Page 1

US
Census
important
for
funding
 By
Zack
Colman

 Mar
14,
2010
 
 The
Census
is
coming.
And
if
all
the
commercials,
letters
to
parents
and
billboards
 haven’t
been
enough
reminder,
here’s
another
one
—
the
Census
is
coming.
 
 The
2010
Census
will
arrive
in
mailboxes
as
early
as
Monday,
and
the
slimmed
 down,
10‐question
survey
must
be
mailed
back
by
April
1.
 
 Students
have
been
urged
to
mark
their
East
Lansing
address
as
place
of
residency,
 as
that
is
where
they
spend
more
than
half
the
year.
 
 An
accurate
count
of
East
Lansing
residents
will
ensure
a
proper
amount
of
federal
 money
is
awarded
to
the
state,
which
will,
in
turn,
keep
tuition
costs
down
as
the
 state
struggles
to
maintain
current
levels
in
the
face
of
declining
revenues
and
 increasing
expenses.
 
 “If
no
one
fills
out
the
Census,
we’re
in
trouble,”
said
Lindsay
Bacigalupo,
a
public
 relations
junior
and
team
director
of
the
Bateman
Case
Study
Competition,
a
public
 relations
contest
that
focused
on
the
Census
for
this
year’s
competition.
 
 “I
didn’t
realize
when
I
got
into
it
how
important
the
Census
was.
It’s
something
a
 college
student
hasn’t
been
exposed
to
yet;
last
time
there
was
one
we
were
about
 10
years
old.”
 
 With
about
$400
billion
in
federal
funds
available
through
it,
the
Census
is
an
 essential
source
of
funding
for
the
next
10
years.
 
 East
Lansing
City
Councilmember
Nathan
Triplett
said
each
East
Lansing
resident
 counts
for
$1,500
annually
through
Census
dollars,
or
$15,000
during
the
10‐year
 period.
 
 The
Census
has
direct
benefits
for
students
other
than
keeping
tuition
costs
 somewhat
stable,
as
it
also
determines
the
amount
of
Pell
Grants
for
low‐income
 undergraduate
students
distributed
in
each
city
and
supports
transportation
 projects
such
as
the
Capital
Area
Transportation
Authority,
or
CATA.
 



Although
people
are
instructed
to
choose
the
residence
where
they
spend
most
of
 the
year,
many
operate
under
the
myth
that
insurance
and
income
taxes
will
be
 affected,
when
in
actuality
those
issues
are
unrelated
to
the
Census,
city
officials
 have
said.
 
 Triplett
said
students
also
should
realize
marking
their
East
Lansing
address
—
 whether
or
not
they
live
in
the
area
for
the
next
10
years
—
will
guarantee
an
 accurate
city
count
for
future
years
when
new
MSU
students
replace
those
who
 graduate.
 
 Michelle
Hooks,
an
English
and
creative
writing
junior
originally
from
Detroit,
said
 she
would
have
put
Detroit
as
her
residency
had
her
parents
not
received
a
letter
 from
MSU
urging
her
to
choose
East
Lansing.
 
 Still,
Hooks
said
she
has
a
strong
allegiance
to
her
hometown.
 
 “I
do
feel
inclined
to
put
Detroit,”
she
said.
 
 “I
went
to
(Detroit
Public
Schools)
since
elementary
school,
and
I
see
how
it
has
 declined
with
budget
cuts
and
teachers
laid
off.
I
still
do
represent
Detroit.”
 
 Ritchie
Altamirano,
a
Lansing
Community
College
junior
who
originally
is
from
 Chicago,
said
he
has
been
inundated
with
information
about
the
Census
and
that
 helped
him
decide
to
use
Lansing
as
his
address.
 
 He
said
he
sees
about
five
or
six
TV
commercials
per
hour
about
the
subject.
 
 He
said
he
didn’t
remember
being
exposed
to
as
much
Census
information
10
years
 ago,
but
advertising
campaigns
have
been
effective
this
year.
 
 Altamirano
said
the
lighter
questionnaire
—
in
2000,
the
Census
contained
53
 questions
—
will
encourage
students
to
complete
the
Census.
 
 “It’s
not
a
big
deal,”
he
said.
 
 “You
sign
a
quick
form,
10
minutes.
If
it
was
a
big
pamphlet,
though,
I
probably
 wouldn’t
do
it.”
 


http://www.lindsaybacigalupo.com/uploads/4/4/7/2/4472877/_census_article_03-14-10  

http://www.lindsaybacigalupo.com/uploads/4/4/7/2/4472877/_census_article_03-14-10.pdf

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