomous box. The box is subsequently fractured by a transformational south wall paving the way toward a more random interior “patterning” of modular panels and skylights. Our choice of utilizing a rotated full length-dressing mirror affixed on an interior wall concludes the desire to reference/re-dux the original house in as many “patterned” ways as possible.

......................................................................................... 3

4

Images of found materials from dumpsters and leftover waste from building sites.

Lower right: The series of images were explorations in modularity and recycled materials before commencing on the main project.

1

2

In images 1+2, I collected recycled steel tubes as building members and used wire to fasten the objects. Next, I established building codes such as “only threads can touch other threads” and an overall size limitation in an attempt to create a systematically organized form. After a few trials of placing, attaching and recording placement, I ended with the model below. Images 3+4 are part of the next assignment of the studio in which each group was given limitations on paper “L” module sizes. We were asked to demonstrate techniques of creating space based on connections between members.


1

......................................................................................... Upper Right: The series of images describe our building progression. We began first by manufacturing key modules such as the floor, wall and roof components. Next, construction included: (1) Fastening all floor components together (2) Erecting modular “L” and straight wall elements to the base. (3) Positioning the three roof segments while ensuring all connections were secure. (4) Installing windows, the skylight and touching up final details.

2

3

4

Architecture 409: Materials/Costs Reclaimed Materials •1x4s- 2/2x2s- 50/2x4s- 60/2x8s- 12 2x10s- 1.5/4x4s- 5 •Heavy Timber Moving Blocks- 8 •I-Joists- 8 •Vinyl Billboard Sheeting- 2 •OSB- 250 sq ft./Plywood- 400 sq ft./ Particle Board - 1 large sheet •Roofing Felt - 2 Rolls •Exotic Hardwood - 100 sq ft. •Hollow Core Doors- 5/Windows- 2 •Vinyl Siding- 330 sq ft. •Skylights - 2 •Electrical Conduit- 30' •Cable Routing Overhead Track- 12' •Cinder Blocks - 8 •Full Length Mirror - 1 •Screws/Washers •Hinges- 5 sets •Door Hardware (1 handle set, 1 dead bolt) Purchased Materials •Framing Nails •Sheathing Nails •Staples •Brad Nails •Nuts & Bolts •Door •Sealant/Paint •Lighting

$120 $40 $90 $82 $332 Total

$332 or $3.32 per square foot (labor not included)

a


R.09

M.01

R.08

W.08

R.07b R.07a W.07

R.06 M.04

W.06

R.05 W.08 R.05

W.07

M.02

W.06

M.03

W.05

R.04 M.02 W.05 W.04

R.03

W.04

W.03 W.03 R.02 R.01 W.01

W.01

W.02 M.01

W.03 W.04

W.03 W.01

W.04 F.01

W.05

W.05 W.06 W.07

M.06 W.02

W.07

W.08 F.02

W.08 M.01 W.09 F.03

F.04

D.01 D.02 F.05

D.03 D.04

F.06 F.07

R - roof components W - wall components F - floor components D - deck components M - miscellaneous parts W.01 - floor trim W.02 - interior sheeting W.03 - studs W.04 - exterior sheeting W.05 - vapor shield (billboard canvas) W.06 - primary trim W.07 - vinyl cladding W.08 - secondary trim W.09 - operable slatted wall

M.01 - cross bracing M.02 - display boards M.03 - door M.04 - ladder M.05 - screen system M.06 - windows F.01 - screen wall threshold F.02 - floor modulation pattern F.03 - OSB flooring strips F.04 - sheathing F.05 - structural joists F.06 - intermediate stair F.07 - supporting timbers

D.01 - exterior sheathing D.02 - trim around flooring D.03 - deck flooring D.04 - structural porch members R.01 - track lights R.02 - skylight baffles R.03 - ceiling screen R.04 - roof joists R.05 - exterior plywood sheathing R.06 - felt membrane R.07 - skylights a. 36”x 20” b. 53”x 36” R.08 - corrugated plastic roofing R.09 - occupiable roof deck


......................................................................................... The model above is describing the physical relationship of the Snower House with the flex space. As the front hinged louvered system becomes active a specific dialogue begins between the two structures The photograph to the right describes one proposal for the use of the versatile, south facing, louvered system.


......................................................................................... Top: The Beijing Dragon scroll painting. The pavilion was sited on Beijing’s main axis near the Bell and Drum Towers Middle Left: Evolution of the Chinese hutong Middle Right: Rebirth brick; used in the final design. Bottom: First iteration images

40


Beijing + Paris + Lawrence, KS

This design studio investigated global communication techniques among students in Paris, Beijing, and Lawrence, KS. Each international team engaged in weekly online meetings which led to the development of a parametric roof canopy and university housing settlement sited in Beijing, China. Critique was offered by Architecture Studio’s Beijing office.


Sketches

......................................................................................... Top. Across the Bay, Sydney, AUS: pencil on sketch pad

42

Center. Landscape in Arnhem Land, AUS: charcoal on sketch pad Bottom. Landscape of Cataract Gorge, Tasmania, AUS: pencil on sketch pad


Mixed Media

......................................................................................... Top. Pen on vellum Bottom. Exploration of urban energies, thread on trace with additive color paths.


A s t ro p h o t o g r a p h y d = digital f = film, Pentax K1000 35mm

......................................................................................... 26 Minutes of the Southern Hemisphere, Uluru-

Kata Tjuta National Park, Northern Territory, Australia. f


Ph o to g ra p hy

......................................................................................... Reflection, Kansas City, Missouri f


......................................................................................... Left. Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia. f Right. Succinct, Breamlea, Victoria, Australia. f


......................................................................................... Left. Street Artist, Melbourne, Australia. f Top right. Silent Vessels, Geelong, Australia. f Bottom right. Shop of Color, Guanajuato, Mexico. d


-T. S. Eliot

We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time.

Profile for Lindsay Brisko

Lindsay Brisko Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate from the University of Kansas

Lindsay Brisko Architecture Portfolio  

Graduate from the University of Kansas

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